12 February 2010 
FM 3-39.40 
3-1 
Chapter 3 
Command and Staff Roles and Responsibilities 
I/R operations consist of complex measures that are necessary to guard, protect, 
assist, and account for individuals who are captured, detained, confined, or evacuated 
from their homes. C2 of I/R operations involves the resources and synchronized 
efforts of multidisciplined functions and personnel. Clear C2 is essential for seamless 
operations  to  ensure  that  the  principles  of  I/R  operations  are  obtained.  These 
operations  must  not  distract  from  simultaneous  military  operations,  which  are 
essential  to  mission  success.  Each  distinct  I/R  operation—whether  focused  on 
detainee  operations,  DC  operations,  or  battlefield  confinement  of  U.S.  military 
prisoners—requires  a  somewhat  different  C2  structure  to  handle  the  diverse 
categories of individuals under U.S. protection and control. Within the Army and 
through the combatant commander, military police are tasked with coordinating for 
shelter, protection, and sustainment,  while ensuring accountability procedures for 
detainees and U.S. military prisoners. They will also perform some or all of these 
when dealing with DCs, depending on the specific nature of the situation (to include 
whether they are U.S. citizens). 
NATIONAL AND THEATER REPORTING AGENCIES 
3-1.  The NDRC  (a Headquarters, DA organization assigned to the OPMG) is responsible for— 
Assigning and forwarding blocks of ISNs to the designated theater and the continental United 
States (CONUS) as required. 
Obtaining and storing information concerning detainees and their confiscated personal property. 
Preparing reports for the protecting power. 
Providing accountability information to the ICRC central tracing agency. 
Acting as the proponent office for the Detainee Reporting System and detainee management 
software. 
3-2.  The TDRC is a modular organization that is comprised of 32 personnel who are capable of deploying 
as a full organization in major combat operations as a team or a combination of up to 4 teams to support 
small-scale operations. It functions as the field operations agency for the CONUS-based NDRC. It is the 
central agency responsible for maintaining information on detainees and their personal property within an 
assigned theater of operations or in CONUS. The TDRC is a theater asset that provides detainee data 
management. The TDRC normally colocates with the CDO staff, but may be located at the TIF in small-
scale operations. 
3-3.  The TDRC serves as the theater or area of responsibility repository for information pertaining to 
detainees. The TDRC is responsible for— 
Accounting for I/R populations and ensuring the implementation of DOD policies. 
Providing initial blocks of ISNs to the area processing organization and requesting ISNs from 
the NDRC as required. 
Obtaining and storing accountability information concerning I/R populations originating within 
the theater or area of responsibility. 
Establishing  and  enforcing the  accountability  information requirements that  the  U.S.  armed 
forces collect. (The TDRC receives these requirements from the NDRC.) 
Ensuring detainee property accountability within detention facilities. 
Pdf change page order acrobat - re-order PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Customizing Page Order of PDF Document in C# Project
reorder pages in pdf; change page order pdf preview
Pdf change page order acrobat - VB.NET PDF Page Move Library: re-order PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Sort PDF Document Pages Using VB.NET Demo Code
how to rearrange pages in a pdf document; move pages in pdf acrobat
Chapter 3 
3-2 
FM 3-39.40 
12 February 2010 
3-4.  The CDO is responsible for ensuring that information regarding I/R populations is transmitted to the 
NDRC and/or civilian organizations. In the absence of a TDRC, the CDO must coordinate through the 
NDRC to ensure that reporting requirements are met. 
ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES 
3-5.  A  clear  understanding  of  the  roles  and  responsibilities  of  each  organization,  agency,  and 
corresponding primary positions of responsibility is essential to effective mission execution. The following 
are categories of I/R populations and the various commanders and staffs or multifunctional agencies that 
are involved in the support of I/R operations: 
Detainees. The Army is the DOD executive agent for detainee operations. The Secretary of 
Defense, Provost Marshal General (PMG), combatant commander, joint task force commander, 
theater PM, and ICRC, along with their respective support staffs, are involved in internment 
operations  involving  detainees.  (Detailed  guidance  for  detainee  operations  that  incorporate 
lessons learned from recent operations in the war on terrorism are presented in chapter 5). 
U.S. military prisoners. The Army is the DOD executive agent for long-term confinement of 
U.S. military prisoners. U.S. military prisoners must be guarded to prevent escape and cannot be 
confined in immediate association with detainees, DCs, or other foreign nationals who are not 
members of the U.S. armed forces. The PMG; commander, U.S. Army Corrections Command; 
theater PM and the chain of command, along with their respective support staffs, are all involved 
in  the  confinement  process  for  U.S.  military  prisoners.  (Detailed  guidance  for  battlefield 
confinement of U.S. military prisoners is presented in chapter 7.) 
DCs. DCs are kept separate from detainees and U.S. military prisoners. DCs are controlled to 
prevent interference with military operations and to protect them from combat. DCs may also 
require assistance during natural or man-made disasters and subsequent humanitarian-assistance 
missions. The Department of Homeland Security, Secretary of Defense, Secretary of the Army, 
and  UN  High  Commissioner  for  Refugees,  along  with  their  respective  support  staffs,  are 
involved in resettlement operations to support and protect DCs. (Detailed guidance for military 
police support to humanitarian-assistance operations and emergency  services  is presented in 
chapter 10.) 
S
ECRETARY OF 
D
EFENSE
3-6.  The Secretary of Defense has overall responsibility for matters relating to detainees or DCs. Within 
the DOD, the Under Secretary of Defense for Policy provides for the overall development, coordination, 
approval, and implementation of major DOD policies and plans relating to I/R operations, including the 
final coordination of proposed plans, policies, and new courses of action with DOD components and other 
federal departments and agencies as necessary. The specific division responsible for I/R policy issues 
within the office of the Under Secretary of Defense for Policy is the Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense 
for Detainee Affairs. The DOD general counsel provides legal advice to the Secretary of Defense and DOD 
on detainee matters. 
S
ECRETARY OF THE 
A
RMY
3-7.  The Secretary of the Army is designated as the DOD executive agent for the DOD detainee program 
(DODD 2310.01E) and in that role— 
Ensures  that  responsibilities  and  functions  of  the  DOD  detainee  program  according  to 
DODD 2310.01E are assigned and executed. 
Develops and promulgates program guidance, regulations, and instructions necessary for the 
DOD-wide implementation of DODD 2310.01E. 
Communicates directly with the heads of DOD components, as necessary, to carry out assigned 
functions. 
Designates a single point of contact (within the DA) who will also provide advice and assistance 
to the Office of the Deputy Secretary of Defense for Detainee Affairs and the Undersecretary of 
Defense for Policy for detainee operations. 
.NET PDF Document Viewing, Annotation, Conversion & Processing
Insert, delete PDF pages. Re-order, rotate PDF pages. PDF Read. Print. Support for all the print modes in Acrobat PDF. Print only specified page ranges.
how to rearrange pages in a pdf file; rearrange pdf pages reader
VB.NET PDF: How to Create Watermark on PDF Document within
create a watermark to PDF file in order to help or image (such as business's logo) on any desired PDF page. And with our PDF Watermark Creator, users need no
move pages in pdf; how to reorder pages in a pdf document
Command and Staff Roles and Responsibilities 
12 February 2010 
FM 3-39.40 
3-3 
Plans for and operates the NDRC and its elements to account for detainees. The Secretary of the 
Army coordinates with the Undersecretary of Defense for Policy to provide reports on detainee 
operations to the Secretary of Defense and others as appropriate. 
Recommends DOD-wide detainee affairs related planning and programming guidance to the— 
„ 
Undersecretary of Defense for Policy. 
„ 
Under  Secretary  of  Defense  for  Acquisition,  Technology,  and  Logistics;  Intelligence; 
Personnel and Readiness; and Comptroller. 
„ 
Assistant Secretary of Defense for Networks and Information Integration. 
„ 
Director of Program Analysis & Evaluation. 
„ 
Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff (CJCS). 
Note. Provide copies of such guidance to the secretaries of military departments. 
Establishes detainee  operations training and  certification  standards  in  coordination  with  the 
secretaries of the military departments and the joint staff. 
Develops  programs  to  ensure  that  all  DOD  detainee  operations  policies;  doctrine;  tactics, 
techniques, and procedures; and regulations or other issuances are periodically reviewed and 
evaluated for effectiveness and compliance with DOD policies. 
P
ROVOST 
M
ARSHAL 
G
ENERAL
3-8.  The Secretary of the Army further designates the PMG as the Secretary of the Army action agent to 
exercise the executive  agent  role for detainee operations and long-term confinement of  U.S.  military 
prisoners. The PMG develops and disseminates policy guidance for the treatment, care, accountability, 
legal status, and processing of detainees. The PMG provides Headquarters, DA, staff supervision for the 
DOD and ensures that plans are developed for providing ISNs to the TDRC and replenishing ISNs. 
3-9.  The PMG provides staff assistance and technical advice to various agencies, including— 
Office of the Secretary of Defense. 
Joint Chiefs of Staff. 
Military departments. 
Combatant commands. 
Department of State and other federal agencies. 
NGOs. 
C
OMMANDER
,
U.S.
A
RMY 
C
ORRECTIONS 
C
OMMAND
3-10. The U.S. Army Corrections Command mission is to exercise C2 and operational oversight for policy, 
programming, resourcing, and support of Army Corrections System facilities and table of distribution and 
allowances elements worldwide. On order, the U.S. Army Corrections Command coordinates the execution 
of condemned military prisoners. Strategic objectives include— 
Providing a safe environment for the retributive incarceration of prisoners. 
Protecting communities by incarcerating prisoners. 
Deterring those who might fail to adhere to discipline laws and rules. 
Providing rehabilitation services to prepare prisoners for release as civilians or for return to duty 
with the prospect of being productive Soldiers/citizens. 
Supporting commanders worldwide by developing detainee experts through experiential learning 
in a prison environment. 
C
OMBATANT
,
T
ASK 
F
ORCE
,
AND 
J
OINT 
T
ASK 
F
ORCE 
C
OMMANDERS
3-11. Combatant,  task  force,  and  joint  task  force commanders have  the overall  responsibility  for I/R 
operations and contingency plans in their area of responsibility. They ensure compliance with the law of 
GIF to PDF Converter | Convert GIF to PDF, Convert PDF to GIF
as easy as printing; Support both single-page and batch Drop image to process GIF to PDF image conversion; Provide filter option to change brightness, color and
reorder pdf pages online; change page order pdf
JPEG to PDF Converter | Convert JPEG to PDF, Convert PDF to JPEG
It can be used standalone. JPEG to PDF Converter is able to convert image files to PDF directly without the software Adobe Acrobat Reader for conversion.
change page order pdf reader; moving pages in pdf
Chapter 3 
3-4 
FM 3-39.40 
12 February 2010 
war and applicable U.S. policies and  directives and receive guidance from the  Secretary  of Defense. 
They— 
Issue and review appropriate plans, policies, and directives as necessary. 
Plan, execute, and oversee detainee operations according to DODD 2310.01E. 
Ensure that all members of DOD components, contract employees, and others assigned to or 
accompanying DOD components are properly trained and certified and are maintaining records 
of training and certification. 
Provide for the proper treatment, classification, administrative processing, and custody of those 
persons captured or detained by military services under their C2. 
Ensure that detainee and DC accountability is maintained using the Detainee Reporting System 
(the official NDRC Data Collection System for processing detainees and issuing ISNs). 
Ensure that suspected or alleged violations of the law of  war are promptly reported to  the 
appropriate authorities and investigated. 
Ensure that personnel deployed in operations across the spectrum of conflict are cognizant of 
their obligations under the law of war. 
Designate a CDO. (The CDO is responsible for all detainee operations and has command over 
all detention and interrogation facilities within an AO. The CDO will typically be the senior 
military police commander in a theater.) 
Are responsible for all facets of the operation of internment facilities (theater and strategic) and 
all facility-related administrative matters. 
Ensure that detention operations comply with the principles of the Geneva Conventions and the 
intent of the commander in chief. 
Support and improve the intelligence-gathering process with everyone who has contact with 
detainees. 
C
OMMANDER
,
D
ETAINEE 
O
PERATIONS
3-12. The CDO is typically responsible for all detention facility and interrogation operations in the joint 
operations area. The CDO should have detainee operations experience and will normally be the senior 
military  police commander. If  the  size  and  scope  of  the  detainee  operation  warrants, the joint  force 
commander may consider designating a general or flag officer as the CDO. (See JP 3-63.) The CDO does 
not normally perform duties  as the operating commander of an I/R facility. MI and medical units or 
personnel will retain control of their respective activities through technical channels. For example, the 
CDO— 
Reports directly to higher headquarters on detainee matters. 
Establishes a technical chain of command with medical and MI assets operating within the 
facility. 
Exercises control over assets performing detainee interrogation operations at the theater level; 
however,  the  JIDC  retains  technical  authority  for  interrogation  functions  and  intelligence 
reporting. 
Ensures effective communication between JIDC personnel and detention facility commanders. 
Reviews interrogation plans. (The CDO does not establish interrogation priorities, but will work 
with  the  detainee  operations  staff  and  higher  headquarters  to  resolve  any  issues  with 
implementing  the  interrogation  plan  according  to  the  approved  Army  forces  standards  for 
interrogations. The CDO does not approve or disapprove interrogation plans.) 
Provides policies and operational oversight, to include developing and disseminating detainee 
policies, directives, and operation orders. 
Ensures that U.S. armed forces who are conducting detainee operations comply with the law of 
war and U.S. laws, regulations, and policies. 
Ensures  that  other  government  agencies  adhere  to  DOD  policies  and  procedures  while 
performing detainee interrogation operations at DOD facilities. 
PDF to WORD Converter | Convert PDF to Word, Convert Word to PDF
PDF to Word Converter has accurate output, and PDF to Word Converter doesn't need the support of Adobe Acrobat & Microsoft Word.
how to move pages around in pdf file; how to move pages in a pdf file
TIFF to PDF Converter | Convert TIFF to PDF, Convert PDF to TIFF
PDF to TIFF Converter doesn't require other third-party such as Adobe Acrobat. Completely free for use and upgrade; Easy to convert multi-page PDF files to multi
how to reverse pages in pdf; pdf page order reverse
Command and Staff Roles and Responsibilities 
12 February 2010 
FM 3-39.40 
3-5 
Note. The CDO and his/her designated representatives will have unfettered access to all areas 
and operations. 
Ensures that allegations of mistreatment are immediately reported through the chain of command 
and investigated by the Military Criminal Investigation Organization according to U.S. policies. 
Ensures that ISNs are issued according to current policies and procedures (normally conducted 
at the TIF level). 
Ensures that detainee accountability and reporting are done properly through the TDRC to the 
NDRC. 
Ensures that detainee board processes are supervised. 
Coordinates visits from representatives of the ICRC and/or protecting powers. 
Coordinates external visits to detainees. 
Coordinates sustainment requirements across the spectrum of detainee operations. 
Note. Sustainment requirements normally range from the establishment of internment facilities 
through sustained operations to the final transition and disposition of internment facilities and 
detainees. 
Plans the transition of detainee operations from U.S. armed forces to the HN, to include— 
„ 
Planning  and building long-term internment  facilities  for transitioning  detainees to HN 
prisons. 
„ 
Coordinating with the appropriate DOD authorities, HN government authorities, HN penal 
authorities, and protecting powers for planning and implementing the transition and transfer 
of internment facilities and detainees. 
„ 
Coordinating with other government agencies to support HN corrections and guard force 
training programs. 
„ 
Coordinating with the HN judicial system for disposition the of criminal cases. 
„ 
Coordinating with HN authorities for the release or repatriation of detainees. 
„ 
Accounting  for  and  transferring  detainee  records  (including  photographs),  personal 
property, and evidence to the HN penal/judicial authorities. 
D
ETENTION 
F
ACILITY 
C
OMMANDER
3-13. The  detention  facility  commander  is  the  commander  for  an  individual  detention  facility.  The 
detention  facility  commander  normally  does  not  serve  as  a  CDO  when  also  functioning  as  a  TIF 
commander. In internment facilities, the detention facility commander ensures, at a minimum, that— 
Internment operations are conducted according to applicable laws and policies. 
Members  of  the  staff  and  command  are  thoroughly  familiar  with  applicable  ARs,  SOPs, 
directives, international laws, and administrative procedures. 
Facility personnel are trained on facility SOPs, applicable ARs, directives, international laws, 
and administrative procedures. 
The safety and well-being of all personnel operating and housed within the internment facility 
are maintained. 
All personnel are properly trained on the RUF and are familiar with the law of land warfare and 
other applicable laws and policies. 
Standards, policies,  and  SOPs (for  detainee  operations)  are  developed and implemented  to 
ensure compliance with AR 190-8 and that all personnel have an effective knowledge of the 
internment facility SOP. 
Suitable  interrogation  space  and  resources,  to  include  provisions  for  live  monitoring,  are 
provided  within  the  internment  facility  to  facilitate  the  intelligence  collection  mission. 
Provisions may also include medical, security, and administrative support. 
DICOM to PDF Converter | Convert DICOM to PDF, Convert PDF to
Adobe Acrobat or any other print drivers when they use DICOM to PDF Converter. Additionally, high-quality image conversion of DICOM & PDF files in single page
reorder pages of pdf; rearrange pages in pdf reader
BMP to PDF Converter | Convert Bitmap to PDF, Convert PDF to BMP
interface; Powerful image converter for Bitmap and PDF files; No need for Adobe Acrobat Reader & print driver during conversion; Support
rearrange pdf pages online; how to move pages within a pdf document
Chapter 3 
3-6 
FM 3-39.40 
12 February 2010 
Coordination is made with the base commander, JIDC commander, and medical and other assets 
regarding facility protection. 
3-14. When operating in detention facilities, HUMINT collectors and medical personnel are under the 
direction of the detention facility commander for actions involving the humane treatment, custody, and 
evacuation of detainees and for facility protection. Tactical control does not include the prioritization of 
interrogations by HUMINT personnel or intelligence and medical operations within the facility. MI and 
medical units or personnel will retain technical authority for their activities from the MI and medical higher 
headquarters, respectively. For instance, MI personnel will receive operational guidance through the MI 
technical  chain of  command  for interrogation  activities and intelligence  reporting.  Guidance obtained 
through technical channels for intelligence and medical personnel may include— 
Ensuring  that  applicable  U.S.  laws  and  regulations,  international  laws,  execution  orders, 
FRAGOs, and other operationally specific guidelines (for example, DOD policies) are followed. 
Ensuring that approved doctrinal approaches and techniques are used properly. 
Providing technical guidance for interrogation activities. 
3-15. The detention facility commander coordinates closely with MI personnel to permit the effective 
accomplishment of military police and MI missions at the facility by— 
Conducting regular coordination meetings with the interrogation element. 
Developing an SOP (in conjunction with the JIDC commander and/or senior interrogator) to 
deconflict the internment and interrogation missions. Considerations include— 
„ 
The need for military police and MI personnel to use incentives for different purposes and at 
different  times.  The proper  coordination between  military  police  and MI  personnel  is 
necessary so that,  when  interrogators promise an  approved incentive to a detainee, the 
military police ensure that the detainee receives the incentive and is allowed to retain it. The 
use  of  incentives  must  be  coordinated  with,  and  approved  by,  the  detention  facility 
commander.  The  provision  and  withdrawal  of  incentives  may  not  affect  the  baseline 
standards of humane treatment. For example, military police may provide incentives such 
as special food items. When those incentives are withdrawn, however, military police must 
still provide the normal rations. Failure to cooperate in an intelligence interrogation cannot 
result in disadvantageous treatment. The withdrawal of incentives provided to similarly 
situated detainees must be based on disciplinary reasons or reasons of security, not failure 
to cooperate with HUMINT interrogations. 
„ 
A system of information exchange between the military police and interrogators about the 
actions and behaviors of detainees and other significant events associated with detainees. 
„ 
The interrogation chain of command’s coordination on the interrogation plan with the CDO. 
The CDO (in conjunction with the MI commander) may convene a multidiscipline custody 
and  control oversight team including, but not  limited to, military  police personnel, MI 
personnel, a behavioral science consultant (if available), and legal representatives. The team 
can advise and provide measures to ensure that effective custody and control is used and 
compliant with the requirements of applicable U.S. laws and regulations, international laws, 
execution orders, FRAGOs,  and other operationally  specific  guidelines. Guards do not 
conduct intelligence interrogations and will not set the conditions for interrogations. Guards 
may support interrogators as additional security (for example, for combative detainees) 
according to JP 3-63, FM 2-22.3, and the approved interrogation plan. 
„ 
The maintenance of an effective, two-way communications system between military police 
and MI elements. 
Training personnel at the internment facility for the mutual understanding of military police and 
MI missions. Interrogation operations familiarization training for military police. 
Providing suitable interrogation space and resources within the internment facility to facilitate 
the intelligence collection mission. 
Authorizing outside access to MI-held detainees only when coordinated with the interrogation 
element and G-2X and/or J-2X. 
Command and Staff Roles and Responsibilities 
12 February 2010 
FM 3-39.40 
3-7 
3-16. With specific regard to detainees, the detention facility commander— 
Is responsible for the administrative processing of each detainee. (When processing is complete, 
DA Form 2674-R [Enemy Prisoner of War/Civilian Internee Strength Report] is transmitted to 
the TDRC.) 
Ensures  that  detainees  are  treated  humanely.  (The  detention facility  commander  will  have 
unfettered access to all areas and operations.) 
Immediately reports allegations of detainee mistreatment immediately through the appropriate 
chain of command. 
Ensures  that  cadre  and  support  personnel  understand  the  different  rules  and  procedures 
applicable to each category of detainee. (Military police leaders and Soldiers must be constantly 
aware  of the category of  personnel they are handling and enforce  the applicable  rules  and 
regulations.) 
Ensures that the following items are posted in each facility in English and the language of the 
detainees housed there, and makes them available to those without access to the posted copies: 
„ 
Geneva Conventions. 
„ 
Facility  regulations,  orders,  and  notices  (printed  in  the  languages  of  detainees  and/or 
depicted  in such a  manner  as to ensure understanding by  all detainees in the  facility) 
relating to the conduct and activities of detainees. 
3-17. The  detention facility commander  maintains  a  copy of, and strictly accounts for, all documents 
(including photographs) on file as designated by the SOP or by command policies. Commanders provide 
copies to all DOD and Army assessment or investigative authorities as requested, ensure safe and proper 
storage, and account for records in archives. 
3-18. Regulations and other guidance relative to the administration, employment, and compensation of 
detainees  are  prescribed  in  detail  in  AR  190-8,  Department  of  Finance  and  Accounting  Service–
Indianapolis (DFAS-IN) 37-1, FM 1-06, FM 4-02, and FM 27-10. 
JOINT INTERROGATION AND DEBRIEFING CENTER 
COMMANDER/MILITARY INTELLIGENCE BATTALION 
3-19. The JIDC commander is responsible for matters relating to interrogations, intelligence collection and 
reporting,  and  interaction  with  other  agencies  involved  in  the  intelligence  and/or  evidence-gathering 
process. The JIDC is normally commanded by an MI officer, who is operational control to the CDO and 
tactical  control  to  the  TIF  commander  for  humane  treatment,  evacuation,  and  custody  and  control 
(reception,  processing,  administration,  internment,  and safety)  of  detainees;  protection  measures;  and 
operation of the internment facility. The JIDC commander is responsible for the conduct of interrogation 
operations,  to  include  the  prioritization  of  effort  and  control  of  interrogation  or  other  intelligence 
operations. The JIDC maintains a technical direction relationship through MI channels for interrogation 
functions  and  intelligence  reporting.  Other  responsibilities  may  include,  but  are  not  limited  to,  the 
following: 
Developing and  implementing synchronized tactics, techniques,  and procedures that comply 
with applicable U.S. laws and regulations, international laws, execution orders, FRAGOs, and 
other operationally specific guidelines (DOD policies). 
Coordinating with the detention facility commander to ensure that the roles and responsibilities 
of HUMINT collectors and military police are understood and applied throughout all phases of 
detainee operations. 
Coordinating  with  the  detention  facility commander  for  MI  personnel participation in base 
operations support, to include tenant unit security, interpreter support, sustainment support, and 
processing-line screening. 
Keeping the CDO informed of interrogation operations. 
Establishing and maintaining technical guidance channels to G-2X and/or J-2X assets. 
Chapter 3 
3-8 
FM 3-39.40 
12 February 2010 
Executing  interrogation  and  debriefing  operations  according  to  the  priorities  and  guidance 
outlined  by the G-2X and/or J-2X (as the asset manager for interrogation operations at the 
JIDC). 
Coordinating  with  the  military  criminal  investigative  organization  and  legal  agencies  for 
evidentiary measures and resolutions as required. 
3-20. The JIDC normally operates within a permanent or semipermanent facility, is administratively and 
operationally  self-sufficient,  and  develops  a  logistical  relationship  with  the  parent  unit  manning  the 
internment facility. The JIDC— 
Normally  consists  of  a  facility  headquarters  and  operations,  analysis,  interrogation,  and 
screening sections. 
Is located within the TIF. 
Is structured to meet mission variable requirements within the theater. 
Includes HUMINT collectors who are trained in interrogation operations; counterintelligence 
personnel; personnel for captured enemy documents; and intelligence analysts (as applicable) 
from the Army, Air Force, Marine Corps, Navy, and other government agencies. 
Maintains the capability to deploy HUMINT collection teams forward as needed to conduct 
interrogations or debriefings to sources of interest that cannot be readily evacuated to the JIDC. 
Often establishes a combined interrogation facility with multinational HUMINT collectors or 
interrogators if operating as part of a multinational operation. 
INTELLIGENCE ANALYSTS 
3-21. Research analysts perform the following duties: 
Research the background of detainees utilizing the source analysis of available data to place the 
detainee into context for collectors. 
Analyze, combine, and report intelligence information collected through the interrogation and/or 
debriefing process for the purpose of validating collected information and identifying related 
intelligence gaps. 
Develop indicators for each intelligence requirement to support screening operations; develop 
detainee-specific collection requirements for collectors. 
Develop and maintain the database and organize collected information for local and customer 
use. 
Make recommendations to the detention facility commander for release/transfer of detainees. 
HUMAN INTELLIGENCE COLLECTORS 
3-22. HUMINT collectors perform the following duties: 
Develop indicators for each intelligence requirement to support screening operations. 
Make recommendations to the detention facility commander for the release/transfer of detainees. 
Provide recommendations to the detention facility commander concerning the segregation of 
detainees. (See FM 2-22.3.) (HUMINT collectors must request approval to employ the restricted 
interrogation technique  of  separation.  The combatant  commander  must  approve  the  use  of 
separation.  The  first  general/flag  officer  in  their  chain  of  command  must  approve  each 
interrogation plan that uses separation. FM 2-22.3, appendix M, must be followed. 
Report information collected through the interrogation process. 
Conduct intelligence interrogations, debriefings, or tactical questioning to gain intelligence from 
captured or detained personnel humanely, according to applicable law and policies. 
Ensure that interrogation techniques are implemented according to applicable laws and policies. 
Develop interrogation plans according to the unit SOP before conducting an interrogation. 
Disseminate screening reports to potential users on a timely basis. 
Command and Staff Roles and Responsibilities 
12 February 2010 
FM 3-39.40 
3-9 
INTERPRETERS AND TRANSLATORS 
3-23. Unless otherwise authorized by the joint force commander, only individuals with the proper training 
and  appropriate  security  level  are  allowed  within  the  confines  of  the  facility  to  perform 
interpreter/translator  duties  (for  example,  multinational  members).  Categories  of  contract  interpreters 
include— 
Category  I  linguists.  Category  I  linguists  are  locally  hired  personnel  who  have  an 
understanding of the English language. They undergo a limited screening and are hired in the 
theater. They do not possess a security clearance and are used for unclassified work. During 
most  operations,  Category I linguists require  rescreening  on  a scheduled basis.  Category  I 
linguists should not be used for HUMINT collection operations. 
Category II linguists. Category II linguists are U.S. citizens who have a native command of the 
target language and a near-native command of the English language. They undergo a screening 
process, which includes a national agency check. Upon favorable findings, they are granted an 
equivalent  of  a  Secret  collateral  clearance.  This  is  the  category  of  linguist  most  used  by 
HUMINT collectors. 
Category III linguists. Category III linguists are U.S. citizens who have native command of the 
target  language  and  native command  of  the  English  language.  These  personnel undergo  a 
screening process, which includes a special background investigation. Upon favorable findings, 
they are granted an equivalent of a top secret clearance. Category III linguists are normally used 
for high-ranking official meetings and strategic collectors. 
D
ETAINEE 
O
PERATIONS 
M
EDICAL 
D
IRECTOR
3-24. The  theater  Army  Surgeon  for  the  Army  Service  component  command  designates  a  detainee 
operations medical director to oversee the aspects of medical care provided to detainees. This director 
establishes and maintains technical guidance and supervision over medical personnel who are engaged in 
providing  health  care  to  detainees,  regardless  of  unit  assignment.  The  detainee  operations  medical 
director— 
Advises the CDO and theater commander on the health of detainees. 
Provides guidance, in conjunction with the command judge advocate, on the ethical and legal 
aspects of providing medical care to detainees. 
Recommends the task organization of medical resources to satisfy mission requirements. 
Recommends policies concerning the medical support for detainee operations. 
Develops, coordinates, and synchronizes health consultation services for detainees. 
Evaluates and interprets medical statistical data. 
Recommends  policies  and  determines  requirements  and  priorities  for  medical  logistics 
operations in support of detainee health care, to include blood and blood products, medical 
supply and resupply, medical equipment, medical equipment maintenance and repair services, 
formulary  development,  optometric  support,  single  vision  and  multivision  optical  lens 
fabrication, and spectacle repair. 
Strictly  accounts  for  and  maintains  medical  records  (to  include  photographs)  on  detainees 
according to AR 40-66 and AR 40-400. 
Recommends  medical  evacuation policies and procedures and monitors medical evacuation 
support to detainees. 
Recommends policies, protocols, and procedures pertaining to the medical and dental treatment 
of detainees. (These  policies, protocols,  and  procedures  provide the same standard  of  care 
provided to U.S. armed forces in the same area.) 
Ensures  that monthly weigh-ins are conducted  and  reported  for  detainees who  are  held  in 
medical facilities as required by regulations. 
Plans  and  implements  preventive  medicine  operations  and  facilitates  health  risk 
communications,  to  include  implementing  preventive  medicine  programs  and  initiating 
preventive medicine measures to counter the medical threat. 
Chapter 3 
3-10 
FM 3-39.40 
12 February 2010 
Ensures that medical personnel are trained in the medical aspects of the Geneva Conventions. 
Ensures that health care providers are appropriately credentialed and that their scope of practice 
is defined. 
Ensures  that  detainee  medical  history  is  recorded  in  the  Detainee  Reporting  System  per  
AR 190-8. The minimum required data is— 
„ 
Monthly height/weight. 
„ 
Immunizations. 
„ 
Initial medical assessment. 
„ 
Prerelease/repatriation medical assessment. 
Upon the death of a detainee, coordinates with the Armed Forces Medical Examiner who will 
determine if an autopsy is required. (The remains are not released from U.S. custody without 
authorization from the Armed Forces Medical Examiner and the responsible commander except 
by waiver from the Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Detainee Affairs or his designated 
representative.) 
MILITARY POLICE ORGANIZATIONS IN SUPPORT OF 
INTERNMENT AND RESETTLEMENT OPERATIONS 
3-25. The type and quantity of units conducting I/R operations vary from echelon to echelon based on 
mission variables, higher directives, and the scope and nature of the mission. The types of military police 
units that may be involved in I/R operations are discussed in the following paragraphs. (See appendix B 
and FM 3-39.) 
M
ILITARY 
P
OLICE 
C
OMMAND
3-26.  The MPC is a theater level organization that is responsible for military police functions performed at 
echelons above corps. Military police organizations performing military police functions at echelons above 
corps will typically be task-organized under the MPC. The MPC commander (usually a general officer) is 
normally designated as the CDO for the entire theater of operations and reports directly to the theater 
commander  or  a  designated  representative.  The  MPC  is  responsible  for  implementing  theater-wide 
standards and ensuring compliance with established DOD and DA detainee policies. In addition, the MPC 
provides  policy  oversight  to  ensure  compliance  with  theater-specific  I/R  policies  and  procedures. As 
required, exercises tactical/operational control of tactical combat forces that are conducting theater level 
response force operations. 
M
ILITARY 
P
OLICE 
B
RIGADE
3-27. Military police brigades are task-organized under an MPC or under a division or corps headquarters. 
Military police brigades provide C2 to two to five military police battalions that are performing military 
police functions,  to include  I/R  operations.  With  organic  or  appropriate  organizational  augmentation, 
military police brigades can provide C2 for long-term detention operations at theater, corps, or division 
levels. In the absence of an MPC, a military police brigade commander may serve as the CDO for a theater 
or specific AO. 
M
ILITARY 
P
OLICE 
B
ATTALIONS
3-28. There are three categories of battalions within the Military Police Corps Regiment that are involved 
with I/R operations—military police, I/R, and CID—and each type of battalion has a specific role.  
Military police battalions, with the appropriate organizational augmentation, can provide C2 for 
short- and long-term I/R operations.  
I/R battalions are specifically designed to establish and provide C2 for long-term I/R operations. 
I/R  battalions  are  normally  employed  at  the  TIF  level  or  higher,  with  the  I/R  battalion 
commander serving as the TIF commander. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested