c# view pdf web browser : Extract one page from pdf control Library system azure .net web page console e2-14-010-part1055

UNESCO - EOLSS 
SAMPLE CHAPTER
WASTEWATER RECYCLE, REUSE, AND RECLAMATION - Recycle and Reuse of Domestic Wastewater - S. Vigneswaran, M. 
Sundaravadivel 
RECYCLE AND REUSE OF DOMESTIC WASTEWATER 
S. Vigneswaran 
Faculty of Engineering, University of Technology, Sydney, Australia 
M. Sundaravadivel 
Graduate School of the Environment, Macquarie University, Sydney, Australia 
Keywords: Blackwater, Dual reticulation, Graywater, Pathogens, Reclamation, 
Recycle, Reuse, Sludge 
Contents 
1. Introduction  
2. History of Wastewater Reuse 
3. Motivational Factors for Recycling/Reuse 
4. Quality Issues of Wastewater Reuse/Recycling 
5. Types of Wastewater Reuse 
6. Future of Water Reuse 
Appendix 
Glossary 
Bibliography 
Biographical Sketches 
To cite this chapter 
Summary 
Reuse of wastewater for domestic  and agricultural  purposes has been occurring  since 
historical times. However, planned reuse is gained importance only two or three decades 
ago, as the demands for water dramatically increased due to technological advancement, 
population growth, and urbanization, which put great stress on the natural water cycle. 
Reuse of  wastewater for  water-demanding activities, which,  so  far  consumed limited 
freshwater resources is, in effect, imitating the natural water cycle through engineered 
processes. Several  pioneering  studies  have  provided the technological confidence  for 
the safe reuse of reclaimed water for beneficial uses. While initial emphasis was mainly 
on reuse for agricultural and non-potable reuses, the recent trends prove that there are 
direct reuse opportunities to applications closer to the point of generation. There are also 
many projects that have proved to be successful for indirect or direct potable reuse. All 
the case studies presented in this article point towards the potential wastewater has to 
serve as a viable alternative source of water, in future. 
1. Introduction 
The  total  supply  of  freshwater  on  earth  far  exceeds  human  demand.  Hydrologists 
estimated that if all the water available on the planet—from oceans, lakes and rivers, the 
atmosphere, underground aquifers, and in glaciers and snow—could be spread over the 
surface, the earth would be flooded to an overall depth of some three kilometers. About 
97 percent of this water is in the oceans, and out of the remaining three percent, only 
©Encyclopedia of Life Support Systems (EOLSS) 
Extract one page from pdf - copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Easy to Use C# Code to Extract PDF Pages, Copy Pages from One PDF File and Paste into Others
extract page from pdf acrobat; cutting pdf pages
Extract one page from pdf - VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed VB.NET Guide for Extracting Pages from Microsoft PDF Doc
export pages from pdf preview; delete page from pdf online
UNESCO - EOLSS 
SAMPLE CHAPTER
WASTEWATER RECYCLE, REUSE, AND RECLAMATION - Recycle and Reuse of Domestic Wastewater - S. Vigneswaran, M. 
Sundaravadivel 
about one-hundredth is the accessible freshwater that can be used for human demand. If 
this available water could be evenly distributed, still it is enough to support a population 
about  ten  times  larger  than  today.  The  foremost  use  of  water  by  humans  is  for  the 
biological survival. However, water need for the biological survival is not the only issue 
being discussed in the world today. Because, apart from drinking, water is required also 
for household needs such as cooking, washing, and is vital for our development needs, 
such as for agriculture and industry. 
Unfortunately, the available freshwater supplies are not evenly distributed in time and 
space. Historically, water management has focused on  building dams, reservoirs,  and 
diversion canals etc., to make available water wherever needed, and in whatever amount 
desired. Soaring  demands  due  to  rapidly  expanding  population, industrial  expansion, 
and  the  need  to  expand  irrigated  agriculture,  were  met  by  ever  larger  dams  and 
diversion projects. Dams, river diversions, and irrigation schemes affected both water 
quality and quantity. 
Demands  on  water  resources  for  household,  commercial,  industrial,  and  agricultural 
purposes are increasing greatly. The world population will have grown 1.5 times over 
the  second  half of the  twenty-first  century,  but  the  worldwide  water usage has been 
growing  at  more  than  three  times  the  population  growth.  In  most  countries  human 
populations are growing while water availability is not. What is available for use, on a 
per  capita  basis,  therefore,  is  falling.  Out  of  100  countries  surveyed  by  the  World 
Resources Institute in 1986, more than half of them were assessed to have low to very 
low  water availability, and quality of water has been  the key issue  for the low water 
availability. Given the rapid spread of water pollution and the growing concern about 
water availability, the links between quantity and quality of water supplies have become 
more  apparent.  In  many  parts  of  the  world,  there  is  already  a  widespread  scarcity, 
gradual destruction and increased pollution of freshwater resources. 
In industrialized countries, widespread shortage of water is caused due to contamination 
of ground and surface water by industrial effluents, and agricultural chemicals. In many 
developing countries, industrial pollution is less common, though they are severe near 
large urban centers. However, untreated sewage poses acute water pollution problems 
that causes low water availability. Development of human societies is heavily dependent 
upon availability of water with suitable quality and in adequate quantities, for a variety 
of uses ranging from domestic to industrial supplies. An estimate infers that every year, 
the wastewater  discharges from  domestic,  industrial and agricultural practices pollute 
more  than  two-thirds  of total available run-off  through  rainfall, thereby, what  can be 
called  a  “man-made  water  shortages.”  Thus,  in  spite  of  seeming  abundance,  water 
scarcity  is  endemic  in  most  parts  of  the  world.  It  is  because  of  these  concerns,  the 
Agenda  21  adopted  by  the  United  Nations  Conference  on  Environment  and 
Development,  popularly  known  as  the  “Earth  Summit”  of  Rio  de  Janeiro,  1992, 
identified protection  and management  of freshwater  resources  from contamination as 
one  of  the  priority  issue,  that  has  to  be  urgently  dealt  with  to  achieve  global 
environmentally sustainable development. 
The need for increased water requirement for the growing population in the new century 
is generally assumed, without considering whether available water resources could meet 
©Encyclopedia of Life Support Systems (EOLSS) 
VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.
If you are looking for a solution to conveniently delete one page from your PDF document, you can use this VB.NET PDF Library, which supports a variety of PDF
copy web pages to pdf; delete pages out of a pdf
C# PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in C#.net, ASP.
C# developers can easily merge and append one PDF document to document imaging toolkit, also offers other advanced PDF document page processing and
copy one page of pdf to another pdf; delete pages from pdf acrobat reader
UNESCO - EOLSS 
SAMPLE CHAPTER
WASTEWATER RECYCLE, REUSE, AND RECLAMATION - Recycle and Reuse of Domestic Wastewater - S. Vigneswaran, M. 
Sundaravadivel 
these needs in a sustainable manner. The question about from where the extra water is to 
come, has led to a scrutiny of present water use strategies. A second look at strategies 
has thrown a picture of making rational use of already available water, which if used 
sensibly, there  could  be enough water for all.  The new look invariably points out  at 
recycle and reuse of wastewater that is being increasingly generated due to rapid growth 
of population and related developmental activities, including agriculture and industrial 
productions. 
2. History of Wastewater Reuse 
The term “wastewater” properly means any water that is no longer wanted, as no further 
benefits can be derived out of it. About 99 percent of wastewater is water, and only one 
percent is solid wastes. An understanding of its potential for reuse to overcome shortage 
of freshwater existed in  Minoan civilization in ancient Greece,  where indications  for 
utilization  of wastewater  for  agricultural irrigation  dates back to 5000  years.  Sewage 
farm practices have been recorded in Germany and UK since 16
th
and 18
th
centuries, 
respectively. Irrigation with  sewage and  other  wastewaters has a long history also in 
China  and  India.  In  the  more  recent  history,  the  introduction  of  waterborne  sewage 
collection  systems  during  the  19
th
century,  for  discharge  of  wastewater  into  surface 
water  bodies  led  to  indirect  use  of  sewage  and  other  wastewaters  as  unintentional 
potable water supplies. Such unplanned water reuse coupled with inadequate water and 
wastewater treatment, resulted in catastrophic epidemics of waterborne diseases during 
1840s and 50s. However, when the water supply links with these diseases became clear, 
engineering  solutions  were  implemented  that  include  the  development  of  alternative 
water sources using reservoirs and aqueduct systems, relocation of water intakes, and 
water  and  wastewater  treatment  systems.  Controlled  wastewater  irrigation  has  been 
practiced in sewage farms many countries in Europe, America and Australia since the 
turn of the current century. 
For the last three decades or so, the benefits of promoting wastewater reuse as a means 
of  supplementing  water  resources  and  avoidance  of  environmental  degradation  have 
been  recognized  by  national  governments.  The  value  of  wastewater  is  becoming 
increasingly understood  in arid  and  semi-arid  countries and  many countries  are  now 
looking  forward  to  ways  of  improving  and  expanding  wastewater  reuse  practices. 
Research scientists, aware of both benefits and hazards, are evaluating it as one of the 
options for future water demands. 
3. Motivational Factors for Recycling/Reuse 
Major among the motivational factors for wastewater recycle/reuse are: 
opportunities to augment limited primary water sources; 
prevention  of  excessive  diversion  of  water  from  alternative  uses,  including  the 
natural environment; 
possibilities to manage in-situ water sources; 
minimization of infrastructure costs, including total treatment and discharge costs; 
reduction  and  elimination of  discharges  of  wastewater  (treated  or  untreated)  into 
receiving environment; 
©Encyclopedia of Life Support Systems (EOLSS) 
C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
Open a document. PDFDocument doc = new PDFDocument(inputFilePath); PDFPage page = (PDFPage)pdf.GetPage(0); // Extract all images on one pdf page.
extract pages from pdf file online; extract pages from pdf acrobat
VB.NET PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in vb.net
all. This guiding page will help you merge two or more PDF documents into a single one in a Visual Basic .NET imaging application.
extract page from pdf online; cut pdf pages online
UNESCO - EOLSS 
SAMPLE CHAPTER
WASTEWATER RECYCLE, REUSE, AND RECLAMATION - Recycle and Reuse of Domestic Wastewater - S. Vigneswaran, M. 
Sundaravadivel 
scope to overcome political, community and institutional constraints. 
Reuse  of  wastewater  can  be  a  supplementary  source  to  existing  water  sources, 
especially  in  arid/semi-arid  climatic  regions.  Most  large-scale  reuse  schemes  are  in 
Israel,  South  Africa,  and  arid  areas  of  USA,  where  alternative  sources  of  water  are 
limited. Even in regions where rainfall is adequate, because of its spatial and temporal 
variability, water shortages are created. For example, Florida, USA is not a dry area, has 
limited options for water storage, and suffers  from water shortages during dry spells. 
For this reason wastewater reuse schemes form an important supplement to the water 
resource of this region. 
Costs  associated  with  water  supply  or  wastewater  disposal  may  also  make  reuse  of 
wastewater an  attractive option.  Positive  influences  on treatment costs  of wastewater 
and water  supplies,  and  scopes  for  reduction  in  costs  of  headworks  and  distribution 
systems, for both water supply and wastewater systems has been the motivation behind 
many reuse schemes in countries like Japan. 
Reuse is frequently practiced as a method of water resources management. For example, 
depleted  aquifers  may  be  “topped-up”  by  injection  of  highly  treated  water,  thus 
restoring aquifer yields or preventing saltwater intrusion (in coastal zones). 
Avoidance  of  environmental  problems  arising  due  to  discharge  of  treated/untreated 
wastewater  to  the  environment  is  another  factor  that  encourages  reuse.  While  the 
nutrients in wastewater can assist plant growth when reused for irrigation, their disposal, 
in extreme cases, is detrimental to ecosystems of the receiving environment. In addition, 
there may be concerns about the levels of other toxic pollutants in wastewater. 
Concern about  water supply or environmental  pollution  may emerge  as a political or 
institutional  issue.  Community  concern  about  the  quality  of  wastewater  disposed  to 
sensitive environments  may  lead  to  political  pressures on  the water  industry  to  treat 
wastewater to  a higher  level  before  discharge,  that  can  be  avoided  through  reuse  of 
wastewater.  Institutional  structures  may  also  provide  incentives  for  reuse.  Because 
responsibility  for  different  parts  of  water  use  and  disposal  system  may  rest  with 
different organizations, a water utility may also be faced with standards of service set in 
agreements with other industry bodies. 
4. Quality Issues of Wastewater Reuse/Recycling 
Despite a long history of wastewater reuse in many parts of the world, the question of 
safety of wastewater  reuse  still remains  an enigma mainly because  of  the  quality of 
reuse  water.  There  always  have  been  controversies  among  the  researchers  and 
proponents of extensive wastewater reuse, on the quality the wastewater is to meet. In 
general, public health concern is the major issue in any type of reuse of wastewater, be 
it  for  irrigation  or  non-irrigation  utilization,  especially long term impact of reuse 
practices. It is difficult to delineate acceptable health risks and is a matter that is still 
hotly debated. 
©Encyclopedia of Life Support Systems (EOLSS) 
VB.NET PDF Annotate Library: Draw, edit PDF annotation, markups in
to display it. Thus, PDFPage, derived from REPage, is a programming abstraction for representing one PDF page. Annotating Process.
convert few pages of pdf to word; extract pages from pdf without acrobat
C# PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
Using RasterEdge Visual C# .NET PDF page deletion component, developers can easily select one or more PDF pages and delete it/them in both .NET web and Windows
delete pages from pdf in reader; acrobat extract pages from pdf
UNESCO - EOLSS 
SAMPLE CHAPTER
WASTEWATER RECYCLE, REUSE, AND RECLAMATION - Recycle and Reuse of Domestic Wastewater - S. Vigneswaran, M. 
Sundaravadivel 
Issues other  than quality of  reuse  water includes, socioeconomic  considerations, and 
hydro-geologic  conditions.  The  socioeconomic  considerations  include  community 
perceptions, and the costs of reuse systems. Wide community level surveys in various 
States of Australia during early 1990s indicated that in general, public is not averse to 
the  concept  of  wastewater  recycling within  the  community.  In  one  of  such  surveys, 
however,  less  than  15%  readily  agreed  for  potable  reuse.  While  non-potable  reuse 
options was a technically  accepted option,  concerns  about possible health  risks were 
frequently  raised by the public.  Documented  public health  investigations available in 
USA  is  given  in  US Environmental  Protection  Agency  Guidelines which  considered 
that epidemiological studies of exposed populations at water reuse sites are of limited 
value, because of the mobility of the population, small sizes of such study populations, 
and difficulties in determining the actual level of exposure of each studied individual. 
Despite  the  limitations  of epidemiological  investigations,  the  wastewater reuse in the 
US has not been implicated as the cause of any infectious disease outbreaks. A more 
specific study of the city of St. Petersburg, Florida to estimate the potential risk to the 
exposed population concluded that: 
there  is no  evidence of increased  enteric diseases in urban  regions  housing  areas 
irrigated with treated reclaimed wastewater, and 
there is no evidence of significant risks of viral or microbial diseases as a result of 
exposure to effluent aerosols from spray irrigation with reclaimed water. 
However,  the  study  recommended  that  adequate  treatment  schemes  must  always  be 
designed to eliminate, or at least minimize the potential risks of disease transmission. 
The  economic  considerations  are  necessary  because,  when  “first-hand”  water  is 
available at a cheaper price, it may not be worthwhile to reuse wastewater, unless there 
are  other  special  conditions.  Consideration  of  hydro-geologic  conditions  helps  to 
compare the reuse water quality and the quality of alternative sources intended for the 
same kind of use. 
Almost all the guidelines and standards for wastewater reuse deal mainly with the reuse 
of wastewater for irrigation purpose. It is mainly because irrigation is the highest water 
consuming activity in any country, and hence is the first option considered in any reuse 
planning. For example, 90 percent of available water supply in the Indian subcontinent, 
and  a  staggering  98  percent  in  Egypt,  is  used  in  irrigation.  Though  there  are  no 
generalized guidelines for reuse water quality for other options, in countries like Japan, 
where domestic reuse also is widely practiced, there are standards for such reuse. 
4.1 Pathogen Survival 
Public health concerns center around pathogenic organisms that are or could be present 
in  wastewater  in  great  variety.  Survival  of  pathogens  in  wastewater  and  in 
environmental  conditions other  than  their  host  organisms  (mainly  humans)  is  highly 
variable. Table 1 presents the survival periods of various types of pathogenic organisms 
under various conditions. 
©Encyclopedia of Life Support Systems (EOLSS) 
C# PDF copy, paste image Library: copy, paste, cut PDF images in
how to copy an image from one page of PDF to cut image from PDF file page by using PDFDocument doc = new PDFDocument(inputFilePath); // Extract all images from
delete page from pdf reader; add and remove pages from pdf file online
VB.NET PDF copy, paste image library: copy, paste, cut PDF images
how to copy an image from one page of PDF how to cut image from PDF file page by using doc As PDFDocument = New PDFDocument(inputFilePath) ' Extract all images
extract one page from pdf acrobat; delete page from pdf file
UNESCO - EOLSS 
SAMPLE CHAPTER
WASTEWATER RECYCLE, REUSE, AND RECLAMATION - Recycle and Reuse of Domestic Wastewater - S. Vigneswaran, M. 
Sundaravadivel 
Survival time in days 
Type of pathogen 
In feces 
and sludge 
In sewage 
and 
freshwater 
In soil 
On crops 
1.  Viruses 
Enteroviruses 
<100  (<20) 
<120 (<50) 
<100 (<30) 
<60 (<15) 
2.  Bacteria 
Fecal coliforms 
Salmonella spp. 
Shigella spp. 
Vibrio cholerae 
<90 (<50) 
<60 (<30) 
<30 (<10) 
<30 (<5) 
<60 (<30) 
<60 (<30) 
<30 (<10) 
<30 (<10) 
<70 (<20) 
<70 (<20) 
<20 (<10) 
<30 (<15) 
<30 (<15) 
<10 (<5) 
<5 (<2) 
3.  Protozoa 
Entamoeba- 
hystolytica 
cysts 
<30 (<15) 
<30 (<15) 
<20 (<10) 
<10 (<2) 
4.  Helminths 
Ascaris- 
lumbricoides 
eggs 
many 
months 
many months
many 
months 
<60 (<30) 
Figures in bracket shows the normal survival time. 
Source:  Feachem  R.  G.,  Bradley  D.  J.,  Garelick  H.  and  Mara  D.  D.  (1983).  World 
sanitation and disease: health aspects of excreta and wastewater management by Bank 
Studies. In Water Supply Sanitation Vol. 3 Chichester, UK: John Wiley & Sons 
Table 1. Survival of pathogens 
While  emphasizing  the  need  to  assess  health  hazards  of  wastewater  reuse  and  the 
importance of various routes of transmission, from direct contact, through food or air, to 
indirect  contact  such  as  in  recreational  use,  there  also  is  a  need  to  recognize  the 
existence  of  many  successive  barriers.  The  barriers  include  the  level  of  wastewater 
treatment previously applied leading to settling, adsorption, desiccation of pathogens, as 
well as soil moisture, temperature, UV irradiation due to sunlight, pH, antibiotics, toxic 
substances,  biological  competition,  available  nutrient  and  organic  matter,  leading  to 
pathogen die-away and/or removal from the wastewater source until final ingestion by 
humans to result in infection. The method and time of application of wastewater and the 
soil type  will also  have  an  influence.  Extensive  and  rational epidemiological  studies 
have led to a consensus view that the actual risk associated with irrigation with treated 
wastewater  is  much  lower  than  previously  estimated,  and  the  early  microbiological 
standards were unjustifiably restrictive for wastewater reuse. 
Another aspect of indirect pathogen contamination due to wastewater reuse has been the 
contamination of soil and subsequent entry of pathogen into groundwater. The principal 
methods of pathogen transport in soils include movement downwards with infiltration 
water, movement with surface runoff and transport on sediments and waste particles. 
Long-term research studies carried out to understand this effect have concluded that no 
soil  or  groundwater  quality  degradation  occurred  due  to  prolonged  wastewater 
application.  One  of  the  important  processes  that  controls  the  contamination  of 
©Encyclopedia of Life Support Systems (EOLSS) 
UNESCO - EOLSS 
SAMPLE CHAPTER
WASTEWATER RECYCLE, REUSE, AND RECLAMATION - Recycle and Reuse of Domestic Wastewater - S. Vigneswaran, M. 
Sundaravadivel 
groundwater  is  the  adsorption  or  retention  of  organisms  on  soil  particles.  Another 
process assisting in the removal of bacteria and viruses from water percolating through 
the soil is filtration. 
4.2 Other Water Quality Parameters 
Other water quality parameters of concern in wastewater reuse have been toxic metal 
accumulation and  salinity  of  wastewater.  The  availability  of  heavy  metals  to  plants, 
their uptake and their accumulation depend on a number of soil, plant and other factors. 
The  soil  factors  include,  soil  pH,  organic  matter  content,  cation  exchange  capacity, 
moisture, temperature and evaporation. Major plant factors are the species and variety, 
plant parts used for consumption, plant age and seasonal effects. 
Dissolved salts causing salinity in wastewater exert an osmotic effect on plant growth. 
An  increase  in  osmotic  pressure  of  the  soil  solution increases  the  amount  of  energy 
which the plant must expend to take up water from the soil. As a result, respiration is 
increased and the growth and yield of plants decline. However, it has been found that 
not all plant species are susceptible. A wide variety of crops normally are tolerant to 
salinity. Salinity also affects the soil properties such as dispersion of particles, stability 
of aggregates, soil structure and permeability. 
4.3 Effluent Quality Standards 
Considering the wide-ranging potential for wastewater reuse, it may be difficult to set 
some common quality standards for all types of reuses. Many countries in the world do 
not have detailed standards or guidelines for recycle and reuse of wastewater. For many 
countries in Europe, either the guidelines of World Health Organization (WHO) or the 
US  Environmental  Protection  Agency  (USEPA)  standards  form  the  basis  for  any 
decision or for granting permission to any kind of reuse. Countries like old USSR, Israel 
and Tunisia have developed their own standards for reuse. Standards or guidelines for 
other  possible  reuses  such  as  groundwater  recharge,  industrial  uses  etc.,  are  not 
common, mainly because such types of reuses are not widespread. 
First water quality criteria for reuse of wastewater in irrigation were set in 1933, by the 
California State Health Department. These standards are for microbiological parameters 
that indicate the presence of pathogenic organisms in wastewater. In 1971, the WHO 
meeting of experts on reuse of wastewater recognized that mere presence of pathogens 
is not sufficient to declare water for reuse as unsafe, and considered that the California 
standards were overly strict and hindered widespread reuse practice, and recommended 
a much relaxed microbiological standard for wastewater irrigation. Table 2 presents the 
microbiological quality guidelines for wastewater reuse in agriculture, recommended by 
WHO. 
Reuse condition 
Exposed 
group 
Intestinal 
nematodes*
Fecal 
coliforms+
Wastewater 
treatment expected 
to achieve the 
quality 
Category 
A:  Workers, 
1000 
series 
of 
©Encyclopedia of Life Support Systems (EOLSS) 
UNESCO - EOLSS 
SAMPLE CHAPTER
WASTEWATER RECYCLE, REUSE, AND RECLAMATION - Recycle and Reuse of Domestic Wastewater - S. Vigneswaran, M. 
Sundaravadivel 
Irrigation of crops 
likely  to  be  eaten 
uncooked,  sports 
fields, 
public 
parks 
consumers, 
public 
stabilization  ponds 
designed  to  achieve 
the  microbiological 
quality  indicated  or 
equivalent treatment. 
Category 
B: 
Irrigation 
of 
cereal 
crops, 
industrial  crops, 
fodder 
crops, 
pasture 
and 
trees++ 
Workers 
Not 
applicable 
Retention 
in 
stabilization  ponds 
for  8-10  days  or 
equivalent  helminth 
and  fecal  coliform 
removal 
Category 
C: 
Localized 
irrigation of crops 
in  category  B  if 
exposure 
of 
workers  and  the 
public  does  not 
occur 
None 
Not 
applicable 
Not 
applicable 
Pre-treatment 
as 
required  by  the 
irrigation  technology, 
but  no  less  than 
primary 
sedimentation. 
* Arithmetic mean no. of eggs per 100 ml 
+ Geometric mean no. per 100 ml 
++ In case of fruit trees, irrigation should cease 2 weeks before fruit is picked 
Source: Health Guidelines for the Use of Wastewater in Agriculture and Aquaculture. 
Technical report series No. 778, World Health Organization, Geneva, 1989. 
Table 2. WHO microbiological quality guidelines for wastewater reuse in agriculture 
Standards  for  other  polluting  parameters  are  intended  to  prevent  pollutant  inputs 
becoming harmful to consumers of the harvested food, and to the soil. If pollutants are 
allowed to accumulate in the soil, its potential use, over  the  long term, may become 
limited. By regulating  land  application,  accumulation of  pollutants  in the  wastewater 
receiving soil can be prevented. However, it is often argued that reuse regulations based 
on  stringent  pollutant  loading  limits,  tend to  discourage  the  land  application  option. 
Moreover,  such  limits  do  not  consider  the  capacity  of  soils  to  attenuate  pollutants. 
Through proper management of land applications, the agronomic benefits of wastewater 
can be realized, and accumulation of pollutants in the soil can be controlled not to reach 
harmful levels. A comparison of water quality standards for physico-chemical, and toxic 
polluting parameters for irrigation reuse of wastewater in some of the countries of the 
world is presented in Appendix I. 
5. Types of Wastewater Reuse 
Wastewater  can  be  recycled/reused  as  a  source  of  water  for  a  multitude  of  water-
demanding activities  such  as  agriculture,  aquifer  recharge,  aquaculture,  fire  fighting, 
©Encyclopedia of Life Support Systems (EOLSS) 
UNESCO - EOLSS 
SAMPLE CHAPTER
WASTEWATER RECYCLE, REUSE, AND RECLAMATION - Recycle and Reuse of Domestic Wastewater - S. Vigneswaran, M. 
Sundaravadivel 
flushing  of  toilets, snow  melting, industrial  cooling, parks  and golf  course watering, 
formation of wetlands for wildlife habitats, recreational impoundments, and essentially 
for several other non-potable requirements. Potential reuses of wastewater depends on 
the  hydraulic  and  biochemical  characteristics  of  wastewater,  which  determine  the 
methods  and  degree  of  treatment  required.  While  agricultural  irrigation  reuses,  in 
general,  require  lower  quality  levels  of  treatment,  domestic  reuse  options  (direct  or 
indirect  potable  and  non-potable)  reuses  need  the  highest  treatment  level.  Level  of 
treatment for other reuse options lie between these two extremes. 
5.1 Reuse for Irrigation 
Agricultural irrigation has, by far, been the largest reported reuse of wastewater. About 
41 percent of recycled water in Japan, 60% in California, USA, and 15% in Tunisia are 
used for this purpose. In developing countries, application on land has always been the 
predominant  means  of  disposing  municipal  wastewater  as  well  as meeting  irrigation 
needs.  In  China  for  example,  at  least  1.33  million  hectares  of  agricultural  land  are 
irrigated with  untreated  or  partially  treated  wastewaters  from  cities. In Mexico  City, 
Mexico,  more  than  70 000  hectares  of  cropland  outside  the  city  are  irrigated  with 
reclaimed wastewater. Irrigation has the advantage of “closing-the-loop” combination of 
waste disposal and water supply. Irrigation reuse is also more advantageous, because of 
the possibility of decreasing the level of purification, and hence the savings in treatment 
costs, thanks to the role of soil and crops as biological treatment facilities. As the water 
supply requirements of large metropolis are growing, the option of reuse of wastewater 
for  domestic  purposes  is  increasingly  being  considered.  Judging  from  international 
experience, there is potential for reuse at all system scales, from household level to the 
large irrigation schemes. Reuse has advantages as well as disadvantages at each level. 
The  choice  is  conventionally  technical  and  economic  one,  though  some  view  it  as 
important that the community as a whole should become more involved in the working 
of reuse systems. 
Irrigation reuse of wastewater can be for application on: 
(i)  agricultural crops, woodlots and pastures, or 
(ii)  landscape and recreational areas. 
The  choice of  type  of  irrigation application  generally depends  upon the location and 
quantity of wastewater available for reuse. 
5.1.1 Irrigation of Agricultural Crops 
As  discussed  earlier,  the  oldest  and  largest  reuse  of  wastewater  is  for  irrigation  of 
agricultural crops. Potential constraints in this type of application are: 
(i)  surface and groundwater pollution, if poorly planned and managed; 
(ii)  marketability of crops and public acceptance; 
(iii)  effect of water quality on soil, and crops; 
(iv)  public health concerns related to pathogens. 
©Encyclopedia of Life Support Systems (EOLSS) 
UNESCO - EOLSS 
SAMPLE CHAPTER
WASTEWATER RECYCLE, REUSE, AND RECLAMATION - Recycle and Reuse of Domestic Wastewater - S. Vigneswaran, M. 
Sundaravadivel 
However, many research studies have proved that in addition to providing a low-cost 
water source, other side benefits of using wastewater for irrigation include increase in 
crop yields, decreased reliance on chemical fertilizers, and increased protection against 
frost  damage.  Modern  reuse  for  irrigation  of  agricultural  purposes  in  developed 
countries were the result of two pioneering studies that were conducted in  California 
during  the 1970s and  1980s:  The  Pomona virus  study and the  Monterey wastewater 
reclamation study for agriculture. 
The Pomona virus study was conducted in Los Angeles in an effort to determine the 
degree of treatment necessary to minimize potential transmission of waterborne diseases 
via surface water. The study concluded that complete virus removal is possible through 
tertiary treatment of wastewater by either direct filtration or activated carbon followed 
by  adequate  disinfection,  thus  proving  the  possibility  for  reclamation  of 
“microbiologically risk free” water from wastewater. These results of this study have 
opened up the possibilities of wastewater reuse for various applications. Since the virus 
removal  through  treatment  has  been  established  by  Pomona  study,  investigations  of 
Monterey study concentrated on virus survival on crops and in soils in the field. Based 
on virological, bacteriological, and chemical results from sampled tissues of vegetables 
grown using wastewater as irrigant, the study established the safety of this type of reuse. 
Both  studies  demonstrated  conclusively  that  even  food  crops  that  are  consumed 
uncooked could be successfully irrigated with reclaimed municipal wastewater without 
adverse environmental or health effects. 
In many countries in the Mediterranean region, spanning from Spain to Syria, shortage 
of water has been the main driving force for wastewater reuse. Wastewater from Tunis, 
the capital city of Tunisia, has been used to irrigate citrus fruit orchards since the 1960s. 
From  1989 onwards,  secondary treated wastewater  has  been allowed for  growing  all 
types  of  crops,  except  vegetables.  In  countries  like  Morocco,  Jordan,  Egypt,  Malta, 
Cyprus,  and  Spain,  several  large-scale  wastewater  irrigation  schemes  are  already  in 
operation or under planning. In Israel, the percentage of wastewater reused for irrigation 
purposes is highest in the region, at 24.4%, which is expected to be increased to 36% by 
the year 2010. 
In temperate zones of Australia, reclaimed water is being used to irrigate a variety of 
crops  including  sugarcane.  A  recent  development  is  the  use  of  reclaimed  water  for 
irrigation  of  tea-tree  plantations,  which  will  produce  tea-tree  oil  as  a  cash  crop. 
Eucalyptus forestry also is a major reuse option followed in Australia, which provides 
timber for a number of purposes including pulp wood and fire wood. 
Table 3 gives a summary of current regulations for irrigation of agricultural crops. 
Country 
Main feature 
Comments 
US EPA 
200  FC/100mL  +  residual  chlorine 
depending on the type of crop. 
States 
treatment 
methods.  Standards  for 
landscape irrigation not 
stated. 
Cyprus 
50–100  FC/100mL  and  200–1000 
FC/100mL, for areas with unlimited 
No 
standards 
for 
intestinal nematodes for 
©Encyclopedia of Life Support Systems (EOLSS) 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested