c# show a pdf file : Rearrange pages in pdf document control application system azure web page html console USArmy-InternmentResettlement24-part79

Use of Force and Riot Control Measures 
12 February 2010 
FM 3-39.40 
H-5 
Allow the force that properly employs nonlethal options to gain advantages over those who rely 
on lethal options alone because the degree of provocation required to employ these options is 
substantially less. This advantage provides a more proactive posture, a quicker response, and a 
diminished likelihood of having a situation escalate to a point where deadly force is required to 
resolve a conflict within an I/R facility. 
Are less likely to provoke others (however, they may provoke a negative response). 
Diminish feelings of anger and  remorse when deadly force is required after nonlethal options 
fail. 
Can facilitate postincident stabilization by reducing detainee alienation and collateral damage. 
Can reduce the possibility of injury to friendly forces when compared to forces without NLWs 
capabilities. 
H-21. The NLW doctrine is designed to reinforce deterrence and expand the range of options available to 
facility  commanders.  They  enhance  the  capability  of  U.S.  armed  forces  to  accomplish  the  following 
objectives: 
Discourage, delay, or prevent hostile actions. 
Limit escalation. 
Take military action in situations where the use of lethal force is not the preferred option. 
Better protect the U.S. armed forces. 
Temporarily disable equipment, facilities, and personnel. 
H-22. Preventing fatalities or permanent injuries is not a requirement of NLWs. While complete avoidance 
of these effects is not guaranteed or expected, properly employed NLWs should significantly reduce them 
as compared with physically destroying the same target. 
M
ILITARY 
P
OLICE 
N
ONLETHAL 
W
EAPONS
H-23. Facility  commanders  should  consider  the  use of force options  discussed  in  this  appendix  and  in 
AR 190-14  when  handling  disruptions  within  the  facility.  They  are  also  encouraged  by  AR 190-14  to 
substitute nonlethal devices for firearms when they are considered adequate for military police to perform 
their duties safely. Military police currently have nonlethal options such as riot control agents (tear gas, 
pepper  spray)  and  the  military  police club  and  riot baton  for  crowd  control.  There are other nonlethal 
devices being tested and fielded, and they should be available to I/R commanders. 
H-24. If the United States is engaged in war, Executive Order 11850 governs the use of riot control agents. 
Presidential  approval  is  required  before  riot  control  agents can  be  used,  and  they can  only  be used  in 
defensive modes (riot control). If the United States is not engaged in war, the use of riot control agents is 
governed by CJCSI 3110.07A and approval authority may be lower than the President. If the use of riot 
control agents is desirable, leaders at any level must coordinate with the approving authority to ensure that 
their use is approved. 
N
ONLETHAL 
W
EAPONS 
T
RAINING
H-25. Soldiers and their leaders must be trained in the correct employment of NLWs that are available to 
them. They must understand the limited use of these weapons in environments with restrictive RUF. Their 
training must be continuous at all levels to ensure that NLWs are properly employed and that leaders and 
Soldiers understand when and how  to employ them effectively.  Additionally,  leaders  and Soldiers must 
understand  that  the  incorrect  application  of  an  NLW  can  have  significant  operational  and  political 
ramifications. Well-trained military police  leaders  who  provide  timely, clear guidance  to military police 
Soldiers using NLWs will ensure mission accomplishment. 
H-26. Many NLWs have maximum effectiveness and minimum safety ranges. Individuals who are struck 
short of the minimum safety range often suffer severe injuries or death, while the effects of most NLWs are 
greatly mitigated at longer ranges. To be effective, the threat must be engaged within the “effective” zone 
(beyond the minimum safety range and short of the maximum effective range). 
Rearrange pages in pdf document - re-order PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Customizing Page Order of PDF Document in C# Project
reorder pages in pdf document; how to move pages within a pdf document
Rearrange pages in pdf document - VB.NET PDF Page Move Library: re-order PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Sort PDF Document Pages Using VB.NET Demo Code
change page order in pdf reader; move pdf pages in preview
Appendix H 
H-6 
FM 3-39.40 
12 February 2010 
H-27. When training with, and planning for, the use of NLWs— 
Never apply an NLW in a situation where deadly force is appropriate. 
Use only NLWs approved for use indoor use when indoors. 
Never apply an NLW in a situation where it will place troops in undue danger. 
Always cover an NLW with deadly force. 
H-28. NLWs  should  be  employed  by  Soldiers  who  are  trained  by  Interservice  Nonlethal  Individual 
Weapons Instructor Course graduates. Units are not authorized to use a nonlethal capabilities set unless a 
course graduate is assigned/attached to the organization. Organizations that may be involved in future I/R 
operations should consider having their Soldiers trained at the course, which is taught at the U.S. Army 
Military Police School. 
N
ONLETHAL 
W
EAPONS 
T
ACTICS
H-29. DODD  3000.3  provides  policy  on  the  employment  of  NLWs.  FM 3-22.40  provides  an  in-depth 
discussion on the tactics associated with NLWs employment. 
RIOT CONTROL MEASURES 
H-30. Some  of  the  preliminaries  involved  when  considering  riot  control  measures  are  provided  in  the 
following  paragraphs.  Riot  control  agents,  formations,  and  movements  are  covered  extensively  in  
FM 3-19.15. 
H-31. All displays  of  conflict  must  be  brought  under  control  quickly.  To  maintain  control,  the facility 
commander must have a well-developed, well-rehearsed plan for defusing tense situations, handling unruly 
captives, and quelling riots. Only by quickly restoring order can the commander exercise effective control 
of the detainees. Due to the physical differences of I/R facilities, consider the following: 
Terrain features where the facility is located. 
Type of structures within the compound. 
Number of detainees within the compound. 
Size of the available control force. 
H-32. Order must be restored using the least amount of force possible. Often, PSYOP resources can play an 
effective role in restoring order to the compound. If necessary, riot control agents and NLWs are authorized 
to incapacitate rioters. 
P
REPLANNING
H-33. Preplanning  is the  preparation conducted  before a  crisis  occurs to improve reactions  contain  and 
neutralize  the  crisis  successfully.  The  preplanning  process  includes  training,  developing  plans,  and 
gathering information and intelligence. At a minimum— 
Maintain updated drawings of the I/R compound. 
Identify potential threats from within the detainee population. 
T
RAINING
H-34. The  quick-reaction force  and associated teams  must train  on a regular  basis  in the five basic  riot 
control formations. There also must be a continuous training program established to include, at a minimum, 
the following subjects: 
Principles of FM 27-10, specifically the provisions of the Geneva Conventions. 
Supervisory and human relations techniques. 
Methods of self-defense. 
Use of force. 
Riot baton use. 
M16 and M4 use with and without a bayonet. 
C# TIFF: How to Reorder, Rearrange & Sort TIFF Pages Using C# Code
C# TIFF - Sort TIFF File Pages Order in C#.NET. Reorder, Rearrange and Sort TIFF Document Pages in C#.NET Application. C# TIFF Page Sorting Overview.
moving pages in pdf; move pdf pages online
VB.NET PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for vb.net, ASP.NET
page directly. Moreover, when you get a PDF document which is out of order, you need to rearrange the PDF document pages. In these
reorder pdf page; reverse page order pdf
Use of Force and Riot Control Measures 
12 February 2010 
FM 3-39.40 
H-7 
Areas of the body to avoid when using the riot baton, M16, or M4. 
Weapons familiarization and qualification. 
Public relations. 
First aid. 
Emergency plans. 
Compound regulations. 
Intelligence and counterintelligence techniques. 
Cultural customs, habits, and religious practices. 
Basic language of the detainees. 
Riot control agents employment and the various methods of dispersing them. 
NLWs employment. 
Bullhorn use. 
Restraint use. 
On-site medical support. 
H-35. It is critical  that personnel assigned or  attached  to internment facilities are oriented and  specially 
trained in the custody and control of individuals. Each individual working within the compound must be 
fully cognizant of the provisions of the Geneva Conventions as they apply to the treatment of detainees and 
the Soldiers guarding the detainees. 
P
LANNING 
P
ROCESS
H-36. The planning process begins during preplanning. Once the quick-reaction force has been alerted of a 
riot situation, the leaders and quick-reaction force members further develop the preplans to fit the situation. 
(See FM 5-0.) 
H-37. This part of the planning process is essential for the successful containment and neutralization of a 
riot.  When  using  riot  control  agents,  plans  must  be  flexible  enough  to  accommodate  changes  in  the 
situation  and  weather.  These  plans  must  also  consider  the  strict  accountability  and  control  of  the 
employment of riot control agents. Riot control agents are employed only when the commander specifically 
authorizes their use and their use must be reported. 
H-38. Other planning factors to consider are the cause, nature, and extent of the disturbance. Based on an 
analysis of these factors, the commander estimates the situation. The estimate must be as thorough as time 
permits. Using the estimate,  the commander considers courses of action, selects riot control agents, and 
determines munitions needs. The main factors in choosing a course of action are— 
Desired effects. 
Demeanor and intent of the gathered detainees. 
Weather. 
Types of munitions available. 
H-39. Plans  must  also  address  the  security  of  riot  control  agents  during  storage,  transportation,  and 
employment. Wind direction, the size of the area, and the proximity of civilian communities may preclude 
the  use  of  large  quantities  of  riot  control  agents.  In  such  cases,  it  may  be  necessary  to  use  low 
concentrations to break a crowd into smaller groups. 
H-40. When  dealing  with  large  riots,  plans  should  indicate  how  the  control  force  should  channel  and 
control individual movements in a specific direction, usually to an area where another force is waiting to 
receive, hold, and search them. Plans must contain information on how the riot control agents are employed 
to  cover the target  area with a cloud of sufficient strength to produce decisive results. Once  the proper 
concentration is reached, the control force must maintain that concentration until the rioters are channeled 
into the predetermined area. When dispersers are used, the dispersal team maintains the concentration by 
moving the disperser along the release line at an even rate. They maintain the concentration by repeating 
the application as necessary. 
VB.NET TIFF: Modify TIFF File by Adding, Deleting & Sort TIFF
do if you want to change or rearrange current TIFF &ltsummary> ''' Sort TIFF document pages in designed & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image to
switch page order pdf; how to rearrange pdf pages reader
C# PowerPoint - How to Process PowerPoint
It enables you to move out useless PowerPoint document pages simply with a few a very easy PPT slide dealing solution to sort and rearrange PowerPoint slides
how to rearrange pages in a pdf reader; change page order in pdf file
Appendix H 
H-8 
FM 3-39.40 
12 February 2010 
H-41. Plans  should  also  include  serious  incident  reporting  procedures.  The  record  of  events  should  be 
initiated to provide a basis for the preparation and submission of a formal serious incident report to higher 
headquarters. At a minimum, the following should be included: 
Time the incident was reported and by whom. 
Time the incident was reported to the commander. 
Time the quick-reaction force was alerted. 
Time the quick-reaction force commander reported to the affected compound. 
Time the quick-reaction force entered the compound. 
Weather conditions as they relate to the use of riot control agents. 
Number of U.S. armed forces injured or killed, including how they were injured or killed, and 
the medical attention given to them. 
Number  of  detainees  injured  or  killed,  including  how  they  were  injured  or  killed,  and  the 
medical attention given to them. 
Time the operation was completed and when the riot control force cleared the compound. 
RIOT FORMATIONS 
H-42. Quick-reaction force  teams should be established with  a minimum response time. Because of  the 
physical nature of riot  control, individuals  in riot  control  formations  should  not  carry  rifles.  Nonlethal 
attachments should follow closely behind the riot control formation. Lethal coverage must be provided for 
this entire formation. (See FM 3-22.40.) 
D
ESIGNATED 
M
ARKSMEN
H-43. During a nonlethal engagement, the use of designated marksmen provides confidence and safety to 
those facing a riot. If a lethal threat is presented, the designated marksmen in overwatch positions (armed 
with  appropriate  sniper  weapons  mounted  with  high-powered  scopes)  can  scan  a  crowd  and  identify 
agitators and riot leaders for apprehension and fire lethal rounds if warranted. Additionally, they are ideally 
suited for flank security and countersniper operations. (See FM 3-22.40.) 
C
ROWD 
D
YNAMICS
H-44. Commanders must be concerned with crowd control and the dynamics caused by disaffected people 
living in close quarters. Generally, the commander needs to be concerned about two types of disturbances: 
riots and disorders.  I/R populations may organize disturbances of either type within the facility to wear 
down the guard force. (See FM 3-19.15.) 
H-45. Simply being part of a crowd affects a person. To some extent, persons in a crowd are susceptible to 
actions different from their usual behavior. For example,  crowds provide a sense of anonymity because 
they are large and often temporary congregations. Crowd members often feel that their moral responsibility 
has  shifted  from  themselves  to  the  crowd as  a whole.  Large  numbers  of  people discourage  individual 
behavior since the urge to imitate is strong in humans. People look to others for cues and disregard their 
own background and training. Only well-disciplined persons or persons with strong convictions can resist 
conforming to a crowd’s behavior. Crowd behavior influences the actions of the disorderly participants and 
the authorities tasked to control them. Under normal circumstances, a crowd is orderly and does not present 
a  problem  to  authorities. However,  when  crowd  behavior violates  laws  or  threatens  life  or  property,  a 
disturbance ensues. 
C
ROWD 
B
EHAVIOR
H-46. Social factors (leadership, moral  attitudes,  uniformity) may  influence  crowd behavior.  Leadership 
has a profound effect on the intensity and direction of crowd behavior. When blocked from expressing its 
emotions in one direction, a crowd’s frustration and hostility may be redirected elsewhere. The first person 
to  give clear orders in an  authoritative manner may become the leader. Agitators can exploit a crowd’s 
mood  and  convert  a  group of frustrated, resentful  people  into  a vengeful  mob.  Skillful agitators using 
Online Merge PDF files. Best free online merge PDF tool.
By dragging your pages in the editor area you can rearrange them or delete single pages. We try to make it as easy as possible to merge your PDF files.
reorder pages in pdf online; rearrange pages in pdf document
VB.NET Word: How to Process MS Word in VB.NET Library in .NET
well programmed Word pages sorter to rearrange Word pages extracting single or multiple Word pages at one & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image to
pdf change page order acrobat; change pdf page order
Use of Force and Riot Control Measures 
12 February 2010 
FM 3-39.40 
H-9 
clandestine communications within the facility can reach large portions of the population and incite them to 
unlawful acts without having direct personal contact. In an I/R environment, any crowd can be a threat to 
law and order because it is open to manipulation. 
H-47. Crowd behavior may be affected by emotional contagion or panic. Emotional contagion provides the 
crowd with psychological “unity.” The unity is usually temporary, but it may last long enough to push a 
crowd  to  mob  action.  When  emotional  contagion  prevails,  normal  law  and  authority  are  suppressed, 
increasing the potential for violence. 
H-48. Panic can occur during a disturbance when— 
Crowd members perceive their safety is at risk and attempt to flee the area. 
Crowd members cannot disperse quickly after exposure to riot control agents. 
Escape routes are limited, blocked, and/or congested. 
H-49. Control  force  members  are  also  susceptible  to  crowd  behavior.  They  may  become  emotionally 
stimulated during a tense confrontation, and facility commanders must counteract this. The control force 
members  must  exercise  restraint  individually  and  collectively.  Rigorous  training,  firm  and  effective 
leadership,  and complete awareness and understanding  of the  RUF and ROI  are necessary to offset  the 
effect of crowd contagion upon the control force. 
C
ROWD 
T
ACTICS
H-50. In disturbances, crowds employ any number of tactics to resist control or achieve their goals. Tactics 
may be unplanned or planned and nonviolent or violent. The more purposeful the disturbance, the more 
likely is the possibility of well-planned tactics. 
Nonviolent Tactics (Disorders) 
H-51. Nonviolent  tactics  may  include  name-calling,  demonstrations,  the  refusal  to  work  or  eat,  work 
slowdown, damage to or destruction of property, or barricade construction. Demonstrators may converse 
with control force members to distract them or to gain their sympathy. They may use verbal abuse such as 
obscene remarks, taunts, ridicules, and jeers. Crowd members want to anger and demoralize the opposition. 
They want authorities to take actions that later may be exploited as acts of brutality. 
H-52. In compounds where women, children, and the elderly are interned, they may be placed in the front 
ranks  of  the  demonstration  to  try  to  discourage  countermeasures  by  the  control  force.  When 
countermeasures are  taken,  agitators  may  try to stir public  displeasure  and  embarrass the control  force 
through the media. Individuals may form human blockades to impede movement by sitting down in the 
footpaths or entrances to buildings within the compound. This may disrupt normal activity, forcing control 
personnel to remove demonstrators physically. Individuals may lock arms, making it hard for the control 
force to separate and remove them, which makes the control force seem to be using excessive force. 
H-53. Some nonviolent tactics are further described as follows: 
Demonstrations. Demonstrations are the actions of groups of people whose behavior, while not 
violent,  conflicts  with  those  in  authority.  They  are  characterized  by  unruliness  and  vocal 
expressiveness without violence. Demonstrations may be organized in celebration  of national 
holidays; as protests against food, clothing, living conditions, or treatment; or for other similar 
factors. 
Refusal to work or eat. Individuals may refuse to work or eat (collectively or individually) as a 
means of harassing the detaining power or in an attempt to gain concessions from the detaining 
power. Prompt isolation and segregation of such offenders and their ringleaders normally control 
this type of disorder. 
Work slowdown. Individuals may initiate a deliberate work slowdown to delay the completion 
of  work  projects,  thereby  harassing  the  detaining  power.  Disorders  of  this  nature  can  be 
controlled in the same manner as the refusal to work or eat. 
Process Images in Web Image Viewer | Online Tutorials
used document types are supported, including PDF, multi-page easy to process image and file pages with the deleting a thumbnail, and you can rearrange the file
how to move pages within a pdf; reorder pages in pdf reader
VB.NET PowerPoint: Sort and Reorder PowerPoint Slides by Using VB.
page will teach you to rearrange and readjust amount of robust PPT slides/pages editing methods powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image to
how to move pages in pdf files; how to reorder pdf pages in reader
Appendix H 
H-10 
FM 3-39.40 
12 February 2010 
Damage or destruction of property. Individuals often damage or destroy property to harass the 
detaining power or to impede or prevent normal operations of the facility. This type of disorder 
can be controlled by identifying, isolating, and segregating individuals involved. 
H-54. Unorganized disorders are characterized as being spontaneous in nature. They begin because of the 
actions of a single individual. Like all disturbances, their prompt control is essential. 
Violent Tactics 
H-55. Violent crowd tactics may be extremely destructive. They may include physical attacks on fellow 
detainees, guards, or government property; fires; or bombings for the purpose of an escape, a grievance 
protest, or tactical or political advantages. Only the attitudes and ingenuity of crowd members, the training 
of their leaders, and the materials available to them limit their use of violent tactics. Rioters may commit 
violence with crude, homemade weapons or whatever items are at hand (rocks, bricks, bottles). If violence 
is planned, rioters may easily conceal makeshift weapons or tools for vandalism. 
H-56. Rioters may erect barricades to impede movement or to prevent a control force from entering certain 
areas  or  buildings.  They  may  use  vehicles,  trees,  furniture,  fences,  or  other  handy  materials  to  erect 
barricades. In an effort to breach barriers, rioters may throw grapples into wire barricades and drag them 
down. They may use grapples, chains, wire, or rope to pull down gates or fences to affect a mass escape. 
They may use long poles or homemade spears (tent poles) to keep control forces back while they remove 
barricades or to prevent control forces from using bayonets. 
H-57. Rioters can be expected to vent their emotions on individuals, troop formations, and control force 
equipment. They may throw rotten fruits or vegetables, rocks, bricks, bottles, improvised bombs, or any 
other objects at hand. 
H-58. Rioters may direct dangerous objects like vehicles, carts, barrels, or liquids (such as boiling water, 
oil,  or  urine)  at  troops  located  on  or  at  the  bottom  of  a  slope.  On  level  ground,  they  may  drive 
commandeered vehicles at the troops, jumping out before the vehicles reach the target to breach roadblocks 
and barricades, and scatter the control force formation. 
H-59. Rioters may set fire to buildings or vehicles to block the advance of the control force formation. Fires 
may also be set to create confusion or diversion, destroy property, or to mask escapes. 
H-60. Riots  are  organized  or  unorganized.  In  organized  riots,  leaders  of  detainees  may  reorganize  the 
detainee population into quasimilitary groups. These groups are capable of developing plans and tactics for 
riots and disorders. Riots could be instigated for— 
An escape. Detainee leaders organize a riot as a diversion for an escape attempt. The attempt 
may be for selected individuals, small groups, or a large mass of individuals. 
 grievance  protest.  Grievance  protests  could  be  organized  as  a  riot.  Under  normal 
circumstances, a riot of this type will not be of an extremely violent nature. It may turn violent 
when the  leaders  attempt to exploit  any successes  of the riot or  weaknesses of  the detaining 
powers. 
Tactical purposes. Riots are often organized for the sole purpose of causing the detaining power 
to divert troops. This tactical move limits the detaining power’s ability to perform its mission. 
Political purposes. Riots are often organized as a means of embarrassing the detaining powers 
in their relations with the protecting powers and other nations or for use as propaganda by the 
nations  whose nationals  are involved in the riot. They may also be organized  as a means of 
intimidating individuals or groups that may have been cooperative with the detaining power. 
H-61. Unorganized riots are characterized at their inception as being spontaneous in nature, although they 
could be exploited and diverted by leaders at any subsequent stage of the riot into a different type. Crowds 
may start as a holiday celebration, a group singing, a religious gathering, an arson event, or any other type 
of gathering that might lead to group hysteria. Under determined leadership, the pattern of these gatherings 
could change to that of an organized riot. 
12 February 2010 
FM 3-39.40 
I-1 
Appendix I 
Medical Support to Detainee Operations 
As participants in the Geneva Conventions, detainees in U.S. custody receive medical 
care consistent with the standard of medical care that applies to U.S. armed forces in 
the same area. (See AR 40-400, AR 190-8, DODD 2310.01E, DODD 2311.01E, the 
FM 4-02 series, FM 8-10-6, and FM 27-10.) 
MEDICAL AND ETHICAL CONSIDERATIONS OF THE 
TREATMENT OF DETAINEES 
I-1.  Medical personnel are well trained in, and guided by, the ethics of their professional calling. These 
training and ethical principles, coupled with the requirements of international laws as they pertain to the 
treatment of detainees during a conflict, ensure the ethical treatment of all sick and wounded personnel. 
Note. See Military Medical Ethics Volume I and Volume II for more medical information. These 
manuals are available electronically at <http://www.bordeninstitute.army.mil>. 
PROHIBITED ACTS 
I-2.  The Geneva Conventions specifically prohibit certain acts and specify that all detainees will receive 
humane treatment. Prohibited acts include murder, torture, medical and scientific experimentation, physical 
mutilation, and the removal of tissues and organs for transplantation. Additionally, causing serious injury, 
pain, or suffering is prohibited. 
I-3.  Torture can take many guises in wartime situations. Historically, it has been used to extract tactical 
information from an uncooperative detainee. However, it has also been applied to punish and/or inflict pain 
and suffering. Regardless of the rationale, the torture of detainees is prohibited. Medical personnel do not 
participate in the torture of detainees, to include— 
Administering drugs to facilitate interrogation. 
Designing psychological strategies for interrogators. 
Advising interrogators on the ability of a detainee to withstand torture. 
I-4.  The  detaining  power  is  prohibited  from  conducting  medical  and  scientific  experimentation  on 
detainees. This prohibition arose from experiences in World War II. Since the prisoner is in the custody of 
the detaining power, any consent to the experiment is suspect as the prisoner may feel coerced to provide 
consent.  This  prohibition  does  not  extend  to  the  introduction  of  new  treatment  regimens  and/or 
pharmaceuticals when there is a substantiated medical necessity and withholding the treatment would be 
detrimental to the health of the detainee. 
I-5.  Due to the nature of warfare, numerous combatants and/or noncombatants may sustain injuries that 
require the amputation of an unsalvageable limb to save their life. Amputation that is based on a medical 
necessity and  conforms to existing standards of medical  care is not  considered  physical mutilation and, 
therefore, is permitted. 
I-6.  With advances in medical science, transplanting organs in peacetime has become an accepted method 
of treatment for certain conditions. However, during wartime, with the exception of blood and skin grafts, 
organ  transplants are  prohibited. Although the recipient’s  health  status  benefits from the transplant,  the 
donor’s health status does not. As with the discussion of consent for medical experimentation, the consent 
of donors in the custody of the detaining power is suspect as donors may feel coerced by their status into 
providing consent. Transplanting organs and/or tissue from cadavers is also prohibited as the practice could 
Appendix I 
I-2 
FM 3-39.40 
12 February 2010 
lead to allegations that donors were permitted to die to harvest their organs. Geneva Protocol I does permit 
the exception of blood and skin grafts but provides stringent controls. Tissues obtained must be used for 
medical  purposes,  not  research  or  experimentation.  The  tissue  donor  must  voluntarily  consent  to  the 
procedure, and records must be maintained. 
I-7.  Geneva  Protocol I reiterates the right of an individual  to refuse a surgical procedure, even if that 
procedure would be lifesaving and falls within existing medical standards. A surgeon may not feel ethically 
bound by a refusal in the case of a minor or an individual whose judgment is impaired by injury or illness. 
Documenting the issue, whether it is the patient’s refusal (in writing, if possible) or the surgeon’s decision 
is an essential step in ensuring that allegations of abuse are not forthcoming. 
SUSPECTED OR ALLEGED ABUSE, TORTURE, OR SEXUAL 
ASSAULT 
I-8.  Medical  personnel  are  obligated  to  report  any  suspected  and/or  alleged abuse,  torture,  or  sexual 
assault through the chain of command and to the U.S. Army Criminal Investigation Command. Medical 
personnel report any suspected abuse and/or torture through technical channels to the detainee operations 
medical director. Medical personnel are also required to document actual, alleged, or suspected abuse in the 
detainee’s medical record. 
I-9.  Medical  personnel  have  contact  with  detainees  in  a  variety  of  settings.  Medical  personnel  must 
document any suspicious medical occurrences during— 
Initial  detainee  screening.  Preexisting  medical  conditions,  wounds,  fractures,  and  bruises 
should be noted. The documentation of these injuries and conditions provides a baseline for each 
detainee and facilitates the identification of injuries that may have occurred in the internment 
facility. 
Routine detainee sick calls. Detainees should be visually examined to determine if unusual or 
suspicious  injuries  are apparent. If  any are present,  the  health  care  provider  must  attempt to 
determine from the detainee how the injuries occurred. Any injuries that cannot be explained, or 
for  which  the  detainee  is  providing  evasive  responses,  are  noted  in  the  medical  record  and 
reported to the chain of command and functional medical channels. 
Facility visits. The reasons for entering the detention facility may include conducting sanitary 
inspections,  providing  emergency  medical  care,  and  dispensing  medications.  When  in  the 
facility, medical  personnel must be  observant. They must  immediately  report to  the  chain of 
command anything which might indicate that detainees are being mistreated. If they observe a 
detainee being mistreated, they must take immediate action to stop the abuse and then report the 
incident. 
I-10. If a detainee alleges that abuse, torture, or sexual assault has occurred, the health care provider must 
report the allegations to the facility commander, CID, and detainee operations medical director. Medical 
personnel  are  not  required  to  investigate  the  allegation  beyond  what  is  required  to  render  appropriate 
medical treatment, except in the cases of alleged rape and/or sexual assault. Cases of alleged rape and/or 
sexual  assault  require  that  medical  personnel  comply  with  the  standard  procedures  for  the  collection, 
preservation, and processing of rape kit evidence. Detainees alleging sexual assault or rape will be tested 
for sexually transmitted diseases, and female detainees will be given a pregnancy test as specified in the 
theater policy. 
MEDICAL SUPPORT PROVIDED TO INTERROGATION TEAMS 
I-11. Under the provisions of the Geneva Conventions, medical personnel are prohibited from engaging in 
acts that are considered harmful to detainees. Medical personnel providing direct patient care for detainees 
will not participate in, or provide medical information to, interrogators. Medical personnel are— 
Medical Support to Detainee Operations 
12 February 2010 
FM 3-39.40 
I-3 
Authorized to halt any interrogation or interrogation technique if the detainee’s health or welfare 
is endangered. 
Authorized to  stop an interrogation  immediately  if a detainee requires  any medical  treatment 
during the interrogation. 
Authorized  to  perform  preinterrogation  and/or  postinterrogation  medical  evaluations  at  their 
discretion. 
Required to perform preinterrogation and/or postinterrogation medical evaluations on the request 
of an interrogator. 
Required to document preinterrogation, during interrogation, and postinterrogation medical care 
in detainees’ medical records. 
Required  to  develop procedures for documenting medical care  delivered during or  due  to an 
interrogation. 
I-12. Behavioral science consultation team members are authorized to make psychological assessments of 
the character, personality, social interactions, and other behavioral characteristics of interrogation subjects 
and to advise authorized personnel performing lawful interrogations. Those who provide such advice may 
not provide medical care for detainees, except in emergencies. 
I-13. Medical personnel must consider the welfare of their patients. If a detainee has a medical condition 
that  could  deteriorate during  interrogation and  result in a  health  crisis  for  the detainee,  the  health  care 
provider should inform the interrogation team of the existing medical limitations. For example, a detainee 
who  is  diabetic  may  have  dietary  restrictions  and  requirements  and  a  need  to  take  medications  on  a 
scheduled basis. 
MEDICAL PERSONNEL 
I-14. The  roles  and responsibilities of  medical personnel associated with detainees  vary. The following 
paragraphs describe those personnel and their activities. 
D
ETAINEE 
O
PERATIONS 
M
EDICAL 
D
IRECTOR
I-15. The theater Army Surgeon for the Army Service component command appoints a detainee operations 
medical director to oversee and guide all elements of health care delivery to detainees within the theater. 
This  ensures  a  comprehensive,  continuous  assessment  of  critical  mission  tasks;  facilitates  the  rapid 
identification of deficiencies; and enhances the timely resolution of health care delivery issues. 
I-16. The detainee operations medical director is responsible for— 
Advising the theater commander on the health of detainees. 
Providing guidance, in conjunction with the command SJA, on the ethical and legal aspects of 
providing medical care to detainees. 
Recommending the task organization of medical resources to satisfy mission requirements. 
Recommending policies concerning medical support to detainee operations. 
Developing, coordinating, and synchronizing health consultation services for detainees. 
Evaluating and interpreting medical statistical data. 
Recommending  policies  and  determining  requirements  and  priorities  for  medical  logistics 
operations in support of detainee health care. This includes blood and blood products, medical 
supply  and  resupply,  formulary  development,  medical  equipment,  medical  equipment 
maintenance and repair services, optometric support, fabrication of single-vision and multivision 
optical lenses, and spectacle fabrication and repair. 
Recommending medical evacuation policies and procedures and monitoring medical evacuation 
support to detainees. 
Recommending  policies,  protocols,  and  procedures  pertaining  to  the  medical  and  dental 
treatment of detainees. These policies, protocols, and procedures provide the same standard of 
care provided to U.S. armed forces in the same area. 
Appendix I 
I-4 
FM 3-39.40 
12 February 2010 
Ensuring  that  medical  records  are  maintained  on  each  detainee  according  to  AR 40-66  and 
AR 40-400. 
Ensuring  that  monthly  weigh-ins  are  conducted  and  reported  as  required  by  regulation  and 
international laws. 
Planning  for  and  implementing  preventive  medicine  operations  and  facilitating  health  risk 
communications (to include preventive medicine programs to counter the medical threat). 
M
EDICAL 
P
ERSONNEL 
O
RGANIC TO 
M
ILITARY 
P
OLICE 
U
NITS
I-17. The military police battalion has organic medical personnel to provide limited Level I medical care 
capability and preventive  medicine  services  within  the  internment  facility.  When  a detainee operations 
medical director has been designated within the joint operations area, these medical personnel are under the 
technical guidance of the detainee operations medical director. 
I-18. These  medical  personnel  assist  with  in-processing  detainees  by  providing  the  initial  medical 
examination. They provide routine sick call services and emergency medical treatment and coordinate with 
the  supporting  medical  units  for  Level  II  and  above  care.  They  maintain  medical  records,  to  include 
DA Form 2664-R.  When the supporting  medical  unit is  colocated  with the  internment  facility, the unit 
scope of practice, schedule, and duty assignments are coordinated through the supporting medical unit. 
M
EDICAL 
P
ERSONNEL 
O
RGANIC TO 
M
ANEUVER 
U
NITS
I-19. Medical  personnel  organic  to  maneuver  units  may  be  required  to  provide  emergency  medical 
treatment, area medical support, and medical evacuation at the POC and to temporary concentrations of 
detainees at DCPs and DHAs. In early-entry operations, the senior medical officer (brigade surgeon) serves 
as the detainee operations medical director until follow-on forces are deployed and a detainee operations 
medical director is designated for the joint operations area. 
M
EDICAL 
P
ERSONNEL 
O
RGANIC TO 
S
UPPORTING 
M
EDICAL 
U
NITS
I-20. The  medical  resources  required  to  support  detainee  operations  are  task-organized  based  on  the 
mission variables. The detainee operations medical director determines the medical support requirements 
and  develops  and  provides  technical  guidance  for  all  medical  resources  engaged  in  detainee  medical 
operations. This guidance is directed to appropriate medical personnel through their technical channels. 
I-21. The detainee operations medical director is designated by the medical deployment support command 
commander  to  develop  and  provide  technical  guidance  or  the  medical  aspects  of  detainee  operations 
conducted throughout the joint operations area. Technical guidance is exercised throughout all echelons of 
medical channels and affects all medical personnel and units delivering health care to detainees. Technical 
guidance encompasses— 
Medical services provided at DCPs and DHAs, to include limited medical screening, emergency 
medical  treatment,  preventive  medicine  measures  (hygiene  and  sanitation),  and  the  medical 
evacuation  of  seriously  injured  or  ill  detainees  through  medical  channels.  The  echelon 
commander must provide guards and/or escorts when detainees are evacuated through medical 
channels; medical personnel cannot perform guard functions. 
Medical services provided in the internment facility, to include— 
„ 
Initial medical examinations. 
„ 
Medical  treatment  (routine  care,  sick  call,  emergency  services,  hospitalization,  medical 
consultation, and specialty care requirements). 
„ 
Medical evacuation. 
„ 
Preventive  medicine  (medical  surveillance,  occupational  and  environmental  health 
surveillance,  hygiene  and  sanitation  standards  and  practices, pest  management  activities, 
water potability, dining facility and services hygiene, food preparation practices). 
„ 
Dental services. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested