c# show a pdf file : How to move pages in pdf Library application class asp.net html web page ajax USArmy-InternmentResettlement30-part86

Foreign Confinement Officer Training Program 
12 February 2010 
FM 3-39.40 
N-5 
Competency in maintaining civil order, enforcing laws, and detaining criminal suspects. 
Modern police  ethos training and procedures, to include a  demonstrated understanding of  the 
basics of investigation, evidence collection, and proper court and legal procedures. 
Capability of operating and maintaining necessary equipment. 
Honesty, impartiality, and commitment to protecting and serving the entire population, operating 
under the rule of law, and respecting human rights. 
Loyalty to the central government and serve national interests, recognizing their role as servants 
of the people and not their masters. 
FRAMEWORK FOR DEVELOPMENT 
N-22. A framework for the development of HN  confinement officers training programs  is  essential and  can 
generally be organized around these processes: 
Assess. 
Organize. 
Build. 
Train. 
Equip. 
Advise. 
N-23. Each  of  these  processes  considers  and  incorporates  all  relevant  DOTMLPF  functions.  Although 
described sequentially, some of these processes will actually be conducted concurrently. For example, training 
and equipping operations must be integrated, and as the operation progresses, assessments will lead to changes. 
A training program may also need to include a transition period during which major I/R operations are handed 
over to HN security forces if U.S. forces were required to establish a confinement system for the HN due to the 
collapse of governmental functions or if no viable system existed when U.S. trainers became involved. 
A
SSESS
N-24. As with every major military operation, the first step is to assess the situation. The assessment should be 
one part of the comprehensive program of analyzing the current situation, and it normally includes a social and 
economic analysis. From the assessment, planners develop short-, mid-, and long-range goals and programs. 
Those goals  and  programs  must remain  flexible enough  to  be responsive  to  changing circumstances.  Some 
existing  confinement  officers  might  be  discovered  to  be  so  dysfunctional  or  corrupt  that  they  have  to  be 
removed rather than rehabilitated. In  some cases,  leaders may need to be replaced for successful training to 
occur. 
N-25. The following indicators are  continuously updated and assessed throughout the planning, preparation, 
and execution of the training mission: 
Structure of social values, organization, demographics, interrelationships, and education level of 
the confinement officer force. 
Methods, successes, and failures of HN I/R efforts. 
State of training at all levels and the specialties and education of leaders. 
Equipment status and the priority placed on maintenance. 
Sustainment and support structure and its ability to meet the requirements of the force. 
Level of sovereignty of the HN government. 
Extent  of acceptance of ethnic and  religious  minorities and  the role and treatment of women 
within the society. 
Laws and regulations governing the security forces and their relationship to national leaders. 
N-26. The mission analysis should provide a  basis  for  determining  the scope of  effort  required  for  mission 
accomplishment. HN confinement officer programs may require complete reestablishment, or they may only 
require assistance to increase quality and/or capacity. They may be completely devoid of a capability, or they 
may  only  require temporary  reinforcement. As  with other military operations,  efforts  to  assist confinement 
How to move pages in pdf - re-order PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Customizing Page Order of PDF Document in C# Project
reorder pdf pages in preview; how to reorder pages in pdf
How to move pages in pdf - VB.NET PDF Page Move Library: re-order PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Sort PDF Document Pages Using VB.NET Demo Code
change page order in pdf file; move pages in pdf online
Appendix N 
N-6 
FM 3-39.40  
12 February 2010 
officers  should  reinforce  success.  For  example,  instead  of  building  new  detention  facilities  in  every  town, 
improve the good facilities and use them as a model for weaker organizations. 
O
RGANIZE
N-27. The best organization for HN forces depends on the social and economic conditions of the country, and 
the cultural and historical factors and the security threat that the nation faces. The aim is to develop an effective 
and efficient organization with a C2, intelligence, logistic, and operational structure that makes sense for the 
HN. The organization must facilitate the collection, processing, and dissemination of intelligence across and 
throughout all detainee operations. 
General Organizational Considerations 
N-28. To the maximum extent possible, decisions on the structure of a confinement officer force organization 
should be made by the HN.  The HN  may be amenable  to  proposals from U.S. or  multinational  forces,  but 
should  at  least  approve  all  organizational  designs.  As  the  HN  government  gets  stronger,  U.S.  leaders  and 
trainers  should  expect  increasingly  independent  organizational  decisions.  These  may  include  changing  the 
number of forces, types of units, and internal organizational designs. Culture and other shaping conditions may 
result  in  confinement  officers  performing  what  U.S.  citizens  might  consider to  be  nontraditional  roles  and 
missions. 
N-29. A thorough review of available HN military and police doctrine is a necessary first step in setting up a 
training program. Advisers should review corrections regulations to ensure that they provide clear and complete 
instructions  for  discipline,  acquisitions,  and  support  activities.  Doctrine  (including  tactics,  techniques,  and 
procedures) should be reviewed and refined to address I/R operations. Regulations should be appropriate for the 
level of education and sophistication of confinement officer personnel. The treatment of DCs, detainees, and 
suspected persons should be spelled out clearly and be consistent with the norms of international and military 
laws. 
Human Resources Issues 
N-30. Organizing a confinement officer training program requires resolving human resources issues related to 
the areas of— 
Recruitment. 
Promotion screening/selection. 
Pay and benefits. 
Leader recruitment and selection. 
Personnel accountability. 
Recruitment 
N-31. Recruitment is critical to the establishment of a confinement officer training program. The recruitment 
program should be crafted by the HN and take local culture into account, using themes that resonate with the 
local  population.  It  should  ensure  that  all  major  demographic  groups  are  properly  represented  in  the 
confinement officers. U.S. and multinational partners should encourage and support HN efforts to recruit from 
among the minority populations. A mobile recruiting capability should be established to target specific areas, 
ethnic groups, or tribes to ensure demographic distribution within the body of confinement officers. Moderate 
groups  and factions  within hostile  or potentially hostile ethnic groups should be contacted, and members of 
minority factions should be encouraged to support recruitment of  their group members into the confinement 
officer training program. Recruitment of disaffected ethnic groups into the confinement officer training program 
will  likely  become  a  major  issue  of  contention  and  be  resisted  by  most  HN  governments.  However,  even 
moderate success in recruiting from disaffected ethnic groups provides an enormous payoff in terms of building 
the  legitimacy  of  the  confinement officers  and  in  quieting  the often  legitimate  fears  of  such ethnic  groups 
regarding their relationship with the government. Cultural sensitivities toward the incorporation of women must 
be observed, but efforts should also be made to include women as correction officers. 
C# TIFF: How to Reorder, Rearrange & Sort TIFF Pages Using C# Code
Using this C#.NET Tiff image management library, you can easily change and move the position of any two or more Tiff file pages or make a totally new order for
moving pages in pdf; how to move pdf pages around
C# Word - Sort Word Pages Order in C#.NET
page reorganizing library control, developers can swap or adjust the order of all or several Word document pages, or just C# DLLs: Move Word Page Position.
move pages in a pdf file; how to reorder pages in a pdf document
Foreign Confinement Officer Training Program 
12 February 2010 
FM 3-39.40 
N-7 
N-32. A clear set of appropriate mental, physical, and moral standards needs to be established and enforced. 
Ideally, recruits are centrally screened and inducted. Recruitment centers need to be in areas that are safe and 
secure from insurgent attacks, as these centers are attractive targets for insurgents. All recruits undergo a basic 
security check and be vetted against lists of suspected insurgents. As much as possible, this process should be 
conducted by HN agencies  and personnel. Membership in  illegal  organizations  is  carefully  monitored.  Past 
membership need not preclude joining the confinement officers, but any ongoing relationship of a recruit with 
an illegal  organization  needs  constant  monitoring. Ensure that no single group of  confinement officers or a 
facility contains many prior members of an illegal unit, tribal militia, or other militant faction. 
Promotion Screening/Selection 
N-33. The selection for promotion based on proven performance  and aptitude for increased responsibility is 
essential. Objective evaluations ensure that promotion is by merit, not through influence or family ties. Two 
methods may be worth considering for selecting leaders. One is to identify the most competent performers, train 
them, and recommend them for promotion. The second is to identify those with social or professional status 
within the training group, train them, and recommend them for promotion. The first method may lead to more 
competent leaders, but could be resisted for cultural reasons. The second method ensures that the new leader 
will be accepted culturally, but may sacrifice competence. The most effective solution is often a combination of 
the two methods. 
Pay and Benefits 
N-34. Appropriate compensation levels help prevent a culture of corruption in confinement officer forces. It is 
cheaper to spend money for adequate wages and produce effective confinement officers than it is to pay less and 
end up with corrupt and abusive forces that alienate the population. This is especially important for the police, 
who  have the greatest opportunity for corruption  in  the  nature of their duties  and  contact  with  the  civilian 
community. Some important considerations concerning pay include the following: 
Pay for commissioned officers, NCOs, and technical specialists should be competitive with other 
professions in the HN. Confinement officers need to be paid a sufficient wage so that they are 
not required to supplement their income with part-time jobs or to resort to illegal methods to 
otherwise supplement their salary. 
Pay should be disbursed through HN government channels, not U.S. channels. 
Cultural  norms  should  be  addressed  to  ensure  that  any  questionable  practices,  such  as  the 
“taxing” of subordinates, are minimized if not eliminated. 
Good pay and
attractive benefits must be combined with a strict code of conduct that allows the 
immediate dismissal of corrupt confinement officers. 
Pensions should be available to compensate the families of confinement officers in the event of a 
service-related death. 
N-35. Effective  confinement  officers can help  improve  the social  and  economic development  of  the  nation 
through the benefits that each member receives. Every recruit should be provided a basic level of literacy, job 
training, and morals/values training. 
Leader Recruitment and Selection 
N-36. Leadership standards should be high. Candidates should be in good health and pass an academic test that 
is set to a higher standard than those for enlisted recruits. Officer candidates should be carefully vetted to ensure 
that they do not have close ties to any radical  or insurgent  organization. Those selected  for leadership roles 
should already have demonstrated leadership potential. 
Personnel Accountability 
N-37. The  accountability  of  confinement  officer  personnel  must  be  carefully  tracked.  Proper  personnel 
accountability reduces  corruption, particularly in manual banking systems  where pay  is provided in cash. In 
addition, the number of personnel failing to report for duty can be an indicator of possible attacks, unit morale, 
or insurgent and militia influences upon the confinement officer forces. 
C# PowerPoint - Sort PowerPoint Pages Order in C#.NET
library control, developers can swap or adjust the order of all or several PowerPoint document pages, or just change the C# DLLs: Move PowerPoint Page Position.
pdf page order reverse; rearrange pdf pages in preview
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
RasterEdge XDoc.PDF allows you to easily move PDF document pages position, including sorting pages and swapping two pages. Copying and Pasting Pages.
change pdf page order; how to rearrange pages in pdf using reader
Appendix N 
N-8 
FM 3-39.40  
12 February 2010 
Demobilization of Security Force Personnel 
N-38. Programs should be developed to prevent the formation of a class of impoverished, disgruntled former 
confinement officers who have lost their livelihood. It may be necessary to remove officers from the detention 
facility  for  poor performance or  for  failure  to  meet the  new,  higher  standards  of  the force.  Some  form  of 
government-provided education grants or low-interest business loans will enable them to earn a living outside 
the military. Confinement officers who have served for several years and are then removed should be given a 
lump sum payment or a small pension to ease their transition to civilian life. These programs should not apply 
to those who are guilty of human rights abuses or major corruption. 
B
UILD
N-39. This process may be build and/or rebuild. Requirements include the infrastructure necessary to support 
the force: barracks, ranges, motor pools, and other military facilities. Because of the long lead times required for 
construction,  early  investment  in  such  facilities  is  essential  if  they  are  to  be  available  when  needed.  Any 
infrastructure  design  (including  headquarters  facilities) may  attractive  targets  for  insurgents,  and  protection 
considerations will be of critical importance. (See chapter 6 and appendix I for more information on facility 
design and sustainment considerations.) 
N-40. During an insurgency, the HN confinement officers and police forces are  likely to  be  operating from 
local  bases.  A  long-term,  force-basing  plan  needs  to  be  established  for  building  training  centers  and  unit 
garrisons.  If  possible,  garrisons  should  include  government-provided  medical  care;  housing  for  the 
commissioned officers, NCOs, enlisted, and families; and other amenities that make national service attractive. 
N-41. The extensive investment of time and resources may be required to restore or create the infrastructure 
necessary to effectively train and use HN confinement officers. In addition to building I/R facilities and police 
stations, the HN will need functional regional and national headquarters and ministries. 
T
RAIN
N-42. U.S. and multinational  training assistance should address shortfalls at  every level with the purpose of 
establishing  training  systems  that  are  self-sustaining.  The  ultimate  goal  is  to  replace  U.S.  or  multinational 
trainers with HN trainers. 
Training U.S. Trainers 
N-43. Soldiers and Marines who are assigned training missions receive a course of preparation to deal with the 
specific  requirements  of  developing  the  target  HN  confinement  officers.  The  course  should  emphasize  the 
cultural  background  of  the  HN,  introduce  its  language  (to  include  specific  confinement-related  terms  and 
phrases) and provide insights into cultural tips for developing a good rapport with HN personnel. The course 
should also include protection training for those U.S. trainers focused on the specifics of working with the HN 
forces. U.S. trainees must become familiar with the HN organization and equipment, especially weapons not 
found in the U.S. inventory. Key points to be emphasized to U.S. trainers who support their training mission 
include, but are not limited to, the following: 
Ensure that training is sustained and includes reinforcement of individual and team skills. 
Use the smallest possible student-to-instructor ratio. 
Develop HN trainers who meet the specific requirements for the focused HN mission. 
Train so that standards—not time—are the driving factor. 
Provide immediate feedback; use after-action reviews. 
Respect HN culture, but be able to tell the difference between cultural practices and excuses. 
N-44. U.S. personnel should show respect for local religions and traditions and willingly accept many aspects 
of the local/national culture, including the local food (if sanitation standards permit). U.S. personnel need to 
make it clear that they are not in the HN to undermine or change the local religion or traditions. On the other 
hand, U.S. personnel have a mission to reduce the effects of dysfunctional social practices that affect the ability 
to  conduct  effective  I/R  operations.  U.S.  trainers  and  advisers  must  have  enough  awareness  to  identify 
C# PDF insert text Library: insert text into PDF content in C#.net
int pageIndex = 0; // Move cursor to (400F, 100F). String outputFilePath = Program.RootPath + "\\" output.pdf"; doc.Save(outputFilePath);
move pages in pdf; how to move pages in pdf converter professional
VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb
Dim pageIndex As Integer = 0 ' Move cursor to (400F, 100F). Dim outputFilePath As String = Program.RootPath + "\\" output.pdf" doc.Save(outputFilePath).
how to move pages in pdf reader; rearrange pages in pdf document
Foreign Confinement Officer Training Program 
12 February 2010 
FM 3-39.40 
N-9 
inappropriate behavior and see that it is stopped or, at the  very  least,  reported to the  multinational and  HN 
chains of command. 
Establishing Training Standards 
N-45. Effective training programs require the establishment of clear and detailed individual, leader, and unit 
performance standards, taking into account cultural factors that directly affect the ability of the individual or 
unit to operate. For example, training a group of confinement officers to conduct effective operations requires 
more  time in  a country  where  the  average  confinement  officer  is illiterate.  Similarly, staff training is  more 
difficult  in  a  country  with  a  low  educational  level.  Building  a  force  of  confinement  officers  from  scratch 
typically takes far more time than when there is a cadre of HN personnel already available. With this in mind, it 
is usually valuable to take advantage of existing military personnel with a basic understanding of discipline and 
organizational structure to form units and cadres for units, rather  than starting from the beginning with raw 
recruits. As previously mentioned, a vetting  process may be required, but this  is still usually better  than the 
alternative. 
N-46. Poorly trained leaders and units are far more prone to human rights violations than well-trained, well-led 
units. Leaders and units unprepared for the pressure of active operations tend to employ indiscriminate force, 
target  civilians,  and  abuse  prisoners—all  actions  that  can  threaten  the  popular  support  and  government 
legitimacy. Badly disciplined and poorly led confinement officers have served very effectively as recruiters and 
propagandists for the insurgents, rather than shining examples for the legitimate government. 
N-47. The confinement officer training program must take into account the culture, resources, and short-term 
security needs of the HN. No firm rules exist on how long particular training programs should take, but previous 
or  existing  U.S.  or  multinational  training  programs  can  be  considered as starting  points  for  planning.  To a 
certain  extent,  the  insurgent  threat  may  dictate  how  long  training  can  take.  As  security  improves,  training 
programs can be expanded to facilitate longer-term end state goals. 
Training Methods 
N-48. Training  programs  are  designed  to  prepare  HN  personnel  to  eventually  train  themselves.  Indigenous 
trainers are the best trainers and should be used to the maximum extent possible. There are a number of possible 
training methods that have  proven successful, many of which also  enhance the development of HN training 
capability. These include— 
Formal schools operated by U.S. forces, with  graduates selected to return as instructors.  This 
includes entry-level individual training. 
Mobile training teams to reinforce individual or collective training on an as-needed basis. 
Partnership training, with U.S. combat units tasked to train and advise HN units with whom they 
are partnered. An military police unit provides support to the HN unit. As training progresses, 
HN squads, platoons, and companies may work with their U.S. military police partners in I/R 
operations.  In  this  manner,  the  whole  U.S.  unit  mentors  their  partners.  Habitual  training 
relationships should be maintained between partners until HN units meet established standards 
for full capability. 
Advanced  partnership  training  with  U.S.  or  international  civilian  policing  and  correctional 
organizations. 
Advisor  teams  detailed  to  assist  HN  units  with  minimal  segregation  between  U.S.  and  HN 
personnel. 
Embedding  U.S.  personnel  (initially)  in  key  billets  in  HN  detention  facilities.  This  may  be 
required where HN confinement officers are needed, but leader training is still in its early stages. 
This approach has the disadvantage of increasing dependency on U.S. forces and should only be 
used in extreme circumstances. As HN capabilities improve, their personnel should be moved 
back into those key positions. 
Selected use of contractors may also be used to assist with training, though care must be taken to 
ensure that the training is closely supervised and meets standards. 
C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
Get image information, such as its location, zonal information, metadata, and so on. Able to edit, add, delete, move, and output PDF document image.
pdf change page order online; reorder pages in pdf file
VB.NET PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file
Rapidly and multiple PDF document (pages) creation and edit methods file formats; merge, append, and split PDF files; insert, delete, move, rotate, copy
reordering pages in pdf document; change pdf page order preview
Appendix N 
N-10 
FM 3-39.40  
12 February 2010 
Soldier Training 
N-49. Foreign confinement officers must be developed through a systematic training program that first builds 
their basic skills, then teaches them to work together as a team, and finally allows them to function as a unit. 
Confinement officers  should  train to standard for conducting  the  major  missions that  they  will likely face. 
Requirements include, but are not limited to, the following: 
Managing their own security. 
Handling weapons. 
Employing special weapons. 
Providing escort/guard duties. 
Controlling riots. 
Providing effective personnel management. 
Conducting logistic (planning, maintenance, and movement) operations. 
Conducting police intelligence operations tasks. 
Handling and processing prisoners/detainees. 
Providing effective medical support. 
N-50. Confinement officers should be trained to handle and interrogate detainees and prisoners according to 
internationally recognized human rights norms. Prisoner and detainee management procedures should provide 
for the security and fair and efficient processing of detainees. 
N-51. I/R operations need effective support personnel to be effective. This requires training teams to ensure that 
training in support functions is established. Specially trained personnel required by confinement officers include 
the following: 
Armorers. 
Supply specialists. 
Communications specialists. 
Administrative specialists. 
Vehicle mechanics and other equipment and facility maintenance personnel. 
N-52. Effective  confinement  operations  are  also  linked  to  an  effective  justice  system  with  trained  judges, 
prosecutors, defense counsel, prison officials, and court personnel who can process arrests, detentions, warrants, 
and other judicial records. These elements are important components for establishing the rule of law. 
N-53. Advisers should assist the HN in establishing and enforcing the roles and authority of the police. The 
authority  to  detain  and  interrogate,  the  procedures  for  detention  facilities,  and  human  rights  standards  are 
important items for instruction during this process. 
Leader Training 
N-54. The effectiveness of the confinement officer training program is directly related to the quality of their 
leadership.  Building  an  effective  leadership  cadre  requires  a  comprehensive  program  of  officer,  staff,  and 
specialized training. The ultimate success of any U.S. involvement depends on the ability to create viable HN 
leadership that is capable of carrying on the mission at all levels and participating in the building of their nation 
without continued U.S. presence. 
Operational Employment of Newly Trained Forces 
N-55. Building the  morale and  confidence of  confinement officers  should be a  primary  strategic  objective. 
Operational performance of  inexperienced organizations should be carefully monitored and assessed  so that 
weaknesses  can  be  quickly  corrected.  The  employment  plan  for  HN  confinement  officers  should  allow 
considerable time for additional training. By gradually introducing units into I/R operations, poor leaders can be 
weeded out, while the most competent leaders are identified and given greater authority and responsibility. 
Foreign Confinement Officer Training Program 
12 February 2010 
FM 3-39.40 
N-11 
E
QUIP
N-56. The strategic plan for confinement officer development should outline requirements for appropriate HN 
equipment for the. Equipment should meet the specific needs and requirements of the HN. Equipment meets the 
standard when it is affordable and suitable against the given requirements and threats. The HN must also be able 
to  train on  the equipment. Interoperability may be  a  desired goal in some cases. A central  consideration  for 
equipment provided must be the HN’s long-term ability to support and maintain the equipment. 
N-57. The  requirement  to  provide  equipment  may  be  as  simple  as  assisting  with  existing  equipment 
maintenance or as extensive as providing everything from shoes and clothing to vehicles, communications, and 
investigation kits. 
N-58. Maintainability, ease  of operation,  and long-term  sustainment  costs should be primary  considerations 
because few developing nations have the capability to support highly complex equipment. In I/R operations, it 
may be better to have a large number of versatile vehicles that are easy to maintain  and operate than a few 
highly  capable  vehicles  or  systems  that  require  extensive  maintenance  to  keep  operational.  Developing  an 
effective maintenance system for the HN may include a major maintenance program conducted by contracted 
firms  to  bring  equipment  up  to  functional  standards.  The  program  would  then  progress  to  partnership 
arrangements with U.S. forces as HN personnel are trained to carry out the support mission. 
N-59. Sources  for  HN  materiel  include  U.S.  foreign  military  sales,  multinational  or  third-nation  resale  of 
property, HN contracts with internal suppliers, or HN purchases on the international market. The HN should 
have the flexibility necessary to obtain equipment that meets the indigenous force needs for quality, timeliness, 
and cost. 
A
DVISE
N-60. Military police advisers that serve within HN detention facilities are a very prominent group. Advisers 
need to live, work and fight with their HN confinement officers, and keep segregation to an absolute minimum. 
The relationship developed between advisers and HN confinement officers is critical to success. U.S. leadership 
must be aware that these advisers are not just liaison officers, nor do they command HN units. 
N-61. Effective  advisers  are  an  enormous  force  enhancer.  The  importance  of  the  job  means  that  the  most 
capable individuals should  be  picked to  fill  these  positions.  Advisers  should be  Soldiers  known to take  the 
initiative and who set the standards for others. (See FM 3-05.202.) 
N-62. More than anything else, professional knowledge and competence win the respect of HN confinement 
officers. Effective advisers develop a healthy rapport with HN personnel but avoid the temptation to adopt HN 
positions contrary to U.S. or multinational values or policy. 
N-63. Advisers  who  understand  the  HN  culture  understand  that  local  politics  have  national  effects.  It  is 
important to recognize and employ the cultural factors that support HN commitment and teamwork. Part of the 
art of the good advisor is to employ the positive aspects of the local culture to get the best performance out of 
each confinement officer and leader. 
N-64. Important guidelines for advisers are as follows: 
Learn enough of the language used by the HN to allow, at the very least, simple conversation. 
Be patient, adaptable, and subtle. In guiding counterparts, explain the benefits of an action and 
convince them to accept the idea as their own. Respect the rank and position of counterparts. 
Be diplomatic in correcting HN confinement officers. Praise each success, and work to instill 
pride in the unit. 
Understand that the U.S. advisory team is not the unit command team, but enablers. The HN 
commander must make decisions and command the unit, and military police are there to help 
with this task. 
Keep all counterparts informed, trying not to hide any agendas. 
Be prepared to act as a liaison to multinational assets, especially in the areas of maintenance and 
logistics. 
Maintain liaison with CA and humanitarian teams in the operational area and specific AOs. 
Appendix N 
N-12 
FM 3-39.40  
12 February 2010 
Stay integrated with the unit. Do not isolate yourself from them. 
Be aware of other operations so that fratricide is prevented. 
Insist on HN adherence to the recognized human rights standards concerning the treatment of 
DCs  and  detainees. Violations that  are observed must  be  reported  to  the chain  of command.
12 February 2010 
FM 3-39.40 
Glossary-1 
Glossary 
The glossary lists acronyms/abbreviations and terms with Army or joint definitions, 
and  other selected  terms. Where Army  and joint definitions are  different, (Army) 
follows the term. Terms or acronyms for which FM 3-39.40 is the proponent manual 
(the authority) are marked with an asterisk (*). 
SECTION I – ACRONYMS AND ABBREVIATIONS 
5 S and T 
search, silence, segregate, speed, safeguard, and tag 
AFI 
Air Force instruction 
AJP 
Allied joint publication (NATO) 
AO 
area of operations 
AR 
Army regulation 
BCT 
brigade combat team 
C2 
command and control 
C-2X 
coalition force human intelligence and counterintelligence staff 
element 
CA 
civil affairs 
CBRN 
chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear 
CBRNE 
chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear, and high-yield 
explosives 
CDO 
commander, detainee operations 
CI 
civilian internee 
CID 
criminal investigation division 
CJCS 
Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff 
CJCSI 
Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff instruction 
CONUS 
continental United States 
CTA 
common table of allowances 
DC 
dislocated civilian 
DA 
Department of the Army 
DCP 
detainee collection point 
DD 
Department of Defense  
DFAS-IN 
Department of Finance and Accounting Service–Indiana 
DHA 
detainee holding area 
DIAM 
Defense Intelligence Agency manual 
DNA 
deoxyribonucleic acid 
DOD 
Department of Defense 
DODD 
Department of Defense directive 
DODI 
Department of Defense instruction 
DOTMLPF 
doctrine, organization, training, materiel, leadership and education, 
personnel, and facilities 
Glossary 
Glossary-2 
FM 3-39.40 
12 February 2010 
EP 
engineer publication 
EPW 
enemy prisoner of war 
FBI 
Federal Bureau of Investigation 
FCF 
field confinement facility 
FDF 
field detention facility 
FM 
field manual 
FRAGO 
fragmentary order 
G-1 
assistant chief of staff, personnel 
G-2 
assistant chief of staff, intelligence 
G-2X 
assistant chief of staff, human intelligence and counterintelligence 
G-4 
assistant chief of staff, logistics 
G-9 
assistant chief of staff, civil affairs operations 
GC 
Geneva Convention IV Relative to the Protection of Civilian 
Persons in Time of War 
GPW 
Geneva Convention III Relative to the Treatment of Prisoners of 
War 
GWS 
Geneva Convention I for the Amelioration of the 
Condition of the Wounded and Sick in Armed Forces in the Field 
GS 
general schedule 
GWS SEA 
Geneva Convention II for the Amelioration of the Condition of 
Wounded, Sick and Shipwrecked Members of Armed Forces at Sea 
HIV 
human immunodeficiency virus 
HN 
host nation 
HUMINT 
human intelligence 
ICE 
Immigration and Customs Enforcement 
ICRC 
International Committee of the Red Cross 
IFRC 
International Federation of the Red Cross 
IO 
international organization 
I/R 
internment and resettlement 
ISN 
internment serial number 
J-2X 
joint force human intelligence and counterintelligence staff element 
JFTR 
joint federal travel regulations 
JIDC 
joint interrogation and debriefing center 
JP 
joint publication 
MCM 
Manual for Courts-Martial 
MEB 
maneuver enhancement brigade 
MI 
military intelligence 
MOS 
military occupational specialty 
MPC 
military police command 
MWD 
military working dog 
MTTP 
multi-Service tactics, techniques, and procedures 
NATO 
North Atlantic Treaty Organization 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested