c# view pdf web browser : Extract pages pdf software control cloud windows azure wpf class ee-mt_tips1-part1080

page 11 
7. Changing Word defaults for menus & drawings (Windows) 
A couple of aggravating features of Word 2002 and later (i.e., Office XP and later) are related to the 
Word menus and creating drawings with the drawing toolbar. 
1.  The default is for Word’s menus (pre-Word 2007) to show only 
basic commands after you first install Office. As you work, the 
menus adjust to show only the items you’ve used most recently. If 
you wait a couple of seconds, the full menu appears. If you don’t 
want to wait, you can click the double chevron at the bottom of 
the menu. 
2.  To change this behavior to always show the full menus, click on 
Tools > Customize. On the 
Options tab, check the box next 
to “Always show full menus”. 
3.  The default for using the 
“AutoShapes” on the Drawing 
toolbar is for Word to create a 
“Drawing Canvas”, into which 
you’ll insert your drawings. If 
you don’t want the Drawing 
Canvas, you can change the 
default. 
4. Except for Word 2007/2010, 
click on Tools > Options, and click on the General tab. Near the bottom of the tab, uncheck the 
box labeled “Automatically create drawing canvas when inserting AutoShapes”. 
5. For Word 2007/2010, click on the Office Button if in Word 2007, or the File tab if in Word 2010, 
then click Word Options. Click on Advanced, and the 5
th
option from the top is “Automatically 
create drawing canvas when inserting AutoShapes”. Uncheck this and click OK. 
Extract pages pdf - copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Easy to Use C# Code to Extract PDF Pages, Copy Pages from One PDF File and Paste into Others
deleting pages from pdf; copy one page of pdf to another pdf
Extract pages pdf - VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed VB.NET Guide for Extracting Pages from Microsoft PDF Doc
cut pages from pdf preview; delete pages of pdf
page 12 
8. Nudging and the MathType Customizable Toolbars 
Nudging is a technique that can be accomplished in both Equation Editor and MathType, and is 
very useful in achieving perfect positioning for your equations. 
1.  For example, let’s say you’d like more space between an integral symbol and the limits of 
integration. We’ll add more space by nudging the limits to the right. 
2.  Select the upper limit. The most common method to select items is to drag the mouse across the 
item. For small items though, such as limits, subscripts, etc., it’s easier to use the Shift and arrow 
keys. With the cursor to either the left or right of the item you want to select, hold down the Shift 
key as you press the either the left or right arrow key, as appropriate. Release the Shift key after 
you’ve completed the selection. 
3.  Hold down the Ctrl key. Use the arrows on the keyboard to move the selected item(s) in the desired 
direction.  
( )
0
f xdx
( )
0
f xdx
before nudging 
after nudging 
Note that not all printers will print the limits as tightly-spaced as the ones in the “before” example. 
You may have to experiment with nudging a bit in order to find the proper amount. 
If you’re using MathType, you can save the newly-nudged expression or equation to the toolbar. That 
way you don’t have to nudge it every time you use it:  
If you want a more generic situation than what’s shown above (you won’t always want limits of zero to 
infinity), see “Saving to the MathType toolbar” on page 17 of this handout for a hint about how to do 
that. 
C# PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in
inputFilePath); PDFTextMgr textMgr = PDFTextHandler.ExportPDFTextManager(doc); // Extract text content C# example code for text extraction from all PDF pages.
extract pdf pages reader; copy pdf page to clipboard
C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
Image: Extract Image from PDF. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› C# PDF: Extract PDF Image. How to C#: Extract Image from PDF Document.
extract pdf pages; delete page from pdf preview
page 13 
9. Aligning items within an equation 
There are all sorts of things to align within an equation – the subtraction shown beneath a dividend in a 
long division problem, equations in a system of equations, items in a pictogram, responses in a 
multiple-choice question, etc. We will look at two of these: systems and multiple-choice. Note: Even if 
you don’t teach the level of math requiring systems of equations, and even if you never create multiple-
choice tests, the techniques learned here will still be useful to you. 
9a. Systems of equations and inequalities 
a.  There is no right or wrong way to “align” the equations in a system; it’s basically a matter of 
choice, and a matter of what your students can read the best. (For simplicity, we won’t specifically 
mention systems of inequalities, but these exact steps will work for those as well.) Here are 4 
different scenarios: 
3
4
17
3
3
5
3
6
2
3
2
15
2
3
2
3
2
7
2
4
3
2
3
3
2
3
x
y
z
x
x
x
y
x
y
z
x
y
x y
x
y
x
y
x
y z
x
y z
+
+
=
=
=
=
+
+
=
+
=
+ =
+
=
+
=
+
+ =
+
+ =
+
1
2
3
4
b.  Systems 2 and 3 above present the greatest challenge, so let’s deal with system 2. 
c.  In this system, we want to align the variables, the operation symbols (
+
, or 
=
), and the sums so 
that they are vertically aligned with similar elements in the previous equation, and right-justified 
within each column (for example, z & 2z and 15 & 4 in system 2 above). 
d.  There are many ways to align a system, but let’s just cut to the chase and say that using a matrix is 
the best way to do it. So with that established, what size? The obvious number of rows is a number 
equal to the number of equations. There are several choices for the number of columns, but the best 
balance between utility and ease of use is a number of columns equal to the number of equations 
plus one. So our matrix for system 2 above will be a 3
×
4. 
e.  The first step is to insert the 
Left brace
from the 
Fences
palette on the Equation Editor or 
MathType toolbar. The icon you’re looking for on the 
Fences
palette is this one:        . (It’s in 
column 1, 4
th
from the bottom.) 
f.  Next insert a 3
×
4 matrix by selecting “Variable-size matrix” from the 
Matrix templates
palette, 
making sure to select 
Column align: Right
in the Matrix dialog. 
g.  Now you’re ready to insert the equations into the matrix, but how you do it is critical! Enter 3x 
+
in 
the first cell, press Tab to go to the next cell, enter 4y 
+
, press Tab, enter z 
=
, press Tab, and enter 
17 in the last cell. Pressing Tab once more gets you down to the 
next 
row to begin entering the second equation. Enter the next 2 
equations similarly. This is how it should look when you’re done 
(doesn’t look very pretty, does it?): 
3
4
17
2
3
2
15
4
x
y
z
x
y
z
x
y
+
+
=
+
+
=
+
=
+
So, how do you get the right amount of space where the “+” should be? In Equation Editor, 
your only choice is to add spaces. Problem is, 3 isn’t enough and 4 is too many. In MathType, 
there’s a more elegant (and more exact) way: insert a +, then color it  white  
VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF
PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Extract PDF Text. VB.NET PDF - Extract Text from PDF Using VB. How to Extract Text from PDF with VB.NET Sample Codes in .NET Application.
copy web pages to pdf; acrobat remove pages from pdf
VB.NET PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images
Image: Extract Image from PDF. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Extract PDF Image. VB.NET PDF - Extract Image from PDF Document in VB.NET.
extract pages from pdf online; copy pdf page into word doc
page 14 
h.  One more step, then we’re done. There’s a simple adjustment that lets us move the columns of the 
matrix closer together. On the 
Format
menu, select 
Define Spacing
. The third item from the top is 
what you want to adjust: 
Matrix column spacing
. The normal setting is 100%. Since we want to 
decrease the spacing, we want a number smaller than 100%. (If the dialog is in the way and you 
can’t see your equations, place the mouse pointer on the title bar of the 
Spacing
dialog and drag it 
away from your matrix so that you can see your entire system.) Try a spacing value of 50%, but 
don’t click 
OK
yet. Watch your system of equations as you click 
Apply
. If you like the results, 
click 
OK
; if you need to decrease the spacing further, try a smaller number. (It’s easy to see how 
valuable the 
Apply
button is. It’s a real time saver when compared to repetitively clicking 
OK
each 
time, because once you click 
OK
the dialog disappears. Also, it’s important that the percent symbol 
is selected in the drop-down box. You don’t want a spacing of 50 points or 50 inches!)
i.  After you settle on a value (my personal opinion is that 25% looks best), either click in your 
document to close the Equation Editor window and go back to Word, or if you’re using MathType, 
simply close the MathType window (click the 
×
in the upper right-hand corner, or the “stoplight” if 
you’re using a Mac).
j. In MathType, you have two attractive options you don’t have in Equation Editor: 
¾
You can save the matrix spacing to a preference file. This is a good idea, because you won’t 
want to use this tight matrix column spacing in a “regular” matrix, and this will give you an 
easy way to change back to your “systems of equations” settings. A MathType preference file 
holds information on fonts, sizes, and spacing. To save the preference file, go to the 
Preferences
menu, scroll down to 
Equation Preferences
, then choose 
Save to File
. You can 
name the file anything you want, but here are some suggestions: 
Systems
(if you always use 
the same font and size for your tests & quizzes); 
Systems-TNR
Systems-A
, etc. (for tests 
written in Times New Roman, Arial, etc. font); 
Systems-A-10
Systems-A-12
, etc. (for tests 
written in Arial 10pt, Arial 12pt, etc.). You get the picture. 
¾
You can save a blank template for a 2-equation system, one for a 3-equation system, etc. to 
your MathType toolbar. The easiest way to do this is to delete everything out of the cells of the 
matrix in the system you just created, then highlight everything and drag it up to the toolbar: 
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
doc2.Save(outPutFilePath); Add and Insert Multiple PDF Pages to PDF Document Using C#. Add and Insert Blank Pages to PDF File in C#.NET.
copy pages from pdf to new pdf; acrobat extract pages from pdf
VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.
doc.Save(outPutFilePath). How to VB.NET: Delete Consecutive Pages from PDF. doc.Save(outPutFilePath). How to VB.NET: Delete Specified Pages from PDF.
extract pages from pdf; acrobat remove pages from pdf
page 15 
9b. Multiple-choice responses 
a.  There are many ways to type multiple choice responses for a test or quiz. You may create each 
choice as a separate equation (remember, we use the word “equation” to denote anything created 
with Equation Editor or MathType, regardless of whether or not it contains an equals symbol), or 
you could include all the responses in a single equation and arrange them in various ways. Two 
common ways to arrange the responses are to place them all on the same line of text or to put two 
responses on one line and two on another line. We’ll deal with the first option here. 
b.  For this example, we’ll create the responses for this question: 
1.  Find the quotient: 
÷
2
1
3
2
1
 
3
1
1
5
2
9
a.  2
b.  2
c.  1
d.  2
c.  One option would be to type the question and all the responses as a single equation, but we’ll type 
the question text in Word and the division expression and responses in Equation Editor or 
MathType. We’ll type all 4 responses as one object. 
d.  Assuming you’ve already typed the question, let’s work on the responses. Open Equation Editor as 
you normally would, either from the 
Insert
menu or by clicking the icon on your Word toolbar. 
(This will be specifically Equation Editor. These steps will work, of course, in MathType as well, 
but there will be separate steps for MathType later.) 
e.  We’re using Arial font and 11pt size, so adjust your 
Style
and 
Size
accordingly. If you don’t 
remember how to do that, see page 3 of this handout. 
f.  We want to space the responses uniformly, and the best way to do that is to use a matrix. This will 
be a 1-row, 4-column matrix, so go ahead and insert one of those in your document. 
g.  Change to 
Text
style, then type the letter a followed by a period and a space. 
(Notice the space bar works just fine in 
Text
style.) Change to 
Math
style, then 
type 
3
5
2
. When you type the fraction, be sure to use the 
Reduced-size vertical 
fraction
, which is the one in the upper-right of the 
Fraction and radical 
templates
palette. 
h.  An easy way to keep from switching from 
Text
to 
Math
four times is to copy what you just typed 
(i.e., select the contents of the first cell with your mouse, then press Ctrl+C or Cmd+C to copy). 
Now press Tab to go to the next cell, and paste the contents into that cell (Ctrl+V or Cmd+C is the 
shortcut). Do the same with the remaining 2 cells, then edit the contents so that it looks similar to 
the above example. We’ll adjust the spacing in the next step. 
i.  Since this is a matrix, and you already know how to adjust the column spacing in a matrix, go 
ahead and adjust it to see what looks best. (I think somewhere in the range of 300-400% looks best, 
but that’s just my opinion. Use whatever setting you like.) 
C# PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
doc.Save(outPutFilePath); Demo Code: How to Delete Consecutive Pages from PDF in C#.NET. Demo Code: How to Delete Specified Pages from PDF in C#.NET.
extract pages from pdf files; extract pdf pages online
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Page: Insert PDF Pages. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Insert PDF Page. Add and Insert Multiple PDF Pages to PDF Document Using VB.
extract page from pdf preview; extract page from pdf reader
page 16 
j. In MathType, you have another tool that makes it even easier to create multiple-choice responses, 
and easier to keep the spacing uniform from one question to the other. If you’re using MathType, 
click on the 
View
menu and make sure there’s a checkmark by 
Ruler
.  
k.  Notice above the ruler there are 5 arrows. These arrows represent 5 types of tabs that are available 
in MathType. From left to right, these are: 
1) Left-justified tab. This is the one selected in the screenshot below, and is the default. When you 
use a left-justified tab, the left edge of the text will be aligned at the tab. 
2) Center-justified tab. The center of the text is aligned at the tab stop. 
3) Right-justified tab. The right edge of the text is aligned at the tab stop. 
4) Relational tab. Use this tab only with more than one line of characters within your equation. 
This will align equations or inequalities at any relational operator, such as 
, and of 
course 
=
. (Basically, it will align on the equals, greater than, or less than signs from the 
keyboard, plus anything on the 
Relational symbols
palette.) 
5) Decimal tab. Use this one also for more than one line of characters. This is for aligning a 
column of numbers, regardless of whether or not a decimal point is present. 
l.  To set a tab stop, simply select the type of tab you want to use and click on the ruler below the 
number or tick-mark where you want the tab to be. Caution: Each template slot has its own set of 
tabs, so if you are inside a numerator slot (for example), and set a tab at the 1” mark, that tab will 
not be set outside the fraction! In the example above, make sure your “insertion point” (i.e., cursor) 
is outside the fraction before you set the tab. You won’t run into this problem if you set your tabs 
prior to typing the MathType equation, but you won’t always know where you want the tabs set 
before you start typing. Just be aware of this feature of tabs. 
m. For our example, since we’re using tabs to align the multiple-choice responses, we don’t need our 
1
×
4 matrix. You can use the matrix if you want, of course, but you wouldn’t use both a matrix and 
tabs. 
n.  One final point on tabs. You already know what the Tab key’s for when you’re typing in 
MathType; it’s to move from one template slot to another, or to move out of the template. To move 
to the next tab stop, you need to press the Ctrl+Tab keystroke combination. 
page 17 
Saving to the MathType toolbar: 
Naturally you don’t want to have to go through the process of creating this for each question. You 
could copy the responses from one question and paste them into another, then edit the responses, but 
there’s an easier way. Using the example above, delete each response and in its place, insert a 1x1 
matrix. Without the matrix, the insertion point (i.e., cursor) will appear after the “d.”, then to type the 
“a” response, you’d have to click the mouse in that position. Having the 1x1 matrix in place before you 
save it to the toolbar gives the insertion point a place to land when you click on the item to use it next 
time. See graphic below: 
The 1x1 matrix is also handy for other purposes, such as the generic quadratic formula and the generic 
2
nd
degree polynomial you see on the Algebra toolbar above. (The green rectangles in the toolbar 
expressions are just empty template slots.) It’s a good idea to save the 1x1 matrix to the toolbar for 
easy access in future situations such as this. You see it saved above on the small Algebra toolbar. 
The 1x1 matrix is also useful, but not really needed, for situations where you want to retain something 
you’ve nudged, but you want to remove the contents from the template slot. Take for example the 
definite integral we saw earlier in the handout. If you save the integral with nudged limits to the 
toolbar but delete the limits first, the nudging is removed. The 1x1 matrix would work in this situation, 
but a better way to do it is to insert an integral symbol with empty limits & integrand. Double-clicking 
a limit will select the limit slot itself, allowing you to nudge it. Nudge them both, then select the 
integral and drag to the toolbar. 
page 18 
10. Using Word’s AutoCorrect Feature 
Some things you create with Equation Editor or MathType are repetitive – the grid discussed earlier, 
for example. If you’re creating a worksheet on graphing linear functions, you’ll quite likely have 10 or 
20 of these, so it’s very useful to be able to insert a grid with just a few keystrokes – and without even 
opening up MathType! 
Note: There is a more detailed tip on our web site for using Word’s AutoCorrect and AutoText 
features. You can access this tip at 
www.dessci.com/autocorrect 
(This will be done using Equation Editor. If you are using MathType, the steps are similar. Since many 
of the things we’ve done in this session has been done with Equation Editor, you may wonder what’s 
so much better about MathType? There’s a page later in the handout that discusses this.) 
Setting up AutoCorrect to Insert Equation Objects 
a.  For the purpose of this mini-tutorial, we’ll 
use the grid created earlier. Insert the 6-by-6 
grid into your document: 
b.  If it doesn’t appear to be perfectly square, 
you can make it square by clicking on it with 
your right mouse button (Mac, Ctrl+click), 
then selecting 
Format Object
from the 
menu. If 
Format Object
doesn’t appear on 
the right-click menu, select 
Object
from 
Word’s 
Format
menu. (In Word 2007, 
Format Object
won’t be in the right-click 
menu. You’ll need to click on the 
Drawing 
Tools > Format
tab in the Ribbon, then 
adjust the size in the 
Size
group.)  
page 19 
c.  Adjust the height and width to the same 
number – whatever you want them to be. 
Make sure the 
Lock aspect ratio
box is 
unchecked! 
d.  Regardless of whether you re-sized your grid 
or not, make sure it’s still selected (as the 
one is to the right). If it’s not selected, click 
once on it with your left mouse button. 
e.  With the grid selected, choose 
AutoCorrect 
Options
from Word’s 
Tools
menu. If you’re 
using a version of Word earlier than Word 
2002 – the one that comes with Office XP – 
it will just say 
AutoCorrect
. If you’re using 
Word 2007, click the
Office Button
, then 
click 
Word Options
. Click 
Proofing
on the 
left, and the 
AutoCorrect Options
button 
will appear on the right. 
f.  Note the grid is already in the box 
underneath the word 
With:
. If it’s not there, 
then you didn’t have it selected in step d 
above. Go back and repeat steps d & e. (You 
must do it this way; you can’t copy the grid 
and paste it into the box.) 
g.  In the 
Replace
box, type in whatever code you want to enter in Word to be replaced with the grid. 
More on this later, but I chose a shortcut I could remember: “gr” for “grid”, “6” meaning “6-by-6”, 
and “a”, meaning it has axes. 
h.  Click 
Add
, then click 
OK
page 20 
i.  Now that you’re back in your document, delete the grid and try your AutoCorrect entry. Type 
gr6a
(or whatever code you entered), followed by the spacebar. Your code should be replaced with a 
grid. 
Here are some notes about what we just did: 
1.  I had you hit the spacebar after the code, but there’s nothing magical about the spacebar. The 
important thing is that you tell Word that you’re through typing that word, and in this case, our 
word was 
gr6a
. Think about what normally “terminates” a word – a space character, any 
punctuation character, a Tab, a new line, or even a mathematical operator (such as < or =). In fact, 
any of these things will replace your code with your grid (or whatever you entered into the 
AutoCorrect box). 
2.  The code I chose – 
gr6a
– may seem a little cryptic to you, and you may not think you can 
remember that one. That’s fine; choose whatever code you’ll remember, but be careful! You don’t 
want to choose a word that will likely appear in any document. The words “grid” or “graph”, for 
example, appear often, so you don’t want to choose these. I’m 100% sure the code I chose will 
never come up in any document ever – unless I want a 6-by-6 grid. 
3.  What other uses for AutoCorrect can you think of? I can think of several: 
sq2 for 
2
qu or qform for 
2
4
2
b
b
ac
a
− ±
2p/3 for 
2
3
π
1/8 for 
1
8
, etc. 
imat3 or simply i3 for 
1 0 0
0 1 0
0 0 1
limx0 for 
0
lim
x
u238 for 
238
92
gr-th for 
θ
, etc. 
xb or xbar for 
x 
…and so on. 
4.  You can use AutoCorrect for even more complex objects than the ones we’ve used, but that’s 
really a subject to deal with elsewhere – like in the Tip I mentioned earlier that’s available on our 
web site! 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested