c# show a pdf file : Move pages in pdf acrobat software control dll windows web page asp.net web forms USArmy-InternmentResettlement25-part80

Medical Support to Detainee Operations 
12 February 2010 
FM 3-39.40 
I-5 
„ 
Veterinary support (food inspection and quality assurance, veterinary preventive medicine, 
animal medical care). 
„ 
Mental health care. 
„ 
Neuropsychiatric treatment and stress prevention as required. 
„ 
Medical  logistics  (medical  supplies,  pharmaceuticals,  medical  equipment  and  medical 
equipment maintenance and repair, blood management, optical lens fabrication). 
„ 
Medical laboratory support. 
Medical  services  provided  in  U.S.  military  medical  treatment  facilities  that  are  not  part  of 
established  internment  facilities.  This  can  include  emergency  medical  treatment  provided  at 
battalion aid stations and Level II medical treatment facilities (medical companies) and forward 
resuscitative  surgery  provided  by  forward  surgical  teams  to  stabilize  the  patient  for  further 
evacuation and hospitalization. 
Medical administrative matters such as the establishment and maintenance of medical records, 
documentation of preexisting injuries (to include medical photography if deemed appropriate), 
restrictions  on  activities  based  on  medical  conditions  (similar  to  medical  profiles),  and 
documentation required for legal purposes (monthly height and weight records). 
Procedural  guides  and  SOPs  that  are  developed  and  disseminated  for  reporting  suspected 
detainee abuse. Medical personnel are trained on procedures and ethical considerations. 
Procedural guides and SOPs that are developed to standardize the credentialing of health care 
providers,  to define the scope of practice  of medical personnel, and to establish the scope of 
practice for retained medical personnel. 
Standards of medical care throughout internment facilities within the joint operations area that 
are established, inspected, and enforced (the standards used are the same as those for U.S. armed 
forces). 
Procedures  that  are  established  and  disseminated  for  identifying,  reporting,  and  resolving 
medical ethics and other legal issues. 
Procedures that are established for ensuring medical proficiencies and competencies, identifying 
deficiencies, and providing required training to resolve deficiencies. 
Programs  of  instruction  that  are  developed  to  ensure  that  all  medical  personnel  engaged  in 
detainee health care have appropriate orientation and training in the detainee’s culture, language 
(and/or linguist support), social order, and religion. 
CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS 
I-22. As  part  of  their  predeployment  activities,  personnel  participating  in  multinational  operations 
normally receive an orientation in the culture, languages, and religious beliefs prevalent in the operational 
area. Medical personnel must ensure that they understand  the medical considerations presented by these 
customs  and  beliefs.  Cultural  or  religious  norms  may  affect  a  patient’s  compliance  with  a  prescribed 
medical regimen, may prohibit the use of blood and blood products, or may restrict the use of certain food 
products, thereby affecting the patient’s nutritional status. 
I-23. U.S.  armed  forces involved  in  multinational  operations will  normally  require interpreter  support. 
This is of particular importance for medical personnel as they interact with multinational forces and treat 
detainees. Medical personnel must be able to discuss a patient’s medical history and to understand the signs 
and symptoms being described. Medical personnel may consider using— 
Flash cards. During recent operations, some medical units devised flash cards which pictorially 
depicted a  variety of  medical complaints. Units  developing this type of  communications tool 
must be cautious and ensure that the images used do not offend the cultural or religious beliefs 
of the individual. Commercial products may also be available. 
Retained  medical  personnel.  The  number  of  individuals  capable  of  fulfilling  interpreter 
requirements may be limited. In detainee operations, retained medical personnel may be able to 
assist in relating the patient’s medical condition to the health care provider. 
Move pages in pdf acrobat - re-order PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Customizing Page Order of PDF Document in C# Project
change page order pdf acrobat; pdf reverse page order online
Move pages in pdf acrobat - VB.NET PDF Page Move Library: re-order PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Sort PDF Document Pages Using VB.NET Demo Code
how to reorder pages in pdf online; reorder pages in pdf reader
Appendix I 
I-6 
FM 3-39.40 
12 February 2010 
Advanced  technology.  Health  care  providers  may  be  able  to  leverage  advances  in 
communications  technology  that  can  provide  an  automated  interpreter  service  through  a 
handheld device. 
SECURITY CONSIDERATIONS FOR MEDICAL PERSONNEL, 
MEDICAL EQUIPMENT, AND SUPPLY ITEMS 
I-24. Level II medical treatment facilities provide support on an area basis. DCPs and DHAs may have to 
coordinate  emergency  medical  care  from  Level  II  medical  facilities  for  temporary  concentrations  of 
detainees being held. If this is necessary, consider the following: 
Security measures instituted at these points  are dictated by the unit that established the DCP. 
Medical  personnel  should  not  enter  the  DHA until  necessary  security  precautions have  been 
taken. 
Medical personnel should inventory medical supplies (especially sharps items, such as needles) 
and equipment that they are taking into the enclosure. While in the enclosure, medical personnel 
must  be alert and prepared to defend themselves if the need arises. Before medical personnel 
leave the enclosure, they  must account  for  and  remove  all  medical  supplies,  equipment,  and 
medical waste. 
I-25. At internment facilities, medical personnel should observe the same precautions as they would at a 
DCP or a DHA. The military police unit that establishes the facility dictates what security procedures will 
be  observed  when  treating  detainees  at  the  facility.  Medical  personnel  should  never  enter  the  general 
population  area  by  themselves.  When  possible,  have  the  detainees  taken  to  the  established  medical 
treatment  area rather than have medical  personnel enter confinement areas. The medical treatment  area 
should have all medical supplies (especially sharp items), medical equipment, and pharmaceuticals secured 
before permitting the detainees to enter. Medical personnel must remain alert continuously while in the 
presence of detainees. Although medical personnel may treat the same detainee for a recurring or chronic 
condition  and  feel  as  though they  have  gotten  to know  the  detainee,  medical  personnel  should  remain 
vigilant and be prepared to react if threatened. 
I-26. At Level III hospitals, detainee patients should be segregated from U.S. and multinational patients. 
Detainee patients are guarded by nonmedical personnel designated by the echelon commander while they 
are  patients  in  the  facility.  All  medical equipment, supplies,  and  pharmaceuticals  should be stored  and 
secured in a room outside the ward. When possible, patients are treated in a room outside the ward. When 
patients are required to  leave the  ward,  they should  be escorted under  guard to ensure that they do not 
attempt to escape, injure hospital personnel or other patients, or damage and/or destroy hospital property. 
MEDICAL SUPPORT BEFORE TRANSFER TO AN INTERNMENT 
FACILITY 
I-27. Only  limited  medical  screening  can  be  accomplished  at  DCPs  and  DHAs.  Medical  personnel 
assigned to the military police unit normally treat detainees at DCPs. If these personnel are not available, 
the  Level  II  medical  treatment  facility  providing  area  support  may  be  required  to  perform  a  hasty 
assessment  of  the detainees  at  the  request  of  the  detaining  unit.  These support  requirements  should be 
included  in the operation order  when possible.  The  purpose  of this medical  screening is  to  ensure  that 
detainees do not have significant wounds, injuries, or other medical conditions (such as severe dehydration) 
that would require immediate medical attention or medical evacuation. Medical personnel are screening for 
conditions that could deteriorate before a detainee is transferred to an internment facility. This screening 
does not include the use of diagnostic equipment such as X-rays or laboratory tests, as these resources are 
not available at a DCP or DHA. Any medical treatment provided during screening is entered on DD Form 
1380. The detainee’s DD Form 2745 number is used as the identification number on the DD Form 1380. If 
the detainee is not to be evacuated through medical channels, one copy of DD Form 1380 is provided to the 
detaining  unit  for  inclusion  in  the  detainee’s  medical  record  that  is  initiated  and  maintained  at  the 
internment facility. Medical personnel do not provide security for detainees. 
C# PDF Converter Library SDK to convert PDF to other file formats
manipulate & convert standard PDF documents in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat.
change pdf page order online; how to reorder pages in pdf
C# powerpoint - PowerPoint Conversion & Rendering in C#.NET
documents in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. PowerPoint to PDF Conversion.
how to reverse pages in pdf; rearrange pages in pdf
Medical Support to Detainee Operations 
12 February 2010 
FM 3-39.40 
I-7 
I-28. If medical  personnel are not  available, emergency medical  treatment  is  provided  by the Level II 
medical  treatment  facility  providing  area  medical support.  Detainees  whose  medical  conditions  require 
hospitalization are treated, stabilized, and evacuated to a supporting medical treatment facility. All medical 
treatment provided to detainees is annotated on DD Form 1380, and the form accompanies the detainees for 
inclusion in their medical records at the Level III hospital. 
I-29. Injured  and  ill detainees  requiring hospitalization  are  evacuated  through  medical  channels  before 
being entered into the Detainee Reporting System. Medical personnel do not search, interrogate, or guard 
detainees being evacuated through medical channels. The echelon commander is responsible for providing 
this support. Once detainee patients reach the Level III hospital, they are reported in the Detainee Reporting 
System.  When  possible,  detainees  should  be  segregated  from  U.S.  and  multinational  forces  during 
evacuation. 
I-30. At  DCPs  and  DHAs,  field-expedient  measures  may  be  required  to  sustain  field  sanitation.  If 
sanitation facilities are not feasible, detainees should be given individual waste collection bags and hand-
washing stations should be established throughout the DHA. If medical personnel are requested to provide 
emergency medical treatment at DCPs and DHAs, they should review how field sanitation measures are 
being implemented. Any deficiencies noted should be corrected on the spot and reported to the chain of 
command and through medical channels. 
MEDICAL SUPPORT AT THE INTERNMENT FACILITY 
I-31. Medical support at the facility involves multiple actions, including the responsibility of keeping the 
facility commander apprised of detainee medical conditions. These actions are discussed in the following 
paragraphs. 
I
NITIAL 
M
EDICAL 
S
CREENING AND 
S
TANDARDIZED 
P
HYSICAL 
E
XAMINATION
I-32.  Detainees  are  screened  by  medical  personnel  within  24  hours  of  their  arrival  at  the  internment 
facility. They are screened for general health and nutritional status, the presence of communicable diseases, 
preexisting chronic medical conditions, medication history (including current medications), immunization 
status,  weight,  and  existing  wounds  or  injuries.  If  detainees  have  medications  on  them  at  the  time  of 
internment,  the  medicine  should  be  bagged,  identified,  transported  by  military  police  personnel,  and 
provided to medical personnel at the internment facility. 
I-33. A medical record is initiated for detainee who does not already have one. If the detainee received 
medical  treatment  while  at  the  DCP  and/or DHA,  the copy  of  DD  Form  1380  provided  to internment 
personnel  is  included  in  the  detainee’s  medical  record.  The  detainee’s  weight  is  recorded  on 
DA Form 2664-R and is updated monthly. (See chapter 5.) 
I-34. If a detainee requires immunizations, they are given at this time as specified by the theater detainee 
health care policy. Additionally, each detainee is given a tuberculin skin test as specified by the theater 
detainee  health care  policy.  When it is  determined that  a detainee requires  medication  on  a continuing 
basis, a dosing schedule is designed. 
I-35. Upon completion of the screening and physical examination, DD Form 503 is completed. One copy 
is maintained in the detainee’s medical record, and another copy is provided to internment personnel. This 
report specifies whether the detainee is mentally and physically qualified to perform hard labor and whether 
the detainee is free from communicable diseases. This report also has a remarks block to provide additional 
information if appropriate and required. 
D
OCUMENTATION OF 
E
XISTING 
I
NJURIES OR 
M
EDICAL 
C
ONDITIONS
I-36. During the initial screening, medical personnel must ensure that they document all existing injuries 
and medical conditions. When appropriate, photographs documenting the wounds and injuries should be 
taken. 
C# Word - Word Conversion in C#.NET
Word documents in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. Word to PDF Conversion.
how to rearrange pages in pdf document; how to move pages around in pdf file
C# Excel - Excel Conversion & Rendering in C#.NET
Excel documents in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. Excel to PDF Conversion.
reverse pdf page order online; reorder pages in pdf document
Appendix I 
I-8 
FM 3-39.40 
12 February 2010 
I-37. AR  190-8  prohibits  the  photographing,  filming,  or  videotaping  of  detainees  except  for  camp 
administration  and  intelligence  and/or  counterintelligence  purposes.  However,  medical  personnel  are 
permitted  to  photograph  a  detainee  to  document  preexisting  conditions,  injuries,  and  wounds.  The 
detainee’s identity should be clearly visible. These photographs are invaluable if a claim of unnecessary 
surgery  or  amputation is  made.  Any  detainee  who requires  amputation  or  major  debridement  of  tissue 
should be photographed. Once taken, these photographs are maintained as part of the detainee’s medical 
record. 
M
EDICAL 
S
URVEILLANCE 
A
CTIVITIES
I-38. Medical  surveillance  is  the  ongoing, systematic  collection of  medical data  that is  essential  to  the 
evaluation,  planning,  and  implementation  of  public  health  and  prevention  practices.  In  particular,  it 
includes medical data related to individual patient encounters; this data is used for calculating disease and 
nonbattle injury rates in a defined population for the primary purpose of preventing and controlling health 
and  safety  hazards. Medical surveillance identifies the  population at risk,  identifies  potential  and actual 
exposures, determines protective measures, and assesses a detainee’s health. Medical surveillance is not 
intelligence gathering. 
I-39. The data collected from this assessment forms the health status of detainees. It identifies the endemic 
and epidemic diseases present in the detainee population, provides the facility commander with pertinent 
information with which to monitor changes in the detainee health status, and provides the basis to perform 
health interventions as necessary.  Medical  surveillance  data  is used to  monitor  the  implementation  and 
effectiveness of preventive medicine measures and field sanitation and hygiene practices. For example, an 
increase  of  acute  diarrheal  disease  within  a  subpopulation  of  the  detainees  may  necessitate  an 
epidemiological investigation to determine the cause of the outbreak and to ensure that the spread of the 
disease is contained. Once the source of the disease outbreak is determined, preventive measures can be 
devised and implemented to ensure that there is not a recurrence. 
I-40. Health  risk  communications  and  instructions  can  be  developed  and  disseminated  to  detainees  to 
promote  an  understanding of  the  medical  threat  faced  by  the  facility.  Dissemination  can  also  enhance 
compliance  with  required  PVTMED  measures,  field  sanitation  requirements,  and  personal  hygiene 
standards to counter the threat. 
M
ONTHLY 
M
ONITORING 
R
EQUIREMENT
I-41. To ensure the continued health of detainees, international laws require that each detainee be screened 
monthly  by  medical  personnel.  During  this  screening,  the  detainee’s  weight  is  recorded  on 
DA Form 2664-R,  which  provides  a  concise,  chronological  weight  history  of  the  detainee.  Significant 
fluctuations in weight can signal an underlying medical condition or can indicate that the detainee’s diet is 
not  meeting  nutritional  requirements.  Any  significant  fluctuations  must  be  investigated  by  medical 
personnel. Detainees with significant weight fluctuations are given a more thorough physical to determine 
if an underlying medical condition exists or if a disease is present. If the physical examination does not 
identify the underlying cause, a thorough evaluation of the detainee’s diet and work schedule is undertaken. 
Findings and recommendations for diet adjustment are made to the facility commander. Cumulative data on 
weight fluctuations is included in the medical surveillance activities conducted at the facility to ensure that 
trends are identified as rapidly as possible and that corrective measures are implemented. 
I-42. Detainees are also screened regularly for the presence of communicable diseases. Other screenings 
include louse infestations, hydration, and other indicators of health status. 
I-43. If a detainee has any signs of unexplained physical injuries (such as burns, fractures, severe sprains, 
or bruises), medical  personnel  should  ask  the detainee about the cause of  the injury. However, medical 
personnel do not investigate allegations or  suspected incidents  of abuse. Any cases of suspected abuse, 
whether by internment facility personnel or other detainees, is documented and immediately reported to the 
facility commander, the supporting  U.S. Army  Criminal  Investigation  Command unit,  and  the  detainee 
operations medical director. 
Medical Support to Detainee Operations 
12 February 2010 
FM 3-39.40 
I-9 
R
OUTINE 
M
EDICAL 
C
ARE
I-44. Detainees may receive medical care and schedule a sick call at  internment facilities. The medical 
section  of  the  I/R  battalion  provides  Level  I  medical  care  within  the  facility.  The  medical  personnel 
assigned to this section are supported through technical guidance provided by higher headquarters. 
A
DMINISTRATION OF 
M
EDICATIONS
I-45. All  medications  to  be  administered  to  detainees  must  be  dispensed  in  unit  doses  by  medical 
personnel.  Depending  on  the  detainee’s  medical  condition,  health  care  providers  should  prescribe 
medications that can be dispensed on a once- or twice-a-day basis when possible. When dispensing oral 
medications, medical  personnel will  verify the  identity of the  detainee, check  the  detainee’s hands  and 
mouth to ensure the detainee swallowed the medication and is not attempting to horde the medications for 
later use. The medication issue registry is primarily used to track the medications that each detainee takes 
and  to  prevent  medication  duplications  and  potentially  dangerous  interactions.  A  local  form  can  be 
developed to  document the dosing  schedule  and the  receipt and  administration of the  medication to the 
detainee. At a minimum the form should reflect— 
•  Date. 
•  Name of prisoner. 
•  Medication issued (name and quantity). 
•  Time and frequency of issue. 
•  Printed name and signature of person issuing medication. 
•  Prisoner’s acknowledgment for receipt of medication. 
I-46. Medical personnel are required to administer medications to detainees, prepare and maintain accurate 
records, and ensure that all medications are taken as prescribed. If a detainee refuses  to take prescribed 
medications or fails to appear for the administration of medication more than three times, the supervising 
NCO  is notified.  If  the  attending  medical  personnel believe that the refusal to take medication  or  that 
missed medication will seriously affect the health of a detainee, the attending physician is notified. 
E
MERGENCY 
M
EDICAL 
C
ARE
I-47. Emergency  medical  treatment  may  be  required  at  any  time  and  any  location  within  the  facility. 
On-site  medical  personnel  should  have  a  standardized  emergency  medical  treatment  set  that  can  be 
accessed rapidly  and  transported to the incident  site. The standardized  set  facilitates  accounting  for  all 
medical supplies and equipment  that are taken  into  the detainee enclosure.  When possible, the detainee 
should be removed from the detainee enclosure and transported to the facility’s medical treatment area. A 
guard  accompanies the  detainee  throughout the evaluation. On-site medical  personnel  treat the  detainee 
and,  if  appropriate,  release  the  detainee  back  into  the  detainee  population.  If  the  detainee’s  medical 
condition requires treatment beyond the capabilities of the on-site medical team, the detainee is evacuated 
to a higher level of care. 
E
VACUATION TO A 
L
EVEL 
3
M
EDICAL 
T
REATMENT 
F
ACILITY
I-48. When a  detainee requires  evacuation  to  a  higher  level of  care,  interpreter  support  is  required  to 
facilitate  medical  personnel  performing  emergency  medical  treatment  en  route  to  the  Level  3  medical 
treatment  facility.  Interpreter  support may  be  provided by  radio  transmission,  or an  interpreter  may be 
onboard the ambulance. Medical personnel onboard the ambulance remain in radio contact with the health 
care provider at the Level 3 medical treatment facility throughout the evacuation. A guard accompanies the 
detainee throughout the evacuation. After treatment, the detainee is returned to the TIF by ambulance if 
appropriate. If the detainee is to be admitted to the Level 3 medical treatment facility, the ambulance crew 
returns  the  TIF  guard  to  the  duty  station.  Military  police  sign  the  detainee  over  to  the  appropriate 
authorities at the medical facility before departure. Medical personnel not responsible for the security of 
detainees within  a facility.  In addition,  transportation  arrangements  should  be coordinated  to return  the 
Appendix I 
I-10 
FM 3-39.40 
12 February 2010 
detainee upon restoration of health. The evacuation and medical treatment received are documented in the 
detainee’s health record and on the ambulance run sheet. 
I-49. When detainees return to the TIF from the hospital, they are examined by the TIF physician. The 
hospital  provides  clear  and  concise  instructions  for  follow-on  care  to  be  given  at  the  TIF.  Medical 
equipment and supplies that are not normally available at the TIF, but required for the continued care of the 
detainees,  are  provided  by  the  hospital.  The  TIF  physician  coordinates  with  the  hospital  for  any 
appointments required for continued care. 
M
EDICAL 
L
OGISTICS 
R
EQUIREMENTS
I-50. A  formulary  must  be  established  for  all medical  treatment  facilities  that  provide  detainee  health 
support  that  is  specifically  tailored  to  the  detainee  health  care  mission.  The  Defense  Medical 
Standardization Board is a joint DOD activity that provides policy and standardization guidance relative to 
the development of deployable medical systems and medical material used for the delivery of health care in 
the  military  health  system.  In  executing  this  mission,  the  Defense  Medical  Standardization  Board 
establishes  and  maintains  information,  to  include  national  stock  numbers,  on  all  medications  available 
within the military health system. This listing is available at the Defense Medical Standardization Board 
Web site <http://www.jrcab.army.mil>. The mailing address is Director, Defense Medical Standardization 
Board, 1423 Sultan Drive, Fort Detrick, Maryland 21702-5013. The detainee operations medical director 
must ensure that pharmaceutical requirements are identified and that a formulary is developed as early as 
possible in the mission planning process. Special plans are devised for the following: 
Endemic and epidemic diseases in the operational area and specific AO. 
Chronic  health  problems  within  the  operational  area  and  specific  AO,  to  include nutritional 
deficiencies. 
Dosing requirements of various medications (such as requiring administration twice a day versus 
four times a day). 
Detainee demographics (age, gender). 
Medications currently available within the operational area and specific AO for civilian health 
care. 
Requirements for obstetric and/or gynecological, pediatric, and/or geriatric health care). 
Requirements for chemoprophylaxis. 
Sufficient  stock  of  medications  to  combat  disease  outbreaks  within  the  detainee  population 
(meningitis, tuberculosis, influenza). 
I-51. In addition to medical supplies, the supporting medical logistics unit provides medical  equipment 
maintenance  and  repair  and  optical  fabrication  and  repair  services,  as  required.  Coordination  for  this 
support is through the detainee operations medical director. 
DENTAL SERVICE SUPPORT 
I-52. The scope of dental services available to detainees is determined by the detainee operations medical 
director according  to established  theater policy. Operational dental  support (emergency and  essential) is 
normally available within  a  joint  operations  area.  Comprehensive dental care  is normally provided in a 
support base and not in a deployed setting. Internment facilities do not have organic dental personnel or 
equipment.  Depending  on  the  anticipated  dental  workload,  dental  assets  may  be  colocated  with  the 
internment facility. If  dental assets are not  colocated with the  internment  facility, coordination  with  the 
supporting dental facility is required. The internment facility must provide the required guard support for 
detainees being transported to the supporting dental facility. 
VETERINARY SERVICE SUPPORT 
I-53. Veterinary support for detainees is normally required to ensure food hygiene and safety support for 
meals.  Food  must  be  from  approved  sources.  Veterinary  personnel  must  approve  food  that  is  locally 
procured from the HN. The use of local food is recommended to ensure that the dietary needs of detainees 
Medical Support to Detainee Operations 
12 February 2010 
FM 3-39.40 
I-11 
are met. If the use of meals, ready-to-eat, is required due to mission variables, cultural and religious dietary 
restrictions  must  be  considered,  as  meals,  ready-to-eat,  contain  food  items  that  may  be  prohibited. 
Humanitarian rations are preferred to meals, ready-to-eat. If meals, ready-to-eat, must be used temporarily, 
the same standards used for U.S. armed forces must be applied to the duration of use. 
I-54. Veterinary support may  also  be  required  for  MWDs at internment  facilities. The support may be 
required to maintain good health or to treat sick or injured MWDs. 
PREVENTIVE MEDICINE SUPPORT 
I-55. Preventive medicine personnel, whether assigned to a military police unit or a supporting medical 
unit, may be required to assist in establishing and/or inspecting a facility. Preventive medicine personnel 
will also provide detailed guidance to the commander on occupational and environmental health standards, 
field sanitation and personal hygiene standards, and base camp assessments and inspections. 
I-56. Additional information on establishing field sanitation devices (latrines and hand-washing stations) is 
contained in FM 4-25.12 and FM 21-10. Occupational and environmental health surveillance is required 
within the facility and when detainees are engaged in work at off-site locations. According to AR 40-5 and 
FM 4-25.12, unit field sanitation teams are the first line of defense for ensuring that these standards are 
properly  maintained.  Preventive  medicine  personnel  will  provide  direct  oversight  and  support  to  these 
teams as necessary. 
P
EST 
M
ANAGEMENT 
A
CTIVITIES
I-57. Pest management activities are conducted within the internment facility to reduce the incidence of 
disease within the detainee population. Such activities require that— 
Food preparation areas are screened to exclude flies from exposed food. Food service support to 
internment facilities must meet the requirements in Technical Bulletin, Medical (TB MED) 530. 
If food is prepared in the camp and detainees work in food preparation, they must receive basic 
food safety training. Retained medical personnel may assist in training. 
Adequate collection and disposal of refuse are maintained to provide sufficient sanitation within 
the facility. If the detainees are preparing their own meals, one 32-gallon container is required 
per  17  detainees.  Detainees  will  have  more  trash  to  discard because  of food  packaging  and 
uneaten and/or spoiled food. If detainees are eating in a centralized dining facility, one 32-gallon 
container  per  25  detainees  is  required  since  more  trash  would  be  generated  in  the  food 
preparation  area and centrally disposed of there rather than  being disposed of  in the  detainee 
living area. Preventive medicine personnel are required to ensure that containers are covered to 
minimize attracting insects and rodents. These containers must be emptied and cleaned daily. 
Latrines  and  hand-washing devices  are  established  and  are  maintained  daily.  The  types  and 
number of latrines established are determined by the number of detainees and the length of time 
that they will be held at a location. Field-expedient measures (individual waste collection bags) 
may be required at temporary locations, such as the DCP. Facilities must be properly maintained 
to control fly populations. 
I-58. Preventive medicine personnel inspect water supplies to ensure potability. If detainees are preparing 
their own food, additional quantities of water are required. 
F
OOD 
S
ANITATION AND 
P
REPARATION 
R
EQUIREMENTS
I-59. Due to differing national standards and practices for food sanitation and preparation, food service 
personnel must be instructed on  food sanitation  and preparation standards  to ensure that  they know the 
standards which will be enforced. Preventive medicine support is required to ensure that food preparation 
and dining facility  sanitation  are maintained to standard. The food sanitation standards contained  in TB 
MED 530 apply. 
I-60. When  food  is  prepared  at  a  central  dining  facility  and  brought  to  the  camp  in  insulated  food 
containers,  particular  attention  must  be  afforded  to  holding  temperatures.  Additionally,  the  maximum 
Appendix I 
I-12 
FM 3-39.40 
12 February 2010 
amount of time that can pass between removing food from the container and serving it must be known and 
closely monitored. 
I-61. Detainees may have personal food items within their designated living space. These items should be 
inspected to ensure that detainees adhere to food hygiene and safety requirements. Containers used to store 
these items must protect them from potential contamination such as insects and dirt. Additionally, if the 
food  item is  sensitive to heat and/or  cold,  it  must be  maintained  in  a manner  that will  protect it from 
spoilage. 
I-62. It is possible that a detainee may bring a domesticated animal into the camp and may then request 
permission  to  slaughter  the  animal.  Coordination  for  veterinary  support  should  be  addressed  to  the 
supporting medical C2 unit. 
P
ERSONAL 
H
YGIENE AND 
F
IELD 
S
ANITATION
I-63. Preventive medicine personnel also provide training in personal hygiene practices, field hygiene, and 
sanitation to detainees. Standards for personal hygiene and sanitation practices should be posted in detainee 
areas in a language that they understand. 
12 February 2010 
FM 3-39.40 
J-1 
Appendix J 
Facility Designs and Sustainment Considerations 
Although  non-I/R-specific  military  police  units  initially  handle  I/R  populations, 
modular military I/R battalions with task-organized guard companies, MWD teams, 
and other necessary support are equipped and trained to handle detainee operations 
for the long term. The I/R battalion headquarters is specifically designed to C2 the 
support,  safeguarding,  and  accounting  of  compliant  detainees,  noncompliant 
detainees,  DCs,  or  U.S.  military  prisoners.  The  higher  headquarters  for  an  I/R 
battalion is typically military police brigade, but may also be an MEB. 
DESIGNS 
J-1.  As the DOD executive agent, the OPMG has responsibility for detainees. This responsibility is then 
delegated to the combatant commander of the affected area. The combatant commander responsible for I/R 
operations provides engineer and logistical support for the facility commander to establish and maintain 
detainee internment facilities. Planning, coordinating, and establishing I/R facilities must begin during the 
build-up phase of an operation. This will ensure that the facility is ready to receive I/R populations at the 
start of the operation. I/R  facility construction must be included in the planning phase of the operation. 
Whether the I/R facility is built by engineers or contractors, military police leaders and their staffs must be 
part  of  the  planning  process.  There  are  three  different  facility  designs.  Each  facility  must  enable  the 
appropriate  segregation,  accountability,  security,  and  support  of  its  respective  I/R  populations.  An  I/R 
facility normally consists of 1 to 8 compounds capable of interning 500 people each and is generally of a 
semipermanent nature. Examples below depict the minimum-security requirements. An excellent document 
that addresses the planning considerations for all base camp developments, to include I/R facilities, is EP 
1105-3-1, produced by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. 
FACILITIES 
J-2.  There are three basic focused types of I/R facilities: detainee internment, DC resettlement, and U.S. 
military prisoner internment. Each facility starts with a modified version (an administrative area and one 
compound) that has a limited, 25 percent capability for start-up operations and is then typically expanded in 
increments of 25 percent until it reaches the full facility design with maximum capacity. I/R facilities have 
a maximum-security area with individual cells to provide individual detention. Based on the situation, some 
internment facilities will have individual detention cells only. 
J-3.  Maximum-security cell blocks consist of portable cells that are stored on pallets and come ready to 
assemble. Maximum-security cells can be assembled as stand-alone cells or hooked together to form a cell 
block. They can be assembled in a tent or hard structure. Military police can assemble the cell blocks with 
minimal engineer support to run the plumbing and electrical systems. 
J-4.  Lessons learned  have  resulted  in  design  modifications  to  the  internment  facility.  (See  figure J-1, 
page J-2.)  The  facility  is  designed  to  be  expandable  in  1,000-person  increments.  The  initial  facility  is 
constructed with the administrative area and one 1,000-person enclosure and then expanded by adding (a 
maximum of 3) additional 1,000-person enclosures. Each 1,000-person enclosure must be self-contained, 
with electric and water capabilities, and available for occupation immediately upon completion. 
D
ETAINEE 
I
NTERNMENT 
F
ACILITY
J-5.  Figure  J-1  shows  a  TIF  comprised  of  four  1,000-person  enclosures,  each  with  two  500-person 
compounds.  Each  500-person  compound  is  further  divided  into  four  125-person  compounds.  This 
configuration  allows  each  compound  to  be  isolated  and  approached  from  all  sides.  Compounds  are 
Appendix 
J-2 
separa
stando
compo
disturb
Legen
admin 
ops 
QRF 
refr 
temp 
D
ISLOCA
J-6. 
1,000-
initial 
expand
capaci
into tw
Each 
availab
ated  by  an  app
off distance fro
ounds  and  fo
bances.  
nd
d
adm
ope
qui
ref
tem
Figu
ATED
D
-C
IVILI
The  resettlem
-person enclos
s
facility  is  co
ded,  as  neede
ity is reached. 
wo  500-person
n
1,000-person 
ble for occupat
propriate  distan
om other comp
p
 reaction  for
ministration 
erations 
ick-reaction for
r
rigeration 
mporary
y
ure J-1. 4,000
0
IAN 
R
ESETT
ment  facility  f
f
ures. The faci
onstructed  wit
ed,  by  adding 
Figure J-2 de
n compounds. 
enclosure  mus
tion immediate
FM 3-
nce  to  provide
pounds. The di
rces  to  emplo
lo
rce 
0-capacity I/R
R
LEMENT 
F
A
for  DCs  is  d
d
lity is designe
th  the  admini
i
additional  1,0
epicts a resettle
e
The compoun
st  be  self-cont
ely upon comp
-39.40
e  an  avenue o
istance allows 
oy  riot  contro
o
R facility for 
ACILITY
Y
designed  with 
ed to be expan
n
strative  area 
000-person  en
ement facility 
nd  is further  d
tained,  with el
l
letion.  
f  approach  to 
enough space 
ol  formations 
compliant d
an  administr
ndable in capac
c
and  one  1,00
nclosures  until 
with eight 1,0
ivided into tw
lectric  and  wa
12
each,  while  p
for security to
and  NLWs 
etainees 
rative  area  an
city increment
t
0-person  encl
l
the  maximum
000-person enc
wo 250-person 
ater  capabilitie
2 February 201
providing a saf
o patrol betwee
e
in  response  t
nd  up  to  eigh
ts of 1,000. Th
h
osure  and  the
 8,000  perso
o
closures divide
e
subcompound
es,  and  must b
10 
fe 
en 
to 
ht 
he 
en 
on 
ed 
ds. 
be 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested