c# winforms pdf viewer control : Delete page from pdf file SDK software service wpf windows .net dnn guide-to-formats7-part1262

The National Archives                                                                                   A Guide to Formats  Version: 1 
Page 71 of 83
11.4  Scalable Vector Graphics (.svg) 
The Scalable Vector Graphics file format
76
(SVG) is a textual format based on XML (see section 
3.3
). It was first defined in 1999 by the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) and there have 
been several versions defined since then. SVG 1.0 became a W3C recommendation in 2001, 
1.1 in 2003 and 1.2 Tiny in 2008. SVG 1.2 Full has been working draft for many years, but is 
likely to be replaced by SVG 2.0. 
Support for SVG is increasingly common, particularly on the web, however Microsoft Internet 
Explorer has only supported it from version 8. 
It supports both static and interactive vector graphics, with a built in scripting language 
(ECMAScript
77
11.4.1 
Continuity properties of Scalable Vector Graphics (SVG) 
). Note that advanced scripted features will probably not survive migration into 
another format. Raster images can also be embedded in an SVG file, and it also includes some 
basic page layout features. It is a non-lossy format, and has no precision issues. 
Flexibility Interoperability  HighMost vector applications and browsers can access SVG 
s SVG 
format. 
Implementability High. SVG support is found in many programming 
ing 
environments. 
Quality 
Lossiness 
None. 
Precision  
No issues. 
Resilience Recoverability 
HighBeing based on a textual XML format, it is quite easy to 
repair damaged SVG files, although there is no specific error 
detection or recovery built in. 
Ubiquity 
HighSVG files are very widespread, particularly on the web. 
Stability 
HighThe format is standardised through the W3C. Although 
ough 
new versions appear reasonably regularly, support for format in 
all versions is likely to continue into the foreseeable future. 
76
See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scalable_Vector_Graphics
77
See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ECMAScript
Delete page from pdf file - copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Easy to Use C# Code to Extract PDF Pages, Copy Pages from One PDF File and Paste into Others
delete pages from pdf; cut pages from pdf
Delete page from pdf file - VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed VB.NET Guide for Extracting Pages from Microsoft PDF Doc
a pdf page cut; deleting pages from pdf in reader
The National Archives                                                                                   A Guide to Formats  Version: 1 
Page 72 of 83
12.  Audio 
12.1  Introduction 
Audio formats are quite diverse, being engineered to support different qualities, file sizes and 
business uses. Consumer grade formats typically focus on small file sizes, support stereo 
channel audio, and have relatively low quality (around CD-quality). Professional grade formats 
may support higher qualities to give some head-room when editing and a greater number of 
channels.  Audio formats described here include: 
Waveform Audio File Format  
WAV  see section 12.2
Windows Media Audio 
WMA  see section 12.3
MPEG Layer 3 Audio  
MP3  see section 12.4
Advanced Audio Coding 
AAC  see section 12.5
12.1.1 
Sampling risks 
In order to reproduce audio, computers must capture the sound level at a particular intervals of 
time, and convert it to a number. The higher the number of samples taken per second, the more 
faithfully the sound can be reproduced. Since human ears can hear frequencies up to around 
22,000 Hz, then a sampling rate of double this (around 44,000 samples per second) is generally 
good enough to reproduce most frequencies a human ear can distinguish. Capturing more 
samples gives more flexibility to edit the sound without noticeably degrading the quality. 
However, when processing audio, if the sampling rate of the sound is adjusted, this can produce 
audible artefacts in the sound. In general, you should capture and store audio in as high a 
sample rate as possible.   
12.1.2 
Codec risks 
A ‘codec’ refers to the algorithm used to compress and decompress the audio data. Some 
codecs are ‘lossy’, in that they intentionally discard data to reduce the file size. Others are 
lossless, reproducing the exact sound data fed into it – although these typically do not compress 
as much as lossy codecs. 
A particular risk of codecs is knowing which codec is actually being used. Many audio file 
formats allow many different codecs to be used within them, and this is not evident from the file 
extension, which simply tells you which audio file container format is being used, not the codec.  
Although it is possible for dedicated audio software to determine the codec in use (otherwise it 
could not play back the audio), it is harder for information managers to acquire this information, 
which may create risk of unusual or older codecs remaining in use in older audio files. 
VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.
using RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF; How to VB.NET: Delete a Single PDF Page from PDF File. This is a VB .NET example for how to delete a single page from a PDF document.
cut pdf pages online; cut pages from pdf file
C# PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
Demo Code: How to Delete a Single PDF Page from PDF File in C#.NET. Description: Delete specified page from the input PDF file. Parameters:
copy pages from pdf into new pdf; extract pages from pdf files
The National Archives                                                                                   A Guide to Formats  Version: 1 
Page 73 of 83
12.1.3 
Digital rights management risks 
Some audio file formats use ‘Digital Rights Management’ (DRM) to protect the content from 
copyright infringement, or to otherwise control the use of the content. By necessity, DRM 
encrypts the content of the audio file format, preventing the use without a key to unlock the 
content. Because of this, all audio files with DRM carry a very high continuity risk. In order to 
facilitate legitimate playback of content, the software must have the decryption key available to 
it. Unless the DRM scheme requires online negotiation, all off-line use (which includes most 
audio players) must include the decryption key in the software client. 
It is often possible to reverse engineer the decryption key, however, there are serious legal 
issues with using such tools to unlock content protected by DRM schemes unless you are the 
legitimate copyright owner.
78
12.2  Waveform Audio File Format (.wav) 
Waveform Audio File Format (WAV)
79
is a simple audio file format used by the Microsoft 
Windows and IBM OS/2 operating systems. However, support for the format is widespread on 
other platforms. It is not formally standardised, but the specifications are available.
80
It can store tw channels of audio at up to 44,100 samples per second, using 16 bits per sample, 
so sound quality is reasonably good, but quality may suffer if edits which transform the audio 
are applied. There are no digital rights management issues with the wav format. 
It is an innately non-lossy format, but does support compression using a variety of codecs 
supplied by the Windows Audio Compression Manager.
81
Like many media formats, the ability 
to use a variety of codecs within the format means that you can experience continuity issues if 
an unusual codec is selected, as not all systems may support all codecs, and it is not directly 
evident from the file which codec is being used. However, note that the wav format is most 
frequently used uncompressed, avoiding such issues, although making the file size of wav files 
quite large. 
78
See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Software_cracking
79
See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/WAV
80
See http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/hardware/gg463006.aspx
81
See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Audio_Compression_Manager#Audio_Compression_Manager
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
C# File: Merge PDF; C# File: Split PDF; C# Page: Insert PDF pages; C# Page: Delete PDF pages; C# Read: PDF Text Extract; C# Read: PDF
extract pages pdf; copying a pdf page into word
VB.NET PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for vb.net, ASP.NET
your PDF document is unnecessary, you may want to delete this page adding a page into PDF document, deleting unnecessary page from PDF file and changing
reader extract pages from pdf; delete page from pdf reader
The National Archives                                                                                   A Guide to Formats  Version: 1 
Page 74 of 83
12.2.1 
Continuity properties of Waveform Audio File Format (WAV) 
Flexibility 
Interoperability 
Very high.   
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
page processing functions, such as how to merge PDF document files by C# code, how to rotate PDF document page, how to delete PDF page using C#
convert selected pages of pdf to word; copy web pages to pdf
C# PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files
Besides, in the process of splitting PDF document, developers can also remove certain PDF page from target PDF file using C#.NET PDF page deletion API.
extract one page from pdf online; extract pages from pdf reader
The National Archives                                                                                   A Guide to Formats  Version: 1 
Page 75 of 83
WMA Voice 
A lossy codec designed for low-bandwidth voice 
communication, supporting up to 22,000 samples a second 
for a single channel of sound. 
However, most WMA audio files encountered use the first codec with the same name – 
Windows Media Audio. The others were defined later in 2003, and may be encountered in 
specialised scenarios, but their use is not particularly common.   
The format optionally supports various forms of digital rights management, which can restrict 
playback of content except on authorised devices, or only allow playback for a limited time.  
Hence, care must be taken with audio in any WMA format to ensure it is not protected by DRM 
schemes if the audio must be reliably accessed into the future. 
12.3.1 
Continuity properties of Windows Media Audio (WMA) 
Flexibility Interoperability  HighMany platforms can process wma files, assuming digital 
gital 
rights management is not used. 
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
using RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF; Add and Insert a Page to PDF File Using VB. doc2.Save( outPutFilePath). Add and Insert Blank Page to PDF File Using VB.
extract pdf pages for; delete pages from pdf acrobat
VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
Since images are usually or large size, images size reducing can help to reduce PDF file size effectively. Delete unimportant contents Embedded page thumbnails.
acrobat extract pages from pdf; export pages from pdf acrobat
The National Archives                                                                                   A Guide to Formats  Version: 1 
Page 76 of 83
MP3 uses a lossy compression algorithm to achieve small file sizes, which discards part of the 
audio signal which human ears cannot easily distinguish, particularly when a lower tone 
obscures the perception of a higher one.   
The amount of loss is configurable, by setting the ‘bit-rate’ of the format – where a higher bit-
rate gives a better quality output. Many MP3 files are encoded using a128-bit rate, but a 192-bit 
rate or higher is not uncommon. In general for continuity purposes, unless space is a prime 
consideration, a higher quality bit-rate should be preferred.   
Since the codec of an MP3 file is part of the format, there are no additional codec risks with 
MP3, other than the MP3 algorithm itself is the subject of patents, which may require license 
fees to be paid if implemented in software. MP3 files do not have any digital rights management 
issues, allowing the unrestricted playback or modification or content, although note that since it 
uses lossy compression, it should not be used if the audio needs to be edited – each time it is 
resaved after a change more information will be discarded. 
12.4.1 
Continuity properties of MPEG Layer 3 (MP3) 
Flexibility Interoperability  Very high. Almost all platforms can process MP3 files. 
es. 
C# PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net
Since images are usually or large size, images size reducing can help to reduce PDF file size effectively. Delete unimportant contents Embedded page thumbnails.
delete pages from pdf reader; extract pages from pdf file online
C# PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in C#.net, ASP.
document file, and choose to create a new PDF file in .NET NET document imaging toolkit, also offers other advanced PDF document page processing and
delete page from pdf file; copy pdf pages to another pdf
The National Archives                                                                                   A Guide to Formats  Version: 1 
Page 77 of 83
support up to 48 channels of audio, each with up to a 96,000 samples per second. It includes 
support for error detection and correction within the encoding.  Note that AAC is a method of 
encoding audio, but AAC-encoded audio must be contained in various standardised audio 
‘container’ formats, including MP4
87
, 3GP
88
and other ISO-based media formats.
89
It was first standardised as part of the MPEG-2 specification in 1997, as ISO 13838-7:1997. It 
was subsequently updated in 1999 as part of the MPEG-4 specification, as ISO 14496-3:1999.  
Further additions have been made in 2000 (ISO 14496-3:1999/Amd 1:2000), 2003 (ISO 14496-
3:2001/Amd 1:2003), 2004 (ISO 14496-3:2001/Amd 2:2004), 2005 (ISO 14496-3:2005/Amd 
2:2006), with the latest being in 2009 (ISO 14496-3:2009). 
It is the default audio encoding for the Apple range of consumer hardware and software, 
including iPhone, iPad and iTunes. While AAC files do not themselves have any digital rights 
management (DRM) built in to the specification, it is possible to add DRM in to the format. For 
example, some AAC files in iTunes are protected by a DRM scheme called FairPlay.
90
12.5.1 
Continuity properties of Advanced Audio Coding (AAC) 
Care 
must be taken with AAC files to ensure that you can access content which you own for as long 
as you need to, and that any DRM restrictions will not prevent access you need to your content. 
Flexibility Interoperability  HighSupport for AAC encoded files can be found on many 
many 
platforms. 
The National Archives                                                                                   A Guide to Formats  Version: 1 
Page 78 of 83
13.  Video 
13.1  Introduction 
There are many video formats in existence, designed to support differing qualities of video and 
audio. Video takes up an extremely large amount of space, so without exception all the formats 
described here use lossy compression to reduce the data to manageable (if still large) volumes.   
This makes them unsuitable for work which involves repeated changes to the video picture, as 
each time they are changed and saved, more quality is lost. Most video formats also include 
audio with them, which may share common codecs (compression-decompression) algorithms 
with audio-only formats (see section 12
).  
Video formats described here include: 
Moving Pictures Expert Group 
MPG, MPEG  see section 13.2
Windows Media Video 
WMV   
see section 13.3
Audio Video Interleave 
AVI   
see section 13.4
Flash Video   
FLV   
see section 13.5
13.1.1 
Scaling risks 
Video, like raster images (see section 10.1.1
) have a natural dimension of width and height in 
pixels. If a video is scaled up to a higher resolution, or downscaled to a lower resolution, then 
the video can appear blurred, areas of high contrast in the video (such as sharp lines) can be 
lost, or flickering can occur as different frames of the video discard slightly different parts of the 
image. In general, video should be kept at as high a resolution as possible, with lower quality 
versions being produced to fill particular needs (e.g. delivery on the web). 
13.1.2 
Codec risks 
A ‘codec’ refers to an algorithm used to compress and decompress the video or audio data.  
Most video codecs are ‘lossy’, in that they intentionally discard data to reduce the file size.   
A particular risk of codecs is knowing which codec is actually being used. Many video file 
formats allow many different codecs to be used within them, and this is not evident from the file 
extension, which simply tells you which video file container format is being used, not the codec.  
Although it is possible for dedicated video software to determine the codec in use (otherwise it 
could not play back the video), it is harder for information managers to acquire this information, 
which may create risk of unusual or older codecs remaining in use in older video files. 
The National Archives                                                                                   A Guide to Formats  Version: 1 
Page 79 of 83
13.1.3 
Digital rights management risks 
Some video file formats use ‘Digital Rights Management’ (DRM) to protect the content from 
copyright infringement, or to otherwise control the use of the content. By necessity, DRM 
encrypts the content of the video file format, preventing the use without a key to unlock the 
content. Because of this, all video files with DRM carry a very high continuity risk. In order to 
facilitate legitimate playback of content, the software must have the decryption key available to 
it. Unless the DRM scheme requires on-line negotiation, all off-line use (which includes most 
video players) must include the decryption key in the software client. 
It is often possible to reverse engineer the decryption key, however, there are serious legal 
issues with using such tools to unlock content protected by DRM schemes unless you are the 
legitimate copyright owner.
91
13.2  Moving Pictures Expert Group (.mpg, .mpeg) 
The Moving Pictures Expert Group (MPG) defined two major video and audio standards with 
corresponding file formats: MPEG-1
92
and MPEG-2
93
, although both can use the .mpg file 
extension. The MP3 audio format (see section 12.4
) is also part of the MPEG-1 standard. 
After a lengthy development, MPEG-1 was finally approved in 1992 and standardised as ISO 
11172 in 1993, with subsequent additions to the same standard being made in 1995 and 1998.  
It is intended to encode VHS-tape quality video, and is still in widespread use.  MPEG-2 was in 
development before MPEG-1 was standardised, and provides higher quality (it is the encoding 
used in DVD videos).   
MPEG-2 was standardised as ISO 13818 in 1996, with many subsequent additions being made.  
MPEG-1 videos are a valid subset of MPEG-2 videos, so software or devices capable of 
decoding MPEG-2 videos can automatically decode MPEG-1. 
MPEG video uses a lossy codec, and has no built-in digital rights management. 
13.2.1 
Continuity properties of Moving Pictures Expert Group (MPG) 
Flexibility Interoperability  Very highAlmost all platforms can access content in MPE
PEG 
format. 
The National Archives                                                                                   A Guide to Formats  Version: 1 
Page 80 of 83
MPG format, although note that MPEG-2 is subject to patent 
restrictions. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested