c# view pdf : Move pages in pdf document control Library system web page asp.net wpf console USArmy-InternmentResettlement5-part89

Command and Staff Roles and Responsibilities 
12 February 2010 
FM 3-39.40 
3-11 
CID battalions, provide C2 for criminal investigations of felony crimes according to AR 195-2, 
including those associated with I/R operations. It has a supporting, rather than primary, role in 
I/R operations.  
3-29. In small-scale contingency operations or in the absence of a higher military police headquarters, an 
I/R or military police battalion commander may serve as the CDO. 
3-30. The  military  police and I/R  battalions  are  structured  to  provide  C2  of  two to  five  companies  or 
elements. A military police or I/R battalion is capable of planning, integrating, and directing the execution 
of military police missions conducted by a mix of military police companies. Either battalion may be found 
within  the  military  police  brigade,  the  MEB,  or  in  support  of  a  BCT.  I/R  battalions  may  C2  a  
task-organized force that consists of military police, MI, legal, medical, and other specialties required for 
I/R operations. A military police or I/R battalion may support an MEB in an I/R role. 
M
ILITARY 
P
OLICE 
C
OMPANIES
3-31. There are three types of companies within the Military Police Corps Regiment––military police, I/R, 
and guard. Similar to military police battalions, each company provides specific capabilities in regards to 
I/R operations, and correspondingly, focus their support on different aspects of I/R operations. 
Military police companies can perform facility security, transport/escort security, and external 
facility protection.  
Guard  companies  with  limited  wheeled  vehicles  and  weapons  platforms  typically  provide 
facility  security  and transport/escort  security  for  I/R  operations.  I/R companies  are specially 
designed  for  long-term,  close-contact  I/R  operations.  All  I/R  companies  have  the  ability  to 
perform detainment tasks as part of contingency operations or confinement duties at permanent 
U.S. military corrections facilities. 
I
NTERNMENT AND 
R
ESETTLEMENT 
D
ETACHMENTS
3-32. There are four types of  military police detachments specifically designed for I/R operations—I/R 
detachment, TDRC, camp liaison detachment, and brigade liaison detachment. 
The  I/R  detachment  augments  the  I/R  battalion  and  is  aligned  with  the  operation  of  a  
1,000-person EPW enclosure or a facility for 2,000 DCs. 
The TDRC collects, processes, and disseminates information regarding detainees to authorized 
agencies. Although typically operating at the theater level, the TDRC may be directly linked to 
the TIF to facilitate accounting. It is a modular organization that is capable of breaking down 
into four separate teams to be deployed in support of smaller contingency operations at the team 
level. 
The camp liaison detachment/brigade liaison detachment maintains continuous accountability of 
detainees  captured  by  U.S.  armed  forces  that have  been  transferred  to  the  control  of  HN  or 
multinational  forces.  The  camp  liaison  detachment/brigade  liaison  detachment  monitors  the 
custody  and  care  of  U.S.-captured prisoners  that  are  being  interned by  HN  or  multinational 
forces according to the Geneva Conventions. 
M
ILITARY 
W
ORKING 
D
OGS
3-33. MWDs  offer  a  psychological  and  actual  deterrent  against  physical  threats  presented  by  I/R 
populations. (See FM 3-19.17.) They may be used— 
To reinforce exterior security measures against penetration and attack by small enemy forces. 
As patrol dogs to track escaped prisoners. 
As perimeter security patrols. 
For narcotic and/or explosives detection. 
To deter escapes during external work details. 
Move pages in pdf document - re-order PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Customizing Page Order of PDF Document in C# Project
reverse pdf page order online; how to change page order in pdf document
Move pages in pdf document - VB.NET PDF Page Move Library: re-order PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Sort PDF Document Pages Using VB.NET Demo Code
rearrange pages in pdf file; how to rearrange pages in pdf using reader
Chapter 3 
3-12 
FM 3-39.40 
12 February 2010 
3-34. MWD employment compliance  and oversight capabilities typically exist at the MPC and military 
police brigade  levels. Responsibilities, to include  those for kennel masters,  should  be  embedded  within 
those organizations to ensure that proper mission-oriented taskings for MWDs are implemented. 
3-35. At the battalion level, the MWD program provides the capabilities of two patrol explosive detection 
dogs  and  one  patrol  narcotic  detection  dog.  These  MWDs  are  normally  employed  exclusively  at  the 
TIF/SIF levels. 
WARNING 
MWDs, contracted dogs, or any other dog in use by a government 
agency will not be used to guard detainees, U.S. military 
prisoners, or DCs. Additionally, dogs may not be used as part of 
an interrogation approach, nor to harass, intimidate, threaten, or 
coerce a detainee for interrogation purposes. 
STAFF DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES IN SUPPORT OF 
INTERNMENT AND RESETTLEMENT 
3-36. The staff primary function is to help commanders exercise control over all aspects of operations and 
sustainment. Control allows commanders to direct the execution of operations. The staff officers/sections 
described in the following paragraphs are especially critical in detainee operations. (See FM 6-0.) 
P
ROVOST 
M
ARSHAL
3-37. The PM advises the CDO and/or commanders on military police capabilities, programs, and policies. 
The PM  coordinates daily with the commander and  staff  officers on the employment  of military  police 
assets and support, ensures that military police planning is practical and  flexible, and ensures that plans 
reflect  manpower  and  resources  that  the  military  police  require.  The  PM advises  the  CDO  on  the C2 
relationship of military police and support assets. When required, the PM coordinates with the movement 
control officer for transportation assets to evacuate detainees, U.S. military prisoners, and/or DCs. 
O
PERATIONS 
O
FFICER
3-38. The  operations  officer  is  responsible  for  planning,  organizing,  directing,  supervising,  training, 
coordinating,  and  reporting  activities  when  conducting  operations  involving  detainees,  U.S.  military 
prisoners, or DCs. The roles and responsibilities of the operations officer may include, but are not limited 
to— 
Planning and directing military police activities required for I/R operations. 
Recommending task organization and assigning missions to subordinate elements. 
Maintaining detainee accountability and the detainee automated personnel database. 
Coordinating detainee evacuation and transportation requirements. 
Transferring detainees to civilian authorities. 
I
NTELLIGENCE 
O
FFICER
3-39. The intelligence officer advises the commander on matters pertaining to MI, operations, and training 
at  all  echelons  where  detainee  operations  are  likely  to  occur.  The  intelligence  officer  produces  and 
disseminates intelligence products throughout the chain of command. 
3-40. Intelligence requirements include specific information that the commander requires to maintain the 
continued control of detainees and those items of information requested by higher headquarters and other 
agencies.  The  intelligence  officer  prepares  priority  intelligence  requirements  in  coordination  with  the 
C# TIFF: How to Reorder, Rearrange & Sort TIFF Pages Using C# Code
Reorder, Rearrange and Sort TIFF Document Pages in C#.NET Application. this C#.NET Tiff image management library, you can easily change and move the position of
reorder pdf pages; change page order in pdf reader
C# Word - Sort Word Pages Order in C#.NET
adjust the order of all or several Word document pages, or just page inserting, Word page deleting and Word document splitting C# DLLs: Move Word Page Position.
reverse page order pdf online; move pages within pdf
Command and Staff Roles and Responsibilities 
12 February 2010 
FM 3-39.40 
3-13 
multinational  force  HUMINT  and  multinational  force  human  intelligence  and  counterintelligence  staff 
element  (C-2X)  J-2X  section,  and  other  interested  agencies. The  CDO  does  not  establish  interrogation 
priorities,  but  will  work  with  the  detainee  operations staff and higher  headquarters to resolve issues  in 
implementing the interrogation plan according to the approved theater Army standards for interrogations. 
The JIDC is responsible for coordinating intelligence requirements to maintain a constant flow of useful 
intelligence  for the joint  force commander. The JIDC  must have unfettered access to the C-2X/J-2X  to 
synchronize  HUMINT  and  counterintelligence  collection  priorities  on  the  collection  of  actionable 
intelligence. 
3-41. Intelligence representatives from the G-2X, J-2X, and/or C-2X will be attached to the CDO staff. The 
human intelligence and counterintelligence operations manager or staff section representatives will advise 
the CDO on all HUMINT and counterintelligence policy and operations. 
M
EDICAL 
S
ECTION
3-42. The I/R battalion and brigade are staffed with medical sections, to include preventive medicine. (See 
appendix I.) The medical personnel section is responsible for the health service support of the command 
and I/R populations within the I/R facility. This section advises the commander and the commander’s staff, 
plans and directs Level 1 health care, and arranges for Level 2 and Level 3 (including air/ground medical 
evacuation  and  hospitalization)  when  required.  It  provides  for  the  prevention  of  disease  through  the 
preventive medicine programs. The medical section consists of— 
The  medical  treatment squad  provides  routine  medical care  (sick  call)  and  advanced  trauma 
management for detainees. U.S. medical personnel supervise qualified  RP who  are providing 
medical care for detainees. This squad performs initial medical exams to determine the physical 
fitness of arriving detainees as stipulated by the Geneva Conventions. It has  the capability to 
operate as two separate treatment teams. 
The preventive medicine section, which provides limited preventive medicine services for the 
facility. This section performs sanitary inspections of  housing, food service operations, water 
supplies, waste disposal operations, and other operations that may present a medical nuisance or 
health  hazard  to  personnel.  It  provides  training  and  guidance  on  all  aspects  of  preventive 
medicine to the staff, unit personnel, and others involved in the operation. 
S
TAFF 
J
UDGE 
A
DVOCATE
3-43. The  SJA  provides  operational  law  advice  and  support  for  I/R  operations  (particularly  the 
interpretation of the Geneva Conventions), to include the application of force in quelling riots and other 
disturbances. The SJA also provides advice and support in any investigation that is required following the 
death or injury of a detainee during internment. In addition, the SJA serves as the recorder for Article 5 
tribunals, which determine the status of individuals who have been detained. There is no requirement that 
the  detainee  commit a  hostile act  before being  entitled to a  tribunal. A  tribunal  may be  established  to 
determine the status of an individual because of complaints and/or inquiries received from the protecting 
powers or the ICRC. The SJA serves as the commander’s liaison to the ICRC and provides legal advice to 
the commander on— 
Military justice. 
Administrative and civil laws. 
Contracts and fiscal laws. 
International and operational laws. 
Legal assistance. 
Claims. 
3-44. The SJA provides technical advice and assistance pertaining to detainee labor policy as it relates to 
supporting local indigenous requirements that do not directly advance the war effort. The SJA ensures that 
the policy complies with all treaties and conventions. 
C# PowerPoint - Sort PowerPoint Pages Order in C#.NET
the order of all or several PowerPoint document pages, or just PowerPoint page deleting and PowerPoint document splitting C# DLLs: Move PowerPoint Page Position.
move pages in pdf online; how to rearrange pdf pages
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
RasterEdge XDoc.PDF allows you to easily move PDF document pages position, including sorting pages and swapping two pages. Copying and Pasting Pages.
reorder pdf pages online; moving pages in pdf
Chapter 3 
3-14 
FM 3-39.40 
12 February 2010 
H
UMAN 
R
ESOURCE 
O
FFICER
3-45. The human resource officer is the staff officer responsible for advising the commander on human 
resource  support  to  the  organization.  Human  resource  support  includes  manning  the  force  (personnel 
accountability,  personnel  readiness  management,  strength  reporting  and  personnel  information 
management), providing  human  resource  support  (postal  and  essential personnel services),  coordinating 
personnel support (morale, warfare, recreation, and command programs), and conducting human resource 
planning and operations. The human resource officer is responsible for maintaining personnel records of 
U.S. military prisoners, providing mail operations to detainees and, by exception, assist in mail support to 
DCs. The human resource officer may also be tasked with coordinating the tracking and accountability of 
DCs, providing  limited administrative  support for U.S. military prisoners, and  preparing documents for 
court-martial charges for  detainees  and  U.S.  military  prisoners. Each  I/R battalion has  a personnel  and 
administration  section,  which  is  capable  of  inprocessing  eight  individuals  per  hour  (depending  on  the 
category). 
F
INANCE AND 
A
CCOUNTING 
O
FFICER
3-46. The  finance  and  accounting  officer  accounts  for  impounded  financial  assets  (cash  and  other 
negotiable instruments) of  applicable detainees.  (See DFAS-IN Regulation 37-1 and  FM  1-06.) An I/R 
finance section is found in each I/R battalion. Finance personnel coordinate with the supporting finance 
unit to record pay and/or labor credits, canteen purchases and/or coupons issued, and other transactions. 
They coordinate for payroll, disbursement, and repatriation settlement processing. The finance section chief 
advises the commander on finance and accounting issues. 
C
IVIL
-M
ILITARY 
O
PERATIONS 
O
FFICER
3-47. The civil-military operations officer–– 
Provides technical advice and assistance in community relations and information strategies. 
Plans  positive,  continuous  community  relations  programs  to  gain  and  maintain  public 
understanding, goodwill, and support for military operations. 
Acts as the liaison and coordinates with other U.S. government agencies; HN civil and military 
authorities  concerned  with  I/R  operations;  and  NGOs,  IOs,  and  international  humanitarian 
organizations in the AO. 
Coordinates  with  the  SJA concerning advice given  to commanders  about RUF  when  dealing 
with detainees. 
Provides technical advice and assistance in the reorientation of enemy defectors or detainees. 
C
HAPLAIN OR 
U
NIT 
M
INISTRY 
T
EAM
3-48. The  chaplain  or  unit  ministry team  assists  the  commander in providing  religious support  for  I/R 
operations. The chaplain or team— 
Serves as the chaplain for detention facility personnel, which does not include detainees. 
Advises the commander on detainee religious issues and support. 
Serves as a moral and ethical advisor to the detention facility commander. 
Exercises supervision and control over RP religious leaders within the facility. 
Is prohibited from privileged communications with detainees. 
Acts as a liaison with clerical personnel who are supporting rehabilitative religious programs. 
E
NGINEER 
O
FFICER
3-49. The engineer officer can assist in planning and implementing infrastructure design and improvement 
at all echelons where I/R operations occur. The support necessary for horizontal and vertical construction 
support,  repair  and  maintenance  of the  infrastructure  that  supports  I/R  operations,  and  other  necessary 
support is coordinated through the engineer officer. The engineer officer may coordinate for the training of 
detainees for internal and external labor requirements that involve construction or repair of facilities, but 
C# PDF insert text Library: insert text into PDF content in C#.net
int pageIndex = 0; // Move cursor to (400F, 100F). aChar, font, pageIndex, cursor); // Output the new document. Program.RootPath + "\\" output.pdf"; doc.Save
how to move pages around in a pdf document; how to rearrange pages in a pdf reader
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
Support adding and inserting one or multiple pages to existing PDF document. Add and Insert Multiple PDF Pages to PDF Document Using C#.
how to reorder pages in pdf reader; rearrange pages in pdf document
Command and Staff Roles and Responsibilities 
12 February 2010 
FM 3-39.40 
3-15 
this will require military police support to control and supervise the detainees. With proper planning and 
resourcing, the engineer officer can coordinate— 
Construction support for facilities. 
Construction, acquisition, maintenance, and  repairs of semipermanent and permanent utilities, 
water supply system, sewage system, and portable or fixed electric power utilities. 
Fire protection measures for facilities. 
P
UBLIC 
A
FFAIRS 
O
FFICER
3-50. The  public  affairs  officer    understands  and  fulfills  the  information  needs  of  Soldiers,  the  Army 
community, and the public in matters related to I/R operations. In the interest of national security and the 
protection of detainees from public curiosity, detainees will not  be  photographed or interviewed by  the 
news media. The public affairs officer— 
Serves as the command spokesperson for communication with external media. 
Facilitates media efforts to cover operations by expediting the flow of complete, accurate, and 
timely information. 
S
IGNAL 
O
FFICER
3-51. The signal officer is responsible for matters concerning signal operations, automation management, 
network management, and information security. The signal officer is typically located at the military police 
brigade. 
M
OVEMENT 
C
ONTROL 
O
FFICER
3-52. The  movement  control  officer  plans  and  coordinates  the  movement  of  detainees,  U.S.  military 
prisoners,  and  DCs  and  their  property  with the movement control  center and coordinates  with  brigade 
operations for the daily transportation requirements for the evacuation and transfer of the I/R population. 
This includes determining the transportation requirements for the evacuation of the I/R population from one 
level of internment to the next and coordinating arrangements. 
I
NSPECTOR 
G
ENERAL
3-53. The inspector general section— 
Advises I/R commanders and staffs. 
Conducts assessments, surveys, and studies to comply with international, state, and U.S. laws. 
Receives allegations and conducts investigations and inquiries based on reports and information 
obtained  from  the  I/R  population,  U.S.  armed  forces,  and/or  multinational  guard  and  police 
forces. 
Consults  with international  and  U.S. agencies  in  matters  pertaining to the  overall  health  and 
welfare of detainees, U.S. military prisoners, and DCs. 
Determines the military police unit’s discipline, efficiency, morale, training, and readiness and 
provides feedback to the chain of command. 
Resolves complaints made by detainees,  U.S. military prisoners, DCs,  and U.S. armed forces 
personnel in a manner that is consistent with military necessity. 
Identifies negative trends to correct and improve I/R operations that are according to doctrine, 
military laws, international laws, UN mandates, and foreign national laws. 
Assists in the resolution of systemic issues pertaining to the processing and administration of the 
protected population. 
3-54. The inspector general section reports war crime allegations from detainees or U.S. military prisoners, 
upon  receipt,  through  the  chain  of  command  to  the  SJA  or  the  U.S.  Army  Criminal  Investigation 
Command. The inspector general does not investigate war crimes. Primary investigative responsibility for 
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Able to add and insert one or multiple pages to existing adobe PDF document in VB.NET. Add and Insert Multiple PDF Pages to PDF Document Using VB.
reorder pages in pdf document; move pages in a pdf file
C# PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file for C#
load, create, convert and edit PDF document (pages) in C# PDF files; insert, delete, move, rotate, copy and robust APIs for editing PDF document hyperlink (url
reorder pages pdf file; reorder pdf pages reader
Chapter 3 
3-16 
FM 3-39.40 
12 February 2010 
alleged war crimes belongs to the U.S. Army Criminal Investigation Command. The SJA provides the U.S. 
Army Criminal Investigation Command with legal advice during war crime investigations. 
P
SYCHOLOGICAL 
O
PERATIONS 
O
FFICER
3-55. The  PSYOP  officer  in  charge  of  supporting  I/R  operations  serves  as  the  special  staff  officer 
responsible for PSYOP. The PSYOP officer advises the military police commander on the psychological 
impact of  military police or MI actions to prevent misunderstandings and disturbances by detainees and 
DCs. The supporting I/R PSYOP team has two missions that reduce the need to divert military police assets 
to maintain security in the I/R facility. (See appendix J.) The team— 
Assists the military police force in controlling detainees and DCs. 
Introduces detainees or DCs to U.S. and multinational policy. 
3-56. The PSYOP team also supports the military police custodial mission in the I/R facility. The team— 
Develops PSYOP products that are designed to pacify and acclimate detainees or DCs to accept 
U.S. I/R facility authority and regulations. 
Gains the cooperation of detainees or DCs to reduce the number of guards needed. 
Identifies malcontents, trained agitators, and political leaders within the facility who may try to 
organize resistance or create disturbances. 
Develops and executes indoctrination programs to reduce or remove antagonistic attitudes. 
Identifies political activists. 
Provides  loudspeaker  support (such as  administrative announcements  and facility  instructions 
when necessary). 
Helps the military police commander control detainee and DC populations during emergencies. 
Plans and executes a PSYOP program that produces an understanding and appreciation of U.S. 
policies and actions. 
Note.  PSYOP  personnel  use  comprehensive  information,  reorientation,  and  educational  and 
vocational programs to prepare detainees and DCs for repatriation. 
3-57. The PSYOP officer is an integral part of the I/R structure. The PSYOP officer often may work in 
close conjunction with the behavioral science consultation team, if available, for behavioral assessments 
and  recommendations.  The  behavioral  science  consultation  team  may  develop  behavioral  management 
plans and perform many other functions to assist the PSYOP officer if directed. The I/R facility commander 
may designate a location in which PSYOP personnel can conduct interviews of the various categories of 
people associated with I/R. This location must be separate and away from the interrogation areas. 
C
IVIL 
A
FFAIRS 
P
ERSONNEL
3-58. CA personnel primarily support civil-military operations. (See chapters 2 and 6.) They conduct DC 
operations in support of I/R across the spectrum of operations. Other related activities that they conduct 
include— 
Population and resource control. 
Foreign internal defense. 
Humanitarian assistance. 
Unconventional warfare. 
C
OUNTERINTELLIGENCE 
A
GENTS
3-59. Counterintelligence agents may be attached or in direct support of a mission to an I/R battalion or 
military police brigade to assist the facility commander with intelligence requirements for the facility and 
surrounding area and to ensure the safety and security of personnel operating in and around the facility. 
Command and Staff Roles and Responsibilities 
12 February 2010 
FM 3-39.40 
3-17 
Note.  Counterintelligence  agents  may  serve  as  a  central  repository  for  information  and 
intelligence on safety and security issues related to the facility. 
3-60. Such responsibilities may include— 
Identification of detainee agitators, leaders, and their followers. 
Identification of existing clandestine detainee organizations, to include— 
„ 
Strength. 
„ 
Objectives. 
„ 
Member identity. 
Identification of existing underground communications systems— 
„ 
Between compounds and internment facilities. 
„ 
With indigenous civilian personnel. 
„ 
For overt attempts by detainees or local indigenous people to communicate with each other. 
Identification  of  suspicious  activities  by  local  people  near  the  internment  facility  (such  as 
photographing or sketching the facility). 
Identification of the existence of fabricated weapons, stores of food, and supplies of clothing in 
the compound. 
Identification of plans by detainees to conduct demonstrations, to include— 
„ 
Date and time. 
„ 
Number of detainees involved, by compound. 
„ 
Nature of the planned demonstration (passive, harassing, or violent). 
Identification of detainee  objectives,  propaganda,  and  attempts  to  weaken  or  test  internment 
facility authority and security, establish control in individual compounds, and orchestrate mass 
escapes. 
L
OGISTICS 
O
FFICER
3-61. The logistics officer is responsible for the acquisition, storage, movement, distribution, maintenance, 
evacuation, and disposition of all classes of supplies and materiel. Additionally, the logistics officer (in the 
absence  of  an  engineer  officer)  must  provide  staff  oversight  to  ensure  acquisition,  construction, 
maintenance, operation, and disposition of facilities. 
S
UBSISTENCE
/F
OOD 
S
ERVICE 
O
FFICER
3-62. The subsistence/food service officer directs activities related to field feeding. He/she inspects survey 
operations, advises on regulatory requirements, prepares instructions, and provides, technical guidance for 
subordinate elements. He/she also assists in the supervision of Class 1 activities for detainees and DCs. 
I
NTERAGENCY 
R
EPRESENTATIVE
3-63. The  interagency  representative  coordinates  visits  with  the  CDO.  Additionally,  the  interagency 
representative  coordinates  with  the  detention  facility  commander  and  JIDC  commander  before  in  any 
interview or interrogation. 
M
ULTINATIONAL 
R
EPRESENTATIVE
3-64. The multinational representative coordinates visits, to include inspections of conditions for detainees 
captured by their forces and coordinating with  the  detention  facility  commander  and JIDC  commander 
before they participate in interviews or interrogations. 
Chapter 3 
3-18 
FM 3-39.40 
12 February 2010 
GUARD FORCE 
3-65. The guard force provides external and internal security of the facility. A guard force at an I/R facility 
is tailored to the size and duration of the particular mission. The guard force may consist of a commander 
of the guard, one  or more  sergeants of the  guard, a  relief commander for each shift, and  the necessary 
number of guards. Orders for guards are as follows: 
General orders apply to all guards. Guards are required to know, understand, and comply with 
the general orders in FM 22-6. 
Special orders apply to particular posts and duties. These orders supplement general orders, are 
established by the commander, and may differ for various guard posts. Special orders may be 
written  for close contact  guards,  interview room guards, hospital guards, main gate/sally port 
guards, quick-reaction force guards, tower/perimeter guards, or walking patrol guards. 
3-66. The guard force is the primary source for the security of I/R populations and must have adequate 
weapons systems, transportation, communication, and night vision equipment to accomplish their mission. 
The guard force— 
Performs internal guard duties. 
Guards sally ports (a series of gates opening and exiting from an enclosed area) and main gates. 
Conducts searches. 
Receives and processes detainees, U.S. military prisoners, and DCs. 
Performs escort duties. 
Guards facility gates. 
Performs external guard duties. 
Performs tower guard duties. 
Guards transfer areas. 
Guards work sites. 
Guards perimeters. 
Maintains custody and control within detainee populations. 
Responds to emergencies according to emergency action plans and contingencies. 
Conducts inspections, searches, head counts, roll calls, and bed checks according to the SOP. 
Maintains custody and control of detainees who may be segregated from the general population 
due to inprocessing, administrative, or disciplinary reasons. 
Annotates required checks, visits, and other procedures as directed by the SOP. 
3-67. The guard force shift supervisor is responsible for the guard force. The shift supervisor— 
Supervises custodial personnel. 
Is responsible for the activities of I/R populations during the tour of duty. 
Monitors custody, control, and security measures. 
Ensures compliance with the daily operations plan for general and close detention. 
Initiates emergency control measures. 
Maintains DA Form 1594 (Daily Staff Journal or Duty Officer’s Log). 
Handles situations dealing with the I/R population in the absence of the commander. 
Maintains a portion of the detainee accountability database. 
12 February 2010 
FM 3-39.40 
4-1 
Chapter 4 
Capture, Initial Detention, and Screening 
Personnel  conducting  detainee  operations  must  ensure  that  these  operations  are 
performed in a manner that provides for the humane treatment and care of detainees, 
thereby reducing the probability of incidents of abuse involving U.S. armed forces 
and detainees. All detainees will be treated according to the GPW and GC unless 
directed otherwise by competent authority. The presumptive status of a detainee (until 
determined  otherwise by  a  tribunal  or combatant commander guidance)  from  the 
POC to the detention facility is EPW.
The professional execution of the I/R function 
is critical in sustaining goodwill among the indigenous population. While not directly 
translatable to dealing  with DCs, the  basic  framework of detainee capture,  initial 
detention, and screening has applicability in resettlement operations. 
DETAINEE FLOW 
4-1.  Detainee  operations  are  the  range  of  actions  taken  by U.S.  armed  forces, beginning at the POC; 
through movement to a DCP, DHA, or fixed internment facility, until their transfer, release, or repatriation. 
All  Soldiers  participating  in  military  operations  must  be  prepared  to  process  detainees.  Actions  at  the 
POC—the point at which a Soldier has custody of, and is responsible for safeguarding, a detainee—can 
directly affect the mission success and could have a lasting impact on U.S. strategic military objectives. 
4-2.  The number of detainees captured by U.S. armed forces at any given point can range from one to 
hundreds, depending on the scope of the operation and the elements involved. While one or two detainees 
may not create  a major  challenge,  a  large  number  of  detainees  require significantly  more  Soldiers  and 
resources and pose increased security risks to Soldiers and themselves. Detainees must be safeguarded, to 
include provisions for adequate space, food, and waste disposal. These tasks are manpower-intensive and 
can cause significant delays in onward movement and divert unit assets from the primary mission. 
4-3.  Military  police  are  responsible  for  receiving,  securing,  processing,  and  interning  detainees  and 
operating a DCP, DHA, TIF, and SIF. Detainees are normally evacuated from the POC to a DCP, DHA, or 
TIF;  however,  this  flow  may  be  modified  to  meet  intelligence  collection  and  medical  treatment 
requirements.  For  example,  an  injured  detainee  may  be  evacuated  to  any  medical  treatment  facility, 
including  one  at  a  higher  echelon  internment  facility  if  required  to  provide  proper  medical  treatment. 
Likewise, a detainee may  bypass one or more of the normal detainee flow steps if necessary to support 
intelligence collection. There may be situations where interests are legitimately in conflict. For example, a 
detainee may need to be expedited to the JIDC for proper interrogation, but the operational situation may 
preclude such evacuation.  Conflicts between competing interests  that cannot be resolved  at  subordinate 
levels will be raised to the common higher headquarters for resolution in an expeditious manner. There are 
numerous points at which decisions must be made at various echelons to retain or release a detainee. These 
decision points are the POC, DCP, DHA, and TIF. When operational circumstances dictate, a DCP or DHA 
may be bypassed, and the detainees may be delivered directly to a TIF. Detainees should not be brought 
directly  to  a  TIF/SIF.  Detainees  should  be  initially  processed  at  the  lowest  level  that  is  operationally 
feasible to maximize the timely receipt of critical tactical intelligence. Figure 4-1, page 4-2, illustrates this 
discussion.  Guards  are  required  when  accompanying  wounded  detainees  and  medical  personnel  to  an 
medical treatment facility. 
Chapter 4 
4-2 
B
RIGADE
4-4. 
respon
unit is
evacua
threat 
U.S.  a
detain
DCP. 
operat
capabi
rates t
not the
techni
and U
Woun
Legend: 
DCP 
DHA 
POC 
SIF 
TIF 
Note.  All  per
practices  and 
facilities. 
C
OMBAT 
T
Detainee oper
nsible for detai
s responsible fo
ates detainees t
t
to detainees as
armed  forces 
nees. The captu
u
(See  figure  4
tions at the DC
ility within  the
typical during 
e officer in ch
h
cal oversight i
U.S. and interna
nded or injured 
detaine
detaine
point o
strateg
theate
sonnel,  includ
procedures  w
T
EAM AND 
B
rations begin a
inee operation
or ensuring the
to the DCP wh
ssociated with 
can  fulfill  leg
uring unit typic
4-2.)  The  milit
CP  unless  the
e BCT  (for ex
x
counterinsurge
arge of a DCP
is exercised so
ational laws. H
H
detainees may
FM 3-
ee collection p
ee holding area
of capture 
gic internment f
f
r internment fa
Figure 4-1
ding  those  from
m
when conductin
n
B
ELOW
at the BCT or 
s might be a t
e humane treat
hen transportati
i
any ongoing c
gal  and  policy
cally releases d
tary  police  pla
la
re  are  multipl
xample, during
ency operation
P, the BCT PM
o that detainee
High-value deta
y need to be tak
-39.40
0
oint 
facility 
acility 
. Detainee flo
m  other  gover
r
ng detention  o
o
armored cava
eam or squad 
tment and prop
ion is available
conflict or ope
 requirement
detainees to the
atoon  leader  s
s
e  DCPs and t
g extended  sta
ns). In instance
M advises BCT 
s are treated h
ainees are typic
ken directly to 
ow 
rnment  agencie
e
r interrogation
alry regiment l
l
leader. The se
per handling of
e. This evacuat
t
ration and to p
ts  for  the  trea
e custody of th
h
erves  as  the  o
the requiremen
ability operatio
es where a mi
i
and subordina
humanely and 
cally taken dire
e
a medical treat
12
es,  must  adhe
e
n  operations w
w
level. At  the P
enior member o
f detainees. Th
tion is conduct
place them in a
atment  and  ad
e military poli
officer  in  char
nts exceed  the
ons and  high  d
ilitary police p
ate commander
r
within the par
ectly from the P
tment facility. 
2 February 201
1
ere  to  DOD 
within  DOD 
POC, the perso
of the capturin
he capturing un
ted to reduce th
a location wher
dministration  o
o
ce operating th
rge  for detaine
e
military polic
detainee  captur
platoon leader 
rs, ensuring th
rameters of AR
POC to the TIF
10 
on 
ng 
nit 
he 
re 
of 
he 
ee 
ce 
re 
is 
hat 
Rs 
F. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested