c# wpf adobe pdf reader : Acrobat extract pages from pdf control software system azure winforms windows console licklider0-part1391

61
In Memoriam: J. C. R. Licklider
1915
-
1990
Augus
t
7, 1990
Systems Research Center
130 Lytton Avenue
Palo Alto, California 94301
Acrobat extract pages from pdf - copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Easy to Use C# Code to Extract PDF Pages, Copy Pages from One PDF File and Paste into Others
extract pages from pdf online tool; add and delete pages from pdf
Acrobat extract pages from pdf - VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed VB.NET Guide for Extracting Pages from Microsoft PDF Doc
copy pages from pdf into new pdf; add or remove pages from pdf
Systems Research Center
The charter of SRC is to advance both the state of knowledge and the state
of the art in computer systems. From our establishment in 1984, we have
performed basic and applied research to support Digital’s business objec-
tives, Our current work includes exploring distributed personal computing
on multiple platforms, networking, programming technology, system mod-
elling and management techniques, and selected applications.
Our strategy is to test the technical and practical value of our ideas by
building hardware and software prototypes and using them as daily tools.
Interesting systems are too complex to be evaluated solely in the abstract;
extended use allows us to investigate their properties in depth. This ex-
perience is useful in the short term in refining our designs, and invaluable
in the long term in advancing our knowledge. Most of the major advances
in information systems have come through this strategy, including personal
computing, distributed systems, and the Internet.
We also perform complementary work of a more mathematical flavor. Some
of it is in established fields of theoretical computer science, such as the
analysis of algorithms, computational geometry, and logics of programming.
Other work explores new ground motivated by problems that arise in our
systems research.
We have a strong commitment to communicating our results; exposing and
testing our ideas in the research and development communities leads to im-
proved understanding. Our research report series supplements publication
in professional journals and conferences. We seek users for our prototype
systems among those with whom we have common interests, and we encour-
age collaboration with university researchers.
Robert W. Taylor, Director
.NET PDF Document Viewing, Annotation, Conversion & Processing
Extract hyperlink inside PDF. PDF Write. Redact text content, images, whole pages from PDF file. Annotate & Comment. Support for all the print modes in Acrobat PDF
extract pdf pages acrobat; delete page from pdf online
C# PDF Converter Library SDK to convert PDF to other file formats
manipulate & convert standard PDF documents in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat.
cutting pdf pages; delete pages of pdf preview
In M
e
mor
i
am:
J
. C. R. L
ic
k
li
d
e
r
1915–1990
C# powerpoint - PowerPoint Conversion & Rendering in C#.NET
documents in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. PowerPoint to PDF Conversion.
a pdf page cut; delete page from pdf preview
C# Word - Word Conversion in C#.NET
Word documents in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. Word to PDF Conversion.
extract pages from pdf on ipad; extract pages from pdf without acrobat
©IRE (now IEEE) 1960
“Man-Computer Symbiosis” is reprinted, with permission, from IRE Trans-
actions on Human Factors in Electronics, volume HFE-1, pages 4–11, March
1960.
©Science and Technology 1968
“The Computer as a Communication Device” is reprinted from Science and
Technology, April 1968.
©Digital Equipment Corporation 1990
This work may not be copied or reproduced in whole or in part for any com-
mercial  purpose.
Permission to copy in whole or in part without payment
of fee is granted for nonprofit educational and research purposes provided
that all such whole or partial copies include the following: a notice that
such copying is by permission of the Systems Research Center of Digital
Equipment Corporation in Palo Alto, California; an acknowledgment of the
authors and individual contributors to the work; and all applicable portions
of the copyright notice. Copying, reproducing, or republishing for any other
purpose shall require a license with payment of fee to the Systems Research
Center. All rights reserved.
C# Windows Viewer - Image and Document Conversion & Rendering in
standard image and document in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. Convert to PDF.
copying a pdf page into word; copy web pages to pdf
VB.NET PDF: How to Create Watermark on PDF Document within
Watermark Creator, users need no external application plugin, like Adobe Acrobat. VB example code to create graphics watermark on multiple PDF pages within the
acrobat remove pages from pdf; copy pages from pdf to another pdf
Pr
e
fa
ce
This report honors J. C. R. Licklider for his contributions to computer sci-
ence research and education in this country. We reprint here two of his
papers, originally published in the 1960s, which exemplify his ideas about
how computers could enhance human problem-solving.
If you were ever fortunate enough to meet him, and you said something
like, “It’s nice to meet you, Dr. Licklider,” he would ask right away that
you please call him Lick. He was Lick to friends, colleagues, and casual
acquaintances  alike.
Lick had a vision of a better way of computing. Once upon a time, to
get a computer to do your bidding, you had to punch holes in paper cards
or tapes, give the paper to someone who fed it to the machine, and then go
away for hours or days. Lick believed we could do better and, more than
any other single individual, saw to it that we did.
In the paper entitled “Man-Computer Symbiosis,” published thirty years
ago, Lick provided a guide for decades of computer research to follow. The
paper was based on work performed by a small research group organized
and headed by him at Bolt, Beranek, and Newman. In the late 1950s, the
group purchased the first PDP- 1 from Digital. On this machine, Lick’s group
designed and built one of the earliest time-sharing systems.
In 1962, Lick was asked by the Director of the Advanced Research
Projects Agency (ARPA) to join the agency to create and manage a program
for funding research. Although its annual budget was greater than the total
amount of money allocated to computer research by all other government-
supported agencies, it was one of the smaller programs within ARPA. This
program led the way to commercial time-sharing in the late 60s and to
networking in the mid-70s.
The computer establishment criticized Lick’s ARPA program. Most
computer manufacturers and directors of computer centers argued that time-
sharing was an inefficient use of machine resources and should not be pur-
sued. But Lick had the courage to persevere.
His ARPA responsibilities included selecting and funding researchers to
build and lead research groups. In this connection, Lick was the architect of
Project MAC at MIT and a number of other projects that shaped the field.
The leaders he chose twenty-five years ago now read like a Who’s Who of
computing  research.
The least known of Lick’s accomplishments is perhaps his most signif-
icant. Prior to his work at ARPA, no U.S. university granted a Ph.D. in
C# Excel - Excel Conversion & Rendering in C#.NET
Excel documents in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. Excel to PDF Conversion.
extract pages from pdf file; cut pages out of pdf file
VB.NET PowerPoint: VB Code to Draw and Create Annotation on PPT
as a kind of compensation for limitations (other documents are compatible, including PDF, TIFF, MS on slide with no more plug-ins needed like Acrobat or Adobe
extract one page from pdf reader; export one page of pdf preview
computer science. A university graduate program requires a research base,
and that in turn requires a long-term commitment of dollars. Lick’s ARPA
program set the precedent for providing the research base at four of the
first universities to establish graduate programs in computer science: U.C.
Berkeley, CMU, MIT, and Stanford. These programs, started in 1965, have
remained the country’s strongest and have served as role models for other
departments that followed. Their success would have been impossible with-
out the foundation put in place by Lick in 1962-64.
For all his considerable influence on computing, Lick retained his mod-
esty. He was the most unlikely “great man” you could ever encounter. His
favorite kind of joke was one at his own expense. He was gentle, curious,
and outgoing.
Lick’s vision provided an extremely fruitful, long-term direction for com-
puting research. He guided the initial research funding that was necessary
to fulfil the early promises of the vision. And he laid the foundation for
graduate education in the newly created field of computer science. All users
of interactive computing and every company that employs computer people
owe him a great debt.
Robert W. Taylor
DICOM to PDF Converter | Convert DICOM to PDF, Convert PDF to
users do not need to load Adobe Acrobat or any Convert all pages or certain pages chosen by users; download & perpetual update. Start Image DICOM PDF Converting.
cut pages from pdf file; cut pages from pdf preview
BMP to PDF Converter | Convert Bitmap to PDF, Convert PDF to BMP
for Adobe Acrobat Reader & print driver during conversion; Support conversion of Bitmap - PDF files in both single & batch mode; Convert all pages or certain
deleting pages from pdf in reader; deleting pages from pdf online
Con
te
n
ts
Man-Computer  Symbiosis
J.C.R. Licklider
The Computer  as a  Communication  Device
J
.C.R. Licklide
r
a
nd Robe
rt
W. T
a
ylo
r
1
21
Man-Compu
te
 Symb
i
o
sis
Summary
Man-computer symbiosis is an expected development in cooperative inter-
action between men and electronic computers. It will involve very close
coupling between the human and the electronic members of the partner-
ship. The main aims are 1) to let computers facilitate formulative thinking
as they now facilitate the solution of formulated problems, and 2) to enable
men and computers to cooperate in making decisions and controlling com-
plex situations without inflexible dependence on predetermined  programs.
In the anticipated symbiotic partnership, men will set the goals, formulate
the hypotheses, determine the criteria, and perform the evaluations. Com-
puting machines will do the routinizable work that must be done to prepare
the way for insights and decisions in technical and scientific thinking. Pre-
liminary analyses indicate that the symbiotic partnership will perform intel-
lectual operations much more effectively than man alone can perform them.
Prerequisites for the achievement of the effective, cooperative association
include developments in computer time sharing, in memory components, in
memory organization, in programming languages, and in input and output
equipment.
 In
t
rodu
cti
on
1.1 Symb
i
o
sis
The fig tree is pollinated only by the insect Blastophaga grossorun. The
larva of the insect lives in the ovary of the fig tree, and there it gets its
food. The tree and the insect are thus heavily interdependent: the tree
cannot reproduce wit bout the insect; the insect cannot eat wit bout the tree;
together, they constitute not only a viable but a productive and thriving
partnership. This cooperative “living together in intimate association, or
even close union, of two dissimilar organisms” is called symbiosis [27].
“Man-computer symbiosis” is a subclass of man-machine systems. There
are many man-machine systems. At present, however, there are no man-
computer symbioses. The purposes of this paper are to present the concept
and, hopefully, to foster the development of man-computer symbiosis by an-
alyzing some problems of interaction between men and computing machines,
calling attention to applicable principles of man-machine engineering, and
1
pointing out a few questions to which research answers are needed. The
hope is that, in not too many years, human brains and computing machines
will be coupled together very tightly, and that the resulting partnership will
think as no human brain has ever thought and process data in a way not
approached by the information-handling machines we know today.
1.2 B
et
w
ee
n “M
ec
han
ic
a
ll
y Ex
te
nd
e
d Man” and “Ar
ti
f
ici
a
l
In
telli
g
e
n
ce
As a concept, man-computer symbiosis is different in an important way
from what North [21] has called “mechanically extended man.” In the man-
machine systems of the past, the human operator supplied the initiative, the
direction, the integration, and the criterion. The mechanical parts of the
systems were mere extensions, first of the human arm, then of the human
eye. These systems certainly did not consist of “dissimilar organisms living
together …”
There was only one kind of organism—man—and the rest was
there only to help him.
In one sense of course, any man-made system is intended to help man, to
help a man or men outside the system. If we focus upon the human operator
within the system, however, we see that, in some areas of technology, a
fantastic change has taken place during the last few years. “Mechanical
extension” has given way to replacement of men, to automation, and the men
who remain are there more to help than to be helped. In some instances,
particularly in large computer-centered information and control systems,
the human operators are responsible mainly for functions that it proved
infeasible to automate. Such systems (“humanly extended machines,” North
might call them) are not symbiotic systems. They are “semi-automatic”
systems, systems that started out to be fully automatic but fell short of the
goal.
Man-computer symbiosis is probably not the ultimate paradigm for com-
plex technological systems. It seems entirely possible that, in due course,
electronic or chemical “machines” will outdo the human brain in most of the
functions we now consider exclusively within its province. Even now, Gel-
ernter’s IBM-704 program for proving theorems in plane geometry proceeds
at about the same pace as Brooklyn high school students, and makes simi-
lar errors.[12] There are, in fact, several theorem-proving, problem-solving,
chess-playing, and pattern-recognizing programs (too many for complete ref-
erence [1, 2, 5, 8, 11, 13, 17, 18, 19, 22, 23, 25] ) capable of rivaling human
intellectual performance in restricted areas; and Newell, Simon, and Shaw’s
2
[20] “general problem solver” may remove some of the restrictions. In short,
it seems worthwhile to avoid argument with (other) enthusiasts for artifi-
cial intelligence by conceding dominance in the distant future of cerebration
to machines alone. There will nevertheless be a fairly long interim during
which the main intellectual advances will be made by men and computers
working together in intimate association. A multidisciplinary study group,
examining future research and development problems of the Air Force, es-
timated that it would be 1980 before developments in artificial intelligence
make it possible for machines alone to do much thinking or problem solving
of military significance. That would leave, say, five years to develop man-
computer symbiosis and 15 years to use it. The 15 may be 10 or 500, but
those years should be intellectually the most creative and exciting in the
history of mankind.
2 A
i
m
s
of Man-Compu
te
r Symb
i
o
sis
Present-day computers are designed primarily to solve preformulated prob-
lems or to process data according to predetermined procedures. The course
of the computation may be conditional upon results obtained during the
computation, but all the alternatives must be foreseen in advance. (If an
unforeseen alternative arises, the whole process comes to a halt and awaits
the necessary extension of the program.) The requirement for preformula-
tion or predetermination is sometimes no great disadvantage. It is often
said that programming for a computing machine forces one to think clearly,
that it disciplines the thought process.
If the user can think his problem
through in advance, symbiotic association with a computing machine is not
necessary.
However, many problems that can be thought through in advance are
very difficult to think through in advance. They would be easier to solve,
and they could be solved faster, through an intuitively guided trial-and-
error procedure in which the computer cooperated, turning up flaws in the
reasoning or revealing unexpected turns in the solution. Other problems
simply cannot be formulated without computing-machine aid. Poincaré an-
ticipated the frustration of an important group of would-be computer users
when he said, “The question is not, ‘What is the answer?’ The question is,
‘What is the question?’ “ “ One of the main aims of man-computer symbiosis
is to bring the computing machine effectively into the formulative parts of
technical  problems.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested