c# winforms pdf viewer control : Delete page from pdf acrobat control application platform web page html .net web browser fnoxdoc1-part1166

2
atmosphere are captured by moisture to form acid rain.  Acid rain, along with cloud and dry
deposition, severely affects certain ecosystems and directly affects some segments of our
economy.  All of these facts indicate an obvious need to reduce NOx emissions.  However, to
successfully do so, we must understand the generation and control of the NOx family of air
pollutants. 
WHAT IS A NITROGEN OXIDE?
Diatomic molecular nitrogen (N
2
) is a relatively inert gas that makes up about 80% of the air we
breathe.  However, the chemical element nitrogen (N), as a single atom, can be reactive and have
ionization levels (referred to as valence states) from plus one to plus five.  Thus nitrogen can
form several different oxides.  Using the Niels Bohr model of the atom, valence state relates to
the number of electrons which are either deficient (positive valence) or surplus (negative
valence) in the ion when compared with the neutral molecule.  The family of NOx compounds
and their properties are listed in Table 1.
Table 1.  Nitrogen Oxides (NOx)
Formula Name
Nitrogen
Valence
Properties
N
2
O
nitrous oxide
1
colorless gas
water soluble
NO
N
2
O
2
nitric oxide
dinitrogen dioxide
2
colorless gas
slightly water soluble 
N
2
O
3
dinitrogen trioxide
3
black solid
water soluble, decomposes in water
NO
2
N
2
O
4
nitrogen dioxide
dinitrogen tetroxide
4
red-brown gas
very water soluble, decomposes in water
N
2
O
5
dinitrogen pentoxide 5
white solid
very water soluble, decomposes in water
Oxygen ions are always at valence minus 2.  Depending upon the number of oxygen ions (always
balanced by the valence state of nitrogen), NOx can react to either deplete or enhance ozone
concentrations.  The nitrogen ion in these oxides really does a dance in which it has (at different
times) various numbers of oxygen ions as partners.  Nitrogen changes its number of partners
when it changes its ionization energy level.  This happens whenever NOx: (1) is hit with a
photon of ionizing radiation (UV or a shorter wavelength light); (2) is hit with enough photons
that together  transfer enough energy to change its ionization level; (3) is catalyzed; (4) is
stimulated sufficiently by thermal (IR) energy; (5) reacts with a chemically oxidizing or reducing
radical (an ionized fragment of a molecule); or (6) reacts with a chemically oxidizing or reducing
Delete page from pdf acrobat - copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Easy to Use C# Code to Extract PDF Pages, Copy Pages from One PDF File and Paste into Others
extract pdf pages for; convert selected pages of pdf to word
Delete page from pdf acrobat - VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed VB.NET Guide for Extracting Pages from Microsoft PDF Doc
delete pages out of a pdf file; delete pages of pdf
3
ion (an atom with unbalanced electrical charge).
When any of these oxides dissolve in water and decompose, they form nitric acid (HNO
3
) or
nitrous acid (HNO
2
).  Nitric acid forms nitrate salts when it is neutralized.  Nitrous acid forms
nitrite salts.  Thus, NOx and its derivatives exist and react either as gases in the air, as acids in
droplets of water, or as a salt. These gases, acid gases and salts together contribute to pollution
effects that have been observed and attributed to acid rain.  
Nitrous oxide (N
2
O), NO, and NO
2
are the most abundant nitrogen oxides in the air.  N
2
O (also
known as laughing gas) is produced abundantly by biogenic sources such as plants and yeasts.  It
is only mildly reactive, and is an analgesic (i.e., unlike an anaesthetic you still feel pain, but you
feel so good that you just don’t mind it).  N
2
O is an ozone depleting substance which reacts with
O
3
in both the troposphere (i.e., below 10,000 feet above sea level) and in the stratosphere
(50,000 - 150,000 feet).  N
2
O has a long half-life, estimated at from 100 to 150 years.  
Oxidation of  N
2
O by O
3
can occur at any temperature and yields both molecular oxygen (O
2
and either NO or two NO molecules joined together as its dimer, dinitrogen dioxide (N
2
O
2
).  The
NO or N
2
O
2
then oxidizes quickly (in about two hours) to NO
2
.   The NO
2
then creates an ozone
molecule out of a molecule of oxygen (O
2
) when it gets hit by a photon of ionizing radiation from
sunlight.  N
2
O is also a “ Greenhouse Gas”  which, like carbon dioxide (CO
2
), absorbs long
wavelength infrared radiation to hold heat radiating from Earth, and thereby contributes to global
warming.  
Emissions of NOx from combustion are primarily in the form of NO.  According to the
Zeldovich equations, NO is generated to the limit of available oxygen (about 200,000 ppm) in air
at temperatures above 1,300
C (2,370
F).  At temperatures below 760
C (1,400
F), NO is either
generated in much lower concentrations or not at all.  Combustion NO is generated as a function
of air to fuel ratio and is more pronounced when the mixture is on the fuel-lean side of the
stoichiometric ratio
50
(the ratio of chemicals which enter into reaction).  The Zeldovich equations
are:
N
2
+ O 
NO + N
N + O
2
NO + O
N + OH 
NO + H
Except for NO from soils, lightning and natural fires, NO is largely anthropogenic (i.e., generated
by human activity).  Biogenic sources are generally thought to account for less than 10% of total
NO emissions.  NO produces the same failure to absorb oxygen into the blood as carbon 
monoxide (CO).  However, since NO is only slightly soluble in water, it poses no real threat
except to infants and very sensitive individuals.
NO
2
is present in the atmosphere and in acid rain.  It produces nitric acid (HNO
3
) when dissolved
in water.  When NO
2
reacts with a photon to make O
2
become O
3
, NO
2
becomes NO.  This NO is
then oxidized within hours to NO
2
by radicals from the photo reaction of VOC.  Therefore, our
.NET PDF Document Viewing, Annotation, Conversion & Processing
Edit, update, delete PDF annotations from PDF file. Print. Support for all the print modes in Acrobat PDF. Print only specified page ranges.
delete blank pages from pdf file; copy web pages to pdf
C# PDF Converter Library SDK to convert PDF to other file formats
using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. to image or document, or from PDF document to other file formats, like multi-page TIFF file
cut pages out of pdf file; acrobat export pages from pdf
4
present ozone concentration is the product of both NOx and VOC pollution.  
Dinitrogen trioxide (N
2
O
3
) and dinitrogen tetroxide (N
2
O
4
) exist in very small concentrations in
flue gas.  However, they exist in such low concentrations in the atmosphere that both their
presence and their effect are often ignored.   N
2
O
4
is two NO
2
molecules joined together (another
dimer) and reacts like NO
2
; so, the presence of N
2
O
4
may be masked by the more abundant NO
2
.
Dinitrogen pentoxide (N
2
O
5
) is the most highly ionized form of nitrogen oxide.  It is generated in
air in a very small concentration, unless it is emitted from a process (such as a nitric acid
production facility) that is specifically designed to generate it.   N
2
O
5
is highly reactive, and
forms nitric acid (HNO
3
) when it decomposes in water. 
Some experts feel that NO
2
is a good surrogate for NOx because NO is rapidly converted to NO
2
,
and N
2
O has such a long life because it is not highly reactive.  Others feel that due to their role in
forming ozone, both NO and NO
2
should be considered NOx.  Still others feel that all nitrogen
oxides (including N
2
O) need to be regulated.  NO and NO
2
are certainly the most plentiful forms
of NOx and they are largely (but not exclusively) from anthropogenic sources.  N
2
O is largely
biogenic, and as such is not subject to regulation.  For environmental purposes, using the
concentration of NO
2
as a surrogate for the concentration of NOx has seemed to suffice, for it is
the precursor for ozone.
WHERE DOES NOx COME FROM?
Automobiles and other mobile sources contribute about half of the NOx that is emitted.  Electric
power plant boilers produce about 40% of the NOx emissions from stationary sources.
34
Additionally, substantial emissions are also added by such anthropogenic sources as industrial
boilers,  incinerators, gas turbines, reciprocating spark ignition and Diesel engines in stationary
sources,  iron and steel mills, cement manufacture, glass manufacture, petroleum refineries, and
nitric acid manufacture.  Biogenic or natural sources of nitrogen oxides include lightning, forest
fires, grass fires, trees, bushes, grasses, and yeasts.
1
These various sources produce differing
amounts of each oxide.  The anthropogenic sources are approximately shown as:
Mobile Sources
Electric Power
Plants
Everything Else
50%
20%
30%
This shows a graphic portrayal of the emissions of our two greatest sources of NOx.    If we
could reduce the NOx emissions from just these two leading categories, we might be able to live
with the rest.  However, don’t expect either of these categories to become zero in the foreseeable
future.  We cannot expect the car, truck, bus, and airplane to disappear.  The zero-emission car is
still on the drawing board and not on the production line.  Also, social customs will have to
change before consumption of electricity can be reduced.
C# powerpoint - PowerPoint Conversion & Rendering in C#.NET
without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. PowerPoint to PDF Conversion. This page will tell you how to use XDoc.PowerPoint SDK
extract page from pdf document; delete pages from pdf without acrobat
C# Word - Word Conversion in C#.NET
independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. Word to PDF Conversion. This page will tell you how to use XDoc.Word
copy pages from pdf to word; copy pages from pdf to another pdf
5
In all combustion there are three opportunities for NOx formation.  They are:
1. Thermal NOx - The concentration of  “ thermal NOx”  is controlled by the nitrogen and
oxygen molar concentrations and the temperature of combustion.  Combustion at temperatures
well below 1,300
C (2,370
F) forms much smaller concentrations of thermal NOx. 
2. Fuel NOx - Fuels that contain nitrogen (e.g., coal) create “ fuel NOx”  that results from
oxidation of the already-ionized nitrogen contained in the fuel.
3. Prompt NOx - Prompt NOx is formed from molecular nitrogen in the air combining with fuel
in fuel-rich conditions which exist, to some extent, in all combustion. This nitrogen then oxidizes
along with the fuel and becomes NOx during combustion, just like fuel NOx.  The abundance of 
prompt NOx is disputed by the various writers of articles and reports - probably because they
each are either considering fuels intrinsically containing very large or very small amounts of
nitrogen, or are considering burners that are intended to either have or not have fuel-rich regions
in the flame.
HOW DOES NOx AFFECT THE ENVIRONMENT?
Because NOx are transparent to most wavelengths of light (although NO
2
has a brownish color
and the rare N
2
O
3
is black), they allow the vast majority of photons to pass through and,
therefore, have a lifetime of at least several days.  Because NO
2
is
recycled from NO by the photo
reaction of VOC to make more ozone, NO
2
seems to have an even longer lifetime and is capable
of traveling considerable distances before creating ozone.  Weather systems usually travel over
the earth’s surface and allow the atmospheric effects to move downwind for several hundred
miles.  This was noted in EPA reports more than twenty years ago.  These reports found that each
major city on the East coast has a plume of ozone that extends more than a hundred miles out to
sea before concentrations drop to 100 parts per billion (ppb).  Another report cited the same
phenomenon for St. Louis.  Therefore, this problem was not just on the sea coast.  Since ozone in
clean air has a lifetime of only a few hours, this phenomenon is a measure of the effect and the
persistence of both VOC and NOx.  
Differences in the distance estimates between the emission of NOx and the generation of ozone
may be related to differences in plume transport (wind) speeds as well as other meteorological
and air quality factors. It is important to note that, under the right conditions, power plant plumes
may travel relatively long distances overnight with little loss of VOC, NO and NO
2
.  These
pollutants can thus be available to participate in photochemical reactions at distant locations on
the following day.
41
Figure 1 shows a map of NOx concentration drawn by the Center for Air
Pollution Impact and Trend Analysis (CAPITA) at Washington University in St. Louis and
reported to the Ozone Transport Assessment Group, a national workgroup that addressed the
problem of ground-level ozone (smog) and the long-range transport of air pollution across the
Eastern United States. OTAG was a partnership among the EPA, the Environmental Council of
the States (ECOS) and various industry and environmental groups with the goal of developing a
thoughtful assessment and a consensus agreement for reducing ground-level ozone and the
VB.NET PDF: How to Create Watermark on PDF Document within
or image (such as business's logo) on any desired PDF page. And with our PDF Watermark Creator, users need no external application plugin, like Adobe Acrobat.
export pages from pdf reader; copy one page of pdf to another pdf
C# Windows Viewer - Image and Document Conversion & Rendering in
standard image and document in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. Convert to PDF.
combine pages of pdf documents into one; extract pages from pdf online
6
Figure 2 NOx Map
Figure 3 Ozone Map
pollutants that cause it.  The animated version of Figure 1 shows the trajectory of NOx emissions
moving with the weather over an 8 day period. 
Figure 2 is a map of ozone concentration that shows the same trajectory over the 8 day period. 
The animated version shows concentrations of both NOx and ozone moving with the weather for
several hundred miles.
5
Ozone is the primary constituent of smog.  Between 1970 and 1990, we in the United States have
tried to control ozone primarily by controlling the emissions of VOC.  However, we have had
mixed results, for although some areas reduced their VOC emissions and attained their ozone
goals, others have not.  It now appears that the communities that failed to meet their ozone goals
C# Excel - Excel Conversion & Rendering in C#.NET
independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. Excel to PDF Conversion. This page will tell you how to use XDoc.Excel
add or remove pages from pdf; copy page from pdf
VB.NET PowerPoint: VB Code to Draw and Create Annotation on PPT
other documents are compatible, including PDF, TIFF, MS platform-friendly, this .NET PPT page annotating component more plug-ins needed like Acrobat or Adobe
convert few pages of pdf to word; extract page from pdf acrobat
7
may not be completely at fault, for they appear to be affected by NOx and VOC emissions in the
air coming to them.  To meet the ozone NAAQS, EPA must now regulate emissions of  NOx
regionally.
ARE THERE OTHER NOx RELATED ISSUES?
Yes.  Nutrient enrichment problems (eutrophication) occur in bodies of water when the
availability of either nitrates or phosphates become too large.  As a result, the ratios of nitrogen
to phosphorus, silicon, and iron and other nutrients are altered.  This alteration may induce
changes in phytoplankton, produce noxious or toxic brown or red algal blooms (which are called
“ red tides” ), or stimulate other plant growth. The algal blooms and plant growth produce a
shadow and cause the death of other plants in the water, which depletes the oxygen content of the
water (hypoxia) when the plants die, sink, and decay.  Such eutrophication can make the bottom
strata of water unihabitable for both marine animals (such as fish and shellfish) and aquatic
plants.  It can progress to virtually the complete depth of the water.  It is estimated that between
12% and 44% of the nitrogen loading of coastal water bodies comes from the air.
40
Inland lakes
are also affected in this way.
Another dimension of the problem is that high temperature combustion can convert sulfur in fuel
to SO
2
and SO
3
.  While SO
2
is toxic and forms sulfurous acid when dissolved in water, SO
3
is
both toxic and hygroscopic (moisture absorbing) and forms sulfuric acid by combining with
moisture in the atmosphere.  SO
2
and SO
3
form sulfites and sulfates when their acids are
neutralized.  Both of these acids can form solid particles by reacting with ammonia in air.  SO
2
and SO
3
also contribute to pH (acidity) changes in water, which can adversely affect both land
and aquatic life.  Therefore, both NOx and SOx from combustion can kill plants and animals.
CAPITA has shown that there are about equal amounts by weight of sulfate/sulfite, nitrate and
organic particles making up 90% of Particulate Matter less than 2.5 microns in aerodynamic
diameter (PM-2.5).  This was confirmed by Brigham Young University researchers.  The Six
Cities Study, published in the New England Journal of Medicine in 1990, has shown that illness
and premature death are closely correlated with the amount of PM-2.5 in the air.  Therefore, there
is epidemiological data indicting nitrogen oxides, sulfur oxides, and/or organic compounds as 
PM-2.5 aerosols.  There is currently no evidence that separately examines the health effects of
each of these substances.  PM-2.5 usually appear as smog, smoke, white overcast, haze, or fog
which does not clear when air warms up.  Brown smog is colored by nitrogen dioxide. 
Because the nitric acid, sulfurous acid and sulfuric acid react with ammonia in air to form solid
crystals that are much smaller than 2.5 microns and can be nucleation sites for particle growth,
we need to be concerned about each of these pollutants.  Some research indicates that even
insoluble particles much smaller than 2.5 microns in size can exhibit severe toxic effects.
38
The
smallest particles that have shown toxicity have a diameter of about 3% to 5% of the wavelength
of any color of visible light.  Therefore, these particles are too small to even scatter light and
cannot even be detected optically.
8
Acid deposition occurs from airborne acidic or acidifying compounds, principally sulfates (SO
4
-2
and nitrates (NO
3
-1
), that can be transported over long distances before returning to earth.  This
occurs through rain or snow (wet deposition), fog or cloud water (cloud deposition), or transfer
of gases or particles (dry deposition).  While severity of damage depends on the sensitivity of the
receptor, acid deposition and NOx “ represent a threat to natural resources, ecosystems, visibility,
materials, and public health.” (section 401(a)(1) of the Clean Air Act).
40
WHAT ABATEMENT AND CONTROL PRINCIPLES APPLY?
NOx abatement and control technology is a relatively complex issue.   We shall try to provide a
structure to the spectrum of NOx pollution prevention and control technologies by first giving the
principles that are used.  Then we shall describe the more successful pollution prevention and
emission control technologies and strategies.  
Please note that abatement and control of NOx from nitric acid manufacturing and “ pickling”
baths differs from abatement and control at combustion sources.  Combustion sources all have
NOx in a large flow of flue gas, while nitric acid manufacturing plants and pickling baths try to
contain the NOx.  Wet scrubbers (absorbers) can control NOx emissions from acid plants and
pickling, and can use either alkali in water, water alone, or hydrogen peroxide as the liquid that
captures the NOx.
3
The wet scrubber operates by liquid flowing downward by gravity through a
packing medium, opposed by an upward flow of gas.  Scrubbers operate on the interchange of
substances between gas and liquid. This requires that the height of the absorber, type of packing,
liquid flow, liquid properties, gas properties, and gas flow should collectively cause a scrubber to
have the desired control efficiency.  Chapter 9 of the OAQPS Control Cost Manual provides
guidance on the application, sizing, and cost of these scrubbers (referred to as gas absorbers). 
Also, Table 16 in this Bulletin presents some information for non-combustion NOx sources. 
Other then that, non-combustion NOx sources are not addressed in this Bulletin. 
For combustion sources, this Bulletin defines abatement and emission control principles and
states the Destruction or Removal Efficiency (DRE) that each successful technology is capable of
achieving.  The effectiveness of pollution prevention measures in reducing NO and NO
2
generation also is expressed in terms of relative DRE; i.e., the amount NOx generation is reduced
by using a prevention technology compared to NOx generation when not using that technology. 
Then, specific boiler types and combustion systems and applicable NOx technologies for each
system are discussed.  Finally, the cost of  these technologies is considered.
Many new combustion systems incorporate NOx prevention methods into their design and
generate far less NOx then similar but older systems.  As a result, considering DRE (even a
relative DRE) for NOx may be inappropriate.  Comparing estimated or actual NOx emissions
from a new, well-designed system to NOx emitted by a similar well-controlled and operated
older system may be the best way of evaluating how effectively a new combustion system
minimizes NOx emissions.
Table 2 lists principles or methods that are used to reduce NOx.  Basically there are six
9
principles, with the seventh being an intentional combination of some subset of the six.  
Table 2. NOx Control Methods 
6,7
Abatement or Emission
Control Principle or
Method
Successful Technologies
Pollution Prevention
Method (P2) or Add-
on Technology (A)
1. Reducing peak temperature Flue Gas Recirculation (FGR)
Natural Gas Reburning
Low NOx Burners (LNB)
Combustion Optimization
Burners Out Of Service (BOOS)
Less Excess Air (LEA)
Inject Water or Steam
Over Fire Air (OFA)
Air Staging
Reduced Air Preheat
Catalytic Combustion
P2
P2
P2
P2
P2
P2
P2
P2
P2
P2
P2
2.Reducing residence time
at peak temperature
Inject Air 
Inject Fuel
Inject Steam
P2
P2
P2
3. Chemical reduction of
NOx
Fuel Reburning (FR)
Low NOx Burners (LNB)
Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR)
Selective Non-Catalytic Reduction
(SNCR)
P2
P2
A
A
4. Oxidation of NOx with     
subsequent absorption
Non-Thermal Plasma Reactor
Inject Oxidant
A
A
5. Removal of nitrogen
Oxygen Instead Of Air
Ultra-Low Nitrogen Fuel
P2
P2
6. Using a sorbent
Sorbent In Combustion Chambers
Sorbent In Ducts
A
A
7. Combinations of these
Methods
All Commercial Products
P2 and A
Method 1. Reducing Temperature -- Reducing combustion temperature means avoiding the
stoichiometric ratio (the exact ratio of chemicals that enter into reaction).  Essentially, this
technique dilutes calories with an excess of fuel, air, flue gas, or steam.  Combustion controls use
different forms of this technique and are different for fuels with high and low nitrogen content. 
10
Control of NOx from combustion of high nitrogen content fuels (e.g., coal) can be understood by
the net stoichiometric ratio.  Control of the NOx from combustion of low nitrogen fuels (such as
gas and oil) can be seen as lean versus rich fuel/air ratios.  Either way, this technique avoids the
ideal stoichiometric ratio because this is the ratio that produces higher temperatures that generate
higher concentrations of thermal NOx.  
Combustion temperature may be reduced by: (1) using fuel rich mixtures to limit the amount of
oxygen available; (2) using fuel lean mixtures to limit temperature by diluting energy input; 
(3)  injecting cooled oxygen-depleted flue gas into the combustion air to dilute energy; 
(4) injecting cooled flue gas with added fuel; or (5) injecting water or steam.  Low-NOx burners
are based partially on this principle.
8,9,10
The basic technique is to reduce the temperature of
combustion products with an excess of fuel, air, flue gas, or steam.  This method keeps the vast
majority of nitrogen from becoming ionized (i.e., getting a non-zero valence).  
Method 2. Reducing Residence Time -- Reducing residence time at high combustion
temperatures can be done by ignition or injection timing with internal combustion engines.  It can
also be done in boilers by restricting the flame to a short region in which the combustion air
becomes flue gas.  This is immediately followed by injection of fuel, steam, more combustion
air, or recirculating flue gas.  This short residence time at peak temperature keeps the vast
majority of  nitrogen from becoming ionized.  This bears no relationship to total residence time
of a flue gas in a boiler.
Method 3. Chemical Reduction of NOx –  This technique provides a chemically reducing (i.e., 
reversal of oxidization) substance to remove oxygen from nitrogen oxides.  Examples include
Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) which uses ammonia, Selective Non-Catalytic Reduction
(SNCR) which use ammonia or urea, and Fuel Reburning (FR).  Non-thermal plasma, an
emerging technology, when used with a reducing agent, chemically reduces NOx.  All of these
technologies attempt to chemically reduce the valence level of  nitrogen to zero after the valence
has become higher.
11
Some low-NOx burners also are based partially on this principle.
Method 4. Oxidation of NOx -- This technique intentionally raises the valence of the nitrogen
ion to allow water to absorb it (i.e., it is based on the greater solubility of NOx at higher valence). 
This is accomplished either by using a catalyst, injecting hydrogen peroxide, creating ozone
within the air flow, or injecting ozone into the air flow.  Non-thermal plasma, when used without
a reducing agent, can be used to oxidize NOx.  A scrubber must be added to the process to
absorb N
2
O
5
emissions to the atmosphere.  Any resultant nitric acid can be either neutralized by
the scrubber liquid and then sold (usually as a calcium or ammonia salt), or collected as nitric
acid to sell to customers.
12, 49
Method 5. Removal of nitrogen from combustion -- This is accomplished by removing
nitrogen as a reactant either by: (1) using oxygen instead of air in the combustion process; or 
(2) using ultra-low nitrogen content fuel to form less fuel NOx.  Eliminating nitrogen by using
oxygen tends to produce a rather intense flame that must be subsequently and suitably diluted.  
Although Method 2 can lower the temperature quickly to avoid forming excessive NOx, it cannot
11
eliminate nitrogen oxides totally if air is the quench medium.  Hot flue gas heats the air that is
used to quench it and this heating generates some thermal NOx.  This method also includes
reducing the net excess air used in the combustion process because air is 80% nitrogen.  Using
ultra-low-nitrogen content fuels with oxygen can nearly eliminate fuel and prompt NOx.
13 
Method 6. Sorption, both adsorption and absorption -- Treatment of flue gas by injection of 
sorbents (such as ammonia, powdered limestone, aluminum oxide, or carbon) can remove NOx
and other pollutants (principally sulfur).  There have been successful efforts to make sorption
products a marketable commodity.  This kind of treatment has been applied in the combustion
chamber, flue, and baghouse.  The use of carbon as an adsorbent has not led to a marketable
product, but it is sometimes used to limit NOx emissions in spite of this.  The sorption method is
often referred to as using a dry sorbent, but slurries also have been used.  This method uses either
adsorption or absorption followed by filtration and/or electrostatic precipitation to remove the
sorbent. 
Method 7. Combinations of these methods -- Many of these methods can be combined to
achieve a lower NOx concentration than can be achieved alone by any one method.  For example,
a fuel-rich cyclone burner (Method 1) can be followed by fuel reburn (Method 3) and over-fire
air (Method 1).  This has produced as much as a 70% reduction in NOx.
55
Other control
technologies that are intended to primarily reduce concentrations of sulfur also strongly affect the
nitrogen oxide concentration.  For example, the SOx-NOx-ROx-Box (SNRB) technology uses a
limestone sorbent in the flue gas from the boiler to absorb sulfur.  This is followed by ammonia
injection and SCR using catalyst fibers in the baghouse filter bags.  The sulfur is recovered from
the sorbent and the sorbent regenerated by a Claus process.  This has demonstrated removal of up
to 90% of the NOx along with 80% of the SOx.
39, 42
EBARA of Japan reported that an electron
beam reactor with added ammonia removed 80% of the SO
2
and 60% of the NOx for a utility
boiler in China.
54
FLS Milo and Sons reported at the same symposium that 95% of the SO
2
and
70%-90% of the NOx were removed in several demonstrations of their SNAP technology, which
is based upon an aluminum oxide adsorber with Claus regeneration.
56
WHAT ABATEMENT TECHNOLOGIES ARE AVAILABLE?
In this report existing NOx abatement technologies are divided into two categories, external
combustion applications (e.g., boilers, furnaces and process heaters) and internal combustion
applications (e.g., stationary internal combustion engines and turbines).  These categories are
further subdivided into pollution prevention (which reduces NOx generation
) and add-on control
technologies (which reduces NOx emissions
). 
EXTERNAL COMBUSTION
For external combustion applicable technologies are shown in Table 3 (based on Table 2 in
Select the Right NOx Control Technology, Stephen Wood, Chemical Engineering Progress,
January 1994).
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested