c# show a pdf file : How to move pages in pdf SDK control API wpf azure html sharepoint Vonnegut_-_Cat_s_Cradle5-part815

Frank stepped ashore, dry shod, and asked where he was. The 
essay didn't say so, but the son of a bitch had a piece of _ice-
nine_ with him--in a thermos jug. 
Frank, having no passport, was put in jail in the capital 
city of Bolivar. He was visited there by "Papa" Monzano, who 
wanted to know if it were possible that Frank was a blood relative 
of the immortal Dr. Felix Hoenikker. 
"I admitted I was," said Frank in the essay. "Since that 
moment, every door to opportunity in San Lorenzo has been opened 
wide to me." 
House of Hope and Mercy 40 
As it happened--"As it was _supposed_ to happen," Bokonon 
would say--I was assigned by a magazine to do a story in San 
Lorenzo. The story wasn't to be about "Papa" Monzano or Frank. It 
was to be about Julian Castle, an American sugar millionaire who 
had, at the age of forty, followed the example of Dr. Albert 
Schweitzer by founding a free hospital in a jungle, by devoting 
his life to miserable folk of another race. 
Castle's hospital was called the House of Hope and Mercy in 
the Jungle. Its jungle was on San Lorenzo, among the wild coffee 
trees on the northern slope of Mount McCabe. 
When I flew to San Lorenzo, Julian Castle was sixty years 
old.  
He had been absolutely unselfish for twenty years. 
In his selfish days he had been as familiar to tabloid 
readers as Tommy Manville, Adolf Hitler, Benito Mussolini, and 
Barbara Hutton. His fame had rested on lechery, alcoholism, 
reckless driving, and draft evasion. He had had a dazzling talent 
for spending millions without increasing mankind's stores of 
anything but chagrin.  
He had been married five times, had produced one son. The one 
son, Philip Castle, was the manager and owner of the hotel at 
which I planned to stay. The hotel was called the Casa Mona and 
was named after Mona Aamons Monzano, the blonde Negro on the cover 
of the supplement to the New York _Sunday Times_. The Casa Mona 
How to move pages in pdf - re-order PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Customizing Page Order of PDF Document in C# Project
pdf rearrange pages online; move pages in pdf acrobat
How to move pages in pdf - VB.NET PDF Page Move Library: re-order PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Sort PDF Document Pages Using VB.NET Demo Code
change pdf page order preview; rearrange pages in pdf online
was brand new; it was one of the three new buildings in the 
background of the supplement's portrait of Mona. 
While I didn't feel that purposeful seas were wafting me to 
San Lorenzo, I did feel that love was doing the job. The Fata 
Morgana, the mirage of what it would be like to be loved by Mona 
Aamons Monzano, had become a tremendous force in my meaningless 
life. I imagined that she could make me far happier than any woman 
had so far succeeded in doing. 
A Karass Built for Two 41 
The seating on the airplane, bound ultimately for San Lorenzo 
from Miami, was three and three. As it happened-- "As it was 
_supposed_ to happen"--my seatmates were Horlick Minton, the new 
American Ambassador to the Republic of San Lorenzo, and his wife, 
Claire. They were whitehaired, gentle, and frail. 
Minton told me that he was a career diplomat, holding the 
rank of Ambassador for the first time. He and his wife had so far 
served, he told me, in Bolivia, Chile, Japan, France, Yugoslavia, 
Egypt, the Union of South Africa, Liberia, and Pakistan. 
They were lovebirds. They entertained each other endlessly 
with little gifts: sights worth seeing out the plane window, 
amusing or instructive bits from things they read, random 
recollections of times gone by. They were, I think, a flawless 
example of what Bokonon calls a _duprass_, which is a _karass_ 
composed of only two persons. 
"A true _duprass_," Bokonon tells us, "can't be invaded, not 
even by children born of such a union." 
I exclude the Mintons, therefore, from my own _karass_, from 
Frank's _karass_, from Newt's _karass_, from Asa Breed's _karass_, 
from Angela's _karass_, from Lyman Enders Knowles's _karass_, from 
Sherman Krebbs's _karass_. The Mintons' _karass_ was a tidy one, 
composed of only two. 
"I should think you'd be very pleased," I said to Minton. 
"What should I be pleased about?" 
"Pleased to have the rank of Ambassador." 
From the pitying way Minton and his wife looked at each 
other, I gathered that I had said a fat-headed thing. But they 
C# TIFF: How to Reorder, Rearrange & Sort TIFF Pages Using C# Code
Using this C#.NET Tiff image management library, you can easily change and move the position of any two or more Tiff file pages or make a totally new order for
how to reorder pages in pdf reader; how to rearrange pdf pages in preview
C# Word - Sort Word Pages Order in C#.NET
page reorganizing library control, developers can swap or adjust the order of all or several Word document pages, or just C# DLLs: Move Word Page Position.
rearrange pages in pdf file; how to rearrange pages in a pdf document
humored me. "Yes," winced Minton, "I'm very pleased." He smiled 
wanly. "I'm _deeply_ honored." 
And so it went with almost every subject I brought up. I 
couldn't make the Mintons bubble about anything. 
For instance: "I suppose you can speak a lot of languages," I 
said. 
"Oh, six or seven--between us," said Minton" 
"That must be very gratifying." 
"What must?" 
"Being able to speak to people of so many different 
nationalities." 
"Very gratifying," said Minton emptily. 
"Very gratifying," said his wife. 
And they went back to reading a fat, typewritten manuscript 
that was spread across the chair arm between them. 
"Tell me," I said a little later, "in all your wide travels, 
have you found people everywhere about the same at heart?" 
"Hm?" asked Minton. 
"Do you find people to be about the same at heart, wherever 
you go?" 
He looked at his wife, making sure she had heard the 
question, then turned back to me. "About the same, wherever you 
go," he agreed. 
"Um," I said. 
Bokonon tells us, incidentally, that members of a _duprass_ 
always die within a week of each other. When it came time for the 
Mintons to die, they did it within the same second. 
Bicycles for Afghanistan 42 
There was a small saloon in the rear of the plane and I 
repaired there for a drink. It was there that I met another fellow 
American, H. Lowe Crosby of Evanston, Illinois, and his wife, 
Hazel. 
They were heavy people, in their fifties. They spoke 
twangingly. Crosby told me that he owned a bicycle factory in 
Chicago, that he had had nothing but ingratitude from his 
C# PowerPoint - Sort PowerPoint Pages Order in C#.NET
library control, developers can swap or adjust the order of all or several PowerPoint document pages, or just change the C# DLLs: Move PowerPoint Page Position.
reorder pages in pdf; reorder pages pdf file
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
RasterEdge XDoc.PDF allows you to easily move PDF document pages position, including sorting pages and swapping two pages. Copying and Pasting Pages.
how to move pages in a pdf file; how to rearrange pages in a pdf reader
employees. He was going to move his business to grateful San 
Lorenzo. 
"You know San Lorenzo well?" I asked. 
"This'll be the first time I've ever seen it, but everything 
I've heard about it I like," said H. Lowe Crosby. "They've got 
discipline, They've got something you can count on from one year 
to the next. They don't have the government encouraging everybody 
to be some kind of original pissant nobody every heard of before." 
"Sir?" 
"Christ, back in Chicago, we don't make bicycles any more. 
It's all human relations now. The eggheads sit around trying to 
figure out new ways for everybody to be happy. Nobody can get 
fired, no matter what; and if somebody does accidentally make a 
bicycle, the union accuses us of cruel and inhuman practices and 
the government confiscates the bicycle for back taxes and gives it 
to a blind man in Afghanistan." 
"And you think things will be better in San Lorenzo?" 
"I know damn well they will be. The people down there are 
poor enough and scared enough and ignorant enough to have some 
common sense!" 
Crosby asked me what my name was and what my business was. I 
told him, and his wife Hazel recognized my name as an Indiana 
name. She was from Indiana, too. 
"My God," she said, "are you a _Hoosier?_" 
I admitted I was. 
"I'm a Hoosier, too," she crowed. "Nobody has to be ashamed 
of being a Hoosier." 
"I'm not," I said. "I never knew anybody who was." 
"Hoosiers do all right. Lowe and I've been around the world 
twice, and everywhere we went we found Hoosiers in charge of 
everything." 
"That's reassuring." 
"You know the manager of that new hotel in Istanbul?" 
"No." 
"He's a Hoosier. And the military-whatever-he-is in Tokyo . . 
." 
"Attaché," said her husband. 
"He's a Hoosier," said Hazel. "And the new Ambassador to 
Yugoslavia . . ." 
"A Hoosier?" I asked. 
"Not only him, but the Hollywood Editor of _Life_ magazine, 
too. And that man in Chile . . ." 
"A Hoosier, too?" 
"You can't go anywhere a _Hoosier_ hasn't made his mark," she 
said. 
"The man who wrote _Ben Hur_ was a Hoosier." 
"And James Whitcomb Riley." 
C# PDF insert text Library: insert text into PDF content in C#.net
int pageIndex = 0; // Move cursor to (400F, 100F). String outputFilePath = Program.RootPath + "\\" output.pdf"; doc.Save(outputFilePath);
pdf change page order; how to move pages in pdf
VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb
Dim pageIndex As Integer = 0 ' Move cursor to (400F, 100F). Dim outputFilePath As String = Program.RootPath + "\\" output.pdf" doc.Save(outputFilePath).
pdf reorder pages; move pdf pages online
"Are you from Indiana, too?" I asked her husband. 
"Nope. I'm a Prairie Stater. 'Land of Lincoln,' as they say." 
"As far as that goes," said Hazel triumphantly, "Lincoln was 
a Hoosier, too. He grew up in Spencer County." 
"Sure," I said. 
"I don't know what it is about Hoosiers," said Hazel, "but 
they've sure got something. If somebody was to make a list, they'd 
be amazed." 
"That's true," I said. 
She grasped me firmly by the arm. "We Hoosiers got to stick 
together." 
"Right." 
"You call me 'Mom.'" 
"What?" 
"Whenever I meet a young Hoosier, I tell them, 'You call me 
_Mom_.'" 
"Uh huh." 
"Let me hear you say it," she urged. 
"Mom?" 
She smiled and let go of my arm. Some piece of clockwork had 
completed its cycle. My calling Hazel "Mom" had shut it off, and 
now Hazel was rewinding it for the next Hoosier to come along. 
Hazel's obsession with Hoosiers around the world was a 
textbook example of a false _karass_, of a seeming team that was 
meaningless in terms of the ways God gets things done, a textbook 
example of what Bokonon calls a _granfalloon_. Other examples of 
_granfalloons_ are the Communist party, the Daughters of the 
American Revolution, the General Electric Company, the 
International Order of Odd Fellows--and any nation, anytime, 
anywhere. 
As Bokonon invites us to sing along with him: 
If you wish to study a _granfalloon_, 
Just remove the skin of a toy balloon. 
The Demonstrator 43 
C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
Get image information, such as its location, zonal information, metadata, and so on. Able to edit, add, delete, move, and output PDF document image.
how to reorder pages in a pdf document; reorder pages in pdf online
VB.NET PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file
Rapidly and multiple PDF document (pages) creation and edit methods file formats; merge, append, and split PDF files; insert, delete, move, rotate, copy
how to rearrange pages in pdf document; moving pages in pdf
H. Lowe Crosby was of the opinion that dictatorships were 
often very good things. He wasn't a terrible person and he wasn't 
a fool. It suited him to confront the world with a certain barn-
yard clownishness, but many of the things he had to say about 
undisciplined mankind were not only funny but true. 
The major point at which his reason and his sense of humor 
left him was when he approached the question of what people were 
really supposed to do with their time on Earth. 
He believed firmly that they were meant to build bicycles for 
him.  
"I hope San Lorenzo is every bit as good as you've heard it 
is," I said. 
"I only have to talk to one man to find out if it is or not," 
he said. "When 'Papa' Monzano gives his word of honor about 
anything on that little island, that's it. That's how it is; 
that's how it'll be." 
"The thing I like," said Hazel, "is they all speak English 
and they're all Christians. That makes things so much easier." 
"You know how they deal with crime down there?" Crosby asked 
me. 
"Nope." 
"They just don't have any crime down there. 'Papa' Monzano's 
made crime so damn unattractive, nobody even thinks about it 
without getting sick. I heard you can lay a billfold in the middle 
of a sidewalk and you can come back a week later and it'll be 
right there, with everything still in it." 
"Um." 
"You know what the punishment is for stealing something?" 
"Nope." 
"The hook," he said. "No fines, no probation, no thirty days 
in jail. It's the hook. The hook for stealing, for murder, for 
arson, for treason, for rape, for being a peeping Tom. Break a 
law--any damn law at all--and it's the hook. Everybody can 
understand that, and San Lorenzo is the best-behaved country in 
the world." 
"What is the hook?" 
"They put up a gallows, see? Two posts and a cross beam. And 
then they take a great big kind of iron fishhook and they hang it 
down from the cross beam. Then they take somebody who's dumb 
enough to break the law, and they put the point of the hook in 
through one side of his belly and out the other and they let him 
go--and there he hangs, by God, one damn sorry law-breaker." 
"Good God!" 
"I don't say it's good," said Crosby, "but I don't say it's 
bad either. I sometimes wonder if something like that wouldn't 
clear up juvenile delinquency. Maybe the hook's a little extreme 
for a democracy. Public hanging's more like it. String up a few 
teen-age car thieves on lampposts in front of their houses with 
signs around their necks saying, 'Mama, here's your boy.' Do that 
a few times and I think ignition locks would go the way of the 
rumble seat and the running board." 
"We saw that thing in the basement of the waxworks in 
London," said Hazel. 
"What thing?" I asked her. 
"The hook. Down in the Chamber of Horrors in the basement; 
they had a wax person hanging from the hook. It looked so real I 
wanted to throw up." 
"Harry Truman didn't look anything like Harry Truman," said 
Crosby. 
"Pardon me?" 
"In the waxworks," said Crosby. "The statue of Truman didn't 
really look like him." 
"Most of them did, though," said Hazel. 
"Was it anybody in particular hanging from the hook?" I asked 
her. 
"I don't think so. It was just somebody." 
"Just a demonstrator?" I asked. 
"Yeah. There was a black velvet curtain in front of it and 
you had to pull the curtain back to see. And there was a note 
pinned to the curtain that said children weren't supposed to 
look." 
"But kids did," said Crosby. "There were kids down there, and 
they all looked." 
"A sign like that is just catnip to kids," said Hazel. 
"How did the kids react when they saw the person on the 
hook?" I asked. 
"Oh," said Hazel, "they reacted just about the way the 
grownups did. They just looked at it and didn't say anything, just 
moved on to see what the next thing was." 
"What was the next thing?" 
"It was an iron chair a man had been roasted alive in," said 
Crosby. "He was roasted for murdering his son." 
"Only, after they roasted him," Hazel recalled blandly, "they 
found out he hadn't murdered his son after all." 
Communist Sympathizers 44 
When I again took my seat beside the _duprass_ of Claire and 
Horlick Minton, I had some new information about them. I got it 
from the Crosbys. 
The Crosbys didn't know Minton, but they knew his reputation. 
They were indignant about his appointment as Ambassador. They told 
me that Minton had once been fired by the State Department for his 
softness toward communism, and the Communist dupes or worse had 
had him reinstated. 
"Very pleasant little saloon back there," I said to Minton  
as I sat down. 
"Hm?" He and his wife were still reading the manuscript that 
lay between them. 
"Nice bar back there." 
"Good. I'm glad." 
The two read on, apparently uninterested in talking to me. 
And then Minton turned to me suddenly, with a bittersweet smile, 
and he demanded, "Who was he, anyway?" 
"Who was who?" 
"The man you were talking to in the bar. We went back there 
for a drink, and, when we were just outside, we heard you and a 
man talking. The man was talking very loudly. He said I was a 
Communist sympathizer." 
"A bicycle manufacturer named H. Lowe Crosby," I said. I felt 
myself reddening. 
"I was fired for pessimism. Communism had nothing to do with 
it." 
"I got him fired," said his wife. "The only piece of real 
evidence produced against him was a letter I wrote to the New York 
_Times_ from Pakistan." 
"What did it say?" 
"It said a lot of things," she said, "because I was very 
upset about how Americans couldn't imagine what it was like to be 
something else, to be something else and proud of it." 
"I see." 
"But there was one sentence they kept coming to again and 
again in the loyalty hearing," sighed Minton. "'Americans,'" he 
said, quoting his wife's letter to the _Times_, "'are forever 
searching for love in forms it never takes, in places it can never 
be. It must have something to do with the vanished frontier.'" 
Why Americans Are Hated 45 
Claire Minton's letter to the _Times_ was published during 
the worst of the era of Senator McCarthy, and her husband was 
fired twelve hours after the letter was printed. 
"What was so awful about the letter?" I asked. 
"The highest possible form of treason," said Minton, "is to 
say that Americans aren't loved wherever they go, whatever they 
do. Claire tried to make the point that American foreign policy 
should recognize hate rather than imagine love." 
"I guess Americans _are_ hated a lot of places." 
"_People_ are hated a lot of places. Claire pointed out in 
her letter that Americans, in being hated, were simply paying the 
normal penalty for being people, and that they were foolish to 
think they should somehow be exempted from that penalty. But the 
loyalty board didn't pay any attention to that. All they knew was 
that Claire and I both felt that Americans were unloved." 
"Well, I'm glad the story had a happy ending." 
"Hm?" said Minton. 
"It finally came out all right," I said. "Here you are on 
your way to an embassy all your own." 
Minton and his wife exchanged another of those pitying 
_duprass_ glances. Then Minton said to me, "Yes. The pot of gold 
at the end of the rainbow is ours." 
The Bokononist Method for Handling Caesar 46 
I talked to the Mintons about the legal status of Franklin 
Hoenikker, who was, after all, not only a big shot in "Papa" 
Monzano's government, but a fugitive from United States justice. 
"That's all been written off," said Minton. "He isn't a 
United States citizen any more, and he seems to be doing good 
things where he is, so that's that." 
"He gave up his citizenship?" 
"Anybody who declares allegiance to a foreign state or serves 
in its armed forces or accepts employment in its government loses 
his citizenship. Read your passport. You can't lead the sort of 
funny-paper international romance that Frank has led and still 
have Uncle Sam for a mother chicken." 
"Is he well liked in San Lorenzo?" 
Minton weighed in his hands the manuscript he and his wife 
had been reading. "I don't know yet. This book says not." 
"What book is that?" 
"It's the only scholarly book ever written about San 
Lorenzo." 
"_Sort_ of scholarly," said Claire. 
"Sort of scholarly," echoed Minton. "It hasn't been published 
yet. This is one of five copies." He handed it to me, inviting me 
to read as much as I liked. 
I opened the book to its title page and found that the name 
of the book was _San Lorenzo: The Land, the History, the People_. 
The author was Philip Castle, the son of Julian Castle, the hotel-
keeping son of the great altruist I was on my way to see. 
I let the book fall open where it would. As it happened, it 
fell open to the chapter about the island's outlawed holy man, 
Bokonon. 
There was a quotation from _The Books of Bokonon_ on the page 
before me. Those words leapt from the page and into my mind, and 
they were welcomed there. 
The words were a paraphrase of the suggestion by Jesus: 
"Render therefore unto Caesar the things which are Caesar's." 
Bokonon's paraphrase was this: 
"Pay no attention to Caesar. Caesar doesn't have the 
slightest idea what's _really_ going on." 
Dynamic Tension 47 
I became so absorbed in Philip Castle's book that I didn't 
even look up from it when we put down for ten minutes in San Juan, 
Puerto Rico. I didn't even look up when somebody behind me 
whispered, thrilled, that a midget had come aboard. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested