c# view pdf web browser : Extract pdf pages control SDK system azure wpf windows console EVTG1073A0-part1113

A Guide to Whole Air Canister Sampling
Equipment Needed and Practical Techniques
for Collecting Air Samples
TECHNICAL GUIDE
Inside:
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2
Equipment Used . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2
Preparing the Sampling Train . . . . .6
Preparing the Canister . . . . . . . . . . .7
Field Sampling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7
Analysis of Collected Samples . . . .9
Cleaning the Sampling Train . . . .10
Cleaning the Canister . . . . . . . . . . .11
Certifying the Canister . . . . . . . . . .13
Conclusion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14
Air Sampling Products . . . . . . . . . .15
www.restek.com  
Pure Chromatography
Extract pdf pages - copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Easy to Use C# Code to Extract PDF Pages, Copy Pages from One PDF File and Paste into Others
copy pdf pages to another pdf; delete page from pdf file online
Extract pdf pages - VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed VB.NET Guide for Extracting Pages from Microsoft PDF Doc
copy one page of pdf; delete pages of pdf online
2
www.restek.com
I. Introduction
Ambient air sampling involves collecting a representative sample ofambient air
for analysis.There are two general approaches:1) “whole air”sampling with
canisters or Tedlar® bags and 2) “in-field concentration”sampling using sor-
bent tubes or cold traps.In this guide,we focus on collecting whole air sam-
ples in canisters,a flexible technique with many applications (Table I).
Passive vs. Active Sampling
In canister sampling,two sampling techniques are commonly used:passive
sampling and active sampling.Active sampling requires the use ofa pumping
device whereas passive sampling does not.
In passive sampling,an air sample is pulled through a flow controller into an
evacuated canister over a chosen period oftime,ranging from 5 minutes to 24
hours.The sampling period and the flow rate determine the canister volume
required.In active sampling,a pump is used to push the sample through a mass
flow controller and into the canister.Additional sample can be collected,relative
to the amount that can be collected by passive sampling,by pressurizing the can-
ister with sample.Commonly the sample is pressurized to 15 psig,effectively
doubling the sample volume.
Although active sampling is very flexible,a drawback to using a pump is the
need for additional quality assurance requirements for sample integrity (i.e.,no
artifacts or loss ofanalytes).Additionally,a pump requires a battery or line
power source,which may be difficult in remote field-site sampling.
Grab vs. Integrated Sampling
Ifthe environment is not changing,or ifonly a qualitative sample is needed,a
simple “grab”sample can be obtained.For example,an evacuated sample canis-
ter can be opened and sample rapidly collected at an uncontrolled rate,usually
over several seconds,until the container reaches equilibrium with atmospheric
pressure.Generally this qualitative approach is used when unknown analytes
must be identified,when the air contains high concentrations ofanalytes at cer-
tain (short) times,or when an odor is noticed and a sample must be obtained
quickly.Paired grab samples (before/after or smell/no smell) often are employed
to qualitatively diagnose a perceived problem.
To obtain a more representative sample requires time-integrated sampling.A
flow restrictor is used to spread the sample collection flow over a specific time
period to ensure an “average”composited or time-weighted average (TWA)
sample.A TWA sample will accurately reflect the mean conditions ofthe
ambient air in the environment and is preferred when,for regulatory or health
reasons,a typical exposure concentration is required for a situation that may
have high variability,as in an occupational setting.
II. Equipment Used for Passive Air Sampling
To ensure a valid sample when using a passive sampling technique,it is impor-
tant that the flow rate not change greatly during the time interval specified for
the integrated sample.The proper sampling equipment helps accomplish this
objective.A typical passive sampling train should include the following compo-
nents,all constructed ofstainless steel:a sampling inlet,a sintered metal parti-
cle filter,a critical orifice,a flow controlling device,a vacuum gauge,and a can-
ister (Figures 1 and 2).
Figure 2Integrated sampling kit.
sampling inlet
sample
canister
vacuum 
gauge
filter
flow 
controller
critical
orifice
rain cap
(
1
/
8
" or 
1
/
4
" nut)
Figure 1Canister grab sampling kit.
Table I I Canister applications.
MMeetthhooddss
US EPA TO-14A, TO-15; ASTM D5466 
OSHA PV2120; NIOSH Protocol Draft
SSaammpplliinngg  EEnnvviirroonnmmeenntt
Ambient air, indoor air, vapor intrusion, emergency response
VVOOCC  RRaannggee
<C3 to ~C10
SSaammpplliinngg  TTyyppee
Grab & integrated sampling
SSeennssiittiivviittyy
ppt to ppm
Sample
inlet
Fitting
with
orifice
10μm
Frit
Unassembled 
kit components
Assembled
kit on canister
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
Page: Insert PDF Pages. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› C# PDF: Insert PDF Page. Add and Insert Multiple PDF Pages to PDF Document Using C#.
delete pages of pdf preview; cut pages from pdf preview
C# PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in
inputFilePath); PDFTextMgr textMgr = PDFTextHandler.ExportPDFTextManager(doc); // Extract text content C# example code for text extraction from all PDF pages.
cut and paste pdf pages; delete page from pdf file
3
www.restek.com
Sampling Inlet
The sampling inlet—the entrance to the sampling train—typically is cleaned
stainless steel tubing,either 
1
/
4
" OD or 
1
/
8
" OD.US EPA Compendium Method
TO-14A/15 recommends sampling at a height of2 meters above the ground.In
a highly trafficked area,this would minimize the problem ofdust particles enter-
ing the sampling train.This height is not mandatory,however,and it is common
practice to use an inlet that is 12" (approximately 
1
/
3
meter) high.The EPA also
recommends having the entrance ofthe sampling inlet face downward to pre-
vent raindrops from entering the inlet.In some sampling trains,a 
1
/
8
" or 
1
/
4
" nut
at the entrance ofthe inlet keeps water droplets away from the edge ofthe inlet,
where they could be drawn into the sampling train with the sample.
Particle Filter
The particle filter is installed in the sampling train prior to the flow-controlling
device to prevent airborne particles from entering the sample flow path.
Particles could partially obstruct the flow path and alter the flow rate during
sampling.In extreme cases,particles could plug the flow path and stop the sam-
ple flow.The smallest orifice commonly used in a passive sampling train is
0.0012" (approximately 30 micrometers).Without a particle filter,dust particles
could occlude this opening as they accumulate in the orifice fitting.Particles also
can affect the leak integrity ofthe valve,and possibly cause damage to the valve.
Two types offilters are used for this application,frit filters and in-line filters
(Figure 3).A variety ofmodels ofeach type are available;most are ofsintered
stainless steel and have 2-,5-,or 7-micron pores.Use ofsmaller pore filters
reduces the likelihood ofproblems from airborne particles.EPA Compendium
Method TO-14A/15 recommends using a particle filter with 2-micron pores.
Critical Orifice
The critical orifice (Figure 4) restricts the flow to a specified range (Table II).In
conjunction with the flow controller,this allows the canister to fill at a certain rate
over a specified time period.The most common critical orifice design is a series of
interchangeable stainless steel 
1
/
4
" NPT to 
1
/
4
" compression unions,each fitted with
a precisely bored ruby orifice.Each orifice provides a specific flow range (Table II).
Stability over a wide range oftemperatures makes ruby the construction material
ofchoice.Typically during field sampling,the sampling train is subjected to tem-
perature fluctuations that would cause metals to contract or expand,affecting the
diameter ofthe aperture and thereby affecting flow.Ruby will not expand or con-
tract across ambient temperature extremes incurred during sampling.
A critical orifice can be used as the sole flow-restricting device,but it cannot
ensure uniform flow.Since the source pressure ofthe flow changes during
sampling,the flow rate through the orifice can also change,resulting in an
invalid time-integrated sample.It is important that a highly consistent flow
rate be maintained during passive sampling,and this is accomplished by the
flow controller.
Flow Controller
The flow controller (Figure 4) maintains a constant sample flow over the inte-
grated time period,despite changes in the vacuum in the canister,or in the envi-
ronmental temperature (Figure 5).In the Veriflo® Model SC423 XL Flow
Controller shown in Figure 4,the critical orifice acts as a flow restrictor,
Table II I Critical orifice diameter vs. flow rate.
OOrriiffiiccee  DDiiaammeetteerr
FFllooww  RRaattee  RRaannggee
CCaanniisstteerr  VVoolluummee  //  SSaammpplliinngg  TTiimmee
((iinn..))
((mmLL//mmiinn..))
11LL
33LL
66LL
1155LL
0.0008
0.5–2
24 hr.
48 hr.
125 hr.
0.0012
2–4
4 hr.
12 hr.
24 hr.
60 hr.
0.0016
4–8
2 hr.
6 hr.
12 hr.
30 hr.
0.0020
8–15
1 hr.
4 hr.
8 hr.
20 hr.
0.0030
15–30
2 hr.
3 hr.
8 hr.
0.0060
30–80
1.5 hr.
4 hr.
0.0090
80–340
0.5 hr.
1 hr.
Figure 3Filters used in sampling trains.
critical 
orifice
frit filter
stand 
alone in-line filter
Frit filter inside 
passive sampling kit
Figure 4 Flow controller & critical orifice.
atmospheric
reference
inlet
outlet
critical
orifice
adjustable
piston
diaphragm
Drawing courtesy of Veriflo Corp., 
a division of Parker Hannifin Corp.
spring
washer
in-line
filter
C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
Image: Extract Image from PDF. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› C# PDF: Extract PDF Image. How to C#: Extract Image from PDF Document.
extract pdf pages reader; export pages from pdf online
VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF
PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Extract PDF Text. VB.NET PDF - Extract Text from PDF Using VB. How to Extract Text from PDF with VB.NET Sample Codes in .NET Application.
cut pages out of pdf file; acrobat extract pages from pdf
4
www.restek.com
upstream ofa constant back pressure.This constant back pressure is established
by the balance between the mechanical spring rate ofthe diaphragm and the
pressure differential across the diaphragm.The latter is established by the pres-
sure difference between the atmospheric pressure,the vacuum in the canister,
and the flow through the critical orifice.The net result is a constant flow.
The critical orifice determines the flow range.The adjustable piston is used to
set a specific,fixed flow rate within the flow range.An adjustment to the posi-
tion ofthe piston changes the back pressure,which changes the pressure dif-
ferential across the critical orifice.Ifthe piston is lowered away from the
diaphragm,the flow rate will increase.If the piston is raised toward the
diaphragm,the flow rate will decrease.This flow controller will accurately
maintain a constant flow despite changes in vacuum over a range of-30" Hg
to -7" Hg.Flow is constant until the vacuum range ofthe device is exceeded,
making the flow controller unable to maintain the constant pressure differen-
tial.In Figure 6,for example,the flow rate is constant from -29.9" Hg to
approximately -7" Hg,at which point the flow rate decreases because the flow
controller is unable to maintain the proper pressure differential.This control
will allow the user to collect approximately 5 liters ofsample in a 6-liter canis-
ter.This is an extremely important factor in obtaining valid time-integrated
samples through passive sampling.We will discuss this point further in the
Field Sampling(Section V) ofthis guide.
Field Sampling and Laboratory Vacuum Gauges
A vacuum gauge as shown in Figure 7A enables sampling personnel to visually
monitor changes in the vacuum in the canister during sampling.Ifthe flow rate
changes unexpectedly (e.g.,due to a leak or an incorrect setting),the vacuum
gauge will indicate a disproportionately high or low vacuum in the canister,and
corrective action can be taken (i.e.,flow adjusted) in time to ensure a valid sam-
ple.This type ofvacuum gauge is attached to the sampling train for use in the
field.The vacuum gauge should be ofhigh quality to ensure that it does not
introduce contaminants into the sample.All wetted parts in the vacuum gauge
are constructed ofstainless steel;Restek gauges are accurate to within 1% offull
scale.Once used for sampling,a gauge must be cleaned,and should be certified
clean.Procedures are described later in this guide.
To monitor pressure in the canister before and after sampling,use a more accu-
rate measuring device.For example,test gauges built by Ashcroft®,as shown in
Figure 7B,are accurate to 0.25% offull scale.These sensitive gauges should not
be used in the field—they typically are wall mounted in the lab.
Courtesy of Veriflo Corp., a division of Parker Hannifin Corp.
Figure 6 A flow controller will maintain a constant sample flow
until it is unable to maintain a stable pressure differential across
the critical orifice.
Differential Pressure Response
Figure 7A Field Sampling Gauge
Figure 7B High Accuracy Laboratory Gauge
Figure 5 A flow controller will maintain a
constant sample flow despite changes in
canister pressure or environmental 
temperature.
Temperature Effects
Courtesy of Veriflo Corp., a division of Parker Hannifin Corp.
VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.
Page: Delete Existing PDF Pages. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Delete PDF Page. How to VB.NET: Delete Consecutive Pages from PDF.
add and delete pages from pdf; delete pages from pdf acrobat reader
VB.NET PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images
Image: Extract Image from PDF. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Extract PDF Image. VB.NET PDF - Extract Image from PDF Document in VB.NET.
copy one page of pdf to another pdf; export one page of pdf preview
5
www.restek.com
Canister
The canister is a stainless steel vessel designed to hold vacuum to less than 10 mTorr or pressure to 40 psig.
Canisters are available in a range ofvolumes:400 mL,1.0 liter,3.0 liter,6.0 liter,and 15 liter.The size ofcan-
ister used usually depends on the concentration ofthe analytes in the sample,the sampling time,the flow
rate,and the sample volume required for the sampling period (Table II,page 3).Typically,smaller canisters
are used for more concentrated samples,such as soil gas collection,3-liter and 6-liter canisters are used to
obtain integrated (TWA) ambient air samples at sampling times ofup to 24 hours,and large 15-liter canis-
ters are used for reference standards.Sampling time will be limited by the combination ofcanister size and
the flow rate at which the sample is to be collected.
A well-designed canister is essential to the success ofthe sampling project.First,the canister should be
made ofstainless steel,so the collected sample will not permeate through the vessel wall or degrade due
to exposure to light during shipment to the analytical laboratory.Second,the interior surface ofthe can-
ister should be inert,to reduce the potential for interactions with the analytes in the sample.Third,all can-
isters involved in a particular application should be ofconsistent volume,to simplify calculating sample
volumes.Finally,the canister should have a high quality valve that resists abuse in the field (e.g.,over-
tightening that potentially could cause leaks).An inferior valve can fail,causing sample loss and incurring
replacement costs.It can be more expensive to sample again than to replace a valve.
Two types ofcanisters are available,the difference being the interior surface.The traditional canister is the
stainless steel SUMMA® or TO-Can® canister.The interior ofthis type ofcanister is electropolished,using
a polishing procedure (developed by Molectrics) that enriches the nickel and chromium surface and makes
it more inert than untreated stainless steel.The new generation ofsampling canister is typified by the
SilcoCan® canister.Like the SUMMA® or TO-Can® canisters,the SilcoCan® canister is made ofstainless
steel,and the interior is electropolished,but in an additional step—Siltek® treatment—an inert layer is
chemically bonded to the interior surface.Siltek® treatment makes the surface inert not only for relatively
inactive organic compounds,but also for compounds that are highly reactive with metal surfaces,such as
sulfur-containing compounds.Thus,surface inertness for SilcoCan® canisters exceeds that for SUMMA®
and TO-Can® canisters.
Canister Valve
The valve on a sampling canister must be ofhigh quality,with the following characteristics:leak integri-
ty,a metal seat,stainless steel wetted surfaces,and a packless design.A metal seat eliminates offgassing of
seat components into the sample and memory effects in the seat material.A packless design provides a
completely enclosed system,to ensure no contamination from lubricants or packing material occurs.
Various valves are used,the most common being the Swagelok® SS4H bellows valve and the Parker
Hannafin diaphragm valve with metal seat.Several valve options are available forRestek canisters.
The connection ofthe valve to the canister is critical.The connection must be leak tight,to ensure a correct
sampling flow rate,but use extreme caution to prevent overtightening the tube compression fittings.To
ensure a leak tight valve,always use a pre-filter (such as an inline filter) to prevent valve seat damage.
Ensure Accurate Sampling of 
Reactive Compounds
with Siltek®Treatment
Siltek® treatment is a proprietary process, developed by Restek Corporation,
through which an inert layer is chemically bonded to a metal surface. The sur-
face produced by this treatment is virtually inert to active compounds. The
stainless steel pathway described in this guide is sufficient for sampling
atmospheres containing only nonreactive compounds, but for reactive com-
pounds the entire sampling pathway should be Siltek® treated to eliminate
contact between the reactive analytes and the metal surfaces. Siltek® treat-
ment can be applied to the interior surfaces of the canister and valve, to
ensure an inert sample pathway.
C# PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
Page: Delete Existing PDF Pages. Provide C# Users with Mature .NET PDF Document Manipulating Library for Deleting PDF Pages in C#.
a pdf page cut; copy pages from pdf to another pdf
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Page: Insert PDF Pages. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Insert PDF Page. Add and Insert Multiple PDF Pages to PDF Document Using VB.
cut pages from pdf; export pages from pdf acrobat
6
www.restek.com
III. Preparing the Sampling Train for Use
The sampling train must be prepared in the laboratory before it can be used in
the field.The train must be assembled and leak tested,the flow rate must be
set,and the train must be certified clean.All ofthe following information
should be documented for the chain ofcustody for the passive sampling train
and the sample collected with it.
Assemble, Leak Test, and Set the Flow Rate of the Passive Sampling Train
Choose the critical orifice (Table II,page 3) according to the sampling period
and flow rate you anticipate using (Table III).This will ensure an accurate and
valid sample.There should be a marking on the outside ofthe critical orifice fit-
ting indicating the size ofthe orifice.In a clean environment,assemble the sam-
pling train components as shown in Figure 2 (page 2).It is imperative that you
leak test the assembled train.Ifthe sampling train leaks during sampling,the
final pressure in the canister will not be the desired final pressure,making the
sample invalid.The most common reason for invalid samples is leaks within the
sampling train.There are two ways to leak test the train:
1. Pass helium gas through the flow controller and use a sensitive helium
leak detector to test for leaks (e.g.,Restek Leak Detector).
or…
2. Cap the inlet,attach the sampling train to an evacuated canister,open the
valve on the canister and evacuate the sampling train.Then,close the
valve and monitor any pressure change in the static sampling train.Leaks
ofless than 1 mL/min.can be detected in 1-2 minutes.
This is a good practical test—the small internal volume ofthe passive sam-
pling train,combined with even a small leak,will produce a large change in
monitored pressure.According to EPA Method TO-15,the pressure change
should be less than 2 psig (13.8 kPa) over a 24-hour period.
After you are certain the sampling train is leak-free,set the desired sampling 
flow rate.
To set the desired flow rate follow these steps:
1. Remove the protective cap from the back ofthe Veriflo® Flow Controller
SC423XL body.
2. Connect either an evacuated canister or a vacuum source to the outlet of
the sampling train.
3. Connect a high quality calibrated flow meter (i.e.,mass flow meter,rotame-
ter,GC-type flow sensor [e.g.,Restek ProFLOW 6000 Electronic Flowmeter,
cat.# 22656]) to the inlet ofthe train.
4. Apply vacuum by opening the canister or turning on the vacuum source.
5. With a 3 mm hex (Allen®) wrench,adjust the piston gap screw to achieve
the desired flow rate (Table III).Between adjustments allow the flow to
equilibrate for several minutes.See Figure 8.
6. Replace the protective cap onto the back ofthe Veriflo® Flow Controller body.
Cleanliness: Certifying the Sampling Train for Use
US EPA Compendium Method TO-14A/TO-15 requires that the sampling
train be certified clean prior to use.Certify the train by passing a humidified,
high-purity air stream through the train,concentrating the exit gas on a trap,
and analyzing the gas by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry or other
selective detector.For the sampling train to pass certification the analytical sys-
tem should not detect greater than 0.2 ppbv ofany target VOC.
The certified sampling train should be carefully packaged in aluminum foil or
in a clean container for storage or for shipment into the field.Care in packag-
ing is critical.Careless handling could affect the preset flow rate.When the
sampling train is ready for sampling,prepare the canister.
Figure 8 Setting flow rate on 
flow controller.
Important Precautions!
•Only hand tighten knob to close valve.
Overtightening may damage seat causing
leakage.
•Tighten compression fitting on valve inlet
only 
1
/
4
turn past finger tight.
Overtightening will cause leakage.
•Use prefilter during sampling to prevent
particulate damage to valve.
•Do not disassemble valve—disassembly may
void warranty.
•Protect valve inlet by replacing brass cap
when not in use.
•Do not exceed canister maximum pressure
of40 psig.
Table IIIFlow rates for integrated sampling,
using a 6-liter canister and sampling on the
flat portion of the flow curve for the flow 
controller (Figure 5).
SSaammpplliinngg  PPeerriioodd
FFllooww  RRaattee  RRaannggee
(hours)
(mL/min.)
0.5
133–167
0.75
89–111
1
67–83
2
33–42
4
17–21
8
8–10
12
5.6–6.9
16
4.2–5.2
24
2.8–3.5
125
0.5–0.7
Collected volume is 4–5 liters 
(flow = volume in mL / sampling time in min.).
7
www.restek.com
IV. Preparing the Canister for Sampling
Preparing a canister for sampling involves certifying the canister clean,evacuating the canister to final
pressure for use,and identifying the canister.All information acquired during these processes is needed
for the chain ofcustody.
Certifying the cleanliness ofthe canister is important toward ensuring that results reported are solely from
the site sampled,and not contaminated with residue from a previous site or volatiles in laboratory air.To
certify a canister clean,fill the canister with humidified air,pass the air from the canister through an adsor-
bent trap and analyze the adsorbent for target VOCs by GC/MS or other selective detector.Two US EPA
methods discuss canister certification:EPA Compendium TO-12 and EPA Compendium TO-14A/TO-15.
To comply with EPA Compendium Methods TO-14A/TO-15,the analytical system should not detect
greater than 0.2 ppbv ofany target VOC.To comply with EPA Compendium Method TO-12 the analyti-
cal system,GC/FID,should not detect greater than 0.02 ppmC hydrocarbons.Although batch certification
ofcanister cleanliness is a relatively common practice,we recommend certifying and documenting each
canister individually.Detailed cleaning instructions are presented in Section VIII.Cleaning the Canister
(page 11).
Some laboratories certify a canister for VOC stability by introducing a low concentration test mixture into
the canister and measuring degradation over a specified time period.Ifthe canister meets the specifica-
tion,it is certified for use.We recommend using such studies to ensure the effectiveness ofa canister or
group ofcanisters for a proposed application.
Once the canister is certified clean,evacuate the canister to a final vacuum of10-50 mtorr,using either the
canister cleaning system or a clean final vacuum system.This vacuum is critical to ensure the correct
amount ofsample is collected.Use an accurate test gauge (shown in Figure 7b,page 4) or digital pressure
tester to ensure final vacuum has been reached and to document the final vacuum reading for the chain
ofcustody.Install a brass cap nut onto the canister valve to ensure no contamination can enter the sam-
ple pathway during shipment to the field.
Apply an individual identity to the canister,either with a label and serial number or with a bar code.
Some analysts prefer to introduce surrogate standards into the canister prior to sampling.Debate on this
practice revolves around theories that there are potential loss issues due to low humidity and inadequate
surface passivation by water.Neither Restek chemists nor our consulting experts recommend adding sur-
rogates to the canisters.Ifyou choose to introduce surrogates into your canisters prior to sampling,be sure
to recheck and record the vacuum reading for each canister after adding the surrogates.
V. Field Sampling, Using a Passive Sampling Train and Canister
It is important to mention again that the sampling train and canister must be leak tested and certified
clean prior to use.To properly begin field sampling,we recommend bringing a “practice”evacuated can-
ister and a flow measuring device with you to the field.Use this canister to verify the flow rate through the
passive sampling train prior to using the train to obtain samples ofrecord.To verify the flow rate,connect
the passive sampling train to the “practice”canister.Attach a flow meter to the inlet ofthe sampling train.
Open the canister and measure the flow rate through the sampling train.Ifthe flow rate is within ± 10%
ofthe flow rate set in the lab,the train is ready to be used on the formal sampling canister.Ifthe flow rate
is not within these limits,adjust the flow rate by adjusting the piston gap screw.
When the flow rate is confirmed,record the rate as the canister flow rate for the chain ofcustody form.
did you know?
Our light-weight tripod holds 
2 canisters securely without
any tools.
Pressure Conversion Table
PPrreessssuurree
ppssii
aattmm
kkgg//ccmm
22
ttoorrrr
kkPP
aa
bbaarr
iinncchheess  HHgg
psi =
1
0.068
0.0703
51.713
6.8948
0.06895
2.0359
atm = 
14.696
1
1.0332
760
101.32
1.0133
29.921
kg/cm
2
 14.223
0.967
1
735.5
98.06 
0.9806
28.958
torr = 
0.0193
0.00132
0.00136
1
0.1330
0.00133
0.0394
kP
a
0.1450
0.00987
0.0102
7.52
1
0.0100
0.2962
bar = 
14.5038
0.9869
1.0197
751.88
100
1
29.5300
in Hg = 
0.49612
0.0334
0.0345
25.400
3.376
0.03376
1
Multiply units in the left-most column by the conversion factors listed in the columns to the right.
e.g., 10PSI x 0.068 = 0.68atm, 10 bar x 29.5300 = 295.300 inches Hg
8
www.restek.com
To begin sampling, using the formal sampling canister, follow these steps:
1. Remove the brass cap nut from the canister valve.
2. Ifyou are using a test gauge,attach the gauge to the canister and record the vacuum reading.Ifyou choose not to use a test
gauge under field conditions,record the reading on the vacuum gauge that is part ofthe passive sampling train.
3. Attach the verified passive sampling train to the canister.
4. Record the sampling start time and necessary meteorological data.
5. Open the canister valve and begin sampling.
6. Periodically check the canister throughout the sampling period to ensure the pressure reading is accurate and sampling is pro-
ceeding as planned.
7. Once the sampling period is complete,close the valve and remove the sampling train.Check the final pressure within the canis-
ter,using the test gauge or the vacuum gauge in the sampling train.
There are four possible scenarios:
A.Ideally there will be a vacuum of-7"to -4" Hg in the canister (e.g.,Table IV).
B. Ifmore than -7" Hg vacuum remains,less sample was collected than ini-
tially anticipated.The sample will be valid,but the detection limit may be
higher than expected.You might have to pressurize the canister prior to
the analysis,which will dilute the sample and require you to use a dilution
factor to determine final concentrations oftarget compounds.
C.A vacuum ofless than -4" Hg indicates the sample might be skewed
toward the initial part ofthe sampling period.This assumption usually is
valid because the flow rate through the flow controller will fall once the
vacuum falls below -5" Hg (Figure 6,page 4),when the change in pressure
across the flow controller diaphragm becomes too small and the flow con-
troller is unable to maintain a constant flow.Although flow was not con-
stant over the entire sampling period,the sample may be usable because
sample was collected over the entire interval.
D.Ifthe ending vacuum is less than -1" Hg the sample should be considered
invalid because it will be impossible to tell when the sample flow stopped.
8. Record the final pressure in the canister and replace the cap nut.
Information that should be acquired at the sam-
pling site includes the start time and interval time,
the stop time,atmospheric pressure and tempera-
ture and,for ambient sampling,wind direction.
Include elevation ifit is a factor.These parameters
often prove very useful when interpreting results.
After sampling,the canisters are sent back to the
laboratory where the final vacuum is measured
again with a test gauge.Using the initial vacuum
and final vacuum,the sample volume collected can
be determined from Equation 1.
It is also good practice to recheck the flow rate after
sampling,because this will affect the sample volume
(Equation 2).Laboratories typically allow a maxi-
mum deviation of±10% to ±25% between the ini-
tial flow rate and the post-sampling flow rate.
Table IV Final vacuum and volume of 
sample collected in 6-liter canister.
FFiinnaall  VVaaccuuuumm
SSaammppllee  VVoolluummee
("Hg)
(liters)
29
0
27
0.58
25
0.99
23
1.39
20
1.99
17
2.59
15
2.99
12
3.59
10
3.99
7
4.60
5
5.0
3
5.40
0
6
Equation 2:
sample volume = [(initial flow rate + post-sampling flow rate)/2] x sampling time
Example: A flow controller was set at 3.3 mL/min. After obtaining a 24-hour
sample the flow rate was 3.0 mL/min.
sample volume = [(3.3 mL/min. + 3.0 mL/min.)/2] x 1,440 min. = 4,536mL
Equation 1:
pressure change*
sample volume =
x  canister volume
initial pressure
*initial pressure – final pressure
Example: A sample is collected in a 6-liter canister. The initial gauge pressure
reading when the canister left the lab was -29.92" Hg vacuum; the final gauge
pressure reading when the canister was returned to the lab was -7" Hg vacuum.
-29.92" Hg – (-7" Hg)
sample volume =
 6 L = 4.59 liters collected
-29.92" Hg
9
www.restek.com
VI. Analysis of Collected Samples
Once received by the lab,each canister is identified from the information in the
chain of custody report.The final pressure is checked to ensure no leaks
appeared during transport.It might be necessary to pressurize a canister prior
to the analysis;do this by adding humidified nitrogen or air to the canister to
a pressure greater than 5 psig or higher,depending on the sample volume
needed for analysis or for suitably diluting the sample (e.g.,Table V).The need
to dilute is determined by the preconcentrator instrument.Some air precon-
centrators can be operated while the canister is under slight vacuum.Check
with your instrument manuals or with the manufacturer to determine ifyou
must dilute your samples prior to analysis.Dilution factors can be calculated
according to Equation 3.
To analyze the sample,withdraw an aliquot ofthe sample from the canister.For low level ambient air analysis,withdraw 250-500 mL
ofsample from the canister and concentrate the analytes by using a mass flow controller and a cryogenically cooled trap (e.g.,glass
beads and/or a solid sorbent).Desorb the concentrated analytes from the trap and deliver them to a cryofocuser to focus the sample
bandwidth prior to introduction onto the GC column.A 60 m x 0.32 mm ID x 1.0 µm Rtx®-1 column typically is used for EPA
Method TO-14A or Method TO-15 ambient air analysis;an MSD is a common detector.Figure 9 shows a typical TIC spectrum for
a TO-15 ambient air analysis.
Table VDilution factors to adjust final
sampling pressure to 14.7 psigfor a 
6-liter canister.
FFiinnaall  VVaaccuuuumm
SSaammppllee  VVoolluummee
DDiilluuttiioonn
("Hg)
(liters)
FFaaccttoorr
29
0
63.77
27
0.58
20.37
25
0.99
12.12
23
1.39
8.63
20
1.99
6.02
17
2.59
4.63
15
2.99
4.01
12
3.59
3.34
10
3.99
3.00
7
4.60
2.61
5
5.0
2.40
3
5.40
2.22
0
6
2.00
Equation 3:
dilution factor = (P
after dilution
+ P
lab atmosphere
) / (P
lab atmosphere
- P
before dilution
)
The dilution factor is calculated from the post-sampling pressure (before dilu-
tion), the final pressure (after dilution), and the atmospheric pressure in the lab-
oratory. The factor for converting "Hg to psi = 0.491.
Example: At the end of a sampling period the gauge pressure in a canister was
-7 "Hg. The canister was pressurized with nitrogen to 14.7 psig (1 Atm.).
The dilution factor is (14.7 + 14.7) / (14.7 - (7 x 0.491)) = 2.61
Figure 9 US EPA TO-15 ambient air analysis.
Column:
Rtx®-1, 60m, 0.32mm ID, 1.0µm (cat.# 10157)
Sample:
TO-15 standard (cat.# 34436) humidified to 33% RH in a 6L SilcoCan®
canister (cat.# 24182)
Concentrator: Nutech 3550A Preconcentrator; 300mL sample concentrated at 
-160°C, thermally desorbed at 150°C, cryofocused at -185°C, 
thermally desorbed to column at 150°C
Carrier gas:
helium, constant flow
Flow rate:
1.2mL/min.
Oven temp.:
30°C (hold 4 min.) to 175°C @ 8°C/min., to 220°C @ 
20°C/min. (hold 2 min.)
Det.:
MS
Transfer line
temp.:
150°C
Scan range:
35–280amu
Ionization:
EI
Mode:
scan
1.propylene
2.Freon®-12 (dichlorodifluoromethane)
3.chloromethane
4.Freon®-114 (dichlorotetrafluoroethane)
5.vinyl chloride
6.1,3-butadiene
7.bromomethane
8.chloroethane
9.carbon disulfide
10.acetone
11.Freon®-11 (trichlorofluoromethane)
12.isopropyl alcohol
13.1,1-dichloroethene
14.methylene chloride
15.Freon®-113 
(1,1,2-trichloro-1,2,2-trifluoroethane)
16.
trans
-1,2-dichloroethene
17.1,1-dichloroethane
18.methyl 
tert
-butyl ether
19.vinyl acetate
20.methyl ethyl ketone
21.
cis
-1,2-dichloroethene
22.hexane
23.chloroform
24.ethyl acetate
25.tetrahydrofuran
26.1,2-dichloroethane
27.1,1,1-trichloroethane
28.benzene
29.carbon tetrachloride
30.cyclohexane
31.1,2-dichloropropane
32.trichloroethylene
33.bromodichloromethane
34.1,4-dioxane
35.heptane
36.
cis
-1,3-dichloropropene
37.methyl isobutyl ketone
38.
trans
-1,3-dichloropropene
39.1,1,2-trichloroethane
40.toluene
41.methyl butyl ketone
42.dibromochloromethane
43.1,2-dibromoethane
44.tetrachloroethylene
45.chlorobenzene
46.ethylbenzene
47.
p
-xylene
48.
m
-xylene
49.bromoform
50.styrene
51.
o
-xylene
52.1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethane
53.4-ethyltoluene
54.1,3,5-trimethylbenzene
55.1,2,4-trimethylbenzene
56.1,3-dichlorobenzene
57.benzyl chloride
58.1,4-dichlorobenzene
59.1,2-dichlorobenzene
60.1,2,4-trichlorobenzene
61.hexachloro-1,3-butadiene
GC_AR00748
10
www.restek.com
Procedures used in these chromatographic analyses generally include a multi-
point calibration,using gas standards.Therefore calculations oforganic com-
pounds in collected samples are straightforward—only volumes analyzed and
dilution rates are needed to determine sample concentrations.High concen-
tration calibration gas standards are commercially available (e.g.,1 ppmv or
100 ppbv).To prepare analytical standards,introduce an aliquot ofstock mate-
rial into a canister and dilute with humidified air or nitrogen.After analyzing
the calibration standards,determine the response factor for each analyte using
the peak area counts per concentration.
After analyzing the multipoint calibration standards and calculating peak
area/concentration response factors,analyze the “real world”samples.Ifan
“unknown”sample has not been diluted,apply the corresponding response
factor to each “unknown”analyte peak area to get the reporting limit concen-
tration ofthe “unknown”in the analysis (typically in ppbv).Ifyou have dilut-
ed the canister to get a positive pressure,you must apply the dilution factor to
the concentration values.This is done by multiplying the reporting limit by the
dilution factor.
VII. Cleaning the Passive Sampling Train
The cleanliness ofthe sampling train is critical to collecting accurate and rep-
resentative samples.Practices followed for cleaning passive sampling equip-
ment between uses range from purging the sampling pathway with humidified
nitrogen or air for many hours,to heating the pathway during a purge,to dis-
assembling each component,sonicating the pieces in solvent (except for the
critical orifice),and oven baking the pieces prior to reassembly.The most
suitable mode ofcleaning depends on the concentrations ofanalytes ofinter-
est,and contaminants,in the previous sample collected.
The particle filter must be thoroughly cleaned between uses.Disassemble the
filter,then remove the larger particles from the frit by blowing particle-free
nitrogen through the frit from the outlet surface toward the inlet surface.After
the larger particles are removed,sonicate or rinse the filter parts in methanol
and then bake the parts in an oven at 130 °C to remove any residual organic
vapors.
The critical orifice and flow controller can be cleaned in either oftwo ways.
The first method is to disassemble the flow controller and clean all the metal
parts with methanol.This will remove any high boiling point compounds that
have condensed onto the wetted areas ofthe controller.Heat the cleaned parts
in an oven at 130 °C to remove residual organic vapors.Do not sonicate the
critical orifice.Do not sonicate in solvent or bake any ofthe nonmetallic
parts,such as O-rings,or they will be damaged.Do not rinse the vacuum
gauge with methanol.The vacuum gauge may be heated,but do not exceed 80
°C;higher temperatures will damage the face and the laminated safety glass
lens.Heating to 80 °C will not affect the mechanical operation ofthe spiral
bourdon tube in the vacuum gauge.
A less involved method ofcleaning the flow controller is to use a heating jack-
et or heat gun to heat the components ofthe assembled sampling train,while
purging the system with nitrogen.As organic compounds are heated and des-
orbed from the interior surfaces,the nitrogen gas sweeps them out ofthe sam-
pling equipment.
Preparing the Clean Passive Sampling Train for Re-use
After the sampling train components have been cleaned,reassemble the sys-
tem,check for leaks,set the desired flow rate,and certify the sampling system
clean.Follow the procedures described previously in this guide.Package the
clean sampling train to prevent contact with airborne contaminants.
frequently askedquestion
Where can I find EPA 
Air Toxic Methods?
pdf files of US EPA Air Toxic 
Methods are available at this 
web address: 
www.epa.gov/ttn/amtic
for moreinfo
ASTM Reference D5466 Standard 
Test Method for Determination 
of Volatile Organic Chemicals in
Atmospheres
(Canister Sampling Methodology)
available at www.astm.org
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested