c# wpf adobe pdf reader : Delete pages of pdf reader Library software class asp.net windows azure ajax amt-2016-130-part161

Applications and limitations of constrained high-resolution peak fitting on 
low resolving power mass spectra from the ToF-ACSM 
Hilkka Timonen
1,*
, Mike Cubison
2
, Minna Aurela
1
, David Brus
1
, Heikki Lihavainen
1
, Risto Hillamo
1
Manjula Canagaratna
3
, Bettina Nekat
4
, Rolf Weller
3
, Douglas Worsnop
3
, Sanna Saarikoski
1
Atmospheric composition research, Finnish Meteorological Institute, Helsinki, Finland  
2
TOFWERK AG, Thun, Switzerland 
3
Aerodyne Research Inc., Billerica, MA, USA 
Alfred-Wegner-Institut Helmholtz-Zentrum für Polar- und Meeresforschung, Bremerhaven, Germany 
*Correspondence to: H. Timonen (hilkka.timonen@fmi.fi) 
10 
Abstract. The applicability, methods and limitations of constrained peak-fitting on mass spectra of low mass resolving power 
(m/dm
50
~ 500) recorded with a time-of-flight aerosol chemical speciation monitor (ToF-ACSM) are explored. Calibration 
measurements as well as ambient data are used to exemplify the methods that should be applied to maximise data quality and 
assess confidence in peak-fitting results. Sensitivity analyses and basic peak fit metrics such as normalised ion separation are 
employed to demonstrate which peak-fitting analyses commonly performed in high-resolution aerosol mass spectrometry are 
15 
appropriate to perform on spectra of this resolving power. Information on aerosol sulphate, nitrate, sodium chloride, 
methanesulphonic acid as well as semi-volatile metal species retrieved from these methods is evaluated. The constants in a 
commonly used formula for the estimation of the mass concentration of hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol may be refined based 
on peak-fitting results. Finally, application of a recently-published parameterisation for the estimation of carbon oxidation 
state to ToF-ACSM spectra is validated for a range of organic standards and its use demonstrated for ambient urban data.  
20 
Atmos.Meas.Tech.Discuss.,doi:10.5194/amt-2016-13,2016
ManuscriptunderreviewforjournalAtmos.Meas.Tech.
Published:2March2016
c
Author(s)2016.CC-BY3.0License.
Delete pages of pdf reader - Library software class:C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Easy to Use C# Code to Extract PDF Pages, Copy Pages from One PDF File and Paste into Others
www.rasteredge.com
Delete pages of pdf reader - Library software class:VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed VB.NET Guide for Extracting Pages from Microsoft PDF Doc
www.rasteredge.com
1. Introduction 
Atmospheric aerosol influence health, climate and visibility (Pope and Dockery, 2006; IPCC 2013). All these influences are 
tightly linked with particulate matter (PM) concentration and PM chemical composition (IPCC 2013). Traditionally, aerosol 
composition was studied by collecting particulate matter on a filter substrate for an extended period ranging from hours to 
days and subsequent composition analysis in laboratory. Development of online analysis instruments, particularly based upon 
aerosol mass spectrometry, have enabled the measurement of chemical composition of PM in real time. The Aerodyne aerosol 
mass spectrometer (AMS; Jayne et al., 2000; DeCarlo et al., 2006) is designed to provide detailed information on size-resolved 
aerosol chemical composition for short to medium term campaigns (weeks to months); however it is not suitable for long-term 
monitoring without the presence of an operator. The Aerodyne aerosol chemical speciation monitor (Q-ACSM; Ng et al., 
2011b) is based on AMS technology but adapted for long-term monitoring, however the quadrupole detector limits the mass 
10 
resolving power to unity and provides reduced sensitivity compared with the AMS. A recently-developed version of this 
instrument employing time-of-flight (TOF) detection provides greater sensitivity and mass resolving power of around 500 
(ToF-ACSM; Fröhlich et al.,2013). Whilst the increase in sensitivity relative to the Q-ACSM is an obvious advantage for 
measurements in clean locations such as Antarctica or for increasing temporal resolution, the limits of potential extra 
information afforded by the increased mass resolving power, and in particular the associated uncertainties on peak-fitting 
15 
parameters, are as yet unexplored in the literature. 
In analysis of high-resolution AMS data, peak-fitting is typically employed to retrieve signal intensities of ions whose peaks 
overlap in the mass spectrum, expanding greatly the content and quality of information that may be extracted from the data in 
comparison to simple peak integration (e.g. DeCarlo et al, 2006; Aiken et al, 2008). Fröhlich et al. (2013) demonstrated that 
peak-fitting could be applied to ToF-ACSM data and presented a simple example for a single isobaric peak, but the extent and 
20 
limitations of the applicability of the technique were not explored. Recently, the uncertainty on fitted peak intensity associated 
with the constrained peak-fitting procedure employed by the AMS community has been explored and parameterisations for 
calculation of the precision reported (Corbin et al, 2015; Cubison and Jimenez, 2015). These are used, together with the 
appropriate sensitivity analyses, to assess the confidence in the peak-fitting results and draw conclusions on the appropriateness 
of applying peak-fitting for retrieval of overlapping ion peak intensities for a range of example scenarios.  
25 
2. Experimental 
2.1. Time-of-flight aerosol chemical speciation monitor 
The ToF-ACSM (Fröhlich et al., 2013; Aerodyne Research Inc., Billerica, USA) is designed for long-term monitoring of 
submicron aerosol composition with temporal resolution of typically 10 minutes (and up to 1 Hz) and mass resolving power 
m/Δm
50
of typically 500 (and up to 600). Based on the sampling technology of the ToF-AMS (time-of-flight aerosol mass 
30 
Atmos.Meas.Tech.Discuss.,doi:10.5194/amt-2016-13,2016
Library software class:VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.
doc.Save(outPutFilePath). How to VB.NET: Delete Consecutive Pages from PDF. doc.Save(outPutFilePath). How to VB.NET: Delete Specified Pages from PDF.
www.rasteredge.com
Library software class:C# PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
doc.Save(outPutFilePath); Demo Code: How to Delete Consecutive Pages from PDF in C#.NET. Demo Code: How to Delete Specified Pages from PDF in C#.NET.
www.rasteredge.com
of-flight mass analyser (ETOF, TOFWERK AG, Thun, Switzerland) and extracted orthogonally using pulsed extraction for 
eventual detection with a discrete dynode detector. Mass spectra are recorded with and without the use of a filter in the inlet 
line; the resulting difference in recorded signal is prescribed to the aerosol. These signals are converted to nitrate equivalent 
mass concentrations using the same ionisation efficiency calibration procedure utilised for the AMS and described by Jimenez 
et  al.  (2003).  Post-
processing  was  performed  using  the  data  analysis  package  “Tofware”  (version  2.5.3, 
10 
www.tofwerk.com/tofware) running in the Igor Pro (Wavemetrics, OR, USA) environment. 
2.2. Measurement locations and datasets 
Three ToF-ACSM datasets were used to study applicability and limitations of constrained peak-fitting on mass spectra 
recorded with the ToF-ACSM, measured in clean background conditions (Neumayer, Antarctica), in the urban background 
(SMEARIII) and in an industrial environment (underground mine). 
15 
2.2.1 Helsinki, Finland 
ToF-ACSM measurements were conducted at the SMEARIII measurement station in Helsinki, Finland, from March 2 to March 
8, 2014. The SMEAR III station (60° 12', 24° 57', 30 m.a.s.l., Järvi et al., 2009) is an urban background measurement station 
for the long-term measurement and investigation of chemical and physical properties of atmospheric aerosols and trace gases, 
meteorological parameters and turbulent fluxes. The station is situated on the Kumpula campus, 5 km northeast from the center 
20 
of Helsinki. Approx. 200 m east of the station is a major road with heavy traffic (60 000 cars/day). During the measurement 
period presented here the PM concentrations (calculated using an assumed collection efficiency of 0.5) exhibited a mean 
average of 16.2 µg m
-3
. However, larger concentrations up to 45 µg m
-3
were observed (Fig. S1).  
2.2.2 Antarctica 
ToF-ACSM  measurements  were  conducted  at  the  Neumayer  III  station  in  Antarctica  (70.6744°  S,  8.2742°  W 
25 
http://www.awi.de/en/go/air_chemistry_observatory; Weller et al., 2011) during the Antarctic summer from December 2014 
to February 2015. Located far from primary emission sources, the Neumayer III station is an ideal location for conducting 
background measurements free from anthropogenic influences (Weller et al., 2015). The two most frequently-observed classes 
of aerosol observed in Antarctica contain sulphur and sea-salt. Sulphur-containing particles, whose secondary production in 
the atmosphere is controlled by pathways including photochemical reactions involving dimethyl sulphide (DMS) emitted by 
30 
Atmos.Meas.Tech.Discuss.,doi:10.5194/amt-2016-13,2016
Library software class:C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
VB.NET Page: Insert PDF pages; VB.NET Page: Delete PDF pages; VB.NET Annotate: PDF Markup & Drawing. XDoc.Word for XImage.OCR for C#; XImage.Barcode Reader for C#
www.rasteredge.com
Library software class:C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
how to merge PDF document files by C# code, how to rotate PDF document page, how to delete PDF page using C# .NET, how to reorganize PDF document pages and how
www.rasteredge.com
presented in this work. Each exhibited different characteristics and posed different problems for extracting information from 
the data using peak-fitting. Episode 1 (December 2-3, 2014) represents emissions from sea areas and had elevated chloride 
concentrations. During episode 2 (January 7-13, 2015) elevated sulphate and MSA concentrations were observed. 
2.2.3 Underground mine 
ToF-ACSM measurements were conducted at the Kemi Mine (Outokumpu Chrome Oy) 500 m below the surface during the 
10 
spring of 2014 as a part of a project aiming to help development of a sustainable and safe mining environment. The main 
sources of particles in the underground mine were the ore extraction and processing for coarse particles and diesel exhausts 
from mining machinery and transport vehicles for submicron particles. A subset of data is used here in order to test peak-fitting 
on information-rich mass spectra taken in an environment with high PM concentrations. 
3. Methods 
15 
3.1. Peak-fitting methodology 
The post-processing 
software “Tofware”
utilised for ToF-ACSM analysis uses a peak deconvolution routine where the peak 
positions are defined a priori and held fixed in the fitting procedure, based on the methodology utilised by the PIKA software 
of the ToF-AMS community (DeCarlo et al, 2006; Sueper, 2008). Electron impact (EI) ionisation, as is used in the ToF-ACSM, 
tends to ionise and fragment the molecules in a very consistent manner. Thus, one degree of freedom is removed from the ion 
20 
fitting procedure, which can be based upon a comprehensive list of ions and their exact m/Q that define the fitted centroid 
values. Furthermore, the peak model (width and shape) is held fixed for a given isobaric mass and the mass calibration is also 
defined a priori and held constant. The only parameter to vary is thus peak intensity, for which the optimal values for all peaks 
at a given isobar are ascertained by non-negative least-squares optimisation using the active set method of Lawson and Hanson 
(1995). We present here a detailed description of each step in the setup of the peak-fitting routine, with exception of the mass 
25 
calibration, which is discussed at length in the following section. 
Atmos.Meas.Tech.Discuss.,doi:10.5194/amt-2016-13,2016
Library software class:VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Page: Insert PDF Pages. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Insert PDF Page. Add and Insert Multiple PDF Pages to PDF Document Using VB.
www.rasteredge.com
Library software class:VB.NET PDF delete text library: delete, remove text from PDF file
Visual Studio .NET application. Delete text from PDF file in preview without adobe PDF reader component installed. Able to pull text
www.rasteredge.com
from the mass spectrum before carrying out the peak fit procedure, such that the assumed fixed peak model (width, shape) 
may be applied. As it is desired to let the analysis software execute peak-fitting as a batch process upon large numbers of mass 
spectra, a parameterisation is required which can reliably generate the MS baseline based on only a few tuneable parameters. 
Tofware achieves this through a simple two step process: 
i) A low-pass filter is applied to the MS to remove noise, 
10 
ii) A running box average of the de-noised MS is generated based not on the mean but on the lowest data point in the box. 
Provided the box width is set large enough such that it extends over the entire width of a typical MS peak, step ii) effectively 
interpolates over the peaks as it takes the lowest data point at each step. Step i) has the effect of ensuring the calculated baseline 
tends to run through the centre and not along the bottom edge of the noise. 
3.1.2. Determination of instrumental transfer function (peak model) 
15 
3.1.2.1. Peak width 
The width of an isolated ion peak is expected to observe a linear relationship with m/Q. A scatter plot of peak width vs. m/Q 
for isolated ions will thus highlight MS peaks that represent multiple, overlapping, ions as they will lie above the linear 
regression line (Meija and Caruso, 2004) as shown in Fig. 2. Junninen et al. (2010) and Stark et al. (2015) both used this effect 
20 
to develop peak width parameterisations for use in atmospheric science analysis software; an adapted version of the method 
of Stark et al. is utilised here. Müller et al. (2013) report on a robust method for peak width calculation in proton mass-transfer 
mass spectrometry which utilises the same list of known isolated ions as the mass calibration. A similar method could certainly 
be employed for the lower part of the ToF-ACSM mass spectrum but would require extrapolation to high m/Q. To constrain 
the upper end of the linear regression, the following steps are taken: 
25 
i) The N most intense peaks in the spectrum are found, where N is the largest m/Q measured divided by 3, 
ii) A single Gaussian fitted to each MS peak 
iii) A straight-line fit is applied to the scatter plot of FWHM vs m/Q, 
iv) Step iii) is iterated, removing the point that lies the furthest above the fit line, until 10 peaks remain. 
The user may choose additional peaks to use at step iv), and has the option to manually remove any points from the linear fit 
30 
of step iii). Peak width is not expected to vary greatly over time other than with changes in instrument tuning. Thus the default 
peak width is calculated automatically for each 24-hr data file, but the user can define a revised version, typically once for 
each set of instrument tuning parameters during an experimental campaign, and save this in the data files for future use.  
Atmos.Meas.Tech.Discuss.,doi:10.5194/amt-2016-13,2016
Library software class:C# PDF Page Rotate Library: rotate PDF page permanently in C#.net
batch changing PDF page orientation without other PDF reader control. NET, add new PDF page, delete certain PDF page, reorder existing PDF pages and split
www.rasteredge.com
Library software class:C# PDF delete text Library: delete, remove text from PDF file in
Delete text from PDF file in preview without adobe PDF reader component installed in ASP.NET. C#.NET PDF: Delete Text from Consecutive PDF Pages.
www.rasteredge.com
high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) methodology proposed by DeCarlo et al. (2006) and 
adapted for use in multiple atmospheric science analysis packages (Sueper, 2008; Junninen et al., 2010; Müller et al., 2013, 
Stark et al., 2015). The ToF-ACSM peak shape is determined using the following routine: 
i) The 20 largest peaks in the spectrum are found, and a single Gaussian fitted to each, 
ii) The measured shape of the peak is normalised to the fitted Gaussian width, 
10 
iii) The second derivative of each normalised peak is analysed and peaks with shoulders are discarded, 
iv) All the remaining normalised shapes are averaged to generate the custom peak shape. 
The user may additional choose to fit more/fewer peaks at step i), and has the option to apply additional constraints such as 
monotonicity and thresholds on the min/max ion counts. The custom peak shape is typically defined once for each set of 
instrument tuning parameters during an experimental campaign and is saved in the data files for future use. 
15 
3.1.3. Peak list 
For HR-ToF-AMS data, the list of ion peaks to be utilised during peak-fitting has been assembled and extended over a decade 
of instrument development and is quite comprehensive in nature (Sueper, 2008). Most of these ions are however unresolvable 
with the mass resolving power of the ETOF-equipped ToF-ACSM which precludes use of the HR-ToF-AMS ion list. The 
particular ions to fit must therefore be carefully considered based on targeted analyses, rather than taking the blanket approach 
20 
of fitting everything as has been generally conducted for HR-ToF-AMS data. In the results section we present multiple case 
studies highlighting the state-of-the-art knowledge of which ions / ion groups are appropriate for inclusion in peak-fitting 
analyses of ToF-ACSM data. 
3.2. Mass calibration 
ToF-ACSM measurement profiles are typically converted from time-of-flight to mass-to-charge space and vice versa using 
25 
the numerical relationship TOF = a + b*sqrt(m/Q), where a and b are constants. In the constrained peak-fitting procedure 
employed during ToF-ACSM and AMS analysis, the accuracy and precision of the mass calibration are of critical importance, 
for the fitting is performed in time-of-flight space and the position of the fitted peaks held constant using fixed mass-to-charge 
values. In consequence, a imperfect mass calibration introduces imprecision in the fitted peak intensities, particularly for 
weaker signals in the presence of larger neighbours (Cubison and Jimenez, 2015), although imprecision in the fitted intensity 
30 
is a significant source of error even for isolated peaks (Corbin et al., 2015). In practice, the precision of the mass calibration is 
Atmos.Meas.Tech.Discuss.,doi:10.5194/amt-2016-13,2016
imprecision; consideration of their sources is however outside the scope of this paper. Finally, it is emphasised that this 
discussion pertains to fitted peaks and these effects would not introduce appreciable error in integrated isobaric peak intensities 
(processing of the full-
resolution mass spectra to centroid, or “stick” spectra based on unit
-mass resolution integration 
boundaries). 
3.2.1. Effect of counting statistics 
10 
A significant source of calibration imprecision during monitoring operation can be counting error. In the lower mass range of 
the ToF-ACSM spectrum, several large signals arising from air and water ions (typically, H
2
O
+
, N
2
+
, O
2
+
, and CO
2
+
) may be 
used for mass calibration. Constraining the upper end is, however, significantly more challenging and is typically achieved by 
including the tungsten ions in the calibrant peak list. As the ToF-ACSM is usually operated at half the emission current of the 
AMS (to maximise filament lifetime), these are weak signals and subject to a significant level of noise from counting error. 
15 
Unfortunately, the inclusion of even one weak ion in the mass calibration peak list greatly increases calibration imprecision 
(Cubison and Jimenez, 2015). A similar simulation of the mass calibration routine used in that study was employed here to 
assess the impact of the weak W
+
signal on the ToF-ACSM mass calibration imprecision. Comparison of the N
2
+
and W
+
ion 
signals for several ambient ToF-ACSM datasets indicates a ratio N
2
+
/W
+
~ 50,000. Assuming a typical N
2
+
signal of ~ 1e5 
ions/s, we expect total ion counts over an integration period of a half hour (typical averaging time for mass calibration) of ~ 
20 
2e8 for N
2
+
but only ~ 4e3 for W
+
. The noise in the tungsten signal leads to relative calibration precisions of ~ 2 ppm for m/dm 
= 450. This value is however around an order of magnitude smaller than the biases in fitted position typically observed for the 
calibrant peaks (the difference in fitted peak position to that predicted from the calibration equation). It is nonetheless important 
that the spectra used for calibration are integrated over a sufficiently long period to ensure that imprecision arising from 
counting statistics is minimised. 
25 
3.2.2. Effect of isobaric ions 
3.2.2.1. Identifying influence of isobaric ions 
Use of the tungsten ions for mass calibration in the ToF-ACSM is further complicated by potential interference from poorly 
separated isobaric ions. Fig. 3 compares ToF-ACSM data with higher-resolution data (m/dm
50
~ 10000) that clearly shows the 
30 
isobaric background organic ions (from electron impact ionisation of lab air) that contribute to the signal observed at the 
Atmos.Meas.Tech.Discuss.,doi:10.5194/amt-2016-13,2016
dirty, vacuum chambers. In the absence of significant background, as may be expected for ambient data in remote locations 
after a few days of pump-down, the tungsten ion signals are 1-2 orders of magnitude larger than the neighbouring peaks. This 
decreases for a recently-vented system to a factor of only 2-5 and with low filament emission currents can be expected to be 
even less. As the resolving power is not sufficient to unequivocally separate the tungsten ions from their neighbours, this leads 
to peak broadening and a centroid position that does not accurately reflect that of the tungsten ions (see e.g. Meija and Caruso, 
10 
2004). Peak fits with freely-varying positions and intensities were applied to each of the four isobaric MS peaks where the 
tungsten isotopes can be measured (182, 183, 184 and 186 Th). The offsets of the fitted positions to the true tungsten isotopes 
were respectively -0.9, 0.6, 0.0 and -0.9 ppm in the clean case and -28, +152, -60 and -95 ppm in the recently-vented case. For 
peaks with mass resolving powers of ~ 500, fitted positional imprecisions of order a few ppm are to be expected. The offsets 
observed in the clean case are thus expected and use of the tungsten isotopes for mass calibration of datasets from clean 
15 
locations can be considered justified. However, for datasets with significant background the offsets are larger than would be 
realistic were the peaks to truly represent isolated ions; their use as calibrant peaks could introduce bias and/or imprecision in 
the mass calibration of magnitude ~ 100 ppm. The ToF-ACSM analysis software contains an integrated tool for assessing the 
degree to which offsets in the fitted positions of calibrant ions affect the mass calibration. Users are strongly encouraged to 
use this tool in order to evaluate whether individual ions with isobaric interferences can be effectively used for mass 
20 
calibrations.  
An additional check on whether a peak represents an isolated ion or not is easily performed by considering the peak width as 
a function of m/Q, which should follow a straight-line relationship (Meija and Caruso, 2004). In the ToF-ACSM, the many 
interferences across the MS lead to observed isobaric peak widths which usually broaden going to higher m/Q; isolated ions 
at high m/Q stand out clearly as they lie under the trend, as is the case for tungsten in the clean-chamber MS in Fig. 4. In 
25 
contrast, for the recently-vented chamber MS it is quite clear that the peak widths at 182, 184, 184 and 186 Th are broader 
than that which would be expected of isolated ions. 
3.2.2.2. Compensating for influences of isobaric ions 
Meija and Caruso (2004) show that, when the peak width is larger than the mass difference of two neighbouring peaks, the 
expected centroidal peak in m/Q is approximately the weighted average of the isobar masses (their Eq. 8): 
30 
m
observed
~ x*m
calibrant
+ (1-x)*m
influence 
(Eq. 1) 
Atmos.Meas.Tech.Discuss.,doi:10.5194/amt-2016-13,2016
ii) the magnitude of the influencing peak is the same as the background peaks in the region of the MS where the calibrant ion 
is, 
iii) the exact mass of the influencing peak takes the same mass excess = m/Q - mod(m/Q) as the background peaks in the region 
of the MS where the calibrant ion is.  
Clearly any adjustment to calibrant ion exact masses introduces a bias into the peak-fitting procedure and, as will be discussed 
10 
later, an analysis of the sensitivity of the fitted peak intensities to the mass calibration should be performed, where perturbations 
in the mass calibration are considered. However, the “best
-
case” scenario is that where the mass calibration reflects the user’s 
best estimate of the true mass positions of the peaks and thus, if it is known that the calibrant ion peaks are shifted due to 
influencing, overlapping peaks, it may be argued that an attempt ought be made to correct for this, such that the sensitivity 
analysis starts from the best-estimated case. 
15 
We illustrate this methodology using the tungsten isotope ions as an example. A single peak (using the true mass spectral peak 
shape but allowing the width to vary) is fitted to each isobaric peak in the MS between 160 and 200 Th, encompassing the 
mass positions of the tungsten ions. The mean average peak intensity and mass excess of the surrounding peaks are calculated. 
Peaks of this intensity and mass excess are used in eqn 1 to calculate the corresponding position of the tungsten (calibrant) 
ions. Figure 5 exemplifies this approach. The surrounding isobaric peaks have an average mass excess of 0.095 Th and intensity 
20 
of 665 ions (~15 times smaller than the tungsten peak
s), leading to small positive shifts to the estimated “true” mass positions 
of the tungsten ions of ~ 0.006 Th (35 ppm). 
In this example, the compensation for the influencing peaks would be applied in the mass calibration by entering not the true 
tungsten isotope exact masses (red circles in Fig. 5) but rather these values less the 35 ppm offset calculated above (yellow 
circles). To assess the validity of this method, the mass spectrum used in the example was recorded using a calibration gas SF
6
25 
injected at the ioniser, giving rise to strong signals at the nominal masses 89, 108 and 127 Th from the ions SF
3
+
, SF
4
+ and 
SF
5
+
respectively. The mass calibration was performed based on the air peaks and the true or compensated tungsten peaks, and 
the mass offset of the SF
3
+
, SF
4
+ and SF
5
+
peaks calculated. As shown in Table 1, the mass accuracy was improved by ~ 20 
ppm using the compensation technique described here.  
For the example MS used in these calculations, the tungsten ion peaks were ~ 15 times stronger than the surrounding 
30 
background peaks. Assuming the same background peaks were present, but exhibited different intensities relative to the 
Atmos.Meas.Tech.Discuss.,doi:10.5194/amt-2016-13,2016
3.2.3. Alternative background peaks to tungsten ions 
For datasets where the use of the tungsten ions in the mass calibration is not acceptable, an alternative constraint on the upper 
part of the MS is desired. 
3.2.3.1. Trichloroethylene 
We propose that the fragmentation pattern from the industrial solvent Trichloroethylene is a potentially useful candidate for 
10 
ToF-ACSM  (and  AMS)  mass  calibration.  Isotope  patterns  matching  the  NIST  electron  impact  reference  MS  for 
Trichloroethylene are apparent in multiple ToF-ACSM and AMS datasets. In particular, MS peaks which appear to correspond 
to the ions C
2
35
Cl
3
H
+
and C
2
37
Cl
35
Cl
2
H
+
at the nominal masses 130 and 132 Th respectively are often visible in ToF-ACSM 
mass spectra recorded in clean locations with low background. The time-trend of the peak intensities for these ions follows 
that of the sensitivity of the instrument, indicating that the source of the interference lies within the vacuum chamber, most 
15 
likely in the ionisation region. The peaks do not show up in the difference spectra and it is unlikely that Trichloroethylene gas 
molecules from an external source could sufficiently penetrate the differential pumping system, which dilutes background gas 
molecule concentrations by a factor of 10
7
The identification of the isotope pattern at 130, 132, and 134 Th as Trichloroethylene is supported by data from the HR-ToF-
AMS. Figure 7 shows a HR-ToF-AMS MS recorded at the urban station in Helsinki (Mäkelänkatu) alongside a ToF-ACSM 
20 
MS from the Neumayer station. Applying free-position peak fits as in section 3.2.2 gave fitted peak positions deviating from 
those of the Trichloroethylene ions  of 0.2, -4.6 and 3.2 ppm respectively in the HR-ToF-AMS (limited by counting statistics) 
and 0.9, 4.9 and 109 ppm in the ToF-ACSM MS for 130, 132, and 134 Th. Whilst the Trichloroethylene ions are clearly well-
separated from their neighbours by the HR-ToF-AMS, this is not the case for the ToF-ACSM and thus for calibration purposes 
the Trichloroethylene ion signals must, as was already pointed out for use of the tungsten ions, be significantly larger than the 
25 
background in order to be considered as reliable mass calibration peaks. In the Neumayer dataset, the C
2
35
Cl
3
H
+
and 
C
2
37
Cl
35
Cl
2
H
+
signals were roughly 30 times background. The influence of the background ions is thus small and a relative 
centroid position shift of only 4 ppm is observed. A compensation of the exact masses during calibration as described above 
would thus have negligible effect. The same is not true for the weaker C
2
37
Cl
2
35
ClH
+
ion, whose centroid position is shifted 
relative to the stronger isotope peaks by over 100 ppm. 
30 
Atmos.Meas.Tech.Discuss.,doi:10.5194/amt-2016-13,2016
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested