5.1. DEFINING NEW OPERATOR NAMES
17
that do not relate in the same way to adjacent symbols; recommended prac-
tice is therefore to dene suitable commands in the document preamble for any
paired-delimiter use of vert bar symbols:
\providecommand{\abs}[1]{\lvert#1\rvert}
\providecommand{\norm}[1]{\lVert#1\rVert}
whereupon the document would contain \abs{z} to produce jzj and \norm{v}
to produce kvk.
|5|
Operator names
5.1 Dening new operator names
Math functions such as log, sin, and lim are traditionally typeset in roman type
to make them visually more distinct from one-letter math variables, which are
set in math italic. The more common ones have predened names, \log, \sin,
\lim, and so forth, but new ones come up all the time in mathematical papers,
so the amsmath package provides a general mechanism for dening new ‘operator
names’. To dene a math function \xxx to work like \sin, you write
\DeclareMathOperator{\xxx}{xxx}
whereupon ensuing uses of \xxx will produce xxx in the proper font and au-
tomatically add proper spacing on either side when necessary, so that you get
AxxxB instead of AxxxB. In the second argument of \DeclareMathOperator
(the name text), a pseudo-text mode prevails: the hyphen character - will print
as a text hyphen rather than a minus sign and an asterisk * will print as a raised
text asterisk instead of a centered math star. (Compare a-b*c and a   b  c.)
But otherwise the name text is printed in math mode, so that you can use, e.g.,
subscripts and superscripts there.
If the new operator should have subscripts and superscripts placed in ‘limits’
position above and below as with lim, sup, or max, use the * form of the
\DeclareMathOperator command:
\DeclareMathOperator*{\Lim}{Lim}
See also the discussion of subscript placement in Section 7.3.
The following operator names are predened:
Pdf extract pages - SDK application service:C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Easy to Use C# Code to Extract PDF Pages, Copy Pages from One PDF File and Paste into Others
www.rasteredge.com
Pdf extract pages - SDK application service:VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed VB.NET Guide for Extracting Pages from Microsoft PDF Doc
www.rasteredge.com
18
6. THE \TEXT COMMAND
\arccos arccos
\deg deg
\lg lg
\projlim proj lim
\arcsin arcsin
\det det
\lim lim
\sec sec
\arctan arctan
\dim dim
\liminf lim inf
\sin sin
\arg arg
\exp exp
\limsup lim sup
\sinh sinh
\cos cos
\gcd gcd
\ln ln
\sup sup
\cosh cosh
\hom hom
\log log
\tan tan
\cot cot
\inf inf
\max max
\tanh tanh
\coth coth
\injlim injlim
\min min
\csc csc
\ker ker
\Pr Pr
\varlimsup
lim
\varinjlim lim
!
\varliminf lim
\varprojlim lim
There is also a command \operatorname such that using
\operatorname{abc}
in a math formula is equivalent to a useof \abc dened by \DeclareMathOperator.
This may be occasionally useful for constructing more complex notation or other
purposes. (Use the variant \operatorname* to get limits.)
5.2 \mod and its relatives
Commands \mod, \bmod, \pmod, \pod are provided to deal with the special
spacing conventions of \mod" notation. \bmod and \pmod are available in LAT
E
X,
but with the amsmath package the spacing of \pmod will adjust to a smaller value
if it’s used in a non-display-mode formula. \mod and \pod are variants of \pmod
preferred by some authors; \mod omits the parentheses, whereas \pod omits the
\mod" and retains the parentheses.
(5.1)
gcd(n; m mod n); x  y (mod b); x  y mod c; x  y (d)
\gcd(n,m\bmod n);\quad x\equiv y\pmod b;
\quad x\equiv y\mod c;\quad x\equiv y\pod d
|6|
The \text command
The main use of the command \text is for words or phrases in a display. It
is very similar to the L
A
T
E
X command \mbox in its eects, but has a couple
of advantages. If you want a word or phrase of text in a subscript, you can
type ..._{\text{word or phrase}}, which is slightly easier than the \mbox
equivalent: ..._{\mbox{\scriptsize word or phrase}}. The other advantage
is the more descriptive name.
(6.1)
f
[x
i 1
;x
i
]
is monotonic, i = 1; :: : ; c + 1
SDK application service:C# PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in
inputFilePath); PDFTextMgr textMgr = PDFTextHandler.ExportPDFTextManager(doc); // Extract text content C# example code for text extraction from all PDF pages.
www.rasteredge.com
SDK application service:VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF
PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Extract PDF Text. VB.NET PDF - Extract Text from PDF Using VB. How to Extract Text from PDF with VB.NET Sample Codes in .NET Application.
www.rasteredge.com
7.2. THE \SIDESET COMMAND
19
f_{[x_{i-1},x_i]} \text{ is monotonic,}
\quad i = 1,\dots,c+1
|7|
Integrals and sums
7.1 Multiline subscripts and superscripts
The \substack command can be used to produce a multiline subscript or su-
perscript: for example
\sum_{\substack{
0\le i\le m\\
0<j<n}}
P(i,j)
X
0im
0<j<n
P(i; j)
Aslightly more generalized form is the subarray environment which allows you
to specify that each line should be left-aligned instead of centered, as here:
\sum_{\begin{subarray}{l}
i\in\Lambda\\ 0<j<n
\end{subarray}}
P(i,j)
X
i2
0<j<n
P(i; j)
7.2 The \sideset command
There’s also a command called \sideset, for a rather special purpose: putting
symbols at the subscript and superscript corners of a large operator symbol such
as
P
or
Q
.Note: this command is not designed to be applied to anything other
than sum-class symbols. The prime example is the case when you want to put
aprime on a sum symbol. If there are no limits above or below the sum, you
could just use \nolimits: here’s \sum\nolimits’ E_n in display mode:
(7.1)
X
0
E
n
If, however, you want not only the prime but also something below or above the
sum symbol, it’s not so easy|indeed, without \sideset, it would be downright
dicult. With \sideset, you can write
\sideset{}{’}
\sum_{n<k,\;\text{$n$ odd}} nE_n
X
0
n<k; n odd
nE
n
The extra pair of empty braces is explained by the fact that \sideset has
the capability of putting an extra symbol or symbols at each corner of a large
operator; to put an asterisk at each corner of a product symbol, you would type
\sideset{_*^*}{_*^*}\prod
Y
SDK application service:C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
Image: Extract Image from PDF. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› C# PDF: Extract PDF Image. How to C#: Extract Image from PDF Document.
www.rasteredge.com
SDK application service:VB.NET PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images
Image: Extract Image from PDF. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Extract PDF Image. VB.NET PDF - Extract Image from PDF Document in VB.NET.
www.rasteredge.com
20
8. COMMUTATIVE DIAGRAMS
7.3 Placement of subscripts and limits
The default positioning for subscripts depends on the base symbol involved. The
default for sum-class symbols is ‘displaylimits’ positioning: When a sum-class
symbol appears in a displayed formula, subscript and superscript are placed in
‘limits’ position above and below, but in an inline formula, they are placed to
the side, to avoid unsightly and wasteful spreading of the surrounding text lines.
The default for integral-class symbols is to have sub- and superscripts always to
the side, even in displayed formulas. (See the discussion of the intlimits and
related options in Section 2.)
Operator names such as sin or lim may have either ‘displaylimits’ or ‘limits’
positioning depending on how they were dened. The standard operator names
are dened according to normal mathematical usage.
The commands \limits and \nolimits can be used to override the normal
behavior of a base symbol:
X
X
;
ZZ
A
;
lim
n!1
To dene a command whose subscripts follow the same ‘displaylimits’ behavior
as \sum, put \displaylimits at the tail end of the denition. When multiple
instances of \limits, \nolimits, or \displaylimits occur consecutively, the
last one takes precedence.
7.4 Multiple integral signs
\iint, \iiint, and \iiiint give multiple integral signs with the spacing be-
tween them nicely adjusted, in both text and display style. \idotsint is an
extension of the same idea that gives two integral signs with dots between them.
ZZ
A
f(x; y) dxdy
ZZZ
A
f(x; y; z)dx dy dz
(7.2)
ZZZZ
A
f(w; x; y; z) dw dx dy dz
Z

Z
A
f(x
1
;: : : ; x
k
)
(7.3)
|8|
Commutative diagrams
Some commutative diagram commands like the ones in A
M
S-T
E
Xare available
as a separate package, amscd. For complex commutative diagrams authors will
need to turn to more comprehensive packages like kuvio or XY-pic, but for
simple diagrams without diagonal arrows the amscd commands may be more
SDK application service:C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
Page: Insert PDF Pages. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› C# PDF: Insert PDF Page. Add and Insert Multiple PDF Pages to PDF Document Using C#.
www.rasteredge.com
SDK application service:VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.
Page: Delete Existing PDF Pages. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Delete PDF Page. How to VB.NET: Delete Consecutive Pages from PDF.
www.rasteredge.com
9.2. RECOMMENDED USE OF MATH FONT COMMANDS
21
convenient. Here is one example.
S
W
T
j
   !
T
?
?
y
?
?
y
EndP
(S   T )=I
(Z   T )=J
\begin{CD}
S^{{\mathcal{W}}_\Lambda}\otimes T
@>j>>
T\\
@VVV
@VV{\End P}V\\
(S\otimes T)/I
@=
(Z\otimes T)/J
\end{CD}
In the CD environment the commands @>>>, @<<<, @VVV, and @AAA give respec-
tively right, left, down, and up arrows. For the horizontal arrows, material
between the rst and second > or < symbols will be typeset as a superscript,
and material between the second and third will be typeset as a subscript. Sim-
ilarly, material between the rst and second or second and third As or Vs of
vertical arrows will be typeset as left or right \sidescripts". The commands @=
and @| give horizontal and vertical double lines. A \null arrow" command @.
can be used instead of a visible arrow to ll out an array where needed.
|9|
Using math fonts
9.1 Introduction
For more comprehensive information on font use in LAT
E
X, see the LAT
E
Xfont
guide (fntguide.tex) or The LAT
E
XCompanion [4]. The basic set of math font
commands in LAT
E
Xincludes \mathbf, \mathrm, \mathcal, \mathsf, \mathtt,
\mathit. Additional math alphabet commands such as \mathbb for black-
board bold, \mathfrak for Fraktur, and \mathscr for Euler script are available
through the packages amsfonts and euscript (distributed separately).
9.2 Recommended use of math font commands
If you nd yourself employing math font commands frequently in your document,
you might wish that they had shorter names, such as \mb instead of \mathbf.
Of course, there is nothing to keep you from providing such abbreviations for
yourself by suitable \newcommand statements. But for LAT
E
Xto provide shorter
names would actually be a disservice to authors, as that would obscure a much
better alternative: dening custom command names derived from the names of
the underlying mathematical objects, rather than from the names of the fonts
used to distinguish the objects. For example, if you are using bold to indicate
vectors, then you will be better served in the long run if you dene a ‘vector’
command instead of a ‘math-bold’ command:
SDK application service:C# PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
Page: Delete Existing PDF Pages. Provide C# Users with Mature .NET PDF Document Manipulating Library for Deleting PDF Pages in C#.
www.rasteredge.com
SDK application service:VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Page: Insert PDF Pages. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Insert PDF Page. Add and Insert Multiple PDF Pages to PDF Document Using VB.
www.rasteredge.com
22
9. USING MATH FONTS
\newcommand{\vect}[1]{\mathbf{#1}}
you can write \vect{a} + \vect{b} to produce a + b. If you decide several
months down the road that you want to use the bold font for some other purpose,
and mark vectors by a small over-arrow instead, then you can put the change
into eect merely by changing the denition of \vect; otherwise you would have
to replace all occurrences of \mathbf throughout your document, perhaps even
needing to inspect each one to see whether it is indeed an instance of a vector.
It can also be useful to assign distinct command names for dierent letters
of a particular font:
\DeclareSymbolFont{AMSb}{U}{msb}{m}{n}% or use amsfonts package
\DeclareMathSymbol{\C}{\mathalpha}{AMSb}{"43}
\DeclareMathSymbol{\R}{\mathalpha}{AMSb}{"52}
These statements would dene the commands \C and \R to produce blackboard-
bold letters from the ‘AMSb’ math symbols font. If you refer often to the
complex numbers or real numbers in your document, you might nd this method
more convenient than (let’s say) dening a \field command and writing
\field{C}, \field{R}. But for maximum  exibility and control, dene such a
\field command and then dene \C and \R in terms of that command:
\usepackage{amsfonts}% to get the \mathbb alphabet
\newcommand{\field}[1]{\mathbb{#1}}
\newcommand{\C}{\field{C}}
\newcommand{\R}{\field{R}}
9.3 Bold math symbols
The \mathbf command is commonly used to obtain bold Latin letters in math,
but for most other kinds of math symbols it has no eect, or its eects depend
unreliably on the set of math fonts that are in use. For example, writing
\Delta \mathbf{\Delta}\mathbf{+}\delta \mathbf{\delta}
produces +; the \mathbf has no eect on the plus sign or the small delta.
The amsmath package therefore provides two additional commands, \boldsymbol
and \pmb, that can be applied to other kinds of math symbols. \boldsymbol can
be used for a math symbol that remains unaected by \mathbf if (and only if)
your current math font set includes a bold version of that symbol. \pmb can be
used as a last resort for any math symbols that do not have a true bold version
provided by your set of math fonts; \pmb" stands for \poor man’s bold" and
the command works by typesetting multiple copies of the symbol with slight
osets. The quality of the output is inferior, especially for symbols that contain
any hairline strokes. When the standard default set of LAT
E
Xmath fonts are in
use (Computer Modern), the only symbols that are likely to require \pmb are
large operator symbols like \sum, extended delimiter symbols, or the extra math
symbols provided by the amssymb package [1].
The following formula shows some of the results that are possible:
A_\infty + \pi A_0
\sim \mathbf{A}_{\boldsymbol{\infty}} \boldsymbol{+}
10.2. ERROR MESSAGES
23
\boldsymbol{\pi} \mathbf{A}_{\boldsymbol{0}}
\sim\pmb{A}_{\pmb{\infty}} \pmb{+}\pmb{\pi} \pmb{A}_{\pmb{0}}
A
1
+A
0
A
1
+A
0
AAA
111
+++ AAA
000
If you want to use only the \boldsymbol command without loading the whole
amsmath package, the bm package is recommended (this is a standard L
A
T
E
X
package, not an AMS package; you probably have it already if you have a 1997
or newer version of L
A
T
E
X).
9.4 Italic Greek letters
For italic versions of the capital Greek letters, the following commands are
provided:
\varGamma  
\varSigma 
\varDelta 
\varUpsilon 
\varTheta 
\varPhi 
\varLambda 
\varPsi  
\varXi 
\varOmega 
\varPi 
|10|
Error messages and output problems
10.1 General remarks
This is a supplement to Chapter 8 of the LAT
E
Xmanual [7] (rst edition: Chap-
ter 6). For the reader’s convenience, the set of error messages discussed here
overlaps somewhat with the set in that chapter, but please be aware that we
don’t provide exhaustive coverage here. The error messages are arranged in
alphabetical order, disregarding unimportant text such as ! LaTeX Error: at
the beginning, and nonalphabetical characters such as \. Where examples are
given, we show also the help messages that appear on screen when you respond
to an error message prompt by entering h.
There is also a section discussing some output errors, i.e., instances where
the printed document has something wrong but there was no LAT
E
Xerror during
typesetting.
10.2 Error messages
\begin{split} won’t work here.
Example:
! Package amsmath Error: \begin{split} won’t work here.
...
l.8 \begin{split}
24
10. ERROR MESSAGES AND OUTPUT PROBLEMS
? h
\Did you forget a preceding \begin{equation}?
If not, perhaps the ‘aligned’ environment is what you want.
?
Explanation: The split environment does not construct a stand-alone displayed
equation; it needs to be used within some other environment such as equation
or gather.
Extra & on this line
Example:
! Package amsmath Error: Extra & on this line.
See the amsmath package documentation for explanation.
Type H <return> for immediate help.
...
l.9 \end{alignat}
? h
\An extra & here is so disastrous that you should probably exit
and fix things up.
?
Explanation: In an alignat structure the number of alignment points per line
is dictated by the numeric argument given after \begin{alignat}. If you use
more alignment points in a line it is assumed that you accidentally left out a
newline command \\ and the above error is issued.
Improper argument for math accent
Example:
! Package amsmath Error: Improper argument for math accent:
(amsmath)
Extra braces must be added to
(amsmath)
prevent wrong output.
See the amsmath package documentation for explanation.
Type H <return> for immediate help.
...
l.415 \tilde k_{\lambda_j} = P_{\tilde \mathcal
{M}}
?
Explanation: Non-simple arguments for any L
A
T
E
Xcommand should be enclosed
in braces. In this example extra braces are needed as follows:
... P_{\tilde{\mathcal{M}}}
Font OMX/cmex/m/n/7=cmex7 not loadable ...
Example:
10.2. ERROR MESSAGES
25
! Font OMX/cmex/m/n/7=cmex7 not loadable: Metric (TFM) file not found.
<to be read again>
relax
l.8 $a
b+b^2$
? h
I wasn’t able to read the size data for this font,
so I will ignore the font specification.
[Wizards can fix TFM files using TFtoPL/PLtoTF.]
You might try inserting a different font spec;
e.g., type ‘I\font<same font id>=<substitute font name>’.
?
Explanation: Certain extra sizes of some Computer Modern fonts that were
formerly available mainly through the AMSFonts distribution are considered
part of standard LAT
E
X(as of June 1994): cmex7{9, cmmib5{9, and cmbsy5{
9. If these extra sizes are missing on your system, you should try rst to get
them from the source where you obtained L
A
T
E
X. If that fails, you could try
getting the fonts from CTAN (e.g., in the form of Metafont source les, direc-
tory /tex-archive/fonts/latex/mf, or in PostScript Type 1 format, directory
/tex-archive/fonts/cm/ps-type1/bakoma).
If the font name begins with cmex, there is a special option cmex10 for
the amsmath package that provides a temporary workaround. I.e., change the
\usepackage to
\usepackage[cmex10]{amsmath}
This will force the use of the 10-point size of the cmex font in all cases. Depend-
ing on the contents of your document this may be adequate.
Math formula deleted: Insufficient extension fonts
Example:
! Math formula deleted: Insufficient extension fonts.
l.8 $ab+b^2$
?
Explanation: This usually follows a previous error Font ... not loadable; see
the discussion of that error (above) for solutions.
Missing number, treated as zero
Example:
! Missing number, treated as zero.
<to be read again>
a
l.100 \end{alignat}
? h
A number should have been here; I inserted ‘0’.
26
10. ERROR MESSAGES AND OUTPUT PROBLEMS
(If you can’t figure out why I needed to see a number,
look up ‘weird error’ in the index to The TeXbook.)
?
Explanation: There are many possibilities that can lead to this error. However,
one possibility that is relevant for the amsmath package is that you forgot to
give the number argument of an alignat environment, as in:
\begin{alignat}
a& =b&
c& =d\\
a’& =b’&
c’& =d’
\end{alignat}
where the rst line should read instead
\begin{alignat}{2}
Another possibility is that you have a left bracket character [ following a
linebreak command \\ in a multiline construction such as array, tabular, or
eqnarray. This will be interpreted by LAT
E
Xas the beginning of an ‘additional
vertical space’ request [7, xC.1.6], even if it occurs on the following line and is
intended to be part of the contents. For example
\begin{array}
a+b\\
[f,g]\\
m+n
\end{array}
To prevent the error message in such a case, you can add braces as discussed in
the L
A
T
E
Xmanual [7, xC.1.1]:
\begin{array}
a+b\\
{[f,g]}\\
m+n
\end{array}
Missing \right. inserted
Example:
! Missing \right. inserted.
<inserted text>
\right .
l.10 \end{multline}
? h
I’ve inserted something that you may have forgotten.
(See the <inserted text> above.)
With luck, this will get me unwedged. But if you
really didn’t forget anything, try typing ‘2’ now; then
my insertion and my current dilemma will both disappear.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested