c# wpf adobe pdf reader : Extract pages from pdf files SDK control service wpf web page windows dnn an-economic-analysis-of-the-pr-20076390-part174

1099 NEW YORK AVE, NW
SUITE 520
WASHINGTON, DC 20001 
PHONE: 202.828.4405
E-MAIL: info@techpolicyinstitute.org
WEB: www.techpolicyinstitute.org
An Economic Analysis of the Proposed Comcast/Time Warner Cable Merger 
May 2014 
Scott Wallsten 
Extract pages from pdf files - Library software component:C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Easy to Use C# Code to Extract PDF Pages, Copy Pages from One PDF File and Paste into Others
www.rasteredge.com
Extract pages from pdf files - Library software component:VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed VB.NET Guide for Extracting Pages from Microsoft PDF Doc
www.rasteredge.com
An Economic Analysis of the Proposed Comcast/Time Warner Cable Merger 
Scott Wallsten
*
May 6, 2014 
Comcast has proposed acquiring Time Warner Cable (TWC) for around $45 billion.
1
Despite the 
transaction being a horizontal merger, it does not raise traditional horizontal issues: although the 
firms operate in the same product markets, they are in different geographic market because their 
service territories do not overlap. This point has not been controversial. Instead, opposition to the 
merger has focused primarily on vertical concerns
how the merger may affect upstream and 
downstream products. 
Even so, for antitrust agencies the basic question remains the same as for all mergers: do the pro-
competitive, efficiency-enhancing effects outweigh any potential anticompetitive harms of the 
merger? The Department of Justice must decide whether to challenge the merger on the grounds 
that the potential loss of competition in some relevant market is greater than the pro-competitive 
efficiencies, while the FCC must decide whether to affirmatively permit the merger to happen, 
partly on antitrust grounds and partly on “public interest” criteria.
In this paper I explore the 
possible pro-competitive benefits and anti-competitive harms. 
Comcast outlines certain benefits in its public interest statement.
2
It believes the merger will 
bring certain cost efficiencies
about $1.5 billion a year after a few years and a one-time $400 
million savings.
3
The benefits to residential consumers depend on how much more quickly 
Comcast would upgrade TWC’s network 
than TWC would have and how much consumers value 
those benefits. The benefits to business customers flow from the presence of a stronger 
competitor in the market for business services
a market in which Comcast and Time Warner 
Cable currently have negligible market share. Finally, larger scale may create additional 
incentives for Comcast to innovate if its larger size allows it to realize higher returns to 
investments that have high fixed costs. 
The possible harms depend on the extent to which a larger Comcast has an increased incentive 
and ability to discriminate against competing video or broadband content. This question is 
complicated for three reasons. First, as a profit-maximizing firm, Comcast must balance the 
benefits of any incentive to discriminate unfairly against incentives to have content available on 
its platforms. We do not know whether 
increasing Comcast’s reach without increasing its share 
of subscribers in any given area would have a bigger effect on its incentive to discriminate or on 
its desire to increase demand for its product, which mitigates incentives for bad behavior. 
*
Senior Fellow and Vice President for Research, Technology Policy Institute. Contact: scott@wallsten.net
. The 
views expressed here are mine alone, and do not necessarily reflect the views of TPI, its staff, or the members of its 
board of directors. 
1
More specifically, Comcast will exchange each of TWC’s outstanding 284.9 million shares for 2.875 Comcast 
shares. At a price of $52 per Comcast share (the approximate price as of market close May 1), that offer equals 
about $42.5 billion. http://corporate.comcast.com/news-information/news-feed/time-warner-cable-to-merge-with-
comcast-corporation
.  
2
Comcast Corporation and Time Warner Cable, Comcast Corp and Time Warner Cable for Consent to Transfer 
Control of Licenses and Authorizations: Applications and Public Interest Statement, April 8, 2014. 
3
It is not clear how the proposed divestiture of subscribers to Charter affects these estimates. 
Library software component:C# PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in
extraction from PDF images and image files. textMgr = PDFTextHandler. ExportPDFTextManager(doc); // Extract text content for text extraction from all PDF
www.rasteredge.com
Library software component:VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF
Extract highlighted text out of PDF document. Image text extraction control provides text extraction from PDF images and image files.
www.rasteredge.com
Second, on the video side a better negotiating position by the distributor may be a consumer 
benefit rather than a harm given rapidly increasing programming fees. Even if a decreasing rate 
of increase in programming fees does not necessarily translate into lower consumer prices, the 
change does not harm consumers. 
Some arguments offered against the merger, meanwhile, seem irrelevant. Most importantly is a 
general 
“big is bad” so “bigger is worse” argument, but this is not generically true—
large firms 
do some things better and small firms do other things better. Indeed, increased size is an 
important contributor to the claimed benefits of the merger given the role of economies of scale 
in high fixed-cost industries.  
This paper examines in more detail the potential benefits and costs of the merger that antitrust 
authorities must weigh in deciding whether to approve the deal. 
Potential Benefits 
Comcast contends that the merger will yield significant efficiencies, mostly related to economies 
of scale. It explains that these efficiencies will yield benefits to Comcast itself in terms of cost 
savings, to TWC residential consumers through faster upgrades, to business consumers by 
creating a viable competitor in that market, and to all consumers through increased innovation 
from its larger scale. I examine each of these claims in turn. 
On the cost side of the ledger, 
Comcast estimates that the “synergies”—
presumably through 
gains from scale efficiencies
will yield cost savings of $1.5 billion a year in operating expenses 
by the third year and continuing into the future, plus short-
term “capital expenditure efficiencies” 
of $400 million, or about 10 percent of TWC’s operating expenses (
Figure 1).
4
Reducing costs 
without reducing output is unambiguously a net economic benefit. 
Figure 1: Cost Savings From the Merger 
Source: Derived from Angelakis (2014).
5
4
Michael J. Angelakis, Declaration of Michael J. Angelakis In the Matter of Applications of Comcast Corp. and 
Time Warner Cable Inc. For Consent to Transfer Control of Licenses and Authorizations, n.d., 3. 
5
Ibid. 
0.2 
0.4 
0.6 
0.8 
1.2 
1.4 
1.6 
Year 1 
Year 2 
Year 3 
Year 4  Year 5+ 
$ billions
Library software component:C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
DotNetNuke), SharePoint. Get JPG, JPEG and other high quality image files from PDF document. Able to extract vector images from PDF. Extract
www.rasteredge.com
Library software component:C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
how to merge PDF document files by C# code, how to rotate PDF document page, how to delete PDF page using C# .NET, how to reorganize PDF document pages and how
www.rasteredge.com
Business Customers 
Cable companies have, for some years, recognized the business market as potentially lucrative 
but have remained minor players in that market. By one estimate, Comcast has 20 percent of the 
small business market and five percent of middle-sized companies.
6
TWC, meanwhile, had 12 
percent of the market for small and mid-sized businesses in 2013.
7
Neither firm has gained 
traction in the market for large businesses. One reason for their absence from the market for 
large businesses
or businesses that have offices across cable company territories
appears to 
be the costs of aggregating communications services into a single network across territories. 
Rosston and Topper (2010) explain in their filing for Comcast that the FCC itself has 
acknowledged “that customers prefer services delivered on a single provider’s network….”
8
Because neither Comcast nor TWC is an established incumbent in the market to serve 
businesses, a stronger presence
and, more specifically, a presence with a larger footprint
is 
likely to yield benefits to these consumers.
9
Neil Smit, President and CEO of Comcast cable 
estimates this market 
to be “about a $15 billion opportunity.”
10
Residential Customers 
Residential consumers
TWC consumers, presumably
will benefit, Comcast says, by 
accelerated 
upgrades to TWC’s infrastructure and access to Comcast’s technology and larg
video-on-demand library. The residential consumer benefits of these actions, therefore, depend 
on how quickly the upgrades would happen under Comcast ownership relative to TWC, how 
much consumers value the upgrades, and how much prices change under Comcast relative to 
changes under TWC. 
Time Warner Cable recently announced an accelerated upgrade schedule
a plan tentatively 
called “TWC Maxx.”
11
Comcast acknowledges this upgrade in its Public Interest Statement 
(PIS), noting that 
“TWC expects to have comple
ted [its all-digital migration in] only 75 percent 
of its footprint by the end of 2016,
12
and explaining that it can complete the upgrade more 
quickly. However, 
TWC’s upgrade timeline may 
shorter than Comcast asserts. The original 
source material the PIS cites says that TWC will 
“…roll out these initiatives across 75 percent of
our footprint in 2015 and 2016,
not “end of 2016.”
13
In other words, the difference TWC’s and 
Comcast’s upgrade timelines may not be as large as Comcast suggests.
6
Larry Dignan, “Comcast Counting on Business Services for Cable Growth,” 
ZDNet, April 22, 2014, 
http://www.zdnet.com/comcast-counting-on-business-services-for-cable-growth-7000028639/. 
7
Gregory L. Rosston and Michael D. Topper, “An Econo
mic Analysis of the Proposed Comcast - Time Warner 
Cable Transaction,” April 8, 2014, para. 117.
8
Ibid., para. 123. 
9
Rosston and Topper, in their filing for Comcast, discuss business services extensively. Ibid., 44
55. 
10
http://www.cmcsa.com/secfiling.cfm?filingID=950103-14-1756 
11
Time Warner Cable, TWC Operational and Financial Plan, January 30, 2014, 
http://ir.timewarnercable.com/files/4Q13/TWC_Operational%20and_Financial%20Plan_vFINAL.pdf. 
12
Comcast Corporation and Time Warner Cable, Comcast Corp and Time Warner Cable for Consent to Transfer 
Control of Licenses and Authorizations: Applications and Public Interest Statement, 70. 
13
Time Warner Cable, TWC Operational and Financial Plan, 11. 
Library software component:VB.NET PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in vb.net
Merge two or several separate PDF files together and into one PDF document in VB.NET. Combine multiple specified PDF pages in into single one file.
www.rasteredge.com
Library software component:C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
PDF, C# print PDF, C# merge PDF files, C# view PDF online, C# convert PDF to tiff, C# read PDF, C# convert PDF to text, C# extract PDF pages, C# comment
www.rasteredge.com
In addition to the upgrade schedule, the economic benefit also depends on how much consumers 
value the upgrades.
14
The answer is not clear, at least on the broadband side. Rosston, Savage, 
and Waldman (2010) found that while consumers were willing to pay quite a bit (about $80) for 
a “fast” and reliable connection, they were, on average, only willing to pay an extra few dollars 
for a “very fast,” reliable connection.
15
Comcast customers appear to have, on average, faster 
broadband connections than Time Warner Cable customers. 
According to Ookla’s most recent 
speedtest results, Comcast customers averaged about 31 Mbps while TWC’s averaged about 23.2 
Mbps.
16
However, decreasing marginal benefits to increasing speed mean that it is not clear how 
much consumers will value this aspect of the upgrade. 
Figure 2: Actual Broadband Speeds as a Share of Advertised Speeds, 2012 
Source: FCC (2013).
17
Additionally, it is not clear how much the actual broadband user experience currently differs 
between the two firms. Figure 2 shows that both firms deliver the speeds advertised to their 
customers, although Comcast performs somewhat better, providing more than promised upload 
speeds. The two firms appear to provide a similar viewing experience to Netflix subscribers, for 
example, except for the time during the peering dispute between Comcast and Netflix (Figure 3). 
14
Cost efficiencies of newer technology is also a real benefit, which Comcast has presumably incorporated into its 
estimate of $1.5 billion annual cost savings. 
15
Gregory Rosston, Scott Savage, and Donald Waldman, “Household Demand for Broadband Internet Service,” 
The 
B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis and Policy 10, no. 1 (September 9, 2010). 
16
As of April 17, 2014 http://explorer.netindex.com/maps# 
17
FCC’s Off
ice of Engineering and Technology and and Consumer and Governmental Affairs Bureau, Measuring 
Broadband America - February 2013 (Federal Communications Commission, February 2013), 
http://www.fcc.gov/measuring-broadband-america/2013/February. 
Library software component:C# PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files
can split target PDF document file by specifying a page or pages. If needed, developers can also combine generated split PDF document files with other PDF
www.rasteredge.com
Library software component:VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple
split target multi-page PDF document file to one-page PDF files or they can separate source PDF file to smaller PDF documents by every given number of pages.
www.rasteredge.com
Figure 3: Broadband Speeds Measured by Netflix 
Source: Netflix Speed Index.
18
Finally, we do not know how the merger will affect real prices. Comcast has made no secret of 
its desire for the merger to yield “revenue synergies
.
19
Indeed, Comcast apparently sees these 
increased revenues as the more important benefit. Neil Smit, President of Comcast Cable, noted 
at the 2014 Deutsche Bank Telecom and Media Conference, 
I think the revenue synergies are greater than the cost synergies. On the revenue synergies side the 
first would be in the residential area where we would seek to bundle more and that is call center 
training, that's teaching people to sell another RTU on a call, on a service call, fix a billing 
problem, upsell to a third product, so just bundling better. You get higher ARPU, higher retention, 
lower churn rates.
20
The question with respect to prices, therefore, is whether these financial benefits to the firm 
reflect increased demand resulting from offering a better service, or simply a better ability to 
extract more of the rents than TWC. 
Innovation 
Finally, it is difficult to predict the effect of the merger on innovation. Research on the 
relationship between firm size and innovation does not reach definitive conclusions, despite 
decades of research.
21
Small firms are likely to be better at some types of innovations and large 
firms at others. Similarly, scale will increase some incentives to innovate and decrease others. 
18
http://ispspeedindex.netflix.com/results/usa/archives 
19
Angelakis, Declaration of Michael J. Angelakis In the Matter of Applications of Comcast Corp. and Time Warner 
Cable Inc. For Consent to Transfer Control of Licenses and Authorizations, para. 9. 
20
http://www.cmcsa.com/secfiling.cfm?filingID=950103-14-1756 
21
Wesley M. Cohen, “Fifty Years of Empirical Studies of Innovative Activity and Performance,”
in Handbook of 
the Economics of Innovation, vol. 1 (Elsevier, 2010), 129
213, 
http://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S016972181001004X. 
1.5 
1.7 
1.9 
2.1 
2.3 
2.5 
2.7 
Dec
-
12
Jan
-
13
Feb
-
13
Mar
-
13
Apr
-
13
May
-
13
Jun
-
13
Jul
-
13
Aug
-
13
Sep
-
13
Oct
-
13
Nov
-
13
Dec
-
13
Jan
-
14
Feb
-
14
Mar
-
14
Mbps
Comcast 
TWC 
Library software component:C# PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in C#.net
How to Use C#.NET Demo Code to Convert PDF Document to HTML5 Files in C#.NET Class. Add necessary references: RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.dll.
www.rasteredge.com
A firm’s incentive to innovate can increase with size, for example, if increased size allows it to 
earn higher returns on innovative activities. This is especially likely to be true with innovations 
that require high fixed costs. It is probably no accident that the largest cable company, Comcast, 
has what is probably the best-reviewed user interface
the X1 platform. The flip side of that 
argument, however, is that fewer companies looking for solutions to certain problems
poor user 
interface in this case
may reduce the number of innovative paths explored to solve those 
problems. 
Potential Harms 
Opponents of the merger are generally concerned that the 
merged company’s increased scale and 
scope will allow it to discriminate unfairly in both video and broadband.
22
In both cases, the 
extent to which this is a concern rests on how the change in the number of subscribers affects the 
net benefits to the business of having content for the platform relative to any net benefits to the 
firm of degrading content from competitors. 
On the one hand, as Rosston and Topper (2014) and Israel (2014) discuss at length in their FCC 
filings for Comcast, research on the relationship between firm size and negotiating power is not 
dispositive.
23
Indeed, it is difficult to come up with a realistic economic theory as to why bigger 
distributors should get better deals than smaller distributors. The primary reason for the 
theoretical ambiguity is that while the content provider needs access to subscribers, the 
distributor needs content to distribute. Simply being bigger does not necessarily reduce the 
relative importance of any given content to demand by consumers for access to the platform. 
On the other hand, in the case of video programming, the little bit of available public data shows 
that, in general, larger cable companies do pay less than smaller companies. Data from SNL 
Kagan show, for example, that for the largest three cable companies, the smallest (Charter) pays 
the most while the largest (Comcast) pays the least on a per-subscriber basis (Figure 4). 
However, the figure also shows the price paid by Comcast and Time Warner Cable converging 
over time. 
22
S
ee, for example, The Editorial Board, “If a Cable Giant Becomes Bigger,” 
The New York Times, February 13, 
2014, http://www.nytimes.com/2014/02/14/opinion/if-a-cable-giant-becomes-bigger.html?_r=0. 
23
Rosston and Topper, “An Economic Analysis of the Proposed Comcast 
Time Warner Cable Transaction”; Mark 
A. Israel, “Implications of the Comcast/Time Warner Cable Transaction for Broadband Competition,” April 8, 2014.
Figure 4: Monthly Programming Costs Per Subscriber 
Source: Chart derived from data in SNL Kagan (2013).
24
The argument that larger firms inherently have stronger negotiating power as a potential harm to 
the merger implies that size conveys market power. But that is not the only hypothesis consistent 
with this outcome. For example, perhaps larger firms are better positioned to make long-term 
contracts with programmers. While smaller distributors may not like this state of the world, it 
would not imply that being larger creates additional market power for distributors vis-à-vis 
programmers. Unfortunately, the few data points available
as in the figure above
do not make 
it possible to rule out one hypothesis in favor of another. 
Even if larger distributors do have advantages in video programming negotiations, it does not 
necessarily follow that a better negotiating position for distributors means harm to consumers. 
Given rapidly increasing programming costs, a reduction in the rate of increase due to an 
improved negotiating position may benefit, rather than harm, consumers if it has any effect at all. 
Additionally, it is possible that 
the distributor’s size affects the likelihood of carriage disputes 
affecting consumers. Comcast has not experienced carriage disputes that lead to temporary 
suspension of carriage itself, which unambiguously harms consumers. Such suspension has 
happened, however, with smaller distributors Cablevision (with Fox in 2010), DirectTV (with 
Viacom in 2012), and TWC (with CBS in 2013). To be sure, in 2012 DirectTV had only slightly 
fewer subscribers than did Comcast
19.9 million compared to 22.1 million
25
and one should 
probably not generalize from three data points. Nevertheless, the available evidence does not 
24
Robin Flynn, U.S. Multichannel Subscriber Update and Programming Cost Analysis, SNL Kagan Special Report, 
June 2013, http://go.snl.com/rs/snlfinanciallc/images/SNL-Kagan-US-Multichannel-Subscriber-Update-
Programming-Cost-Analysis.pdf See table on page 3. 
25
Federal Communications Commission, Annual Assessment of the Status of Competition in the Market for the 
Delivery of Video Programming, July 22, 2013, para. 130, Table 7, 
http://hraunfoss.fcc.gov/edocs_public/attachmatch/FCC-13-99A1.pdf. 
$20 
$22 
$24 
$26 
$28 
$30 
$32 
$34 
$36 
$38 
$40 
2008 
2009 
2010 
2011 
2012 
Charter 
Comcast 
TWC 
support an argument that a bigger video distributor would necessarily lead to consumer harm on 
the video side. 
On the broadband side, opponents of the merger have two general concerns. The first is that the 
merged company would have an incentive to block or otherwise degrade service from companies 
that offer competing services, such as Netflix. The second is that the merged company could 
present an entry barrier to any new Internet service or application.
26
For the sake of evaluating the merger, the relevant question for regulators and antitrust 
authorities is not whether Comcast or TWC have the incentive and ability to block or otherwise 
degrade Internet content. The question is whether the merger increases the incentive and ability 
to do so and, if so, does the increase pose an anticompetitive threat. 
As with video, ultimately the question is whether incentives to discriminate unfairly outweigh 
incentives to increase demand for the platform. It is perhaps worth recalling, however, that the 
one telecommunications company that tried to block a competing service was tiny Madison 
River Telephone Company in North Carolina, which blocked Vonage until the FCC ordered it to 
stop via a consent decree.
27
It is dangerous to generalize from a single data point, but it is 
suggestive that perhaps the size of the provider is at least not the only factor relevant when 
thinking about incentives to behave in such a manner. 
The specific question facing antitrust authorities is whether a merged Comcast/TWC with almost 
40 percent of fixed broadband subscribers (or 20 percent of all broadband subscribers if 
including mobile)
28
is more likely to act in a potentially anticompetitive way than do Comcast 
and TWC separately, with 30 and 13 percent of subscribers. If so, do those concerns outweigh 
the benefits of increased scale? 
How the Market Viewed the Competitive Effects of the Merger: A Simple Event Study 
We may never know for sure whether regulators will have made the right decision, because if the 
merger is approved we will not know what would have happened without the merger, and vice 
versa. But there is some evidence concerning how investors view the likely effects of the merger 
on upstream firms. In particular, an event study
—the reaction of the firms’ stock price to the 
merger news
—can reveal the market’s unbiased view of how 
investors expect the merger to 
affect the firms. The changes in market value should take into account expectations regarding the 
chances the merger is approved and various remedies the government may impose. 
In this case, the merger announcement was made after the stock market closed on February 12 
and before market open on February 13.
29
Thus, the difference between the closing price on 
26
See, for example, Gene Kimmelman, “Testimony of Gene Kimmelman, President and CEO of Public 
Knowledge,” April 9, 2014, 2, http://www.judiciary.senate.gov/imo/media/doc/04
-09-14KimmelmanTestimony.pdf. 
27
Declan McCullagh, “Telco Agrees to Stop Blocking VoIP Calls,” 
CNET, March 3, 2005, 
http://news.cnet.com/Telco-agrees-to-stop-blocking-VoIP-calls/2100-7352_3-5598633.html. 
28
Israel, “Implications of the Comcast/Time Warner Cable Transaction for Broadband Competition,” 32.
29
http://corporate.comcast.com/news-information/news-feed/time-warner-cable-to-merge-with-comcast-corporation 
February 12 and the opening price on February 13 captures the market’s belief regarding the 
implications of this merger. Figure 5 shows this information. 
Figure 5: Change in Share Prices Relative to Change in S&P 500 From Feb 12 Market 
Close to Feb 13 Market Open 
TWC shareholders were the 
obvious big winner from the announcement, with TWC’s share
price 
up more than seven percent relative the S&P 500 index immediately after the announcement. 
Comcast’s shares, by contrast, were down by almost three percent. Share of other broadband and 
video distribution firms AT&T, Verizon, and CenturyLink did not change much in response to 
the announcement, consistent with the change in the competitive landscape for residential 
consumers in any given region. 
Netflix’s stock opened 0.5 percent lower the day 
after the announcement. This change is small 
relative to normal variance in Netflix’s stock,
30
so it is not clear if the change is meaningful. By 
the time the stock markets closed on February 13, 
Netflix’s stock was up more than one percent.
Programmers Disney, Time Warner, and Fox also saw almost no change in the prices of their 
stocks, suggesting that their shareholders did not view the merger as having much effect on their 
ability to earn revenues. Viacom’s stock was down about 0.7 percent relative to th
e S&P 500. 
The outlier is CBS, whose stock increased by more than three percent in response to an 
announcement on February 12 after the markets closed that CBS had decided to initiate a $1.5 
billion “accelerated share repurchase.”
31
As evidenced by the CBS stock, event studies have inherent flaws that limit their effectiveness. 
The primary flaw is that stock prices are affected by a number of events in addition to the event 
of interest, ranging from surprise announcements about the macro-economy to factors affecting 
30
The average daily change in the absolute value of Netflix
’s stock price from May 1, 2013 through May 2, 2014 
was about 1.9 percent, according to http://finance.yahoo.com/q/hp?s=NFLX
 
31
http://www.reuters.com/finance/stocks/CBS/key-developments/article/2920904 
-3% 
-2% 
-1% 
0% 
1% 
2% 
3% 
4% 
5% 
6% 
7% 
8% 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested