c# view pdf web browser : Add remove pages from pdf Library control component asp.net web page windows mvc eBURST_readme_v30-part1069

http://eburst.mlst.net
Version 3; February 2006 
Contents 
Introduction 
Defining groups  
Identifying the founder of a group and the patterns of evolutionary  
  
 descent 
Subgroups and subgroup founders   
Estimating the level of confidence in the predicted founding ST   
Building up the eBURST diagram 
Exploring alternative patterns of descent 
10 
7.1 
Re-assigning the primary founder   
10 
7.2 
Using additional data to optimise patterns of descent 
11 
Using eBURST   
12 
8.1 
The Profiles window   
12 
8.2 
The Analysis window  
13 
8.3 
The Diagram window  
14 
8.3.1  The default diagram(six out of seven group definition)    
15 
8.3.2  Relaxing the group definition to five out of seven  
15 
8.3.3  Further relaxation of the group definition   
15 
8.4 
Subgroups and subgroup founders   
15 
8.5 
Displaying a “Population Snapshot”   
16 
8.6 
Comparing two datasets 
16 
Manipulating and editing the eBURST diagram 
18 
9.1 
Moving the eBURST diagram  
18 
9.2 
Horizontal and vertical expansion   
18 
9.3 
Rotating and zooming  
18 
9.4 
Manual editing the eBURST diagram  
18 
9.4.1  Moving STs   
18 
9.4.2  Highlighting connections between STs   
18 
9.4.3  Options 
18 
9.4.4  Text size and font of ST labels 
18           
9.4.5  Colour Key  
18 
9.4.6  Changing default colours and line widths   
18 
9.4.7  Show ST labels 
18 
9.5 
Saving and printing output   
19 
9.5.1  Saving text output   
19 
9.5.2  Saving eBURST diagrams  
19 
9.5.3  Printing eBURST diagrams and text 
19 
Add remove pages from pdf - copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Easy to Use C# Code to Extract PDF Pages, Copy Pages from One PDF File and Paste into Others
extract pdf pages reader; deleting pages from pdf document
Add remove pages from pdf - VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed VB.NET Guide for Extracting Pages from Microsoft PDF Doc
extract one page from pdf reader; delete pages out of a pdf file
9.6 
Obtaining more information about groups or STs   
19 
9.7 
Highlighting all SLVs and DLVs of a ST 
19 
9.8 
Re-assigning the primary founder   
19 
10 
Using eBURSTv3 standalone   
20 
10.1 
Launching eBURSTv3 standalone   
20 
10.2 
Loading data   
20 
10.3 
Changing the number of loci  
20 
10.4 
Differences when using standalone eBURSTv3 
20 
11 
Software requirements   
20 
11.1 
eBURSTv3 application 
20 
11.2 
http://eburst.mlst.net   
20 
12 
Further examples of eBURST diagrams 
21 
VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password
manipulations. Open password protected PDF. Add password to PDF. Change PDF original password. Remove password from PDF. Set PDF security level. VB
extract one page from pdf; cut pages out of pdf file
VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.
can simply delete a single page from a PDF document using VB.NET or remove any page Add necessary references: How to VB.NET: Delete Consecutive Pages from PDF.
export pages from pdf acrobat; extract pdf pages acrobat
1.  Introduction 
BURST was devised and developed by Ed Feil (University of Bath; e.feil@bath.ac.uk
), while 
he  was  in  the  laboratory  of  Brian  Spratt  (now  at  Imperial  College  London; 
b.spratt@imperial.ac.uk), as a way of displaying the relationships between closely-related 
isolates of a bacterial species  or  population*.  BURST, unlike cluster diagrams,  trees  or 
dendrograms,  uses  a  simple  but  appropriate  model  of  bacterial  evolution  in  which  an 
ancestral (or founding) genotype increases in frequency in the population, and while doing so, 
begins to diversify to produce a cluster of closely-related genotypes that are all descended 
from the founding genotype (Figure 1A).  This cluster of related genotypes is often referred to 
as a “clonal complex”.  
The BURST algorithm first identifies mutually exclusive groups of related genotypes in the 
population (typically a multilocus sequence typing [MLST] database), and attempts to identify 
the founding genotype of each group (see below).  The algorithm then predicts the descent 
from the predicted founding genotype to the other genotypes in the group, displaying the 
output as a radial diagram, centred on the predicted founding genotype.  The procedure was 
developed for use with the data produced by MLST (sequence types or STs, and their allelic 
profiles), but using a suitable criterion for the definition of groups of related genotypes, it could 
be  used  with  some  other  types  of  data,  particularly  data  from  multilocus  enzyme 
electrophoresis (MLEE) or from molecular typing methods that produce strings of integers by 
using multiple repeat length polymorphisms.  
The approach used in BURST greatly simplifies the problem of depicting the evolutionary 
relationships among closely related genotypes, which are poorly represented on a tree, as the 
focus  for  each  genotype  is  its relationship  to, and distance from, its  predicted  founding 
genotype, and the great majority of the  pair-wise relationships between genotypes  in the 
population  are  ignored.  BURST  does  not  make  any  inferences  about  the  relationships 
between  the  more  distantly  related  genotypes  that  belong  to  different  groups.  In  many 
bacterial populations, the relationships between distantly-related genotypes may be difficult to 
discern, as the extent of homologous recombination may be sufficiently high that relationships 
may be poorly represented by a phylogenetic tree, and should be represented by a network. 
eBURST does not tell you the truth – it simply produces an hypothesis about the way each 
clonal complex may have emerged and diversified - and any additional phenotypic, genotypic, 
or epidemiological data that are available should be used to explore the plausibility of the 
proposed ancestry and patterns of descent.  
The original version of  BURST was implemented by Ed Feil and Man-Suen Chan (man-
suen.chan@paediatrics.ox.ac.uk).  A greatly enhanced version of BURST (eBURST v1) was 
developed as a Java™ applet by Bao Li (Bao@mac.com), and was integrated into the MLST 
website  by  David  Aanensen  (d.aanensen@imperial.ac.uk
),  within the  laboratory  of  Brian 
Spratt, with help and advice from Ed Feil, Jon Evans (jemevans@yahoo.com
), Bill Hanage 
(w.hanage@imperial.ac.uk
)  and  Christophe  Fraser  (c.fraser@imperial.ac.uk).  The  original 
version  of  BURST  is  still  available  at www.mlst.net
and,  if  necessary,  may  be  used  in 
conjunction with eBURST, as the two algorithms differ slightly in the way they display the 
relationships between STs. 
eBURSTv3 has been further developed  with  funding from  the Wellcome Trust by Derek 
Huntley and David Aanensen at Imperial College London and contains several new features 
improving on previous versions: 
JAVA Web Start Implementation – allowing the most up-to-date version of eBURSTv3 to be  
installed locally and data streamed over the internet directly to the application. 
Comparative eBURST -  The ability to compare two datasets and differentially colour those 
STs unique to one or other of the datasets, or present in both datasets.  
C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#
String outputFilePath = Program.RootPath + "\\" Output.pdf"; // Remove the password. doc.Save(outputFilePath); C# Sample Code: Add Password to Plain PDF
extract pages from pdf; copy web pages to pdf
C# PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
Ability to remove a range of pages from PDF file. Add necessary references: Demo Code: How to Delete Consecutive Pages from PDF in C#.NET.
acrobat export pages from pdf; extract pages from pdf online tool
Other enhancements –  
•  Docking of eBURSTv2 floating windows and menu based access to functionality. 
•  Search and highlight STs within a population. 
•  Printing directly from eBURST. 
•  Output formats – images can be saved in a number of bitmap formats and also as 
Scalable Vector Graphics (SVG) allowing further editing of eBURST diagrams in third 
party applications.   
*Feil, E.J., Li, B., Aanensen, D.M., Hanage, W.P. and Spratt, B.G. 2004. eBURST: Inferring 
patterns  of  evolutionary  descent  among  clusters  of  related  bacterial  genotypes  from 
multilocus sequence typing data. J. Bact. 186: 1518-1530. 
C# PDF Digital Signature Library: add, remove, update PDF digital
Image: Insert Image to PDF. Image: Remove Image from Redact Text Content. Redact Images. Redact Pages. Annotation & Highlight Text. Add Text. Add Text Box. Drawing
delete pages out of a pdf; extract pages from pdf reader
C# PDF metadata Library: add, remove, update PDF metadata in C#.
Add metadata to PDF document in C# .NET framework program. Remove and delete metadata from PDF file. Also a PDF metadata extraction control.
extract pages from pdf on ipad; deleting pages from pdf
2. Defining groups 
The MLST data used by eBURST are the STs and their associated allelic profiles. The first 
step is to divide the input data (e.g. the isolates within a MLST database) into groups of STs 
that have some user-defined level of similarity in allelic profile, since eBURST focuses on 
those STs that are similar and which may share descent from the same founding genotype, 
and provides no information about the more distant relationships between groups.   
The definition of the group can be changed, but the default eBURST setting is to identify 
groups of related STs using the most stringent (conservative) definition, where all members 
assigned to the same group share identical alleles at ≥ 6 of the 7 loci with at least one other 
member of the group.  A less stringent approach is to define the groups by the sharing of 
alleles at ≥ 5 of the 7 loci.  Whatever group definition is used, this approach results in non-
overlapping groups; no ST can be assigned to more than one group.   
A ’group’ is used here as a neutral term for the collection of STs that are placed together by 
eBURST, according to the selected group definition, whereas a clonal complex is a set of STs 
that are all believed to be descended from the same founding genotype. Using the stringent 
group  definition  (6/7  shared  alleles),  isolates  in  the  group  defined  by  eBURST  will  be 
considered to belong to a single clonal complex.  With a less stringent group definition (e.g. 
5/7 shared alleles) all of the STs in an eBURST group cannot be assumed to belong to a 
single clonal complex.  
eBURSTv3 is designed for MLST data, which typically uses seven loci, but there is an option 
to change the number of loci, and the number of shared alleles used to define a group can 
also be changed to an appropriate number within the application (see below). 
3. Identifying the founder of a group and the patterns of evolutionary descent 
The following description of eBURST focuses on groups identified using the stringent default 
setting, where all STs must be a single locus variant (SLV) of at least one other ST in the 
group, and eBURST produce a diagram  where all STs in the group are linked (a clonal 
complex).  The use of eBURST with the more relaxed group definition of 5/7 shared alleles is 
discussed later.   
The primary founder of a group is defined as the ST that differs from the largest number of 
other STs at only a single locus (i.e. the ST that has the greatest number of single-locus 
variants; SLVs). This method of assigning the primary founder takes account of the way in 
which  clones emerge and  diversify  (Figure 1A); the  initial diversification  of  the  founding 
genotype of a clonal complex will result in variants of the founder that differ at only one of the 
seven loci (i.e., SLVs of the founder).  If two STs have the same number of associated SLVs, 
the one with the greatest number of double-locus variants (DLVs) is selected as the founding 
ST. In such cases the confidence in the assignment of the primary founder will be low, as 
reflected in the bootstrap values (see section 5).   
Note  that the assignment of the  founding ST does not take into account the number of 
isolates of each ST; this makes the procedure relatively robust to sampling bias.  In many 
cases, however, the predicted primary founder will also be the most prevalent ST within the 
group. Together with strong bootstrap support, this can provide added confidence in the 
assignment of the primary founder.  The average distance of each ST to all other STs in the 
eBURST group is also calculated by eBURST v3 and the primary founder is likely to be the 
ST with the minimum average distance to all other STs. 
C# PDF bookmark Library: add, remove, update PDF bookmarks in C#.
Help to add or insert bookmark and outline into PDF file in .NET framework. Ability to remove and delete bookmark and outline from PDF document.
extract pdf pages; add and remove pages from pdf file online
C# PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in C#.
Image: Insert Image to PDF. Image: Remove Image from Redact Text Content. Redact Images. Redact Pages. Annotation & Highlight Text. Add Text. Add Text Box. Drawing
extract page from pdf document; cut pages from pdf
The eBURST diagrams display the patterns of descent within each group from the predicted 
founding  ST (Figure  1B).  The initial version  of BURST  placed  the founder  centrally and 
positioned SLVs and DLVs of the founder within concentric rings, whereas eBURST uses 
lines to show the radial links from the founder to each of its SLVs.  A second difference is that 
only SLV links are shown in eBURST, and DLVs of the founder will therefore only be linked if 
the intermediate SLV on the path from the founder to the DLV is present in the input data.  All 
isolates that are directly linked on a eBURST diagram will therefore differ at only a single 
locus  and  the cluster  of  linked STs  should  represent  a  clonal  complex.    A  DLV  of  the 
predicted primary founder of a group will not be included if the linking SLV has not been 
sampled and using the stringent (conservative) default group definition some STs that might 
be part of the clonal complex will therefore not be shown.  In the eBURST diagram, the circle 
representing the predicted primary founder is coloured blue and the areas of each of the 
circles indicate the prevalence of the ST in the input data (Figure 1B). 
With the less stringent group definition of 5/7 shared alleles, more than one cluster of linked 
STs (clonal complex) may be displayed in the eBURST diagram, along with a number of 
unlinked individual STs. The lack of linking between two clusters within a single eBURST 
group implies  that no ST within one  cluster is a  SLV  of  any ST in the other cluster(s).  
Similarly, unlinked individual STs will not be SLVs of any ST in the group.   The SLVs and 
DLVs of any ST can be displayed on the eBURST diagram (see section 9.7.). 
VB.NET PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in
Image: Insert Image to PDF. Image: Remove Image from Redact Text Content. Redact Images. Redact Pages. Annotation & Highlight Text. Add Text. Add Text Box. Drawing
deleting pages from pdf in preview; deleting pages from pdf online
VB.NET PDF metadata library: add, remove, update PDF metadata in
Add permanent metadata to PDF document in VB .NET framework program. Remove and delete metadata content from PDF file in Visual Basic .NET application.
copy pdf pages to another pdf; delete page from pdf online
4. Subgroups and subgroup founders 
In larger eBURST groups there may be several STs besides the predicted primary founder 
that have a number of SLVs of their own. For example, a SLV of the primary founder may 
have become successful and diversified to produce its own SLVs.  A ST that appears to have 
diversified to produce multiple SLVs is called a subgroup founder.  In the default setting for 
the eBURST diagram, a ST with at least two assigned descendent SLVs (i.e. three SLVs in 
total, as the link from the ST to its putative progenitor is also a SLV) is defined as a subgroup 
founder.   In larger eBURST groups there may be many STs with  at least two assigned 
descendent SLVs, and the number of descendent SLVs that define whether a ST is shown as 
a subgroup founder should be increased.  The STs that are subgroup founders, according to 
the default definition of a subgroup, or a user-defined definition, are coloured yellow on the 
eBURST diagram (see examples below).  The primary founder of the group is coloured blue. 
5. Estimating the level of confidence in the predicted founding ST 
In some cases, particularly in small groups with few SLVs, the predicted primary founder of a 
group will have little statistical support and a bootstrapping procedure is used in eBURST to 
provide the level of confidence in the assignment of the primary founder of each group.  The 
bootstrap  values  are  only  available  using  the  default  group  definition  as  they  are  not 
appropriate with less stringent group definitions where an eBURST group may include several 
unlinked clusters of STs (clonal complexes). 
eBURST first divides the input population into groups and, for each group, one example of 
each ST is extracted, and a user-defined (default = 1000) number of random datasets of the 
same size as the extracted ST set are produced by re-sampling with replacement.  For each 
re-sampling the predicted primary founder is computed, and a tally is kept of the number or 
times that each ST in the group is predicted to be the primary founder of the group.   The 
bootstrap values shown for each ST are the percentage of times the ST was predicted to be 
the primary founder of the group in the bootstrap re-samplings.  As a ST cannot be the 
predicted founder if it is not present in a re-sampled dataset, the calculation of the percentage 
of times each ST is predicted to be the primary founder omits those re-samplings in which 
that  ST  is absent.   eBURST therefore  produces  conditional bootstraps,  which  scale  the 
bootstrap confidence values to 100%; a ST that is the predicted primary founder in every re-
sampling in which it is present will have a bootstrap value of 100%.   
Bootstrap values for the primary founders of the groups are shown for re-samplings from the 
extracted ST set, but are also available for re-samplings taken from the set of all isolates in 
the group, which often will include multiple isolates of some STs.  The bootstrap values for a 
ST may differ considerably when one of each ST is used, compared to when all isolates are 
included, since the STs represented in each re-sampling will be influenced by the frequencies 
of the STs in the database. Considerable caution should therefore be used in evaluating the 
bootstrap values using all isolates as they are difficult to interpret, and the default setting is to 
show only the bootstrap values for the resampled datasets obtained from the extracted set 
containing one of each ST.  An option can be set to show the bootstraps calculated using all 
isolates.  We recommend that the bootstrap value obtained using resamplings from a dataset 
containing  one of each ST is  used to  evaluate the robustness  of the assignment of  the 
primary founders. 
In some cases two STs may have relatively high bootstrap support and the predicted primary 
founder may not be the real founder of the group.  For example, a SLV of the real founder of a 
group that becomes antibiotic-resistant, and of much clinical concern, is likely to be massively 
over-sampled – this can result in a number of its antibiotic-resistant SLVs being sampled.   
The over-sampling of the latter SLVs can lead to the resistant strain being selected as the 
founder of the whole group.  In this case, mapping antibiotic resistance onto the eBURST 
diagram would indicate that this may have happened, but the sudden increase in the success 
of a SLV that is not antibiotic-resistant may cause a similar mis-assignment that would not be 
so apparent.   The presence of two isolates having substantial bootstraps scores provides an 
alert that the assignment of the primary founder cannot reliably be discerned in the absence 
of additional information.    
6. Building up the eBURST diagram 
The  original BURST algorithm  identifies  the  primary founder  as the  ST  with  the  largest 
number of SLVs.   Those STs that are SLVs of the predicted primary founder are assigned to 
the primary founder and the new ST that has the greatest number of previously unassigned 
SLVs is identified. The iterative process of identifying the new ST with the greatest number of 
previously unassigned SLVs continues until all of the STs that have multiple unassigned SLVs 
(subgroup founders) have been identified.   DLVs of the primary founder and of the subgroup 
founders are then identified in a similar iterative manner.  The original BURST displayed the 
primary founder and the subgroup founders, and their SLVs and DLVs, but did not attempt to 
link all of these clusters of STs together.   
In eBURST, the default group definition results in all STs being connected as a single clonal 
complex and eBURST makes these links.  However, if the primary founder and subgroup 
founders, and their SLVs and DLVs, are assigned as described above for the original BURST 
algorithm, there can be problems in achieving a fully linked diagram without introducing ad 
hoc  linking  rules.  In  order  to  circumvent  this  problem,  eBURST  produces  an  initial 
approximation of the above arrangement of STs, which ensures that all STs in the group are 
linked, and then optimises the arrangement of STs to produce the final eBURST diagram. 
The procedure is as follows. The ST that has the greatest number of SLVs is assigned as the 
primary founder and is positioned centrally with radial links to all of its SLVs.  Having assigned 
all of the SLVs of the primary founder, the SLVs of each of these SLVs are identified (ignoring 
any STs that have already been assigned to the primary founder) and linked, and this iterative 
procedure of linking previously unassigned SLVs carries on outwards from the SLVs, to the 
DLVs and then to the TLVs, until all SLV links have been made.   
Optimisation of the initial arrangement of STs is then carried out. The optimisation method 
looks at each ST (excepting the primary founder and its SLVs, which are unambiguously 
assigned) and searches for a better positioning of STs that maximises the numbers of SLVs 
associated with subgroup founders.  Optimisation takes account of the simple model of clonal 
expansion  that  underpins  BURST  where  some  STs  within  a  clonal  complex  may  have 
increased in frequency and diversified to produce subgroups.  It attempts to identify the most 
likely pattern of subgroups by searching for those subgroup founders that have the greatest 
numbers of linked SLVs.  
An illustrative example is shown in Figure 2.  The initial procedure identifies ST1 as the ST 
with the greatest number of SLVs (the primary founder) and links ST1 to its seven SLVs.  It 
then assigns the SLVs of each of these seven SLVs, and identifies ST2 as a SLV of ST17 
and links it.  Progressing further outwards, the four descendent SLVs of ST2 are identified 
and linked, and the process continues outwards and links the four descendent SLVs of ST3.  
This initial assignment of SLVs from the primary founder outwards results in STs that are 
SLVs of more than one ST being preferentially assigned to the more centrally positioned ST 
(ST2 in Figure 2).   
In the example shown in Figure 2, optimisation identifies ST10 and ST12 as SLVs of ST3 as 
well as of ST2. The optimisation procedure re-assigns STs to maximise the numbers of SLVs 
associated with ST3 as this subgroup founder has more SLVs than ST2 and thus is a more 
likely subgroup founder. ST2 and ST3 each start with four SLVs and after optimisation ST3 
ends up with six linked SLVs (STs 10, 12, 13, 14, 15 and 16) and ST2 with two linked SLVs 
(STs 3 and 11). Optimisation re-organises the arrangement of STs to maximise the numbers 
of SLVs associated with subgroup founders, closely approximating the sub-groups produced 
by the original BURST algorithm, but providing complete linkage between all of the STs in the 
group.  
Figure 2 
10 
7. Exploring alternative patterns of descent 
7.1. Re-assigning the primary founder 
There may be cases where you believe that the primary founder predicted by eBURST is 
wrong, or where there are two possible founders with substantial bootstrap support and you 
would like to explore how the eBURST diagram would look if the alternative ST was assigned 
as the primary founder.  The ability to re-assign the primary founder (see section 9.8 for 
details of how to do this) can change the diagram substantially as many STs may be SLVs of 
both  the predicted primary founder and an  alternative plausible  primary founder, but are 
preferentially assigned to the primary founder (the true number of SLVs of any ST are shown 
in the Analysis Panel; section 8.2).  Re-assigning the primary founder will now preferentially 
assign all of these SLVs to the user-selected primary founder. Figure 3 shows an example of 
an eBURST diagram shown with the primary founder assigned by eBURST (blue) and re-
drawn with a user-defined ST as the primary founder (red).    The diagrams represent the 
unedited  output  of  eBURST  v3.  In  this  example,  the  lineage  3  clonal  complex  of  N. 
meningitidis, we proposed in Feil et al. (2004) that ST303 (arrow) may have been the near 
extinct founding ST of this large clonal complex, although it is not assigned as the primary 
founder by eBURST.  To explore this further, the diagram is re-drawn with ST303 as the user-
defined primary founder, which shows that ST303 has many SLVs and looks a plausible 
founder.  This is also supported by the fact that ST303 has the minimum distance to all other 
STs in the clonal complex. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested