c# show a pdf file : Reorder pdf pages reader SDK control service wpf azure .net dnn USArmy-InternmentResettlement3-part85

12 February 2010 
FM 3-39.40 
2-1 
Chapter 2 
Internment and Resettlement in Support of the Spectrum 
of Operations 
I/R operations  are of  significant importance at all  levels of  war and  across the 
spectrum of conflict. They are typically tactical operations that may have strategic 
impact. Soldiers conducting I/R operations must be professional and compassionate. 
The failure to maintain professional and humane behavior will have far-reaching 
impacts. Although military police units (to include military police platoons within a 
BCT)  are typically  the  first military police  elements performing  I/R operations, 
modular  I/R  battalions  with  assigned  I/R  detachments,  I/R  companies,  guard 
companies, and supporting military working dog (MWD) teams are equipped and 
trained to handle long-term I/R operations. 
Note. While many Soldiers come in contact with detainees, only those trained and 
certified  to  handle  detainees  (according  to  Army  policies)  should  be  placed  in 
positions where detainees are in their custodial care. 
2-1.  The I/R function includes missions involving the movement and protection of DCs and operations to 
secure and protect detainees from the POC through the TIF or SIF. These operations may be within a 
contiguous or noncontiguous AO. In either framework, military police take control of detainees, typically at 
the DCP and expedite movement from the POC through the DHA to the TIF or SIF to ensure the freedom 
of maneuver for maneuver units and the safe and humane treatment of detainees under U.S. control. During 
combat operations involving DCs, military police control movement to avoid the disruption of combat 
forces and to protect DCs from avoidable hazards. In all environments involving DCs, military police may 
be required to support the movement of personnel and temporary resettlement facilities to ensure the safety 
and security of persons displaced due to natural or man-made disasters or conditions. Additionally, I/R 
units may be conducting day-to-day custody and control operations simultaneously for the confinement of 
U.S. military prisoners at permanent sites around the world and tactical I/R operations in support of a DHA, 
TIF, or SIF. 
SUPPORT TO COMBAT OPERATIONS 
2-2.  The Army is the DOD executive agent for detainee operations. Additionally, the Army is the DOD 
executive agent for the long-term confinement of U.S. military prisoners. Within the Army and through the 
geographic combatant commander, military police units are tasked with coordinating shelter, protection, 
accountability, and sustainment for detainees; that role is primarily being performed by I/R units, but is 
supported by other military police units as necessary. 
2-3.  The I/R function serves a significant humane and tactical importance. In any conflict involving U.S. 
forces, the safe and humane treatment of detainees is required by international laws. Military actions across 
the spectrum of operations will likely result in detainees. In major combat operations, entire units of enemy 
forces, separated and disorganized by the shock of intensive combat, may be captured. The magnitude of 
such numbers places a tremendous burden on operational forces as they divert tactical units to handle these 
detainees. Similarly, large numbers of CIs may also be interned during long-term stability operations, and 
DCs may place an additional load on the operational commander. Military police units performing the I/R 
function can preserve the capturing combat effectiveness of the unit by removing these detainees or DCs as 
rapidly and safely as possible in conjunction with initial interrogation requirements and other operational 
considerations. Military police units support the force by relieving tactical commanders of the requirement 
Reorder pdf pages reader - re-order PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Customizing Page Order of PDF Document in C# Project
change page order in pdf reader; reorder pdf pages
Reorder pdf pages reader - VB.NET PDF Page Move Library: re-order PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Sort PDF Document Pages Using VB.NET Demo Code
pdf change page order online; reordering pages in pdf document
Chapter 2 
2-2 
FM 3-39.40 
12 February 2010 
to divert large numbers of combat forces to handle detainees and removing DCs from routes and locations 
that  would  have  an adverse  effect  on  operations.  Military police  units  perform the  I/R functions  of 
collecting, evacuating, and securing detainees and DCs throughout the AO. In this process, military police 
and military intelligence (MI) units coordinate closely. It is essential that military police and MI Soldiers 
have a high level of situational awareness and share information with each other. 
2-4.  The organic military police platoon in the BCT is ideally positioned to take control of detainees from 
the combat force in the BCT AO. Although the BCT military police platoon initially handles detainees, 
modular  I/R battalions with assigned  guard companies and supporting MWD teams are equipped and 
trained  to  handle  this  mission  for the  long  term.  An I/R  battalion is  typically organized  to  support, 
safeguard, account for, guard, and provide humane treatment for up to 4,000 EPWs/CIs, 8,000 DCs, or 
1,500 U.S. military prisoners; however, certain missions may require additional resources and manning (for 
example, long-term counterinsurgency internment). 
2-5.  The  commander,  detainee  operations  (CDO),  is  typically  responsible  for  detention  facility  and 
interrogation operations in the joint operations area. The CDO should have detainee operations experience 
and will normally be the senior military police commander. If the size and scope of the detainee operation 
warrants, the joint force commander may consider designating a general or flag officer as the CDO. (See  
JP 3-63.) In major combat operations, during deployment a military police commander may serve as the 
CDO for a theater operation. 
2-6.  When a  corps  or  division  serves  as  the  higher headquarters  without  an  AO,  a military  police 
command may not be required. When this occurs, a military police brigade may be deployed to provide C2 
for detainee operations and its commander designated as the CDO. 
2-7.  I/R  operations  require  robust  and  focused  sustainment  support.  The  presence  of  hundreds  or 
thousands of detainees  or refugees may challenge sustainment operations to meet the requirements to 
house, feed, clothe, and protect those individuals. While the sustainment of refugee populations is primarily 
a HN responsibility, U.S. forces must plan for, and be prepared to conduct the long-term sustainment of 
refugee populations, especially if the security environment is unstable, until these responsibilities can be 
transferred to HN organizations or the UN with support from nongovernmental organizations such as the 
Red Cross.  (A  broader  discussion of  I/R  sustainment requirements  and  considerations  is  included  in 
appendix J.) 
D
ETAINEE 
H
ANDLING
2-8.  Military  police units  are typically  tasked with  collecting  detainees  from combat units  at  DCPs 
positioned as far forward as possible. The BCT military police platoon or military police units assigned to a 
BCT typically operate collection points or holding areas to temporarily secure detainees until they can be 
evacuated to the next higher echelon’s holding area. This is most critical during major combat operations, 
when combat units can be seriously degraded by the buildup of large numbers of detainees in the forward 
combat areas. During stability operations, military police unit missions may be prioritized such that the 
capability of limited military police assets to take control of detainees at detainee collection points limited. 
In these cases, non-military police units may operate collection points under the supervision of the echelon 
provost  marshal  (PM).  Guard  companies assigned  to  the  military  police  brigade  or  the  I/R battalion 
evacuate detainees from division or corps DHAs to theater internment facilities. Some detainees will be 
evacuated  from  the  theater  to  Army  level  internment  facilities.  Military  police  units  conducting  I/R 
operations  safeguard  and  maintain  accountability  and  protect  and  provide  humane  treatment  for  all 
personnel under their care. 
2-9.  In a mature theater, I/R units provide C2 administration and logistical services for assigned personnel 
and prisoner population, or provide custody and control  for the operation  of a U.S. military prisoner 
confinement facility  or  a high-risk detainee  internment  facility.  Guard  companies  provide guards  for 
detainees or U.S. military prisoners, installations, and facilities. 
C# TIFF: How to Reorder, Rearrange & Sort TIFF Pages Using C# Code
Reorder, Rearrange and Sort TIFF Document Pages in C#.NET Application. C# TIFF Page Sorting Overview. Reorder TIFF Pages in C#.NET Application.
pdf move pages; how to rearrange pdf pages in preview
C# PDF: C# Code to Process PDF Document Page Using C#.NET PDF
just following attached links. C# PDF: Add, Delete, Reorder PDF Pages Using C#.NET, C# PDF: Merge or Split PDF Files Using C#.NET.
pdf change page order acrobat; reorder pages of pdf
Internment and Resettlement In Support of the Spectrum of Operations 
12 February 2010 
FM 3-39.40 
2-3 
D
ISPLACED 
C
IVILIAN 
H
ANDLING
2-10. Military police units may be required to support the collection and control of DCs. In offensive, 
defensive, and stability operations many of the fundamentals are similar to that of handling detainees, but 
the focus is typically different. The handling of DCs is also a mission that may be performed in support of 
disaster  relief  or  other  emergencies  within  the  United  States  or  U.S.  territories  during  civil  support 
operations. As such, local, state and federal agencies are primarily responsible for handling DCs with the 
U.S. military in a support role. When a state of emergency is declared, the state’s national guard may be 
called to assist with DCs under the control of the state governor or they may be federalized and conduct 
operations as federal U.S. military forces. (See Titles 10 and 32, U.S. Code [USC].) 
2-11. Military police units performing this mission will likely have a smaller percentage of I/R units, but 
the expertise of I/R trained personnel will still be critical to mission success. Meeting the personal needs of 
DCs will typically require extensive sustainment support. The basic  sustainment requirements,  unique 
needs of DCs impacted by mission variables, and the sheer numbers of DCs may initially overwhelm relief 
units and organizations. Military police forces may be critical enablers in providing essential services until 
the HN government or other agencies can do so. The effort is typically conducted in conjunction with 
civilian agencies and in addition to other military police support to U.S. forces. (See chapter 10 for more 
information on handling DCs.) 
SUPPORT TO STABILITY OPERATIONS 
2-12. Stability  operations  are  designed  to  establish  a  safe  and  secure  environment  and  to  facilitate 
reconciliation among local or regional adversaries. Stability operations can also establish political, legal, 
social, and economic institutions and support the transition to legitimate local government. It is essential 
that stability operations maintain the initiative by pursuing objectives that resolve the causes of instability. 
The  combination  of  tasks  conducted  during  stability  operations  depends  on  the  situation.  Stability 
operations consist of five primary tasks— 
Maintain civil security. 
Maintain civil control. 
Restore essential services. 
Provide support to governance.  
Provide support to economic and infrastructure development. 
2-13. The  primary tasks are discussed in detail in FM 3-07. Various stability operations may require 
focused internment operations, resettlement operations, or both; but one or the other will typically be 
predominant. 
2-14. I/R operations in support of stability operations may become enduring and assume many of the 
characteristics  of  large-scale,  maximum  security  prison  operations  that  are  typically  found  in  the 
international  civilian  sector.  Long-term  custody  and  control  requirements  are  often  augmented  with 
structured rehabilitative and reconciliation programs, increased access to medical treatment, and visitation 
opportunities  concluding with some form of guarantor or sponsor-based release or supervised  system. 
These operations are resource-intensive and should receive a priority commensurate with their strategic 
significance. 
2-15. I/R operations, especially within the context of long-term stability operations, require a robust and 
focused sustainment effort to provide security and order while meeting basic health and sanitary needs. Too 
often, the scope of the detention or resettlement facility sustainment effort is not realized until health or 
security requirements overwhelm the logistical system. The maintenance and development of large-scale 
facilities is a continuous sustainment effort and often involves contractors, HN personnel, or third country 
nationals. The synchronization of sustainment, security, and operational requirements and efforts necessary 
to operate a detention or resettlement facility are complex tasks that require sufficient authority to achieve 
the unity of effort and security. 
2-16. The military police I/R support to stability operations is central to transitioning the strategic risk of 
interning large numbers of combatants and civilian detainees to a strategic advantage gained from the 
VB.NET PowerPoint: Sort and Reorder PowerPoint Slides by Using VB.
Sort and Reorder PowerPoint Slides Range with VB amount of robust PPT slides/pages editing methods powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
how to rearrange pdf pages reader; change pdf page order reader
VB.NET PDF: Create PDF Document Viewer in C#.NET for Document
Support navigating to the previous or next page of the PDF document; Able to insert, delete or reorder PDF document page in VB.NET document viewer;
move pages within pdf; how to move pdf pages around
Chapter 2 
2-4 
FM 3-39.40 
12 February 2010 
reintegration of informed and productive citizens at peace with their community and government. Military 
police may be tasked with detaining, interning, and confining enemy combatants, members of the armed 
forces, or civilians anywhere along the spectrum of conflict. Although military police formations have been 
typically organized and staffed for conducting detainee operations in high-intensity conflict, the reality is 
that military operations at the general war end of the spectrum of conflict are commonly of short duration 
compared to  operations  conducted  at  levels of  violence less than  general war, such  as insurgency or 
unstable peace. 
2-17. An increase in the frequency of stability operations requires more complex and sustainable systems, 
solutions, and facilities in support of I/R operations. Even during major combat operations, enemy forces 
often blend into the civilian population and criminals frequently escape or are released from jails and 
prisons, while government records are removed or destroyed. Criminal, terrorist, and other opportunists 
cross poorly secured borders and take personal or political advantage of the initial chaos that typically 
accompanies general warfare. Major belligerents may or may not join these or other elements (tribes,  
third-country nationals, or factions) to conduct insurgent activities. 
2-18. During stability, the nature of the threat can often inhibit the ability of friendly forces to differentiate 
between a hostile act and hostile intent or between insurgents and innocents within the civilian community. 
For this reason, military  commanders and forces  must  have  the  authority  to  detain civilians and  an 
acceptable framework to confine, intern, and eventually release them back into the OE. This authority has 
the most legitimacy when sanctioned by international mandate or when it is bestowed or conveyed from the 
local or regional governmental power. The initial or baseline authority granted to military forces to use 
force and detain civilians will ultimately determine the status of the persons they detain. The status of 
detainees will further determine the manner in which they are processed, the degree of due process they are 
afforded, and whether their offense is military or criminal in nature. Detainee status and identification will 
also help develop and determine eventual rehabilitative, reconciliatory, and release strategies. 
2-19. During conflict with a conventional force, the segregation of officers, enlisted personnel, civilians, 
and females is required when conducting internment operations and is relatively clear in its application. In 
contrast, due to the unconventional nature of the enemy, stability operations may be more likely to require 
segregation  (or  typology)  by  ethnic,  tribal,  or  religious  affiliation;  human  behaviors,  traits,  and 
characteristics; age groups; and other categories, to include those typically applied in combat operations. 
The facts and circumstances resulting in an apprehension may also determine detainee custody and control 
status.  The  goal  is  to  isolate  insurgents,  criminals,  and extremists  from  moderate  and  circumstantial 
detainees. Inaccurate assessments can have immediate and significant effects within the TIF that can result 
in injury or death to detainees; contribute to insurgent recruitment; or cause custody and control problems 
for the guard force. (See FM 3-07 and FM 3-24 for more information on stability and counterinsurgency 
operations.) 
2-20. The theater of operations must have an effective framework to detain, assess, reconcile, transition, 
and  eventually  release  detainees  in  a  manner  that  is  integrated  with,  and  responsive  to,  the  overall 
counterinsurgency  effort. TIF commanders often support larger coordinated approaches  to deliberately 
shape the information environment and reconciliatory efforts involving detainees. This includes various 
rehabilitation  programs  that  support  the  overall  reconciliatory  efforts.  The  capture,  detention, 
rehabilitation/reconciliation, and repatriation of detainees must be conducted in a manner that is consistent 
with the strategic end state, operational goals, and tactical realities, and also fully in compliant with the rule 
of  law  to  ensure  legitimacy  with  the  population.  Nowhere  is  this  more  evident  than  in  the 
counterinsurgency fight. 
2-21. Counterinsurgency  is  those  military,  paramilitary,  political,  economic,  psychological,  and  civic 
actions taken by a government to defeat insurgency. (JP 1-02) In counterinsurgency, HN forces and their 
partners operate to defeat armed resistance, reduce passive opposition, and establish or reestablish the HN 
government’s legitimacy. Military police units and Soldiers play a key role in counterinsurgency through 
I/R operations. (See FM 3-24.) 
C# PDF Page Rotate Library: rotate PDF page permanently in C#.net
Enable batch changing PDF page orientation without other PDF reader control. PDF page, delete certain PDF page, reorder existing PDF pages and split
rearrange pages in pdf; reorder pdf pages in preview
VB.NET TIFF: Modify TIFF File by Adding, Deleting & Sort TIFF
Users can use it to reorder TIFF pages in ''' &ltsummary> ''' Sort TIFF document pages in designed powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
reorder pages in pdf preview; reorder pages in pdf file
Internment and Resettlement In Support of the Spectrum of Operations 
12 February 2010 
FM 3-39.40 
2-5 
C
OUNTERINSURGENCY 
E
FFECTS ON 
I
NTERNMENT 
O
PERATIONS
2-22. Demanding and complex, counterinsurgency draws heavily on a broad range of capabilities and 
requires a different mix of offensive, defensive, and stability operations from that typically expected in 
major  combat  operations.  The  balance  between  them  depends  on  the  local  situation.  A  successful 
counterinsurgency effort establishes HN institutions that can sustain government legitimacy. 
2-23. The need for information is so crucial in counterinsurgency operations that it typically leads to an 
increased  number  of  detainees.  The  time-sensitive  nature  of  information  and  intelligence  in 
counterinsurgency often leads to detentions based on incomplete or inaccurate information that makes 
determining detainee status and identification difficult and complex. The process of detainee identification 
and assessment is continuous and begins at the POC; is actively monitored during the period of detainee 
internment; and significantly impacts custody, control, and release decisions and strategies. 
2-24. Detainee  operations play  a  significant role  in  counterinsurgency  efforts  because  large  detainee 
populations can become fertile ground for insurgent, extremist, and criminal recruitment, development, and 
growth if they are not processed quickly and effectively. The development and growth of insurgent and/or 
criminal  networks,  if not identified  and  mitigated,  can  pose  significant  threats  to  I/R  cadre  and  the 
detainee/DC population. 
2-25. Detainee  populations  grow  incrementally  as  counterinsurgency  operations  endure,  or  they  can 
increase very rapidly during surge operations, reflecting the episodic nature of counterinsurgency. Captured 
insurgents display a propensity to continue recruitment, assassination, and intimidation inside TIFs, making 
it incumbent upon forces supporting detainee operations to focus their efforts on countering that portion of 
the insurgency within the facility, while synchronizing their efforts with military operations outside the 
detention facility. 
C
OUNTERING 
T
HREATS 
W
ITHIN THE 
F
ACILITY
2-26. Prisons  can  provide  insurgents  with  a  large  pool  of  discontented  persons  that  may  facilitate 
recruitment  efforts by  insurgent, criminal, or other irregular actors. These threats  are not  confined  to 
internment operations;  they are  just as likely  to  propagate  within resettlement  or conventional  prison 
operations. These irregular threat actors may also attempt to infiltrate detention or resettlement facilities to 
intimidate  or  assassinate  political  opponents  or  their  supporters.  The  facility  commander  develops 
procedures designed to identify and defeat insurgent efforts to organize escape, harm the guard force and 
other detainees, or degrade the effectiveness of the facility threat operation in general. These efforts may be 
linked to an overarching counterinsurgency effort in the theater or may be locally initiated efforts to gain 
control  within  the  facility  population.  The  identification  of  a  linkage  to  an  external  effort  may  be 
accomplished through and coordinating and sharing police information with an external multifunctional 
headquarters such as  the military  police  command  or a joint detainee task  force.  The  military police 
command or joint detainee task force coordinates and synchronizes support with MI, civil affairs (CA), 
PSYOP and linguists; medical, legal, HN, and interagency personnel; and local leaders in an effort to defeat 
insurgency within the facility. Procedures or tactics, techniques, and procedures to defeat the internal threat 
networks and efforts within the facility may include— 
Developing  deliberate  procedures  for  detainee  identification,  categorization,  and  continual 
assessment. 
Using multifunctional boards to assess detainees and develop reconciliation plans. 
Identifying and designating dedicated teams with specific skill sets through mission analysis for 
each major compound
.
(The teams are organized to identify and mitigate threats within the 
facility  and  will  likely  include  bilingual  bicultural  advisors;  intelligence  officers; 
counterintelligence agents; and others as required.) 
Allowing detainee participation in their own adjudication and rehabilitation destiny. 
Empowering detainee leaders to leverage their support through incentives. 
Ensuring that the informational needs of detainees are met and that rules and/or disciplinary 
actions are understood. 
VB.NET PDF: VB.NET Guide to Process PDF Document in .NET Project
It can be used to add or delete PDF document page(s), sort the order of PDF pages, add image to PDF document page and extract page(s) from PDF document in VB
how to move pages around in pdf file; how to move pages in pdf files
VB.NET TIFF: VB.NET Sample Code to Process & Manage TIFF Page
certain TIFF page, and sort & reorder TIFF pages in Process TIFF Pages Independently in VB.NET Code. powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
rearrange pdf pages in preview; rearrange pages in pdf document
Chapter 2 
2-6 
FM 3-39.40 
12 February 2010 
Note. Many of the techniques for identifying,  segregating,  and controlling personnel during 
resettlement  operations  can  be  similarly  applied,  although  the  level  of  overall  control  is 
significantly less than in an internment operation. 
R
ELEASE OR 
T
RANSITION
2-27. Generally, the military does not lead the planning and execution of detainee release type programs, 
but may establish and operate TIF reconciliation centers to ensure the continuity of detainee programs 
established in detention centers and reintegration efforts that conclude at the points of release back into 
society. The individual or large-scale release or reintegration of detainees back into the civilian community 
is a significant event that occurs during stability operations and can have a powerful effect in reducing the 
issues that created the counterinsurgency conditions. Reintegration efforts must be widely understood and 
visible. This is generally achieved by a deliberate information and public affairs effort. Former combatants 
may participate in the process when offered some level of due process involvement linked to corrective 
behavior modification. Commanders  must  seek  legal assistance  as they  balance regulatory  operations 
security  and  detainee  privacy entitlements with  the  transparency necessary  for  supporting  democratic 
institutions and national values. Military police may provide the security, custody, and control of detainees 
at TIF reconciliation centers and may actively conduct rehabilitative and reconciliatory programs in a 
command  or  support  relationship  with  the  headquarters  responsible  for  an  AO  containing  a  TIF 
reconciliation center. (See chapter 9 for more information on detainee release or transition.) 
H
OST 
N
ATION 
T
RAINING
2-28. Military  police or corrections personnel may be required to provide training  and advice to HN 
personnel for HN detention and corrections operations. Likewise, MI personnel may be required to provide 
training and advice to HN personnel for proper interrogation procedures. HN personnel should be trained 
on corrections skill level tasks to handle detainees according to internationally recognized standards for the 
care and treatment of prisoners or other detainees. Management procedures should provide for the security 
and fair and efficient processing of those detained. Effective HN internment operations that replace the 
need for U.S. facilities is a necessary goal of HN training. 
R
ESETTLEMENT 
O
PERATIONS
2-29. Resettlement operations may occur across the spectrum of operations. (See chapter 10.) Events under 
the  category  of resettlement operations  include  relief; chemical, biological,  radiological, nuclear,  and 
high-yield explosives (CBRNE); civil laws; and community assistance operations. Military police provide 
support to resettlement operations, which includes establishing and operating facilities and supporting CA 
efforts to ensure that supply routes remain open and clear to the maneuver commander. Additional tasks 
include enforcing curfews, restricting movement, checking travel permits and registration cards, operating 
checkpoints, instituting amnesty programs, and conducting inspections. The level of control is drastically 
different from that used during detainee operations. During resettlement operations, DCs are allowed the 
freedom of movement as long as such movement does not impede operations. 
2-30. DC is a special category associated with resettlement operations. CA personnel perform the basic 
collective  tasks  during  DC  operations.  DC  operations  minimize  civilian  interference  with  military 
operations, protect civilians from combat operations, and are normally performed with minimal military 
resources. Nonmilitary international aid organizations, and other NGOs are the primary resources used to 
assist CA forces. However, CA forces may depend on other military units, such as military police I/R units, 
to assist with a particular category of DCs. 
2-31. Controlling DCs is essential during military operations because uncontrolled masses of people can 
seriously impair the military mission. Commanders plan measures to protect DCs in the AO and to prevent 
their interference with the mission. Military police commanders and staffs must have a clear understanding 
of the OE, ROE, and legal considerations before setting up a resettlement facility. 
Internment and Resettlement In Support of the Spectrum of Operations 
12 February 2010 
FM 3-39.40 
2-7 
2-32. DCs are provided aid, shelter, and protection. The emphasis is on protecting them from hazardous 
environments or hostile actions. A special category of personnel arises when I/R operations require the 
housing of DCs that are detained against their will. Such is the case of mass migrants who flee their 
countries  and  find  themselves  under  U.S.  custody  while  policies  for  formal  proceedings  are  being 
developed. In the case of mass migrants, I/R operations must be sensitive to the situation and attempt to 
strike a balance between security, shelter, protection, and detention procedures. 
2-33. In an OE where hostile groups are engaged against one another, a TIF or SIF may be set up to protect 
one group from another. In this case, the purpose of the TIF or SIF is to shelter, sustain, account for, and 
protect DCs from violence. Designated units concentrate on providing area security to protect the I/R 
facility from direct fire. Other military police or combat forces provide protection beyond the direct-fire 
zone. The accountability for DCs is coordinated with the SJA and CA. Military police focus on maintaining 
a record of the people in the I/R facility and their physical conditions. In a semi-permissive environment, 
the UN mandate or ROE may include the authority to detain civilians that are a threat to a secure and stable 
environment. Military police units may be required to establish CI detention facilities for this purpose. In 
operations where no hostile groups are engaged (such as natural disasters), the I/R facility may be set up to 
provide shelter, food, and water and to account for personnel. There may not be a need for external security 
personnel. 
2-34. The C2 structure of I/R and other military police units for stability or civil support operations is 
based on the mission variables. The nature and complexity of the mission, number and type of detainees 
and/or DCs, and operational duration should be considered. For example, smaller operations may require a 
single I/R battalion while larger operations may require I/R battalions within a military police brigade to 
meet operational requirements. 
Note. Resettlement conducted as a part of civil support operations will always be conducted in 
support  of  another  lead  agency  (Federal  Emergency  Management  Agency,  Department  of 
Homeland Security). 
U.S.
M
ILITARY 
P
RISONERS
2-35. Military police units detain, sustain, protect, and evacuate U.S. military prisoners. When possible, 
Soldiers  awaiting  trial  remain  in  their  units.  Commanders  may  request  a  judge  to  impose  pretrial 
confinement when reasonable grounds exist to believe that the Soldier will not appear at the trial, the 
pretrial hearing, or the investigation or that they will engage in serious criminal misconduct. Under these 
pretrial confinement instances, the commander must also reasonably believe that a less severe form of 
restraint (such as conditions of liberty, restriction in lieu of apprehension, or apprehension) is inadequate. 
When these circumstances exist and other legal requirements are met, U.S. military personnel may be 
placed in pretrial confinement under the direct control of military police. Convicted military prisoners are 
moved as soon as possible to confinement facilities outside the operational area. 
2-36. U.S. military prisoner confinement operations parallel, but are separate from, the other types of I/R 
operations. No member of the U.S. armed forces may be placed in confinement in immediate association 
with a detainee who is not a member of the U.S. armed forces. A temporary confinement facility for U.S. 
military prisoners may be maintained in an operational area only if distance or the lack of transportation to 
a higher facility requires this. When U.S. military prisoners are retained in the theater, temporary field 
detention facilities may be established. (See AR 190-47.) 
R
ESETTLEMENT 
O
PERATIONS 
R
ESULTING FROM 
P
OPULATION AND 
R
ESOURCE 
C
ONTROL 
2-37. Population and resource control denies adversaries or insurgents access to the general population and 
resources and prevents incidental civilian activity from interfering with military operations. Military police 
units support local commanders and often assist CA personnel in planning and conducting population and 
resource control programs employed during all military operations. This assistance may consist of training 
HN police and penal agencies and staffs, conducting law and order operations, enforcing curfews and 
movement  restrictions,  resettling DCs,  conducting  licensing  operations,  controlling  rations,  enforcing 
Chapter 2 
2-8 
FM 3-39.40 
12 February 2010 
regulations, implementing amnesty programs, inspecting facilities, and guarding humanitarian-assistance 
distributions. 
2-38. Military police units also assist, direct, or deny DCs the use of main supply routes as they move to 
resettlement camps where they are cared for and while NGOs often work to coordinate their relocation. 
Military police I/R units are specifically trained to provide care and shelter for DCs. 
SUPPORT TO CIVIL SUPPORT OPERATIONS 
2-39. Civil  support  is  the  DOD  support  to  U.S.  civil  authorities  for  domestic  emergencies,  and  for 
designated law enforcement and other activities. (JP 3-28) Civil support includes operations that address 
the consequences of natural or man-made disasters, accidents, terrorist attacks and incidents in the U.S. and 
its territories. 
2-40. The I/R tasks performed in support of civil support operations are similar to those during combat 
operations, but  the  techniques and procedures are  modified based on the special  OE  associated with 
operating within U.S. territory and according to the categories of individuals (primarily DCs) to be housed 
in I/R facilities. During long-term I/R operations, state and federal agencies will operate within and around 
I/R facilities within the scope of their capabilities and identified role. Military police commanders must 
closely coordinate and synchronize their efforts with them especially in cases where civil authority and 
capabilities have broken down or been destroyed. 
ARMY COMMAND AND SUPPORT RELATIONSHIPS 
2-41. Most military police units are typically assigned, attached, or placed under the operational control of 
military police brigades or military police commands when one or more is committed to an operation. The 
senior military police commander will normally be designated as the CDO for all detainee operations in the 
AO. This includes organizing and employing commands and units, assigning tasks, designing objectives, 
and giving directions to accomplish the mission. Military police C2 relationships may be changed briefly to 
provide better support for a specific operation or to meet the needs of the supported commander. Support 
relationships define the purpose, scope, and effect desired when one capability supports another. (See FM 
3-0 for more information on command and support relationships.) 
2-42. Within the military police structure, attached units that participate in I/R operations are under the 
command of  the senior military  police  officer  present  at  each echelon.  Units  and personnel  (such  as 
HUMINT, counterintelligence, medical, and SJA) that support or are associated with I/R operations are 
normally placed in a tactical control relationship to the military police commander or the platoon leader at 
the BCT  level when they are  operating inside the DCP, DHA,  or fixed I/R  facility. MI and medical 
units/personnel continue to operate within the guidance and direction of their technical channels to ensure 
that the technical aspects of their activities are not impeded. 
2-43. Technical channels are the transmission paths between two technically similar units or offices within 
a command that perform a technical function require used to control performance of technical functions. 
They are not used for conducting operations or supporting another unit mission. (FM 6-0) It is critical to the 
overall success of operations that elements have unfettered access to their parent organizations or technical 
staff channels. Technical channels apply exclusively to certain specialized functions as follows: 
MI personnel will remain under the direction of their MI technical channels for interrogation 
activities  and  intelligence  reporting.  These  channels  remain  intact  as  a  procedural  control 
measure  for  interrogation  operations  to  provide  technical  guidance,  allow  proper  technical 
management, ensure adherence to applicable laws and policies, and guide the proper use of 
doctrinal approaches and techniques during the conduct of interrogation operations. 
Medical personnel operate within similar technical channels. These technical channels should 
never  be  circumvented  or  disrupted  by  personnel  outside  the  medical  chain.  All  medical 
personnel  and assets are under the technical supervision of the  detainee operations medical 
director. 
All HUMINT units are under the direction of the facility commander for the humane treatment, 
evacuation, and  custody  and  control (reception,  processing,  administration,  internment,  and 
Internment and Resettlement In Support of the Spectrum of Operations 
12 February 2010 
FM 3-39.40 
2-9 
safety)  of  detainees;  protection  measures;  and  internment  facility  operation.  The  MI  unit 
commander is responsible for the conduct of interrogation operations, to include prioritizing 
effort and controlling the technical aspects of interrogation or other intelligence operations. The 
intelligence staff  maintains  control over interrogation  operations  through  technical channels 
according to the commander’s intent and plans, orders, and established unit SOPs to ensure 
adherence to applicable laws and policies. Applicable laws and policies include U.S. laws, the 
law  of  war,  relevant  international  laws,  relevant directives  (including  DODD  3115.09  and 
DODD 2310.01E),  DODIs,  execution  orders,  and  FRAGOs.  The  assistant  chief  of  staff, 
HUMINT and counterintelligence (G-2X) or joint force HUMINT and counterintelligence staff 
element  (J-2X)  controls  all  HUMINT  and/or  counterintelligence  units  through  technical 
channels. 
The joint interrogation and debriefing center (JIDC) or MI battalion must receive intelligence 
collection priorities from the G-2X or J-2X elements and have some degree of autonomy to 
complete its vital intelligence mission for the commander. Military police should not establish 
intelligence priorities for the JIDC. 
Military  police  use  technical  channels  to  ensure  that I/R  and  law and order functions  are 
conducted  according  to  applicable  regulations  and  U.S.  and international  laws.  Within  I/R 
operations, technical channels are especially critical at DCPs and DHAs where military police 
conducting  operations  may  require  advice  and  guidance  from  senior  military  police  staff. 
Technical staff assistance may also flow through the BCT PM to advise BCT commanders and 
staffs  regarding  DCP  operations  when  military  police  are  not  available  to  take  control  of 
detainees. 
CONSIDERATIONS WITHIN THE OPERATIONAL AREA AND THE 
AREA OF OPERATIONS 
2-44. Each  combatant commander  is  assigned a geographic  area of responsibility.  Within the  area of 
responsibility, the combatant commander has the authority to plan and conduct operations. Joint force 
commanders at all levels may establish subordinate operational areas within the area of responsibility, such 
as AOs, joint operations areas, joint special operations areas, and joint security areas. The joint security 
areas facilitate the protection and operation of bases, installations, and the U.S. armed forces that support 
combat operations. 
2-45. During major combat operations, the POC for most detainees will typically be in a BCT AO. A DCP 
will normally be located within the brigade area. The military police platoon organic or assigned to the 
BCT typically establishes the DCP as close to the POC as possible, many times within a battalion AO, to 
temporarily secure detainees until they can be moved to the next higher echelons DHA. The DCP is an 
austere site established as a temporary holding area within the BCT AO to provide security and ensure the 
humane treatment of detainees pending movement to a DHA or TIF. The DHA and TIF are typically 
outside a BCT AO. (See paragraph 6-13.) The DHA is a temporary holding area normally established 
within the division area (typically outside the maneuver BCTs AO, but potentially in the AO of a maneuver 
enhancement brigade [MEB]) to receive detainees from the DCPs, provide security, and ensure humane 
treatment of detainees pending movement to a facility outside the division area. (See paragraph 6-25.) 
Detainees are held at the DCP or DHA until transportation is available and time-sensitive exploitation by 
MI personnel has been completed. 
2-46. During  stability  operations,  many  more  DCPs  and  DHAs  may  be  required,  based  on  mission 
variables and detainee flow. In these instances, locations for DCPs and DHAs typically may be established 
at an  echelon lower than in major combat operations. For example, DCPs  may  be established within 
battalion AOs and DHAs established within BCT AOs. Additionally, the high demand for military police 
technical capabilities within TIF and in support of HN policing operations may create a shortage of military 
police available to support the BCT, establishing a requirement for BCTs to operate DCPs and DHAs with 
nonmilitary police personnel. In these instances, it is critical that the echelon PMs are heavily involved to 
ensure that detainees are cared for and processed according to ARs and U.S. and international laws. The 
military  police  technical channels are available  to  the echelon PM  and  BCT commanders  to provide 
technical advice and guidance regarding detainee operations. 
Chapter 2 
2-10 
FM 3-39.40 
12 February 2010 
2-47. Typically, a TIF or SIF is established at the theater level. (See paragraph 6-59.) A TIF or SIF is a 
permanent or semipermanent facility that is normally within the regional area of combat operations and 
designed to hold large numbers of detainees for extended time periods. All TIFs and SIFs are operated 
under military police C2, with augmentation and support of many of the military disciplines. The decision 
may be made to establish a TIF or SIF outside the theater of operations that is not under the authority of a 
theater commander.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested