11 
For the Neumayer data, Trichloroethylene proved to be a much more useful constraint on the upper region of the mass 
calibration than the tungsten ions, whose signal relative to background was relatively an order of magnitude weaker. 
Nonetheless, it is important to caveat that the peaks do not represent truly isolated ions, as is clearly visible comparing the HR-
ToF-AMS and ToF-ACSM spectra in Fig. 7. Calibration biases of order a few ppm can be expected as a result, and should be 
considered when assessing peak-fitting results, as will be discussed later. 
3.2.3.2. Extrapolation 
In the absence of a valid constraint on the upper region of the mass calibration, the question is posed as to whether it is better 
to utilise the poorly-defined calibrant peak regardless, or simply extrapolate the calibration from the lower, well-defined, region 
of the MS. To investigate this, lab data was recorded where SF
6
gas was injected directly into the ionisation region, leading to 
strong signals at unit masses 89, 108 and 127 Th from the ions SF
3
+
, SF
4
+ and SF
5
+
respectively. A mass calibration was 
10 
performed using the square-root relationship TOF = a + b*sqrt(m/Q) and the calibrant peaks OH
+
, N
2
+
, O
2
+
, Ar
+
and CO
2
+
The offsets from the true peak positions for SF
3
+
and SF
4
+
were then assessed for the extrapolated calibration and again when 
additionally using SF
5
+
as a calibrant peak. For the constrained calibration (with SF
5
+
), offsets of -31 and 25 ppm were found 
for SF
3
+
and SF
4
+
respectively. Without the SF
5
+
constraint, these changed to -71 and -19 ppm respectively, a difference of up 
to approximately -40 ppm. In section 3.2.2 it was shown how interferences around the tungsten ions could lead to centroid 
15 
peak position shifts of > 100 ppm, indicated that an extrapolated calibration could indeed be preferred over introduction of a 
bias of unknown direction and magnitude due to interferences at the calibrant peaks. 
It is noted that the offsets (biases) of a few tens of ppm represent the limiting average mass accuracy across the MS range that 
may be expected during routine ToF-ACSM operation. Careful calibration selection, fitting of a sub-range and/or use of more 
complicated TOF/mass relationships may increase accuracy to below 10 ppm, but during normal operation the user should 
20 
expect mass axis biases of around 10-20 and 50-100 ppm in the lower and upper regions of the MS respectively. Fitted peak 
intensities should be evaluated accordingly (see Corbin et al., 2015, for a detailed discussion on the influence of calibration 
bias on fitted peak intensity). 
3.2.3.3. Addition of calibrant compounds 
In the HR-ToF-AMS, the use of a plastic servo motor inside the vacuum chamber leads to a background peak at 149 Th from 
25 
the ionisation of the phthalate molecules leaching out from the plastic. This is a useful and commonly-used calibrant peak that 
is however missing from the ToF-ACSM MS, as the instrument does not utilise this particular component. In the Q-ACSM, a 
naphthalene source is intentionally installed in the ioniser region to generate known background peaks for both transmission 
correction and mass calibration. In the interest of securing a decent calibration, installation in the vacuum chamber of a 
naphthalene source or a simple plastic element known to release phthalates into the environment could be a useful future 
30 
modification to the instrument. 
Atmos.Meas.Tech.Discuss.,doi:10.5194/amt-2016-13,2016
ManuscriptunderreviewforjournalAtmos.Meas.Tech.
Published:2March2016
c
Author(s)2016.CC-BY3.0License.
Extract page from pdf preview - SDK application service:C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Easy to Use C# Code to Extract PDF Pages, Copy Pages from One PDF File and Paste into Others
www.rasteredge.com
Extract page from pdf preview - SDK application service:VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed VB.NET Guide for Extracting Pages from Microsoft PDF Doc
www.rasteredge.com
12 
3.2.4. Evaluating calibration biases 
In certain cases, a bias exists in the mass calibration fit residuals which takes an apparent polynomial shape in mass-to-charge 
space, as exemplified in Fig. 8. It is known that unusually long extraction pulse lengths can exacerbate the magnitude of these 
biases. The mass accuracies of the fit residuals are biases and, for a given instrumental tuning and timing setup, tend to be 
invariant over time. These biases have been shown to propagate into fitting errors (Corbin et al., 2015) and it is desired to 
compensate for them during mass calibration. 
For the measurement in Fig. 8, the calibrant gas SF
6
was injected at the ioniser to provide a known set of strong calibrant peaks 
to exemplify this issue. Importantly, when the assumption is taken that the mass calibration biases are invariant with time, the 
polynominal fit to the residuals can be determined on a single MS and held fixed thereafter. A similar methodology has been 
employed to fix the exponent parameter in previous studies (DeCarlo et al., 2006). A MS with known calibrant ions in the 
10 
central mass range exhibiting strong mass spectral peaks can thus be used to minimise the residuals, and this subtraction applied 
to all calibrations in the entire dataset time-series, which are in turn performed using the standard square-root fit only on 
stronger calibrant peaks such as N
2
+
, O
2
+
or CO
2
+
For routine ToF-ACSM analysis, where SF
6
fragment ions are not available, other calibrant ions would be required in the 
centre region of the MS to determine potential biases. The trichloroethylene, phthalate or naphthalene ions discussed above 
15 
would be useful candidates. Indeed, in Fig. 8 the phthalate fragment ion at 149 Th is included in the calibrant peak list; the 
trichloroethylene peaks were, however, poorly defined owing to the much larger signal from the neighbouring SF
5
+
isotopes. 
3.3 Peak-fitting uncertainties and terminology 
Cubison and Jimenez (2015) give parameterisations to estimate the precision, 
σ
I
, on fitted peak intensity for a system of two 
overlapping peaks using the same constrained peak-fitting procedure employed in this study. The two dependent parameters 
20 
are the ratio of the two peak intensities, R
I
, and the peak separation normalised to half-width at half-maximum (HWHM), 
Χ
As R
I
increases, the precision with which the intensity of the less-intense ion peak can be fitted degrades. As 
Χ
decreases, the 
same is true for both the more- and less-intense peaks. As a general rule, for R
I
up to ~10, the fitted intensity of the child peak 
can be retrieved with acceptable precision for 
Χ
as low as ~0.7. For smaller 
Χ
, the imprecision increases and obtaining reliable 
results becomes challenging and eventually impossible. Peaks separated by 
Χ
> 1.6 can nearly always be reliably fitted, except 
25 
in the case of R
I
> 200, above which the imprecision on the fitted parameters of the less-intense peak is so great as to preclude 
their use in data analysis. We make use of this parameterisation in this study when discussing peak separations, which we state 
henceforth as 
Χ
, i.e. normalised to HWHM. 
Atmos.Meas.Tech.Discuss.,doi:10.5194/amt-2016-13,2016
SDK application service:How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.Word
RasterEdge XDoc.Word provide you with APIs to get a thumbnail bitmap of the first page in the word document file. You can be able to get a preview of this word
www.rasteredge.com
SDK application service:How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.PowerPoint
XDoc.PowerPoint provide you with APIs to get a thumbnail bitmap of the first page in the PowerPoint document file. You can be able to get a preview of this
www.rasteredge.com
constructed based on molecular fragmentation patterns which account for these large interferences (Allan et al., 2004), are thus 
noisy and detection limits correspondingly high. Fröhlich et al. (2013) applied peak-fitting to ToF-ACSM spectra and 
concluded that the NH
x
ions were unresolvable from the interfering ions; we extend this discussion, with reference to the peak 
separations and expected intensity ratios, as the NH
x
ions exemplify how the intensities of well separated peaks cannot always 
be accurately fitted. In the case of NH
2
+
, NH
3
+
, and NH
4
+
Χ
approaches unity and the peaks can be considered partially 
10 
separated. However, for peak ratios over 100 as are observed for these ions, 
Χ
> 1 is required even to achieve precisions on 
fitted intensity, 
σ
I
, of 100% (Cubison and Jimenez, 2015), effectively precluding successful peak-fitting for all but the strongest 
ammonium signals. The only possibility for extracting useful information on ammonium from peak-fitting is thus at 15 Th 
where the interferences on NH
+
are much smaller, as exemplified in Fig. 9. However, with peak separations to the neighbouring 
ions of 
Χ = 
0.5, the imprecision expected in the fits is still large. Batch peak-fitting at 15 Th on ammonium nitrate calibration 
15 
data yielded a time-series for NH
+
whose signal:noise was similar to that of the integrated peak time-series. However, peak-
fitting did not improve the quality of the data and thus for ammonium could only be used to help support assumptions required 
to construct the integrated data fragmentation table. It is estimated that mass resolving power approaching 1000 in this lower 
region of the MS would be required in order to reliably deconvolve the ammonium peak intensities.  
4.2. Nitrate 
20 
In AMS analysis, concentrations of aerosol species from integrated unit mass data are calculated based on well described 
fragmentation patterns (Allan et al., 2004). Previous studies have shown that, in many ambient conditions, the default 
fragmentation patterns work well. However, in the case of high organic loadings and particularly during biomass-burning 
events, the assumptions tend to break down and nonsensical mass concentrations may result (e.g. Ortega et al., 2013). In 
general, it is preferred to construct the time-series from the sum of individual fitted ion intensities, providing of course that the 
25 
uncertainty on these values is not large. 
Inorganic nitrate is an important aerosol component whose principal contributing ion signals, NO
+
and NO
2
+
, both suffer from 
isobaric interferences due to neighbouring organic ions. Although Fröhlich et al. (2013) reported that it should be possible to 
use peak-fitting to resolve these interferences, the peak separations are very small indeed and no uncertainties or confidence 
metrics were presented. We address these issues here in detail. 
30 
Atmos.Meas.Tech.Discuss.,doi:10.5194/amt-2016-13,2016
SDK application service:C# WinForms Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit PDF
It makes users easy to view PDF document and edit PDF document in preview. PDF Annotation. • Add sticky notes to PDF document in preview.
www.rasteredge.com
SDK application service:C# WPF Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit PDF
This page will mainly let you know: PDF versions supported by RasterEdge WPF Viewer for C# .NET. Highlight PDF text in preview.
www.rasteredge.com
to other regions in the mass spectrum (where the calibration may be extrapolated) and its magnitude can be predicted from the 
biases of the calibrant ions themselves. 
Given the expected sensitivity of the highly-overlapping fits to the mass calibration, it is appropriate to conduct a sensitivity 
analysis to assess the degree of confidence that might be drawn from the fitted intensity values. Tofware offers a graphical tool 
for this purpose. An example is given for the isobar 30 Th, with fitted ions NO
+
, CH
2
O
+
and C
2
H
6
+
, in Fig. 11, using data from 
10 
the SMEAR III campaign. Using the ions H
2
O
+
, N
2
+
, O
2
+
and CO
2
+
to perform the mass calibration gave mass accuracies of 
between 2 and 13 ppm. Assessment of the sensitivity of the fitted intensities at 30 Th to mass calibration bias does not therefore 
need to consider much larger values than this; we conservatively chose 20 ppm, which equates to about 5% of the separation 
of the ions NO
+
and CH
2
O
+
. In the general case, a larger perturbation value of between 50 and 100 ppm would be appropriate, 
depending on the confidence in the calibration. 
15 
From Fig. 11 one can take confidence that the fitted NO
+
ion intensities are reliable. Firstly, consider the time-series of the 
fitted vs integrated peak intensities and their residuals for the un-perturbed mass calibration (left panels). The sum of the fitted 
peak intensities matches the integrated values to within a few percent. For 20-second averaging of a peak with a significant 
non-zero MS baseline and closely-separated neighbouring isobaric peaks (which influence the integrated intensities), this level 
of agreement is indeed indicative that the peak-fitting process has been properly performed. The step changes in the summed 
20 
fitted intensity as the aerosol filter is switched in/out of the inlet line are also accurately captured. 
The influence of perturbing the mass calibration is shown in the right panels as a time series (bottom) and scatter plot (top). 
When positively perturbing the calibration by 20 ppm (shifting the entire mass axis 20 ppm = 30 Th * 20/1e6 = 0.0006 Th, but 
holding peak positions fixed), the fitted NO
+
intensity increases by 10 %. A negative perturbation of similar magnitude would 
decrease fitted intensity by 12 %. It is important to note that this is a sensitivity analysis and not an uncertainty calculation on 
25 
the fitted intensities, nonetheless the method does offer a useful validity check on the fitted parameters. We henceforth refer 
to the relative intensity bias (offset, in %) introduced by calibration perturbation as 
Δ
I
Further to the perturbed time-series, the estimated precision on fitted intensity from the parameterisation of Cubison and 
Jimenez (2015), 
σ
I
, is also shown on the un-perturbed intensity time-series (shaded area, bottom right panel). The fitted 
intensity of the NO
+
ion is deconvolved with 
σ
I
less than a few percent. Although this example presents a truly challenging 
30 
peak-fitting scenario with limited signal and a large degree of peak overlap, one may draw conclusions based on the actual 
Atmos.Meas.Tech.Discuss.,doi:10.5194/amt-2016-13,2016
SDK application service:VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
Remove bookmarks, annotations, watermark, page labels and article threads from PDF while compressing. Also a preview component enables compressing and
www.rasteredge.com
SDK application service:C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
Ability to add PDF page number in preview. Offer PDF page break inserting function. Free components and online source codes for .NET framework 2.0+.
www.rasteredge.com
uncertainties. 
4.3. Sulphate 
Sulphate is a further important inorganic aerosol component measured by the ToF-ACSM. The principal contributing ions, 
SO
+
, SO
2
+
, SO
3
+
, HSO
3
+
and H
2
SO
4
+
, are all affected by isobaric organic influences and the total sulphate concentration from 
integrated peak data over the nominal masses is, as per ammonium and nitrate, calculated based on assumed fragmentation 
10 
patterns to account for these influences (henceforth referred to simply as “integrated data”). Like nitrate, these assumption
tend to break down for high organic mass loading and particularly for biomass-burning. However, with X values relative to the 
closest organic interferences of 0.5 - 0.8, constrained peak-fitting can be employed to directly calculate the sulphate ion signals 
with acceptable uncertainty. To demonstrate this, peak-fitting was performed on the SMEAR III dataset and an analogous 
sensitivity analysis was performed as presented for nitrate in the previous section (Figures S3-S7). The mass calibration 
15 
perturbation employed for these sensitivity analyses reflected the position of the ions under study in the mass spectrum, relative 
to those used to perform the calibration (H
2
O
+
, N
2
+
, O
2
+
and CO
2
+
). Thus, the confidence in the mass calibration at 48 Th (SO
+
is quite high and a 20 ppm perturbation was applied. In contrast at 98 Th (H
2
SO
4
+
), the calibration is somewhat extrapolated 
and a 50 ppm perturbation was applied. The resulting sensitivities of the fitted intensities to calibration perturbations, 
Δ
I
, ranged 
from approx. 3 to 30 %. 
20 
The SMEAR III data is used to demonstrate construction of a mass-loading time-series for sulphate based on the sum of the 
sulphate ion signals retrieved from peak-fitting (Fig. 12) The sum of the fitted intensities was able to reconstruct the same 
time-series as that from the fragmentation table with only 3% difference (integrated ~ 1.03 * fitted), demonstrating the validity 
of the method.  
Figure 12 shows the fitted intensities of the isobaric interferences from organic ions. The ratio of the organic signal from the 
25 
integrated data to the sum of the fitted intensities of the organic ions is 0.64±0.40. Overall, the peak-fitting method weighted 
the allocation of the ion signals more heavily towards organic than the fragmentation table approach. However, the differences 
are small and the only significant conclusion that may be drawn is that, for this dataset, the methods are consistent to within a 
few percent.  
Atmos.Meas.Tech.Discuss.,doi:10.5194/amt-2016-13,2016
SDK application service:How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.excel
RasterEdge XDoc.Excel provide you with APIs to get a thumbnail bitmap of the first page in the Excel document file. You can be able to get a preview of this
www.rasteredge.com
SDK application service:C# PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in C#.
VB.NET convert PDF to text, VB.NET extract PDF pages, VB to remove a specific image from PDF document page. Remove PDF image in preview without adobe PDF reader
www.rasteredge.com
optimise the calibrant ion fits. Mass accuracy was in the range 10-20 ppm for all calibrant ions. 
On December 2 and 3, 2014, elevated aerosol chloride was observed at the Neumayer station (Fig. S8-S9). Airmass back 
trajectories (Global Data Assimilation System (GDAS) air mass backward trajectories using the NOAA Hybrid Single-Particle 
Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory model (HYSPLIT, v4.9, (Draxler and Rolph, 2013)) show that the airmass was transported 
along the Antarctic coastline in low altitudes during the previous days, pointing to the influence of sea-salt as an explanation 
10 
for the observed chloride concentrations of up to 300 ng m
-3 
(Fig. S9). Neither MSA, proxied by m/Q 79, nor organic aerosol 
was elevated during this period. Peak-fitting was conducted on the mass spectra from this episode to i) demonstrate the 
presence of sea-salt related compounds, and ii) generate a time-series for NaCl
+
, separated from its isobaric organic 
interference(s). The Chloride ions 
35
Cl
+
and 
37
Cl
+
have only relatively tiny interferences in ToF-ACSM mass spectra and thus 
no meaningful additional information can be expected to be gained from peak-fitting relative to the integrated peak data, except 
15 
perhaps in exceptionally-large organic plume cases. 
Several ions attributable to sea salt (following Schmale et al, 2013.), such as Na
35
Cl
+
(57.958 Th), Na
37
Cl
+
(59.956 Th), 
Fe
35
Cl
2
+
(125.87 Th) and Fe
37
Cl
35
Cl
+
(127.87 Th) could be identified in the average mass spectrum from this period, as shown 
in Fig. 13. In the case of NaCl
+
, three interfering isobaric organic ions are known to be visible in ToF-ACSM mass spectra; at 
this mass resolving power it is not possible to state which of these are observed here, although the oxygenated peak C
3
H
6
O
+
is 
20 
a likely candidate and is demonstrated in Fig. 13. However, irrespective of the interference(s) chosen, sensitivity of the fitted 
intensity of NaCl
+
to a 100 ppm mass calibration perturbation was ~ 5%, indicating that the majority of the difference signal 
at 58 Th could indeed be attributed to this ion. 
The FeCl
+
ions are shown as a further example of sea salt compounds that could be unambiguously identified in the Neumayer-
data. The centre panel in Fig. 13 shows a portion of the average mass spectrum together with peak-fitting curves for the period 
25 
during which elevated chloride was observed. The mass calibrant ion C
2
Cl
3
H
+
at 130 Th is visible in addition to unknown 
background ion(s) at 126 and 128 Th. For the difference mass spectrum, however, these background ions contribute only to 
the noise and two aerosol signals are resolvable above the noise level, defined as 3 times the standard deviation over the 
adjacent mass range. These signals are well represented by the Fe
35
Cl
2
+
and Fe
37
Cl
35
Cl
+
isotopes; the mass excess of these 
aerosol peaks is significantly (~1500 ppm) less than the background peaks observed for the total mass spectrum. We note that 
30 
it is almost certain that the signal from a multitude of unresolvable organic ions combines together to give the apparent single 
background peak, but in this analysis we are only concerned with the relatively well-separated sea salt signals. Further support 
Atmos.Meas.Tech.Discuss.,doi:10.5194/amt-2016-13,2016
SDK application service:C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
PDF page position and save existing PDF file or output a new PDF file. An independent .NET framework viewer component supports inserting image to PDF in preview
www.rasteredge.com
SDK application service:C# Word - Extract or Copy Pages from Word File in C#.NET
Preview Document. Conversion. Convert Word to PDF. Convert Word to Convert Word to ODT. Convert PDF to Word. Page: Move Word Page Position. Page: Extract Word Pages
www.rasteredge.com
and the noise in the organic background signal at 58 Th from C
3
H
6
O
+
is significant, but it shows no apparent correlation with 
the chloride signal.  
4.5. Methanesulphonic acid 
Oceans release dimethyl sulphide, which is further oxidized to several sulphur compounds, SO
2
, H
2
SO
4
and MSA (Gondwe et 
al., 2003; Yin et al., 1990). Previous studies have demonstrated that the AMS can be used to measure MSA concentrations of 
10 
submicron particles (Phinney et al., 2006; Schmale et al., 2013).  
From January 7-13
th
, 2015, elevated sulphate (up to 2000 ng m
-3
) and MSA concentrations were observed at the Neumayer 
station (Fig. S10). At Neumayer, the interference from isobaric ions was very low (Fig. S11). All typical MSA fragments 
(Schmale et al., 2013, Phinney et al., 2006) were relatively strong signals relative to their isobaric interferences and could be 
straightforwardly identified in the mass spectra: CHS
+
(44.98 Th), CH
3
S
+
(47.00 Th), HSO
2
+
(64.97 Th), CH
2
SO
2
+
(77.98 Th), 
15 
CH
3
SO
2
+
(78.99 Th) and CH
4
SO
3
+
(95.99 Th) (Fig. 15, Table 2). A good correlation between the main ions (HSO
2
+
, CH
3
SO
2
+
and CH
4
SO
3
+
) with highest signals was observed (Fig. S12, Table S1). However, we note that for all MSA ions the separation 
from isobaric ions was low (X=0.2-0.4, thus increasing the uncertainly of the results. In typical conditions with larger 
background and/or organic signals, this analysis would become difficult and uncertainties large. In clean conditions ToF-
ACSM provided the possibility to discern between and measure both sulphate and MSA fragments, which combined with 
20 
meteorological data could be used to e.g. to further study the CLAW hyphothesis (Charlson et al.,1987). 
4.6. Metals 
Data collected in an underground mine is used to study the peak-fitting of ions from semi-volatile metals. It has been 
demonstrated that the ToF-AMS, upon whose technology the ACSM is based, is capable of detecting ions associated with the 
metals Cu, Zn, As, Se, Sn, and Sb (Salcedo et al, 2012). Further semi-volatile elements may also be measurable based on their 
25 
melting or thermal decomposition points (Drewnick et al., 2015). In the mine environment it is to be expected that metallic 
elements comprise a significant fraction of the aerosol mass (Csavina et al., 2012). This dataset is thus a good example for a 
first assessment of the capability of the ToF-ACSM to detect metal species. The ions of these species tend to have large mass 
excesses and are often separated from their neighbouring ions by 
Χ 
> 1, indicating that peak-fitting should be able to resolve 
Atmos.Meas.Tech.Discuss.,doi:10.5194/amt-2016-13,2016
made when performing this analysis step. Consequently, a careful sensitivity analysis must be performed before drawing 
conclusions from the fitted peak intensities. To highlight the performance of the instrument and fitting procedure in measuring 
changes in mass component intensities, a period at the end of a working day was chosen for detailed analysis, where the organic 
mass loading in the mine falls sharply from > 30 to < 3 μg m
-3
over a 2 hour period. 
As many of the metals isotopes exhibit mass excesses that differ significantly from other (in most cases organic) peaks in the 
10 
MS, representation of the fitted position in m/Q of each isobaric peak in a mass excess plot can be used to highlight features 
of interest, as shown in Fig. 16. Certain peaks stand out from the general pattern as having mass excesses that deviate from the 
general trend, principally those from SO
x
(48, 64, 66) and As
x
(75, 150). It is noted that there is a contribution from 
66
Zn
+
at 
66 Th which also contributes to the observed negative mass excess. A more detailed investigation was thus undertaken to 
assess potential signals from the As and Zn ions. 
15 
4.6.1. Mass calibration 
The high mass loadings encountered during the mine study led to a large instrument background, which remained elevated 
overnight. The tungsten isotope pattern was occluded and these ions could not be used in the mass calibration. However, the 
pattern of the trichloroethylene isotopes was evident during cleaner periods, albeit not without interference from overlapping 
organic background peaks. An example MS is shown in Fig. S13; the peaks at the isobars 130 and 132 Th, where the principal 
20 
ions of trichloroethylene show, are approximately 3 times as large as many of the surrounding organic background peaks. As 
no other identified isolated ions were available at masses greater than 44 Th (CO
2
+
), an attempt was made to constrain the 
high-end of the mass calibration by employing the mass-compensation technique described in section 3.2.2.2. As a result, the 
exact mass of the trichloroethylene ions in the mass calibration was increased by 0.04 Th or ~ 300 ppm (the corresponding 
mass excess plot is given in Fig. S14. These ions, together with N
2
+
, O
2
+
and CO
2
+
, were used to apply a mass calibration for 
25 
the entire time period of study. The compensation technique could not have been utilised for mass spectra during the working 
hours of the mine as the organic mass loading was too high (and the Trichloroethylene peaks thus obscured to the extent that 
the calibration compensation technique would introduce unacceptably large errors into the fitted parameters). It is noted that, 
relative to the mass axis derived using this calibration technique, calibrating on the air peaks alone would have led to a mass 
offset of -57 ppm at 150 Th (ie, extrapolating to the high end of the MS). A sensitivity analysis must therefore account for 
30 
mass calibration perturbations at least as large as this, preferably greater. 
Atmos.Meas.Tech.Discuss.,doi:10.5194/amt-2016-13,2016
peak fits is shown in Fig. S15). Three ions have been fitted to the isobaric peak, As
2
+
, C
4
H
6
O
6
+
and C
10
H
14
O
+
. The two organic 
ions are closely spaced (
Χ 
< 0.4) and we emphasise that we do not attempt to conclude whether the organic signal at 150 Th is 
attributable to either C
4
H
6
O
6
+
or C
10
H
14
O
+
(or otherwise) but seek only to separate the metal and organic signals as a whole. 
Although it was demonstrated for nitrate that highly-overlapping peaks with similar X values could be deconvolved, the 
uncertainty in the mass calibration is much larger in this example, precluding the reliable separation of the organic signals. 
10 
However, As
2
+
and its assumed closest neighbour C
4
H
6
O
6
+
are separated by 
Χ 
~ 1.0 and thus should be resolvable according 
to the results of Cubison and Jimenez (2015). As Figure 17 shows, this does indeed appear to be the case. Both the organic 
and metal signals decrease in intensity at the end of the working day, but the organic remains at a measurable non-zero value 
overnight whereas the As
2
+
decreases below the detection limit. A similar trend was apparent for the As
+
ion (scatter plot in 
Fig. S16). It is noted that no attempt is made here to derive the true mass loadings of the metal and organic components, whose 
15 
calculation is outside the scope of this peak-fitting paper and would require application of relative ionization efficiencies which 
are s
till poorly understood (Salcedo et al., 2012). Finally, it is observed that use of the “Fast
-
MS” sampling technique described 
by Kimmel et al. (2011) allows time-resolved detection of slowly evaporating components in the difference data (ambient 
minus filter).  
4.6.3. Sensitivity analysis 
20 
Given the assumptions made in applying the mass calibration, assessment of the sensitivity of the fitted peak intensities to 
calibration perturbations, analogously as was described in section 4.2 for nitrate, was particularly important for this dataset. 
Figure 18 shows the results of this sensitivity analysis at 150 Th, with fitted ions As
2
+
, C
4
H
6
O
6
+
and C
10
H
14
O
+
and an especially 
large mass calibration perturbation of +/- 200 ppm, to reflect the low confidence in the mass calibration. From these analyses 
we conclude that i) the integrated area can be reconstructed from summed fitted peak intensities to within a few percent 
25 
(excluding points with weak signals less than 2 ions/s where counting error is large), ii) the fitted intensity of As
2
+
is not 
sensitive to calibration imperfections, exhibiting 
Δ
I
~ 20 % with a 200 ppm offset, and iii) the predicted imprecision on this 
intensity, 
σ
I
, is also (coincidentally) ~ 20 %. Although this example presents a truly challenging peak-fitting scenario with 
limited signal, a large degree of peak overlap and an uncertain mass calibration, it can be confidently concluded that there is a 
non-negligible contribution to mass loading from the metal ion As
2
+
. One may also draw conclusions based on the actual fitted 
30 
peak intensities provided they hold true for changes of +/- 20 %. 
Atmos.Meas.Tech.Discuss.,doi:10.5194/amt-2016-13,2016
estimating the concentrations of oxygenated organic aerosol (OOA) and hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol (HOA) from the 
integrated signals at 44 and 57 Th, giving the relationship for HOA ~ 13.4 * (C
57
- a * C
44
), where C
x
represents the integrated 
signal over the isobar peak at m/Q = X. The constant a was estimated as 0.1 and accounts for the predicted concentration of 
the interfering oxygenated ion C
3
H
5
O
+
at 57 Th where the majority of ion signal can be attributed to C
4
H
7
+
. These two ions 
are separated by 
Χ = 
0.6 Th at m/dm = 450 and are thus, with some degree of uncertainty, separable in ToF-ACSM mass 
10 
spectra. Thus a linear regression can be made of the fitted ion intensities of CO
2
+
and C
3
H
5
O
+
to calculate the constant a for 
the dataset under analysis, as shown for the SMEARIII dataset in Figure S20. The derived slope for the SMEARIII data of 
0.04 led to an increase in estimated HOA concentrations of 6% with respect to using the default value of 0.1. 
4.8. Oxidation state from analysis of mass excess 
The limited mass resolving power of the ETOF-equipped ToF-ACSM precludes the calculation of the oxidation state (see 
15 
Kroll et al., 2011) and O/C and H/C ratios using the elemental analysis approach commonly employed in HR-ToF-AMS 
analysis and detailed in Aiken et al. (2007). However, it was recently shown using chemical ionisation data how the carbon 
oxidation state approximately follows the observed mass excess of the fitted ion peaks (Stark et al., 2015). Given that this 
principle of mass excess variation applies generally to all organic molecules irrespective of the ionisation technique, a similar 
mass excess analysis was thus applied to the SMEARIII data to investigate the aerosol oxidation state. Stark et al. used the 
20 
higher mass resolving power of their data together with comprehensive ion lists to analyse the mass excess of all the fitted ions 
using the constrained peak-fitting methods described in section 3. A mass resolving power of ~ 500 precludes this approach, 
so instead, the simpler bulk mass spectrum method also proposed by Stark et al. was employed. A mean average of the mass 
excess for the mass spectral data points for each isobaric MS peak between 41 and 100 Th, except those known to be influenced 
by inorganic ions such as SO
+
, was generated by weighting to the observed signal level at each point. The range and weighted 
25 
mean average of the mass excess values are plotted for a time-series of a few days in Fig. 19. The OOA and HOA components 
were also calculated following the so-
called “poor woman’s PMF” methodology of Ng et al. (2011
a) and the relative fraction 
of OOA is also shown. The average mass excess exhibits a clear anti-correlation with the OOA fraction with R
2
= 0.88, 
supporting the validity of the method for the assessment of aerosol oxidation. 
Atmos.Meas.Tech.Discuss.,doi:10.5194/amt-2016-13,2016
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested