c# view pdf web browser : Deleting pages from pdf Library software class asp.net winforms html ajax e2-14-011-part1056

UNESCO - EOLSS 
SAMPLE CHAPTER
WASTEWATER RECYCLE, REUSE, AND RECLAMATION - Recycle and Reuse of Domestic Wastewater - S. Vigneswaran, M. 
Sundaravadivel 
public  access,  and  crop  irrigation 
with  limited  public  access, 
respectively. 
all  types  of  reuse.  For 
industrial  crops  up  to 
10 000 
FC/100mL 
allowed  with  higher 
BOD and SS limits. No 
irrigation  of  vegetables 
allowed.  
France 
200–1000  FC/100mL  depending  on 
the type of crop. 
Exposed 
groups 
indicated. To be revised 
shortly. 
Israel 
120–250 FC/100mL. Regulations for 
BOD, SS, DO and residual chlorine. 
Wide 
ranging 
guidelines  according  to 
the  type  of  crop 
irrigated. 
Japan 
No  detectable  coliform  bacteria  for 
landscape  irrigation.  Less  than 
10/mL for reuse as toilet flush. 
Guidelines  for  crop 
irrigation 
not 
mentioned.  
Spain 
Less  than  1000  FC/100mL  and less 
than 1 nematode per liter. 
WHO  guidelines  are 
generally encouraged. 
Saudi Arabia 
2.2–100  and  23–200  FC/100mL  for 
unrestricted and restricted irrigation, 
respectively.  Intestinal  nematodes  1 
per liter. 
Includes  limits  for 
various 
physico-
chemical parameters. 
Tunisia 
Intestinal  nematode  less  than  1  per 
liter. 
No  limit  for  fecal 
coliforms  prescribed. 
Includes  wide  range  of 
physico-chemical 
parameters,  irrespective 
of the type of crops. 
Table 3. Current regulations for wastewater reuse for irrigation of agricultural crop—a 
comparison. 
5.1.2 Irrigation of Landscape and Recreational Area 
Application  of  reclaimed  wastewater  for  landscape  irrigation  includes  use  in  public 
parks,  golf  courses,  urban  green  belts,  freeway  medians,  cemeteries,  and  residential 
lawns. This type of application is one of the most common application of wastewater 
reuse worldwide. Examples of such uses can be found in USA, Australia, Japan, Mexico 
and Saudi Arabia  among  others.  These schemes have  been  operating  successfully  in 
many  countries  for  many  years  without  attracting  adverse  comments.  This  type  of 
application  has  the  potential  to  improve  the  amenity  of  the  urban  environment. 
However,  such  schemes  must  be  carefully  run  to  avoid  problems  with  community 
health. Because the water is used in areas that are open to public, there is potential for 
human contact, so reuse water must be treated to a high level to avoid risk of spreading 
diseases.  Other  potential  problems  of  application  for  landscape  irrigation  concern 
aesthetics such as odor, insects, and problems deriving from build-up of nutrients. 
©Encyclopedia of Life Support Systems (EOLSS) 
Deleting pages from pdf - copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Easy to Use C# Code to Extract PDF Pages, Copy Pages from One PDF File and Paste into Others
delete pages from pdf online; delete pages of pdf reader
Deleting pages from pdf - VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed VB.NET Guide for Extracting Pages from Microsoft PDF Doc
extract pdf pages acrobat; acrobat remove pages from pdf
UNESCO - EOLSS 
SAMPLE CHAPTER
WASTEWATER RECYCLE, REUSE, AND RECLAMATION - Recycle and Reuse of Domestic Wastewater - S. Vigneswaran, M. 
Sundaravadivel 
The  “water  mining” project is an  innovative  concept  followed  in  Australia,  in which 
wastewater  from  a  main  sewer  in  the  reticulated  wastewater  collection  system  is 
diverted to be treated and reclaimed for use in landscape irrigation. The first of such a 
water mining plant was opened in May 1995 at Southwell Park in Canberra. The plant 
design  focused  on  health  issues,  noise  and  odor  control,  and  preservation  of 
neighborhood amenity. 
5.2 Domestic and Industrial Reuse 
Reuse of wastewater for purposes other than irrigation may be either for: 
industrial reuse; 
non-potable purposes; 
indirect potable purposes; or 
direct potable purposes. 
5.2.1 Industrial Reuse 
Industrial reuse of reclaimed wastewater represents major reuse next only to irrigation 
in both  developed and developing countries. Reclaimed wastewater is ideal for many 
industrial  purposes, which  do  not  require  water of high  quality.  Often  industries  are 
located  near  populated  area  where  centralized  treatment  facilities  already  generate 
reclaimed water. Depending on the type of industry, reclaimed water can be utilized for 
cooling water make-up, boiler feed water, process water etc. Cooling water make-up in 
a majority of industrial operations represent the single largest water usage. Compared to 
other purposes such as boiler feed and process water, the water quality requirements for 
industrial cooling is not generally high. Consequently, cooling water make-up presents a 
single largest opportunity for reuse. In Australia, considered the “driest continent” on 
earth,  cooling water make up would be attractive from the viewpoint of  substantially 
lessening  the  demand  for  potable  water  by  power  stations.  Operational  problems 
encountered  in  cooling  water recirculation  systems  are  irrespective  of  the  quality  of 
make-up water used. They are scaling, corrosion, biological growth, and fouling.  
A  major  problem  associated  with reuse  of  wastewater  will  be  biofilm  growth  in  the 
recirculation  system.  Presence  of  microorganisms  (pathogens  or  otherwise)  with 
nutrients  such  as  nitrogen  and  phosphorus,  in  warm  and  well-aerated  conditions,  as 
found in cooling water towers, create ideal environments for biological growth. 
A successful example for reuse for industrial cooling exists at Eraring Power Station in 
New South  Wales, Australia.  Electrical power  generation industries, by the nature of 
their activities, are normally located close to large urban settlements, where domestic 
wastewater is generated in large quantities. Since power-generating stations have a huge 
cooling water requirement, they provide potential reuse locations for reclaimed sewage. 
Eraring  Power  Station used 4 million liters/day of potable  quality water from a local 
water supply in the Hunter region of New South Wales. When the continued residential 
growth in the  region necessitated  an expansion of potable water infrastructure, many 
environmental issues were raised about the proposed water source, Lake Macquarie. It 
was assessed that installation of water intake and construction of pipelines to convey it 
©Encyclopedia of Life Support Systems (EOLSS) 
C# PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
C#.NET PDF Library - Delete PDF Document Page in C#.NET. Provide C# Users with Mature .NET PDF Document Manipulating Library for Deleting PDF Pages in C#.
copy pdf pages to another pdf; extract one page from pdf file
VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.
Document Page in VB.NET Class. Free PDF edit control and component for deleting PDF pages in Visual Basic .NET framework application.
copy pdf page to powerpoint; copy page from pdf
UNESCO - EOLSS 
SAMPLE CHAPTER
WASTEWATER RECYCLE, REUSE, AND RECLAMATION - Recycle and Reuse of Domestic Wastewater - S. Vigneswaran, M. 
Sundaravadivel 
to water treatment plant would have disturbed environmentally sensitive areas around 
the  lake.  Then it  was identified  that  such an  expansion could  be offset if  the  Power 
Station could replace its cooling water requirement with reclaimed water from a nearby 
sewage treatment plant located at Dora Creek. 
Pilot scale feasibility studies carried out in Australia have concluded that it is possible to 
economically treat  the  domestic  wastewater to  achieve  adequate  quality  for  reuse  as 
cooling water. Based on the conclusions of the feasibility study, a full-scale treatment 
plant  employing  cross-flow  membrane  microfiltration  system  was  installed.  The 
membrane  filtration  system  could  remove  all  suspended  solids,  fecal  coliforms,  and 
giardia cysts. It could also significantly reduce human enteric viruses such as reovirus 
and enterovirus. The water reclamation plant at Eraring Power Station demonstrates the 
potential  for  reuse  of  wastewater  in  power  generation  and  other  industrial 
manufacturing facilities. 
5.2.2 Non-potable Domestic Reuse 
Adequately treated wastewater meeting strict quality criteria, can be planned for reuse 
for  many  non-potable  purposes.  Non-potable  reuse  leads  to  both  a  reduction  water 
consumption  from  other  sources,  and  a  reduction  in  wastewater  flow  rate.  So,  non-
potable reuse schemes can avoid adverse environmental consequences associated with 
conventional  water  sources  and  wastewater  disposal  systems.  Non-potable  domestic 
reuse can be planned either within single households/building, or on a larger-scale use 
through a reticulation system meant only for use for non-potable purpose. 
Systems for individual households/buildings/facilities. In many parts of the world, it has 
become apparent that it may not be possible to provide a centralized sewage collection 
facility  for  all  the  households,  due  to  both  geographic  and  economic  reasons. 
Wastewater  from  individual  dwellings  and  community  facilities  in  such  unsewered 
locations  is  usually  managed  by  on-site  treatment  and  disposal  systems.  Although  a 
variety of onsite systems have been used, the most common system consists of a septic 
tank for the partial treatment of  wastewater, and  a subsurface  disposal field for final 
treatment and disposal. 
By segregating the “gray” sullage from “black” toilet wastes, potential for reuse with 
minimal treatment within the household enhances manifold. There are several different 
schemes for reusing gray water at the household levels. In California, systems which 
use gray water treated to a primary level for subsurface irrigation of gardens, have been 
in use for many years, and studies have shown no health problems associated with the 
use.  In  non-sewered  areas  of  Australia,  water  scarce  conditions  in  some  regions  of 
Victoria have prompted interest in gray water recycling for garden irrigation. Collection 
and  recycling  systems  for  bathroom  and  laundry  water  have  recently  been  tested  in 
Victoria. A simple valve arrangement for diversion of laundry  gray water for garden 
watering  has  been  developed.  Australian  authorities  are  currently  considering  the 
introduction  of  a  comprehensive  guidelines  for  gray  water  recycling  systems  in 
individual households. 
©Encyclopedia of Life Support Systems (EOLSS) 
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
Deleting Pages. You may feel free to define some continuous PDF pages and delete. Certainly, random pages can be deleted from PDF file as well. Sorting Pages.
cut pages from pdf; delete pages of pdf
C# Word - Delete Word Document Page in C#.NET
C# Word - Delete Word Document Page in C#.NET. Provides Users with Mature Document Manipulating Function for Deleting Word Pages. Overview.
delete page from pdf; extract one page from pdf online
UNESCO - EOLSS 
SAMPLE CHAPTER
WASTEWATER RECYCLE, REUSE, AND RECLAMATION - Recycle and Reuse of Domestic Wastewater - S. Vigneswaran, M. 
Sundaravadivel 
Where the gray water is not separated from toilet wastes, improvements in the quality of 
treated  wastewater  can  be  brought  about  by  many  alternative  systems.  One  of  the 
alternatives include intermittent and recirculating granular-medium filters. The effluent 
from a recirculating filter has been found to be of such high quality, it can be used in a 
variety of applications, including drip irrigation. In Japan, the major in-house gray water 
reuse system is the  hand basin toilets, which  uses a  hand basin set on the top of the 
cistern,  so  the  water  from  hand  washing  forms  part  of  the  refill  volume  for  toilet 
flushing. Hand basin toilets are reportedly installed in most new houses in Japan. 
A  large-scale  non-potable  reuse  scheme  at  the  Taronga  Zoological  Park  in  Sydney, 
Australia is operating since 1996. Before the scheme, wastewater and stormwater from 
the  zoo  premises  were  being  discharged  with  less  effective  treatment  into  Sydney 
Harbor. Reports of foul smell and discolored water from the public were common. With 
the reuse scheme in place, the zoo now treats all wastewater generated, and recycles 
about  200 kl/day  of  reclaimed  water  to  hose  down  animal  enclosures,  watering  the 
gardens and lawns, flush public toilets and fill ornamental moats. 
Large-scale non-potable reuse through a dual reticulation system. A  Dual reticulation 
system  is  the  wastewater  reuse  concept  for  urban  areas  where  a  centralized  sewage 
collection system is in place, on a large scale. This system supplies treated wastewater 
to houses, and commercial/official/shopping complexes through a separate water supply 
network,  to  be  used  primarily  for  toilet  flushing,  and  irrigation  of  lawns.  Thus, 
households will have two  water supply lines, one for potable  and human-contact use 
purposes, and the second for non-potable, non-contact uses such as toilet flushing, use 
in the yards and gardens etc., hence the name “dual reticulation system.” 
Dual reticulation system case studies: 
1. USA. The city of Altamonte Springs, near Orlando in Florida, USA has a long 
established sewage reuse scheme for non-potable residential and other uses, through 
dual  reticulation  systems.  The  incentives  to  build  the  reuse  scheme  came  from 
concerns  about  maintaining  the  quality  of  the  lake  which  received  the  treated 
wastewater of the city, and from the need to limit withdrawals of potable water from 
the Central Florida groundwater aquifer. 
Wastewater  for  reclamation  is  withdrawn  from  the  isolated  sewer  lines  collecting 
wastewater predominantly from residential sites. It is low in salinity. The treatment train 
includes, 
(i)  primary sedimentation tanks, 
(ii)  secondary biological treatment including nitrification systems, 
(iii)  tertiary chemical coagulation, filtration, reaeration and high-level disinfection, 
(iv)  polishing for dechlorination and pH control. 
A  comprehensive  and  continuous  process  control  and  a  well-equipped  laboratory 
support the  treatment  system  for  quality  control.  Trenchless  technology  was  used  to 
retrofit the city with small-diameter pipes for delivery of reclaimed water. This means 
that there was no need to excavate streets, pathways. 
©Encyclopedia of Life Support Systems (EOLSS) 
VB.NET PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for vb.net, ASP.NET
You may feel free to define some continuous PDF pages through deleting pages in VB.NET demo code. Certainly, random pages can be deleted from PDF file as well.
extract pages from pdf on ipad; convert selected pages of pdf to word online
C# PowerPoint - Delete PowerPoint Document Page in C#.NET
C# PowerPoint - Delete PowerPoint Document Page in C#.NET. Provides Users with Mature Document Manipulating Function for Deleting PowerPoint Pages. Overview.
delete pages of pdf online; extract pages pdf preview
UNESCO - EOLSS 
SAMPLE CHAPTER
WASTEWATER RECYCLE, REUSE, AND RECLAMATION - Recycle and Reuse of Domestic Wastewater - S. Vigneswaran, M. 
Sundaravadivel 
This scheme serves a population of some 45 000 people, and the reclaimed water is used 
for  irrigation  of  lawns  in  industrial,  commercial  and  public  buildings  (including  the 
grounds of a public hospital), as well as open space irrigation. Some of the reclaimed 
water is being supplied to office and apartment buildings for toilet flushing, and once-
through cooling in industries. The water is also used for water level control in the lake, 
automobile washing, public fountains and water falls. About 30–40% of the total water 
use is provided by the dual reticulation system, which produces about 45 Ml per day of 
reclaimed  water.  Extensive  public  consultation  combined  with  a  mixture  of  forceful 
advocacy  on  the  part  of  city’s water  supply authority  has resulted  in  general  public 
acceptance. The city ordinance was amended to enforce compulsory connection to the 
reclaimed  water  distribution  network.  Initial  apprehensions  about  public  health  risks 
proved to  be misplaced, as no public health impact had been detected in the first six 
years of operation from 1989 to 1995. 
2.  Japan. Japan has a long history of planned wastewater reclamation and reuse, the 
first  of  which  dates back to 1951,  when secondary  treated effluent  of  Mikawashima 
wastewater treatment plant in Tokyo was experimentally used for paper manufacturing 
in  a  paper mill  nearby.  Today,  Japan  has  well  developed  policies  and  programs  for 
wastewater  recycle  and  reuse,  to  promote  water  pollution  control,  environmental 
protection, and amenities for urban environment. Treated wastewater has also been used 
for washing passenger trains, and as plant water in solid waste incineration plants. The 
water  reuse  projects  are  favored  as  they  stimulate  private  sector  investment  in  such 
works as installing drainage and flush-toilet facilities, thereby creating economic side 
benefits. The status of wastewater reuse in Tokyo in 1993 was as in Table 4. 
Wastewater 
treatment plant 
Applications 
Quantity (in 
1000 m
3
/ year) 
Shibaura 
Train washing 
111 
Sunamachi 
Dust control by wetting 
Morigasaki 
Plant water at refuse 
incineration plant 
386 
Mikawashima 
Industrial water 
8835 
Ochiai 
Toilet flushing 
970 
Tamagawa-Joryu 
Stream augmentation 
12370 
Source: Maeda M., Nakada K., Kawamoto K., and Ikeda M. (1996). Area-wide use of 
reclaimed water in Tokyo, Japan. Journal  of Water Science and Technology, 33(10–
11), 51–57 
Table 4. Wastewater reuse in Tokyo in 1993. 
Japan  has  several  instances  of  graywater  reuse  in  high-rise  buildings  through  dual 
reticulation system. Through various economic incentives, existing and new high rise 
buildings in Japan are encouraged to have a dual reticulation system. In 1990, about 844 
buildings  were  identified  to  have  wastewater  recycling  systems.  A  water  recycling 
project  for  area-wide  non-potable  reuse  of  reclaimed  water  has  been  adopted  in 
Shinjuku, a business and commercial center. Shinjuku has been one of the largest urban 
©Encyclopedia of Life Support Systems (EOLSS) 
VB.NET TIFF: Modify TIFF File by Adding, Deleting & Sort TIFF
Please check following TIFF page deleting methods and &ltsummary> ''' Sort TIFF document pages in designed & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
extract one page from pdf preview; copy pages from pdf to another pdf
VB.NET TIFF: An Easy VB.NET Solution to Delete or Remove TIFF File
also empowers users to insert blank pages into TIFF I have tried the function of deleting page from powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
copy pdf page into word doc; delete page from pdf document
UNESCO - EOLSS 
SAMPLE CHAPTER
WASTEWATER RECYCLE, REUSE, AND RECLAMATION - Recycle and Reuse of Domestic Wastewater - S. Vigneswaran, M. 
Sundaravadivel 
redevelopment  projects  in  Tokyo,  and  the  water  demand  for  this  newly  developed 
business district  has  been largely  coped-up  with  the supply  of  reclaimed  wastewater 
through a dual reticulation system. 
Secondary  treated  wastewater forms  the  influent  to  the  water  recycling  system.  The 
recycling system consists of rapid sand filters, pumping facilities, force mains, recycling 
center that house distribution reservoir and distribution pump, and distribution network. 
The Shinjuku water distribution center is located in the basement of a hotel. Because of 
its location, noise, odor and other nuisances are strictly controlled. The system supplies 
reclaimed water to 19 high-rise buildings that house commercial and office premises, up 
to a daily maximum of 8000 KL, since 1991. The Tokyo Metropolitan Government, in 
an  effort  to  promote  water  conservation,  and  wastewater  reclamation,  introduced 
increasing  block  rate  structure  of  water  and  waste  charges.  All  new  buildings  were 
requested to  provide  dual system, for the  use of reclaimed water. By setting up 20% 
lower water charge for of reclaimed water, its use has been encouraged. 
The Fukuoka city comprise a population of over 1.3 million, and covers an area of about 
340 sq.km. Due to the non-availability of stable water source either through large rivers 
or groundwater, for the domestic and industrial water supply, the Fukuoka City Council 
started  vigorously  promoting  a  water  conservation  plan  since  1979,  which  included 
wastewater reclamation and reuse. The city reclaimed water supply amounting to 4500 
KL per day in 1995, and is planning to achieve the rate of 8000 KL/day by the end of 
the century. 
3.  Australia. Recycling reclaimed water and stormwater for residential non-potable 
uses has been  estimated to have  potential to reduce residential  water  demands by an 
average  of  40—50%  in  most  Australian  cities.  There  are  many  pilot  scale  dual 
reticulation schemes in Australia. Social surveys conducted in Melbourne indicated that 
people  support recycling of  bathroom  and laundry  wastewater. In  Western  Australia, 
domestic  graywater  reuse  has  been  an  accepted  option  for  future  urban  expansions. 
Commercial  scale  systems  have  been  installed  in  Rouse  Hill,  a  suburban  area  near 
Sydney, and New Haven in South Australia. The Rouse Hill scheme is Australia’s first 
full-scale application of domestic non-potable reuse through a dual reticulation system. 
The decision to include a dual reticulation system was taken after the sewage treatment 
plant  (STP) design for the Rouse Hill Shire Council has  been completed.  In order to 
achieve  the  desirable  water  quality,  and  to  fulfil  the  acceptable  treatment  train 
recommended in the “Guidelines for urban and residential use of reclaimed water” of 
the State of New South Wales (NSW), a tertiary treatment train to the completed STP 
was  added.  This  train  included  coagulation,  flocculation,  clarification,  filtration, 
disinfection and pH control. Table 5 summarizes the salient design parameters of the 
Rouse Hill tertiary treatment plant, and compares them with the requirements of NSW 
guidelines, and the Californian treatment train adopted in Florida, USA. 
Treatment unit 
Rouse Hill STP 
NSW guidelines 
California 
process (Florida) 
Coagulation 
1  min.  hydraulic 
retention time (HRT) 
Optional 
Required 
if 
turbidity  is  more 
©Encyclopedia of Life Support Systems (EOLSS) 
C#: How to Delete Cached Files from Your Web Viewer
PDF pages extract, copy, paste, C#.NET rotate PDF pages, C#.NET VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word Visual C#.NET Developers the Ways of Deleting Cache Files.
cut pages from pdf online; cut pages out of pdf file
C# PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in C#.
VB.NET comment annotate PDF, VB.NET delete PDF pages, VB.NET C# PDF - Remove Image from PDF Page. Provide C# Demo Code for Deleting and Removing Image from PDF
delete page from pdf acrobat; delete pages from pdf in preview
UNESCO - EOLSS 
SAMPLE CHAPTER
WASTEWATER RECYCLE, REUSE, AND RECLAMATION - Recycle and Reuse of Domestic Wastewater - S. Vigneswaran, M. 
Sundaravadivel 
than 5 NTU 
Flocculation 
20min. HRT, 3 stage  Not specified 
Not specified 
Clarification 
2.4 m/hr. peak flow  Not specified 
Not specified 
Filtration 
0.3 m medium depth, 
10 m/h filtration rate 
0.9 m medium depth, 
12 m/h filtration rate 
0.9  m  medium 
depth, 
12m/h 
filtration rate 
Disinfection 
5 mg/l  free chlorine, 
1 hr. contact time 
5 mg/l free chlorine, 
1hr. contact time 
mg/l 
free 
chlorine,  2  hr. 
contact time 
pH control 
6.5–8.0 
6.5–8.0 
Not specified 
Source: Law I. B. (1996) Rouse Hill—Australia’s first full scale domestic non-potable 
reuse application. Water Science and Technology33(10–11), 71–78 
Table 5. Tertiary treatment plant criteria for non-potable water reuse. 
The reclaimed water is pumped and stored in elevated reservoirs, from where water is 
distributed by gravity through some 34 km of distribution network. Continuity of supply 
in  the  non-potable  water  supply  line  is  achieved  by  having  each  of  the  reservoirs 
connected to the potable water supply, via an air gap. The reservoirs are also equipped 
with  facilities  for  dechlorination  using  sodium  metabisulfite  to  ensure  that  residual 
chlorine at the consumer end does not exceed the maximum allowable limit of 0.5 mg/l. 
Other salient features of the dual reticulation system are: 
reclaimed water is distributed through non-metallic PVC or reinforced plastic pipes; 
reclaimed water supply  fittings  are distinguished by  different  labels  and  color of 
surface boxes and indicator plates; 
different sizes for the service mains for potable and non-potable water supply are 
used: the recycled water line is colored lilac and labeled “Recycled water—Do not 
drink”; 
reclaimed  water to  the  houses  is connected  to the toilets, which  are “dual-flush” 
type, as well as to an external tap with a removable handle; 
price  of reclaimed  water is  fixed  at 20  cents/kl  as against 65 cents/kl for potable 
water. 
5.2.3 Indirect Potable Reuse 
Indirect  potable  reuse  of  treated  wastewater  may  occur  unintentionally,  when 
wastewater is disposed into a receiving body of water that is used as a source of potable 
water  supply.  It  can  also  be  through  planned  schemes,  such  as  that  of  Cerro  del  la 
Estrella sewage treatment plant in Mexico city. Here, treated wastewater which meets 
the criteria for potable reuse except for total dissolved solids, is diluted by water from 
other  sources  to  meet  this  criteria,  and  used  for  potable  purposes.  Another  planned 
indirect potable reuse can be through groundwater recharge of treated wastewater. 
Deliberate (artificial) recharge of groundwater aquifers with treated wastewater can be 
carried out to achieve one or more of the following objectives: 
©Encyclopedia of Life Support Systems (EOLSS) 
UNESCO - EOLSS 
SAMPLE CHAPTER
WASTEWATER RECYCLE, REUSE, AND RECLAMATION - Recycle and Reuse of Domestic Wastewater - S. Vigneswaran, M. 
Sundaravadivel 
as storage during periods of low water demand; 
as an additional treatment method; 
as a measure to improve the depleting groundwater potential; and 
as a measure to improve the overall quality of groundwater by injecting reclaimed 
water of specific qualities. 
Use of treated wastewater for artificial groundwater recharge is increasing as a way to 
treat and store effluent underground for subsequent recovery and unrestricted reuse. A 
recent report by the National Academy of Sciences, USA, has given a cautious green 
signal for  potable use of water from aquifers recharged  with wastewater.  The report 
suggests  that  with  surface  infiltration  systems  for  artificial  recharge,  considerable 
quality improvements can be obtained as the water flows through the unsaturated zone 
to the aquifer, and this soil-aquifer treatment (SAT) reduces pretreatment requirement. 
However, it cautions that impaired quality waters used to recharge groundwater aquifers 
must receive a sufficiently high degree of pretreatment (prior to recharge) to minimize 
the extent of any degradation of groundwater quality, as well as to minimize the need 
for any extensive post-treatment at the point of recovery. In many arid and semi-arid 
countries,  like  Israel  and  Morocco,  SAT  is  used  as  an  extra  advanced  wastewater 
treatment process in order to produce an alternative source of water and is considered as 
a relatively inexpensive but efficient advanced treatment, because it removes efficiently 
the  parasitic  protozoa  and  helminths,  as  well  as  bacteria,  mostly  by  filtration.  It  is 
because  of  this  reason  that  water  from  polluted  natural  water  (as  against  treated 
wastewater) sources also have been artificially recharged to be recovered and reused for 
potable purposes. In Israel, water from a lake is used for recharge for such purposes. 
One of the earliest  indirect  reuse  of treated wastewater can  be traced  back to  a pilot 
study of 1930s, in the city of Los Angeles. The study reported that secondary treated 
wastewater  treated  in  a  long  chain  of  tertiary  treatment  processes  including  super 
chlorination,  ferric  chloride  coagulation,  sedimentation,  sand  filtration,  and  activated 
carbon filtration, has been infiltrated into ground up to 7–5 m above groundwater table 
in a dry river bed  2–5 km upstream from collection galleries for the municipal water 
system.  In  Arizona,  USA,  many cities  and  towns  recharge  their  aquifers  with  urban 
wastewater to obtain “recharge credits,” which allows them to continue pumping their 
groundwater wells for municipal water supplies. Recharged water is recovered for use 
in drinking, irrigation and industrial purposes. 
5.2.4 Direct Potable Reuse 
Direct potable reuse means adding treated wastewater directly into the normal drinking 
water  distribution  system.  Though  the  idea  of  such  a  wastewater  reuse  may  be 
repugnant to many, technologically, direct potable reuse of treated wastewater has been 
feasible  for  many  years.  A  classic  example  of  wastewater  reuse  for  direct  potable 
purposes in an emergency  happened in  1950s in the town of Chanute, Kansas, USA. 
The Nesho river in eastern Kansas served as the sole water source of Chanute. Due to 
continuous  drought  for  five  years,  surface  flow  of  the  river  ceased  in  1956.  After 
considering all other alternatives, the river was dammed just below the towns sewage 
outfall, and the treated wastewater was used to fill the potable water intake pool. For 
five months, the city reused its sewage, circulating it some eight to fifteen times. Thanks 
©Encyclopedia of Life Support Systems (EOLSS) 
UNESCO - EOLSS 
SAMPLE CHAPTER
WASTEWATER RECYCLE, REUSE, AND RECLAMATION - Recycle and Reuse of Domestic Wastewater - S. Vigneswaran, M. 
Sundaravadivel 
to the elaborate sewage treatment as well as for raw water, the bacteriological qualities 
were met.  An epidemiological survey  showed  fewer  cases  of  stomach  and  intestinal 
illness during recycle  than in the following winter when Chanute was back to use as 
river water. In the United States, the Denver Potable Reuse Demonstration Project has 
operated since 1984. A larger demonstration plant at Daspoort sewage treatment plant, 
however, did  not  reuse  treated  wastewater to supplement drinking  water  supplies  for 
various reasons. 
Case  study of Windhoek  water reclamation scheme for direct potable reuse. Another 
famous  example  widely  quoted  for  direct  potable  reuse  of  reclaimed  water  is  the 
reclamation scheme adopted in Windhoek, capital city of Namibia, which was initiated 
in 1968. The city of Windhoek, approached the limits of its conventional drinking water 
sources  during  the  1960s  due  to  severe  water  shortage,  as  groundwater  and  surface 
water sources in the vicinity of the city had been fully harnessed. Therefore, in 1968, the 
city adopted a water reclamation scheme from domestic wastewater to supplement the 
potable water to the city. The scheme was well publicized and there has been no public 
opposition.  The  reclamation  scheme  was  founded  on  the  three  basic  premises  for 
reclamation to succeed: diversion of  industrial and  other potentially toxic  wastewater 
from  the  main  wastewater  stream,  wastewater  treatment  to  produce  an  effluent  of 
adequate  and consistent quality, and effluent treatment to  produce acceptable potable 
water. In addition, it was considered that it is of utmost importance to develop a multi-
barrier treatment sequence as a safeguard against pathogens. 
The  industrial  wastewaters  were  diverted  to  be  treated  in  separate  small  treatment 
plants, and only the industries that do not generate wastewater were allowed in areas 
were effluents merged with domestic sewage. The system went through a succession of 
modifications  and  improvements  over  the  year.  The  wastewater  is  treated  in  two 
separate, consecutive treatment plants to potable standard. The first is the conventional 
biological  treatment  plant  (activated  sludge  process)  at  Gamams  to  treat  raw 
wastewater.  This  wastewater  is  discharged  into  a  series  of  maturation  ponds,  from 
where the effluent gravitates directly to the water reclamation plant at Goreangab. The 
water  reclamation  plant  consists  of  alum  coagulation,  dissolved  air  floatation,  lime 
dosing,  sedimentation,  sand  filtration,  breakpoint  chlorination,  activated  carbon 
filtration, and final chlorination. 
Up to the present, the reclaimed water is blended in two steps. The first blending step 
takes place at the Goreangab treatment plant, where the reclaimed water is blended with 
conventionally  treated  surface  water,  which  ensures  a  minimum  1:1  dilution  of 
reclaimed  water.  The  second  blending  step  takes  place  in  the  bulk  water  system  of 
Windhoek,  where the blend  from Goreangab  is mixed  with  treated  water  from other 
sources. It has been estimated that in future, the surface water supply at Goreangab will 
not have any significant benefit, due to its quality deterioration as well as its reduced 
contribution to the total flow.  
Until  1982,  the  scheme  had  research  status,  and  some  costs  of  monitoring  were 
absorbed by the South African Water Research Commission. Since then, the project is 
considered a normal production facility. To ensure water quality, an independent expert 
monitoring  of  system  performance,  a  technical  committee  representing  experts  from 
©Encyclopedia of Life Support Systems (EOLSS) 
UNESCO - EOLSS 
SAMPLE CHAPTER
WASTEWATER RECYCLE, REUSE, AND RECLAMATION - Recycle and Reuse of Domestic Wastewater - S. Vigneswaran, M. 
Sundaravadivel 
five independent professional bodies convened three times a year for a detailed review 
of  water  quality.  This  procedure  was  discontinued  since  1988  and  replaced  by  a 
monitoring system by  three  independent  laboratories.  The  treated  wastewater,  before 
reclamation,  is  also  continuously  monitored  to  ensure  a  consistent,  high  quality 
maturation pond effluent. 
The  Windhoek  experience  with  wastewater  reclamation  to  potable  drinking  water 
standard was an unqualified success during the last twenty-five years, which is of great 
significance to all arid and semi-arid regions of the world, as it demonstrates that: 
with  proper  care  and  diligence,  water  of  acceptable  quality  can  be  consistently 
produced from domestic wastewater, 
if properly informed, consumers will fully accept this perhaps controversial option, 
wastewater reclamation for direct potable purpose is a practical option, not only for 
technologically  advanced  countries,  but  also  for  regions  with  relatively  difficult 
access to advanced technology, management and operating skills. 
5.3 Wastewater Sludge Reuse 
Wastewater  sludge  is  the  solid/semi-solid  substance,  concentrated  form  of  mainly 
organic, and some inorganic impurities (pollutants), generated as a result of treatment of 
wastewater.  For  any  growing  modern  city,  it  is  necessary  to  expand  its  sewage 
collection system to cater to the needs of the growing urban areas and its population. 
With the expansion of sewerage system comes the ever-increasing problem of how best 
the  sludge  generated  in  wastewater  treatment  facilities  can  be  disposed.  Disposal 
methods  once  used  for  sludge  management,  such  as  ocean  disposal,  are  not 
environmentally appropriate. Though it is traditionally suggested that the sludge can be 
applied on land as soil conditioner and as fertilizer, there are many issues involved in 
handling  and  transportation, and  odor nuisance,  which are  of concern.  Experience in 
Europe and the USA have shown that land application/reuse of sludge options are the 
most promising ones that benefit the society. Sludge can be reused to reclaim parched 
land by application as soil conditioner, and also as a fertilizer in agriculture. 
Deteriorated  land  areas,  which  cannot  support  the  plant  vegetation  due  to  lack  of 
nutrients, soil organic matter, low pH and low water holding capacity, can be reclaimed 
and improved by the application of sludge. Sewage sludge has a pH buffering capacity 
resulting from an alkalinity that is beneficial in the reclamation of acidic sites, like acid 
mine  spoils,  and acidic coal refuse  materials. There  are  a number  of  successful  land 
reclamation  projects  reported  from  the  United  States.  Operational  experience  is 
available for handling systems, application systems, amount required per hectare, and 
response of various types of vegetation. Sludge with a solid content of 30% or more can 
be  handled  with  conventional  end-loading  equipment,  and  applied  with  agricultural 
manure spreaders. Liquid sludge, typically with solid content less than 6%, are managed 
and handled by normal hydraulic equipment. Agricultural use of sludge matches best 
with priorities in waste management. Sewage sludge contains nutrients in considerable 
amounts, which lead to fertilization of soil  and organic matters  that improve  the soil 
through humic reactions. 
©Encyclopedia of Life Support Systems (EOLSS) 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested