c# view pdf web browser : Extract pages from pdf file online SDK application API .net html windows sharepoint download5-part1024

48 
7.  
Preparation of Staff
#
Ensure confidentiality: all staff sign code of 
conduct
#
Same sex/language trained staff, 1 support 
person 
#
Ensure trained staff are employed and have 
correct information
#
Prepare and translate all protocols and forms
- 1
st
bullet point: refer again to the guiding principles. One way to ensure confidentiality is to have all staff 
(including support staff) sign a code of conduct, which is backed up by reporting mechanisms. 
- 2
nd
bullet point: ideally the health care provided is of the same sex as the survivor and speaks her language. 
If the provider is not of the same sex as the survivor, ensure that there is a trained chaperone. Also allow the 
survivor to have one trusted support person in the room with her. Avoid having too many people in the room. 
Police officers should not be in the examination room. 
- 3
rd
bullet point: where possible, make sure female health workers are recruited to provide post-rape care.  
8.  
Medical management of rape survivors 
1.
Provide clinical care
-history
-examination
-treatment
-counselling 
2.
Collect forensic evidence
3.
Refer for further crisis intervention
- Explain that the medical management consists of 3 key elements 
- Explain that the next slides will focus on points 1 and 2. 
9.  
Clinical Care
History and examination
#
Compassionate and non-judgemental
#
Survivor‘s own pace, no unnecessary 
repeating
#
Explain everything you are going to do
#
Do not do anything without consent 
#
Follow History and Examination forms
#
Document everything thouroughly 
- 1
st
bullet point: the majority of survivors do not tell anyone about the rape. In coming to you and telling 
you what has happened, she is demonstrating that she trusts you. Do not betray this trust. The first step to 
recovery is often your reassurance that she did not deserve to be raped, that the incident was not her fault 
and that it was not caused by her behaviour or manner of dressing. This requires awareness of the provider’s 
own feelings and preconceptions!  
- 2nd bullet point: she may have reported to the police or community services already. Carefully read any 
documentation that she brings along and do not make her tell her story again, unless it is absolutely 
necessary. 
Emphasize
Emphasize
Extract pages from pdf file online - copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Easy to Use C# Code to Extract PDF Pages, Copy Pages from One PDF File and Paste into Others
extract pages from pdf; acrobat export pages from pdf
Extract pages from pdf file online - VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed VB.NET Guide for Extracting Pages from Microsoft PDF Doc
convert few pages of pdf to word; copy pages from pdf to another pdf
49 
10.  
Medical management: forensic evidence
Forensic evidence is 
collected during
the 
clinical examination
#to confirm recent 
sexual contact
#to show that force or 
coercion was used
#to possibly identify 
the assailant
#to corroborate the 
survivor’s story
Types of evidence that can 
be collected
#Medical documentation
#Injuries 
#Presence of sperm 
(<72 hours)
#Stateof clothes
#Clothes
#Foreign materials 
Foreign hairs?
DNA analysis?
Blood or urine for toxicology 
testing?
- Stress that the primary objective of the examination is to determine the medical care that needs to be 
given. However, forensic evidence may also be collected to help the survivor pursue legal redress. 
- Left column: stress that evidence is collected during the examination. 
- Click to show the reasons why we collect evidence (left column). Ask participants what kind of evidence 
would be useful for issues mentioned in each of the bullet points. 
- To confirm recent sexual contact: sperm 
- Force or coercion: wound, bruises, trauma 
- Identify assailant: DNA (not a possibility in most settings) 
- Story corroboration: document findings that support her report of events 
- Click to show the right column: medical documentation (documenting findings during examination) is often 
the only type of evidence that can be collected in emergency settings, and therefore is very important. 
- Other types of evidence that can be collected are: 
- Taking torn clothes (take it only if you can provide replacement clothing) 
- Foreign material: such as soil, leaves, grass on clothes or body or in hair 
- DNA, foreign hairs and toxicology testing is usually not available. SRH Coordinators should be aware 
of the limitations of the setting and inform providers accordingly. 
11. 
Medical management: forensic evidence
#
Findings should ALWAYS be documented
#
Other evidence is ONLY collected IF
#
Timing is appropriate  (< 72 hours?)
#
Local possibilities for analysing samples
#
Government policies are respected
#
Consent is obtained 
#
The chain of evidence can be maintained
- Last bullet point: the chain of evidence is maintained by: 
- Correct collection of evidence 
- Correct labeling (with anonymous code) 
- Correct storage and transport (to conserve samples) 
- Documented hand-over with signatures of the responsible persons to avoid risk of manipulation. 
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
File: Merge PDF; C# File: Split PDF; C# Page: Insert PDF pages; C# Page: Delete PDF pages; C# Read: PDF Text Extract; C# Read: PDF
cut pages from pdf reader; reader extract pages from pdf
C# PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in
to C#: Extract Text Content from PDF File. textMgr = PDFTextHandler.ExportPDFTextManager( doc); // Extract text content for text extraction from all PDF pages.
acrobat extract pages from pdf; export one page of pdf preview
50 
12. 
Clinical care: treatment
#
Treat life threatening complications first
#
STI prevention
-Syphilis, chlamydia, gonorrhoea (other infections if 
common)
-Use local treatment protocols
-
Hepatitis B vaccination, if indicated
#
Prevent HIV transmission (PEP)
-If incident <72 hours
and risk of transmission:
-Zidovudine (AZT) + Lamuvidine (3CT) for 28 days
- 1
st
bullet point: stress that life threatening complications should be treated first. 
- Click to show the 2
nd
bullet point: ask participants ‘What are the STI you want to prevent?’ 
- Click to show the answer: stress the usage of local treatment protocols. 
- There is growing evidence that 1 gram of Azithromycin will prevent incubating syphilis as well as chlamydia. 
Be aware that established syphilis cannot be treated by Azithromycin. 
- Click to show the 3
rd
bullet point: ask participants ‘What is PEP?’ (post-exposure prophylaxis), then ‘What is 
the timing for the administration of PEP?’ (72 hours) 
- Click to show the answer: write 72 hours on the flip chart to stress the short time period during which rape 
survivors can benefit from PEP. If rape survivors come to the clinic after 72 hours, it is too late for PEP and 
referral for voluntary counseling and testing (VCT) is needed 3-6 months
after the incident, if the survivor 
wants to know her HIV status. 
13.  
Considerations when supplying PEP 
#
HIV testing is not a requirement
for supplying PEP
#
PEP if survivor presents < 72 hours of rape, but:
first dosethe sooner the better
#
Provide one-week, then three-week supply but:
full supply if the survivor cannot return
#
Schedule return visit one day prior to last dose
#
For recurrent exposures requiring repeat PEP:
Crisis intervention. Offer protection
- 1
st
bullet point: emphasize that testing is not a requirement before giving PEP 
- 2nd bullet point: stress that the sooner the first PEP dose, the more beneficial it is. 
- 3
rd
and 4
th
bullet points: give 7-day supply, schedule visit on day 6 to assess the patient and to give the rest 
of the supply (21 days). If the follow-up visit on day 6 is not feasible, service providers should dispense the 
full supply (28 days). 
- Last bullet point: when the person is repeatedly assaulted, consider other crisis interventions and offering 
durable protection. 
Emphasize
Emphasize
Emphasize
Emphasize
VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF
advanced PDF Add-On, developers are able to extract target text content from source PDF document and save extracted text to other file formats through
deleting pages from pdf file; copying a pdf page into word
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
Offer PDF page break inserting function. Free components and online source codes for .NET framework 2.0+. Add and Insert Blank Pages to PDF File in C#.NET.
cut pages from pdf reader; extract pages from pdf file
51 
14. 
#
Prevent pregnancy:
-< 5 days
-Preferred: levonorgestrel 1.5 mg single dose
-Or: ethinylestradiol 100 mcg + levonorgestrel 0.5 
mg, two doses 12 hours apart (Yuzpe)
-Alternative: IUD (very effective, but need skills!) 
#
Injury care
-Clean and treat wounds
-Provide tetanus prophylaxis and vaccination
#
Refer for higher level care if needed
Clinical care: treatment
- If the menstrual history is not clear, rule out an existing pregnancy with a pregnancy test (best option) or a 
checklist if no pregnancy test is available (checklist on page 12 of the Clinical Management of Rape 
Survivors). 
- 1st bullet point: ask ‘How many days after the incident can you prevent the pregnancy?’ (5 days: stress that 
it is no longer 72 hours as recommended in previous guidelines). 
Then ask ‘What are the methods that can be used?’ (Emergency contraceptive (EC) pill or IUD) 
- Click to show the answer:  
EC pills: facilitators must study Annex 11
of the Clinical Management of Rape Survivors so that they can give 
the appropriate information. Levonorgestrel (the preferred EC method) is included in RH Kit 3 (rape 
treatment). 
15.  
Clinical care: treatment counseling
#
Effectiveness of drugs, importance of adherence, 
side effects
#
VCT recommended at baseline and 3 months
#
Use condoms until 3 months after rape (or until HIV 
status is determined)
#
Pre-existing pregnancy? Counsel survivor
#
Too late for EC, or pregnancy as result of rape? 
Counsel survivor on all options
#
Follow up visits at 1 week, 6 weeks, 3 months
#
Return at any time if problems
- Explain to participants that the education of survivors on their treatment plan needs to take into account 
the listed bullet points. 
- 2
nd
and 3
rd
bullet points: stress that VCT (Voluntary Counseling and Testing for HIV) is recommended at 
baseline and 3 months, and that condom use is recommended until HIV status is determined. 
- 4th bullet point: if a pre-existing pregnancy is diagnosed, this is not a result from the rape. The survivor 
needs to be reassured and referred for early antenatal care.  
- 5th bullet point: counsel on options: keeping the pregnancy, adoption, safe abortion if legal, or abortion in 
other country, etc. If she chooses to keep the pregnancy, refer for early antenatal care as potential 
pregnancy complications due to the rape need to be monitored (miscarriage, infections, early labor, etc.) 
Social support is also needed as mothers with children born as a result of rape may be stigmatized by the 
community. It is important to give early support to mother and child and find solutions if the child is 
neglected. 
Emphasize
Emphasize
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
to create a blank PDF page with related by using following online VB.NET may use the following VB.NET demo code to insert multiple pages of a PDF file to a
copy web pages to pdf; extract pages from pdf document
C# PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files
splitting PDF file into two or multiple files online. Support to break a large PDF file into smaller files. Separate PDF file into single ones with defined pages
extract page from pdf; cut pdf pages online
52 
16. 
- 2
nd
bullet point: as a first step to psychological support of the survivor, the provider must be 
compassionate, supportive, non-judgmental and aware of his/her own taboos and pre-conceptions!  
- Last bullet point: the provider needs to refer all cases to community or social services (but should not force 
her to go). Facilitators must study pages 26 and 27
of the Clinical Management of Rape Survivors so that they 
can give the appropriate information.  
17. 
- Remind participants of the guiding principle Safety. 
- 5
th
bullet point: stress that the survivor needs to give her/his consent before sharing any information on the 
case. 
- 6
th
bullet point: share information only with actors providing assistance to survivors. 
Medical management 
Mental health care
#
Most survivors will cope with trauma within their 
own culture and support systems
#
At the health care setting
:
-Respectful, confidential, non-judgemental
care
-Supportive listening, do not force talking at 
first visit
-Refer
to trained community focal point for 
ongoing psychosocial support
Medical management: safety considerations 
#
Make sure survivor has a safe place to go to (refer)
#
All files must be stored in secure locked cabinet
#
Use codes (not names) on documents that are shared
#
Reports or statistics made public should have all
potentially identifying information removed
#
Share only necessary and relevant information, only 
if requested and agreed
by the survivor
#
Only actors providing assistance
#
Consider safety of staff
C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
Extract various types of image from PDF file, like XObject Image, XObject Form, Inline Image, etc. Extract image from PDF free in .NET framework
extract pages from pdf files; delete pages from pdf without acrobat
VB.NET PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images
Online source codes for quick evaluation in VB.NET class. By using RsterEdge XDoc PDF SDK for .NET, VB.NET users are able to extract image from PDF page or file
extract page from pdf document; cut pages from pdf online
53 
18. 
Medical Certificate
#
Legal requirement in many countries
#
Confidential medical document
#
Often only material evidence available
#
Completed by health care provider
#
1 copy to survivor, 1 copy locked with file
#
Hand over with consent
of survivor to 
-legal services
-organizations with protection mandate
Only survivor decides 
when and where to use this document!
- Medical care of a survivor includes preparing a medical certificate or a police form. It is a confidential 
medical document that the service provider can hand over to the survivor. 
- 3
rd
bullet point: stress that the medical certificate is often the only material evidence available. 
- Last message: stress that the survivor has the sole right to decide whether and when to use the medical 
certificate. 
19. 
Special considerations: Children
#
Legal issues
#
Trained health care workers
#
Find out country specific laws:
#Reporting
#Consent
#
Clinical care 
#
Safe environment (beware of repeated abuse)
#
Adapt interview; slow, no leading questions
#
Never force examination
#
NO digital vaginal, anal or speculum examination in 
young children
#
Appropriate drug dosage and forms
#
Emergency contraception even in pre-pubertal girls!
- The clinical management of children has some issues that need special attention. Facilitators must study 
Care for Child Survivors
(page 32 onward) of the Clinical Management of Rape Survivors so that they can give 
the appropriate information. 
Legal issues
- Mention that in many countries it is obligatory to report cases of child abuse. SRH Coordinators need to be 
familiar with applicable legislation and should obtain a sample of the national child abuse protocol as well as 
information on police and court proceedings.  
- Consent: there may be specific laws that determine who can give consent for minors. Normally it is the 
parent or legal guardian, unless he or she is the suspected offender. In this case, a representative from the 
police, community support services or the court may sign the form. The child should also be given the choice 
in deciding who should be present in the room during the examination. 
- Health workers who have to deal with a lot of child abuse should get specific training. 
Emphasize
Emphasize
Emphasize
Emphasize
54 
20. 
Special considerations: Men
#
Male survivors are less likely than women to 
report the incident, because of:
-
extreme embarrassment 
-
shame 
-
criminalization of same sex-relationships
-
slowness of institutions and health workers 
to recognize the extent of the problem
#
Psychological trauma and after-effects 
similar to women
- Facilitators must study Special Considerations for Men
(page 28) of the Clinical Management of Rape 
Survivors so that they can give the appropriate information. 
- Last bullet point: explain that while the physical effects differ, the psychological trauma and emotional 
after-effects for men are similar to those experienced by women. 
21.  
Inform the community
#
Provide information to community leaders, women’s 
groups, adolescents, on prevention of sexual violence 
and where to get care
#
Emphasize that to receive optimum care, survivors 
must report <
72 hrs
#
Give correct information on available services (i.e. 
PEP prevents transmission of HIV; it is not treatment 
of AIDS
)
#
Develop talking points to ensure all staff deliver the 
same message
#
Use different media (radio, posters, leaflets) to 
disseminate your message
- Explain that informing the community is essential for an adequate uptake of the services, and should 
address the what, why, where and when
- 2nd bullet point: emphasize the 72 hours period 
- 3
rd
bullet point: stress that the community needs to understand that PEP is not a treatment of AIDS, but 
helps prevent the transmission of HIV. 
22.  
Key messages
#
Guiding principles in medical management of rape 
survivors: safety, confidentiality, respect, non-
discrimination
#
Provide 24/7, confidential services that include at least
-prevention of pregnancy (<5 days), STIs, and HIV 
transmission (<72 hours)
-detailed documentation
-referral for further crisis intervention
#
Ensure staff have treatment protocols, forms, and 
supplies
#
Coordinate confidential referral procedures between 
health, psychosocial, police, and legal services
- Wrap up session with key messages and allow questions and answers as time permits 
55 
23. Optional PEP Discussion: the following slides may be useful for a discussion on PEP, which can be 
controversial in various settings. Tackle these slides if participants are interested and if time allows. 
Otherwise, offer this discussion to those who are interested during the breaks or at the end of the day. 
24. 
0.3%
Needlestick
?
Receptiveoral
0.1 –1%
Insertiveanal
< 0.1 %
Insertivevaginal
1-3 %
Receptiveanal
< 0.1 % -1%
Receptivevaginal
HIV transmission risk
[per consensualsexualcontact]
Exposure
PEP discussion
Why PEP for rape survivors?
- Explain that this shows the HIV transmission risk per consensual sexual contact, and that survivors who are 
vaginally raped (receptive vaginal) or anally raped (receptive anal) are at higher risk of infection. 
25. 
PEP discussion
Why PEP for rape survivors?
Increased risk of HIV transmission with rape
#
Multiple assaillants
#
Perpetrator unknown
#
Genital trauma
#
Anal penetration
- Ask participants to discuss in pairs: ‘Why is the risk of HIV transmission increased in the case of rape?’ and 
invite reporting after 30 seconds. Briefly facilitate feedback and click to show answers. 
26.  
PEP discussion
Is HIV test result needed before starting PEP?
PEP for alreadyHIV-positive individual?
#
No benefit, no harm
#
Someresistancepossible after PEP; 
but disappears <
6 months
#
No change in naturalhistoryof infection
Increasedriskof resistantvirus in community? 
#
PEP usuallyprovidedto HIV negativesurvivors
#
PEP will reducetransmission of HIV
> HIV VCT recommended, but not a pre-condition!
- Ask participants: ‘Is a HIV test result needed before starting PEP?’ 
- Then ask participants: ‘What happens if you give PEP to someone who is already HIV-positive?’ 
- Briefly facilitate feedback and click to show answer and stress that it is possible for the HIV-positive 
individual to develop some drug resistance but this will disappear within six months. There will be no change 
in the natural history of the infection. 
- Ask participants: ‘Can PEP increase the risk of resistant virus in community?’ 
- Facilitate feedback and click to show answer and explain that rape survivors are usually HIV-negative. By 
keeping survivors free from HIV infection, PEP actually reduces the transmission of HIV in the community. 
- Last message: emphasize that VCT is recommended prior to PEP but is not a prerequisite. 
56 
27. 
PEP discussion 
Twoor three drugs?
#
No consensus
#
No evidencethat 3 drugs are more effective 
than2
#
More sideeffects, less compliance
#
Possible dangerouscomplications
#
More high-tech follow-up needed
#
Increasedcost++
Other points…
#
PEP for perpetratorsif rapesurvivor knownto 
beHIV positive?
#
«Fake» survivors?
- Explain that there is no evidence for the superiority of three drugs over two. The 2-drug regime avoids 
serious side effects, the need for high-tech follow up and high costs. 
- Providers should not give PEP to perpetrators. In case the suspected perpetrator is caught and the survivor 
is known to be HIV positive, it is not the role of the service provider to take care of the perpetrator. Above 
all, the provider needs to respect the survivor’s confidentiality and therefore cannot disclose her status 
without her consent. In addition, the perpetrator must admit that he was responsible for the rape and the 
timeframe needs to be under 72 hours. 
- Fake survivors: some providers believe that there may be HIV positive people who do not have access to 
antiretrovirals and who present with the story that they were raped in order to receive PEP, hoping that this 
can cure AIDS. Community information needs be clear to dispel such misconceptions. 
28. 
There is no such thing as a “PEP KIT”
Occupational exposure
#PEP starter kit
#For UN and NGO staff
#Has 4 days treatment prior to evacuation
#Individual PEP kit
#Individual kit with 28 day treatment
#Sometimes available for staff working in 
remote settings
- The term ‘PEP Kit’ is confusing and should not be used. PEP is included in different types of kits.  
- Click to show ‘Occupation exposure’ and explain that UN agencies and some NGOs have PEP starter Kits or 
individual PEP Kits in the context of occupation exposure for their own staff. 
- Click to show the different types of Kits. 
29. 
MISP: Manage the consequences of SexualViolence
#
Rape treatment kit (RH kit 3A and B)
#
Kit for emergency settings
#
Designed for a population of 10 000 people
#
Contains drugs and supplies, including PEP
Re-ordering medicines and supplies
#
Normal supply management system! 
#
Order medicines as needed
Do not order «PEP Kits». Be specific!
There is no such thing as a “PEP KIT”
- Explain that in the context of the MISP, PEP is part of managing the consequences of Sexual Violence 
together with EC and STI prevention. 
- Click to show information on the rape treatment Kit. 
- Click to show ‘re-ordering medicines and supplies’: insist that SRH Coordinators should follow the normal 
supply management system when re-ordering when supplies are low and should not reorder RH Kits. 
- Click to show last message and insist that SRH Coordinators need to be specific in their Kit ordering. 
57 
Suggested further reading 
- Clinical Management of Rape Survivors, WHO/UNHCR, 2004, Geneva, available at 
http://www.rhrc.org/pdf/Clinical_Management_2005_rev.pdf 
- Sexual and Gender-Based Violence against Refugees, Returnees and Internally Displaced Persons, UNHCR, 
2003, Geneva, available at http://www.rhrc.org/pdf/gl_sgbv03.pdf 
Notes: 
__________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________ 
__________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________ 
__________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________ 
__________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________ 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested