c# view pdf : Reorder pages in pdf reader software application cloud windows winforms html class USArmy-InternmentResettlement7-part91

Capture, Initial Detention, and Screening 
12 February 2010 
FM 3-39.40 
4-13 
4-37. DD Form 2745 is a three-part, perforated form with an individual serial number. It is constructed of 
durable, waterproof, tear-resistant material with reinforced eyeholes at the top of Parts A and C. Part A is 
attached to the detainee’s clothing with wire, string, or another type of durable material. The capturing unit 
maintains Part B in its records. Part C is attached to the confiscated property so that  the owner  can be 
identified later. 
4-38. Everything  confiscated  from  a  detainee  (weapons,  personal  items,  items  of  intelligence  and/or 
evidentiary value) must be documented on DA Form 4137 and linked to the detainee by annotating  the 
form with the DD Form 2745 number. Always transport the detainee and the confiscated items to ensure 
that both are available to MI personnel during screening and tactical interrogation. Further documentation, 
such as a photograph taken of the detainee and the detainee’s property at the POC, allows for the increased 
ability to prosecute criminal detainees in courts of law. While photographs greatly enhance the possibility 
of future prosecution, they are only taken for official purposes and must be guarded from unauthorized use 
or  release.  (See  AR  190-8.)  If  a  detainee  is  suspected  of  committing,  being  involved  in,  or  having 
knowledge of terrorist acts, crimes against humanity, war crimes, or other crimes, the PM and legal advisor 
must become involved with the case immediately. It is also imperative that an uncontaminated, unbroken 
chain of evidence be maintained to ensure a fair hearing if the detainee is brought to trial. 
4-39. Proper and accurate documentation of the capture circumstances (DD 2745 and, if desired, a locally 
produced  and  approved  supplemental  form)  provides  information  to  support  continued  assessments  on 
whether to detain or release the detainee; to make determinations on the detainee’s status (CI, RP, or enemy 
combatant); to prepare for  criminal proceedings; and/or  to,  ultimately,  transfer  custody  of  the detainee. 
Proper documentation also provides an official historic record of the events surrounding the capture of a 
detainee, which may prove invaluable to counter future false claims (such as the loss of personal property). 
Documentation  initiates  the  chain  of  custody  for  evidence  required  to  prosecute  detainees  who  are 
suspected of committing crimes. 
4-40. All Soldiers should possess the required detainee processing kit, which contains the items essential 
for the safe and proper processing of a detainee. The kit contains essential forms and expendable equipment 
to restrain a detainee and establish accountability for the detainee and their confiscated items. If time or the 
situation does not allow for the use of DA Form 4137 to document confiscated items, items are placed in 
the large resealable bag included in the detainee processing kit. The detainee’s DD Form 2745 number is 
carefully marked on the bag using a permanent marker. The property inventory can then be transferred later 
to DA Form 4137 at the DCP. 
R
ETAINED 
I
TEMS
4-41. Retained  items  are  items  that  detainees  may  keep  during  their  captivity.  (Initially,  all  items  are 
confiscated.) Retained items are generally divided into two groups. The first group consists of items taken 
during the reception portion of inprocessing, and they may be returned later during processing. It contains, 
but is not limited to— 
Military mess equipment (except knives and forks). 
Helmets. 
CBRN protective suits and masks. 
Clothing. 
Badges of grade and nationality. 
Military decorations. 
Identification cards and tags. 
Reorder pages in pdf reader - re-order PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Customizing Page Order of PDF Document in C# Project
how to reorder pdf pages in reader; pdf change page order
Reorder pages in pdf reader - VB.NET PDF Page Move Library: re-order PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Sort PDF Document Pages Using VB.NET Demo Code
how to rearrange pdf pages reader; move pdf pages online
Chapter 4 
4-14 
FM 3-39.40 
12 February 2010 
4-42. The second group consists of items that detainees may keep at all times. It contains, but is not limited 
to— 
Religious literature (within reason). 
Personal items that have sentimental value (such as rings and pictures). 
Note. Allow the detainees to retain their own rations in the early stages of detention. 
C
ONFISCATED 
I
TEMS
4-43. Confiscated items are weapons, ammunition, and military equipment other than those items allowed 
for personal protection. Medications in a detainee’s possession are confiscated and placed in a plastic bag 
that is clearly marked. Medical personnel determine if detainees are permitted to retain their medication on 
their  person  for  emergency  treatment  (such  as  an  inhaler).  All  other  medications  are  administered  by 
medical personnel as required and/or directed. Some items (potential weapons, documents of intelligence 
value) should always be confiscated when searching detainees. 
4-44. Military  police coordinate  with  the  MI  HUMINT  and  counterintelligence  collectors  to  determine 
which confiscated items are of evidentiary and/or intelligence value. Personal items such as diaries, letters 
from home, and family pictures may  be taken  by the  MI teams for review but are  later returned to the 
military police so that they can be returned to their owners. Items with evidentiary value must be marked 
(for example, engraved) in such a manner that the item can be positively linked to the detainee and to the 
supporting statements rendered by the detainee or witnesses of the suspected criminal activity. Evidence 
documented on DA 4137 must be transported to a centralized storage facility that has procedures in place 
regarding proper accountability, storage, and security until final disposition. 
4-45. Per AR 190-8, currency is only confiscated on the order of a commissioned officer. DA Form 4137 is 
used as a receipt for currency. Confiscated currency may be impounded, retained as evidence of a crime, or 
retained  for  specific intelligence  purposes.  In  any case, currency  must  be  particularly safeguarded  and 
promptly evacuated into appropriate security channels until final and proper disposition is determined. 
4-46. Impounded items are not returned to detainees during detention because they make escape easier or 
compromise U.S. security interests. Items normally impounded are cameras, radios, and currency. (For a 
more in-depth discussion about confiscated and impounded property, see AR 190-8 and DFAS-IN 37-1.) 
4-47. Property should be bundled or placed in bags to keep it intact and separated from other detainees’ 
possessions.  Accounting  for  property  is  not  only  important  for  returning  items  and  preventing  claims 
against  the  U.S.  government,  but  also  to  link  detainees  to  their  property  for  intelligence  exploitation. 
Property accountability is critical to possible criminal proceedings by the HN. Military police–– 
Use DA Form 4137 as a receipt for confiscated and impounded property. 
Prepare DA Form 4137 for signature by the detainee and the receiver for any currency and/or 
negotiable items. 
List currency and negotiable items on DA Form 4137, but treat them as impounded property and 
possibly counterfeit material. 
Keep original receipts with the property during evacuation. 
Give detainees a copy of DA Form 4137 as a receipt for their property. 
Instruct detainees (in their own language, if possible) to keep the receipts to expedite the return 
of their property when they are released. 
Have MI personnel  sign for  property on  DA Form 4137 and sign  for detainees on DD Form 
2708. 
Ensure that confiscated property is cleared by MI teams and returned to supply. 
Coordinate with the supported S-2X to ensure that items kept by MI personnel for intelligence 
value are forwarded through MI channels. 
C# TIFF: How to Reorder, Rearrange & Sort TIFF Pages Using C# Code
Reorder, Rearrange and Sort TIFF Document Pages in C#.NET Application. C# TIFF Page Sorting Overview. Reorder TIFF Pages in C#.NET Application.
reorder pages in pdf preview; pdf reverse page order preview
VB.NET PowerPoint: Sort and Reorder PowerPoint Slides by Using VB.
Sort and Reorder PowerPoint Slides Range with VB amount of robust PPT slides/pages editing methods powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
move pages in a pdf; how to move pages in pdf converter professional
Capture, Initial Detention, and Screening 
12 February 2010 
FM 3-39.40 
4-15 
Evacuate  property retained by the detainee when the  detainee is  moved to  the next detention 
level. 
Maintain controlled access to confiscated and impounded property. 
DETAINEE MOVEMENT 
4-48. When detainees have been processed and are ready for movement, leaders— 
Report detainee status through military police channels to the CDO. 
Request transportation, rations, and water from logistics channels. 
Ensure that DD Forms 2708 for detainees are ready for the escort guard’s signature. 
Ensure that property taken from detainees for security or intelligence reasons is properly tagged 
and given to the guards who are moving the detainees to a DCP or DHA. 
Note.  All  movements  at  or  after  the  TIF  are  documented  and  executed  using  the  Detainee 
Reporting System. 
4-49. Prior to movement and when possible, detainees should be given clear, brief instructions in their own 
language. Military necessity may require delays in movement. When this occurs, ensure that there is an 
adequate food supply; potable water; and appropriate clothing, shelter, and medical attention available. 
4-50. From  the  POC, detainees  can  be  moved by a number  of methods. Prior to movement  ensure  the 
detainees and transportation asset are searched for weapons or contraband. Develop a manifest for use as an 
official receipt of transfer and as a permanent record to ensure accountability of each detainee until release. 
The manifest should contain the following: 
Each detainee’s— 
„ 
Name, grade, and status. 
„ 
DD Form 2745 control number. 
„ 
Nationality and their power served. 
„ 
Physical condition. 
The transport vehicle and destination. 
4-51. Maintain control  and  accountability  of detainees  and their property until  releases  or transfers  are 
received by the appropriate authorities. Joint inventories of pertinent documentation and confiscated items 
must be completed before any transfer or release. Confiscated items should be transported along with the 
detainee,  annotated  on  a  DA Form 4137,  and  identified  by  the  DD  Form  2745  control  number.  The 
DD Form 2745 control number should also be noted on the DA Form 4137. Strict accountability will be 
maintained throughout all movement. 
4-52. Before movement, an interpreter should be used to brief detainees on— 
Actions to take upon hearing the word “Halt.” 
The need to remain silent at all times. 
Actions to take during an emergency (such as a delay, crash, or enemy attack). 
Signals used to direct detainee movement. 
Responses to escape attempts according to the ROE and RUF. 
4-53. Detainees should not  be daisy-chained during transport. In addition, restraining detainees to fixed 
structures  or  objects  while  in  transport  is  prohibited  unless  specifically  approved  by  the  facility 
commander. 
Note. Restrained detainees will  always be assisted on and off any mode of  transportation  to 
prevent injury. 
Read PDF in Web Image Viewer| Online Tutorials
Extract images from PDF documents; Add, reorder pages in PDF files; Save and print Document Viewer, make sure that you have install RasterEdge PDF Reader Add-on
how to reorder pages in pdf file; change pdf page order online
C# PDF Page Rotate Library: rotate PDF page permanently in C#.net
Enable batch changing PDF page orientation without other PDF reader control. PDF page, delete certain PDF page, reorder existing PDF pages and split
how to move pages within a pdf document; rearrange pages in pdf file
Chapter 4 
4-16 
METH
F
OOT
4-54. 
detain
occur,
used f
W
HEELE
4-55. 
possib
b
detain
coveri
Condu
securit
B
US
4-56. 
allow 
are use
C
ARGO 
T
4-57. 
Tightl
fixed 
multip
HODS OF T
T
Movement by 
nees from the P
P
ensure that de
or uncooperati
ED 
V
EHICLE
Movement  by
ble,  avoid  usin
nees inside whe
ings when poss
uct  a  search  o
ty vehicles sho
o
During bus m
m
detainees to st
ed, escort secu
u
T
RUCK 
T
RA
The  use  of  ta
y position deta
objects. Soldie
ple cargo truck
k
TRANSPO
O
foot is the leas
POC to the DC
etainees are fu
ive detainees. 
y vehicle is the
ng  team  vehic
eeled vehicles b
sible. Guards s
of  the  vehicle 
ould be conside
movement,  plan
n
tand, sit, or lie
urity vehicles m
m
NSPORT
arp-covered  ve
ainees along th
ers should  not
t
s are used, esco
Figu
FM 3-
ORTATIO
st preferred tra
CP. Distances d
ully ambulatory
e most commo
cles  (such  as 
by covering ve
should always 
for  potential 
ered for front, r
nners  should  p
e on the floor. 
may also be nec
c
Figure 4-4. 
ehicles  is  anot
he bench seat w
t allow  detaine
ort security veh
h
ure 4-5. Move
-39.40
ON 
ansportation me
do not normally
y and have app
on and  most r
r
high-mobility
ehicle window
w
be placed to t
weapons  or  c
rear, and flank 
plan for two  d
d
Lock doors fro
cessary. 
Movement b
ther  method  o
without restrai
ees to stand,  s
hicles may also
o
ement by car
ethod. It is ofte
y exceed 5 mil
propriate footg
g
eliable method
 multipurpose
ws and other op
the rear of veh
h
ontraband  bef
security. 
detainees  per s
om external th
h
by bus 
of  transporting
ining them to t
t
it,  or lie on th
o be necessary
y
rgo truck 
12
en used, as nec
les. If moveme
gear. Movemen
d of transporti
 wheeled  veh
penings with ta
icles with open
ore  loading  d
seat.  (See  figu
hreats. When m
m
 detainees.  (S
the bus infrast
he floor of the
2 February 201
cessary, to mov
ent by foot mu
nt by foot is no
ing detainees. 
hicles).  Conce
e
rps and windo
n tops or back
k
etainees.  Esco
ure 4-4.) Do no
multiple vehicle
e
See  figure  4-5
tructure or othe
e vehicle. Whe
e
10 
ve 
ust 
ot 
If 
al 
ks. 
ort 
ot 
es 
5.) 
er 
en 
VB.NET TIFF: Modify TIFF File by Adding, Deleting & Sort TIFF
Users can use it to reorder TIFF pages in ''' &ltsummary> ''' Sort TIFF document pages in designed powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
reorder pages in a pdf; reordering pdf pages
C# PDF: C# Code to Process PDF Document Page Using C#.NET PDF
just following attached links. C# PDF: Add, Delete, Reorder PDF Pages Using C#.NET, C# PDF: Merge or Split PDF Files Using C#.NET.
reorder pdf pages in preview; how to rearrange pdf pages reader
12 Feb
R
AIL
4-
Th
de
vu
ra
4-
an
w
se
L
H
ELI
4-
co
de
ad
en
ba
bruary 2010 
L
-58. Movemen
he disadvantag
etainees  requir
ulnerable  at cr
ailcars. 
-59. During m
nd at stations o
when possible, 
earched before
e
oading and sea
ICOPTER
R
-60. The  critic
ommander  is  i
etainees will b
dditional traini
ntails different
attlefield. 
Note. Do 
nt of detainees 
ges to moveme
re  additional  t
ritical  sites  du
u
movement, posi
or other stoppin
n
and always po
e boarding deta
ating arrangem
cal  planning  f
in  charge  of  t
t
e enforced. (Se
ng and rehears
ROE. An adv
not use firearm
Fig
by rail is rare 
ent by rail are t
transportation 
ring transport.
Figure 4
ition mobile se
ng points if po
osition guards 
ainees, and det
ments are based 
factor  to  reme
that  aircraft  an
ee figure 4-7.) 
sals, is weather
vantage to air m
ms aboard an ai
i
gure 4-7. Mov
FM 3-39.40
and only avail
that trains are e
e
to  rail  station
.  The  preferred
d
4-6. Movemen
n
ecurity teams a
ossible. Concea
a
at the rear of 
tainees should 
on the size and
ember  during 
nd  will  likely 
Some of the d
r-dependent, re
movement is th
ircraft. 
vement by CH
Capture
0
lable in industr
easily disrupted
ns  or  other  sto
d method of r
r
nt by rail 
at critical urba
al detainees us
s
open-top railca
never be restr
d configuration
n
air  transport 
dictate  how  t
disadvantages t
equires a highe
he speed with 
H-47 and UH
, Initial Detent
rialized locatio
d by improvise
opping  points, 
ail transportati
an crossing site
e
ing railcars an
ars. Railcars sh
rained to the r
n of railcars. 
by  helicopter 
the  transportat
to air movemen
n
r guard-to-deta
which a detain
H-60 
tion, and Scre
e
ons. (See figure
ed explosive de
e
and  the  miss
ion  is via pass
s
es, bridge cros
nd window cov
hould be thoro
railcar infrastru
u
is  that  the  a
tion  and  secur
nt are that it re
ainee ratio, and
d
nee is moved o
o
eening 
4-17 
e 4-6.) 
evices, 
sion  is 
senger 
ssings, 
verings 
oughly 
ucture. 
aircraft 
rity  of 
equires 
d often 
off the 
VB.NET TIFF: VB.NET Sample Code to Process & Manage TIFF Page
certain TIFF page, and sort & reorder TIFF pages in Process TIFF Pages Independently in VB.NET Code. powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
how to move pages in pdf; how to reorder pdf pages
C# Word: How to Create Word Document Viewer in C#.NET Imaging
in C#.NET; Offer mature Word file page manipulation functions (add, delete & reorder pages) in document viewer; Rich options to add
how to move pages in a pdf document; how to move pages around in a pdf document
Chapter 4 
4-18 
A
IRPLAN
4-61. 
aircraf
variati
in mos
includ
consid
Soldie
officer
detain
NE
E
Movement  by
ft. An example
ions based on 
st situations. V
de,  but  are  no
derations.  The 
ers  escorting  d
rs  and  membe
nees and ensure
 airplane  has
e of transport 
the mission va
Variations that 
 limited  to,  e
e
empty  seats s
detainees, and 
ers  of  the  cock
e that they are b
b
Figur
FM 3-
similarities  t
by C-130 is p
ariables, but th
h
will affect the
elevation,  fuel
shown in this 
aircraft  crew 
kpit  denial  ele
better positione
re 4-8. Movem
-39.40
0
o  movement  b
provided in figu
he basic relatio
e maximum nu
 load,  passeng
g
example may 
members.  On
ement  leave  th
ed to watch and
ment by C-13
by  helicopter 
ure 4-8. This 
onships and po
umber of detain
ger  collective 
be  further  fil
ce  the  aircraft
heir  seats  to  c
d respond to de
30 aircraft 
12
and  other  po
example is bu
sitioning shou
nees transporte
e
weight,  and 
led with addit
t  is  airborne,  s
conduct  roving
etainee actions
2 February 201
1
tential  types  o
t one of sever
ld be applicab
ed on an aircra
a
other  necessar
tional detainee
selected  conta
g  patrols  of  th
s. 
10 
of 
ral 
le 
aft 
ry 
es, 
ct 
he 
Capture, Initial Detention, and Screening 
12 February 2010 
FM 3-39.40 
4-19 
DETAINEE RELEASE 
4-62. Commanders responsible for detainee operations must understand the proper authority for the release 
of detainees at any echelon. (See chapter 9.) When a release is approved, the commander must— 
Ensure that detainees are segregated, outbriefed, and medically screened before release. 
Determine the receipt or transfer location. 
Determine the movement routes to the transfer location, and coordinate all routes through the 
appropriate combatant commanders. 
Make public notification of release and/or transfer only in consultation and coordination with the 
proper authority due to operations security concerns. 
Ensure that releasable confiscated personal property accompanies the detainees. 
Conduct an inventory of personal property and identify any discrepancies. 
Ensure that the detainees sign property receipts. 
Provide  the  detainees  with  appropriate  and  adequate  food,  clothing,  and  equipment  for  safe 
transition and movement. 
This page intentionally left blank.  
12 February 2010 
FM 3-39.40 
5-1 
Chapter 5 
Detainee Operations 
Combat operations and stability operations in the war on terrorism continue to result 
in  the detention of  criminals, combatants, and  civilians  as military forces seek  to 
support  emerging  democracies,  mitigate  the  threat  from  terrorists,  and  quell 
insurgencies.  A  common  lesson  is  the  requirement  to  prepare  for  and  conduct 
detainee operations as an integral part of full spectrum operations. Modern military 
actions, whether in a contiguous or noncontiguous environment characteristic of the 
war on terrorism, result in the capture of many and varied detainees. The war-on-
terrorism detainee differs significantly from traditional EPWs of past conflicts and 
presents a potentially different and greater type of security threat during processing, 
escorting, and handling. 
COMMAND AND CONTROL 
5-1.  The synchronization and clear understanding of C2 at all echelons is critical to the overall mission 
success. C2 clarifies key commander roles and responsibilities from POC to the Army service component 
command level. Although policy and joint doctrine updates are pending, this FM lays the groundwork for, 
and is nested with, current and emerging policy and joint doctrine regarding C2 during detainee operations. 
R
ESPONSIBILITIES AT 
E
CHELONS OF 
C
OMMAND
5-2.  At each location and echelon of command conducting  detainee operations, a commander must be 
responsible  for  those  operations  and  exercise  commensurate  command  authority  to  meet  legal  and 
operational requirements. Commanders at all units must ensure that detainees are accounted for and treated 
humanely. Elements not assigned to the commander executing  detainee operations will be placed under 
tactical control or another appropriate command and support relationship to the internment commander for 
the humane treatment, evacuation, custody, and control (reception, processing, administration, internment, 
and  safety)  of  detainees  and  the  operation  of  the  DCP,  DHA,  or  internment  facility.  Tactical  control 
provides  authority  for  controlling  and  directing  the  application  of  force  or  capability  for  an  assigned 
mission or task. It is intended for temporary situations and for specific tasks and missions that are normally 
explicitly  stated.  The  MI  commander  is  responsible  for  conducting  interrogation  operations  (including 
prioritizing  the  effort)  and  controlling  interrogation  or  other  intelligence  operations  through  technical 
channels. 
5-3.  At the theater Army level, the commander responsible for detainee operations is designated as the 
CDO. The senior military police commander normally serves as the CDO. The CDO does normally not 
serve  as  a  detention  facility  commander.  The  CDO  develops  local  policy  and  procedures  for  the 
commander’s approval  and dissemination  and  provides input to operation orders  to  ensure the uniform 
application  of detainee operations  policy and procedures  at  subordinate echelons. MI and  medical units 
performing  their  assigned  functions  within  a  detainee  facility  establish  and  maintain  a  support  chain 
through technical direction from their respective technical chain. 
5-4.  A military police commissioned officer should serve as the officer in charge of all U.S. DCPs unless 
no  military police officer  is available due  to the operational situation.  If  a military police officer is not 
available  to  perform  duties  as  the  officer  in  charge  of  a  DCP,  the  designated  officer  in  charge  must 
coordinate with the echelon PM for technical guidance regarding the treatment and processing of detainees 
to comply with Army regulations and U.S. and international laws. All DHAs and internment facilities will 
be commanded by a military police officer. However, this commissioned officer does not establish medical 
and interrogation priorities. The commander/officer in charge is responsible for the oversight of detainee 
Chapter 5 
5-2 
FM 3-39.40 
12 February 2010 
operations and must have unfettered access to all areas and operations. The commander/officer in charge 
provides technical direction to subordinate echelons. 
5-5.  The  commander/officer in charge for detainee  operations  makes detainees available to  authorized 
intelligence personnel for interrogation to the maximum extent possible, commensurate with requirements 
for  humane  treatment,  custody,  evacuation,  protection,  and  administration.  The  commander/officer  in 
charge  is  responsible  for  ensuring  that  policy  and  technical  procedures  for  intelligence  and  medical 
operations are enforced through technical channels. The commander/officer in charge coordinates with the 
MI  unit  commander  who  is  responsible  for  conducting  interrogation  operations.  The  intelligence  staff 
maintains control through technical channels for interrogation operations to ensure adherence to applicable 
laws and policies and ensure the proper use of doctrinal approaches and techniques. Applicable laws and 
policies  include  U.S.  laws,  the  law  of  war,  relevant  international  laws,  relevant  directives  (including 
DODD 2310.01E and DODD 3115.09), DODIs, operation orders, and FRAGOs. The officer in charge is 
also responsible for joint, interagency, and multinational personnel who are conducting detainee operations 
in U.S. facilities within an assigned AO. 
Note.  Non-DOD  agencies  must  observe  the  same  standards  for  the  conduct  of  interrogation 
operations  and  the  treatment  of  detainees  as  do  Army  personnel.  The  officer  in  charge  of 
detainee operations possesses the authority over these personnel and is obligated to terminate or 
deny  access  to  the  facility  and/or  the  detainees,  as  necessary,  to  stop  or  prevent  inhumane 
treatment  or  a  loss of custody  and  control.  All  personnel  who observe  or  become  aware  of 
violations of Army interrogation operation standards will immediately report the infractions to 
the commander/officer in charge. For personnel who are not subject to the detainee operations 
chain of  command  and  others  who  have  been  denied  access  to  the  facility  or  detainees,  the 
officer in charge will report such access denial up the chain of command for resolution. 
PLANNING CONSIDERATIONS 
5-6.  Detainee  operations  involve  a  wide  array  of  operational  and  sustainment  support  to  ensure 
compliance  with U.S. and international  laws. Proper planning before  operations  commence is vital  and 
includes positioning military police, engineer, and other essential support element assets and construction 
materials early in the time-phased force deployment list. Commanders must also recognize that conditions 
for the successful execution of detainee operations are historically set in the planning phase of operations. 
To this end, commanders should establish planning mechanisms that ensure the effective consideration of 
potential detainee-related issues and the development of plans and procedures to respond to these issues as 
early in the planning  process as  feasible. In addition,  training  requirements,  proper  procedures, and an 
enhanced  security plan  all  go into  developing and  maintaining  a location  where  detainees  are  held  and 
treated in a humane manner. 
5-7.  The  planning  should  focus  across  the  doctrine,  organization,  training,  materiel,  leadership  and 
education,  personnel,  and  facilities  (DOTMLPF)  domains  to  ensure  that  all  requirements  are  met. 
Synchronization  with adjacent staff elements and  commands is another  important  element  that must be 
considered. 
5-8.  Food sanitation, personal hygiene, and field sanitation standards must be met to prevent diseases and 
ensure the cleanliness of the facility. (See AR 190-8.) These standards are as follows: 
Provide adequate space within housing units to prevent overcrowding. 
Provide sufficient showers and latrines for detainees, and ensure that showers and latrines are 
cleaned and sanitized daily. 
Teach detainees working in the dining facility the rules of proper food sanitation, and ensure that 
they are observed and practiced. 
Dispose  of  human  waste  properly  to  protect  the  health  of  detainees  and  U.S.  armed  forces 
associated with the facility according to the guidelines established by preventive medicine. 
Provide sufficient potable drinking water and food service purposes. At a minimum, detainees 
should receive the same amount of water that is afforded U.S. military personnel. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested