c# wpf document viewer pdf : Delete page from pdf file online SDK control service wpf azure windows dnn an-overview-of-best-fitting0-part178

2012 v1 
An overview of 
best-fitting: 
Building 2011 Census 
estimates from 
Output Areas 
October 2012  
Edition No.: 2012 v1 
Editor:  
I Coady 
Office for National Statistics 
Delete page from pdf file online - SDK control service:C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Easy to Use C# Code to Extract PDF Pages, Copy Pages from One PDF File and Paste into Others
www.rasteredge.com
Delete page from pdf file online - SDK control service:VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed VB.NET Guide for Extracting Pages from Microsoft PDF Doc
www.rasteredge.com
Building 2011 Census estimates from Output Areas
2012 v1 
Office for National Statistics 
Contents
1. 
What is best-fitting? ........................................................................................................................... 3 
2. 
How have best fit estimates be produced? ..................................................................................... 3 
3. 
What data was used to produce best-fit estimates? ....................................................................... 4 
4. 
So why was best-fit used this time? ................................................................................................. 4 
5. 
What impact does best-fitting have on statistical estimates? ....................................................... 6 
6. 
What about instances of geographies that are smaller than an OA? ........................................... 6 
7. 
Are there any instances where best-fitting cannot be applied? .................................................... 8 
a)
Local authority districts
........................................................................................................ 8 
b)
National parks
...................................................................................................................... 9 
c)
2011 Census merged wards
................................................................................................ 10 
8. 
What best-fit tools and products are available? ........................................................................... 11 
Appendix I – Production of 2001 exact-fit estimates ................................................................................. 12 
Appendix II – 2001 best-fitting to higher geographies ............................................................................... 14 
SDK control service:VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.
If you are looking for a solution to conveniently delete one page from your this VB.NET PDF Library, which supports a variety of PDF file editing features
www.rasteredge.com
SDK control service:C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
Provides you with examples for adding an (empty) page to a PDF and adding empty pages You may feel free to define some continuous PDF pages and delete.
www.rasteredge.com
Building 2011 Census estimates from Output Areas
2012 v1 
Office for National Statistics 
An overview of best-fitting: 
building 2011 Census estimates from output areas (OAs)  
1. What is best-fitting? 
1.1 Best-fitting is the method used to produce estimates for any output geography, by 
aggregating whole statistical building blocks, even where these may be nested within a 
higher geography.  It is the method used to produce all national and 2011 Census statistics, 
so that estimates produced are consistent, comparable and non-disclosive. 
2. How have best-fit estimates be produced? 
2.1 For the 2011 Census ONS has simplified the process of producing best-fit of OA to higher 
geographies. This has been done in a way that allows anyone to produce lookups in the 
same way, without needing to access 2011 Census source data.  
2.2 Each geographic instance of the 2011 OA, lower super output area (LSOA) and middle 
super output area (MSOA) geographies has a population weighted centroid. This centroid, 
described below, is a single summary point that reflects the spatial distribution of the 2011 
Census population in each instance of those geographies. Figure 1 shows how an OA is 
allocated to a higher geography if the OA population weighted centroid falls within the 
boundary of the higher geography.  
2.3 Generating estimates using these OA best-fit allocations provides an approach that is 
flexible enough to allow users to build their own best-fit OA allocations. This is done by 
plotting these frozen OA population weighted centroids to the boundaries of any new or 
changed geographies.  
2.4 This approach to building estimates for any geography minimises the risk of disclosure by 
preventing slivers containing very small populations.  
WARD 1
OA 1
OA 2
OA 3
OA 4
Fig 1. 2011 Best fit of Output Areas to Higher Geographies. OA4 is allocated to 
WARD 2 because OA4's population weighted centroid falls within the WARD 2 
boundary
WARD 2
WARD 3
WARD 4
WARD 5
OA 1 
OA 2
OA 3
OA 4
WARD 1
WARD 2
WARD 1
WARD 1
OA
WARD
OA-Ward Lookup
SDK control service:C# PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
Advanced component and library able to delete PDF page in both Able to remove a single page from PDF document. Ability to remove a range of pages from PDF file.
www.rasteredge.com
SDK control service:C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
to rotate PDF document page, how to delete PDF page using C# capable of adding and inserting (empty) PDF page or pages from various file formats, such as
www.rasteredge.com
Building 2011 Census estimates from Output Areas
2012 v1 
Office for National Statistics 
3. What data was used to produce best-fit estimates?  
3.1 Best-fit estimates are produced using the 2011 OAs and their population weighted 
centroids.  
3.2 A population weighted centroid represents how the population is spatially distributed within 
the OA, summarised to a single point on the ground. 
3.3 Population weighted centroids were calculated using a median centroid algorithm, which is 
less influenced by outliers, i.e. a  household location that is located a long way from the rest 
of the households in the OA -  than the mean centroid algorithm that was used to produce a 
set of population weighted centroids for the 2001 Census.
1
3.4 The Median Center (sic) function in ArcGIS 10.0 was run against the coordinates and the 
populations of each household in each OA, LSOA and MSOA.  
3.5 Where the calculated centroid fell outside the boundary of the area for which it was being 
calculated or within two metres of the area boundary, it was moved to the nearest location 
at least two metres inside the area boundary.   
3.6 More information about the Median Center algorithm is here
4. So why was best-fit used this time? 
4.1 The Geography Policy for National Statistics sets out best practice for producing national 
and official statistics by geography, to ensure outputs are accurate, consistent and 
comparable in their use of geography.  One element of the policy prescribes that statistical 
estimates should be produced for the core statistical geographies of OAs and SOAs and 
that estimates for all geographies should be built from aggregations of OAs or SOAs.  For 
this reason OAs and SOAs are referred to as building block geographies. 
4.2 When OAs were created in 2001, they aligned with the administrative ward, parish and 
community boundaries current at the time. Many of the administrative boundaries have 
changed significantly since the 2001 Census, so they no longer align with the OAs and 
SOAs. In addition, a number of the OAs and SOAs have been redesigned which means 
they no longer align with unchanged ward and parish boundaries. The maintenance of the 
OAs and SOAs have been maintained as part of the 2011 Census OA maintenance. No 
decision has yet been made on whether any future maintenance will be applied, but any 
decision will be made in the context of the Beyond 2011 programme, which is looking at the 
future of the England and Wales census. 
4.3 The fact that OAs and administrative boundaries no longer align means it is not possible to 
aggregate OAs and SOAs to exactly fit these changed administrative boundaries. This 
poses a number of problems for producing statistics for an area that does not now align 
with OAs.  
1
The 2001 population weighted centroids were not used for the production of statistical estimates or 
geographic lookups as part of the 2001 Census 
SDK control service:VB.NET PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for vb.net, ASP.NET
in your PDF document is unnecessary, you may want to delete this page PDF Page and File Splitting. If you want to split PDF file into two or small files, you
www.rasteredge.com
SDK control service:C# PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files
with other PDF files to form a new PDF file. Using this C#.NET PDF document splitting library can easily and accurately disassemble multi-page PDF document into
www.rasteredge.com
Building 2011 Census estimates from Output Areas
2012 v1 
Office for National Statistics 
4.4 An exact-fit estimate could be produced for an area that does not align with an OA. This 
could be done by plotting the grid reference of each household address directly into the 
boundary of the output geography. It would then be possible to compare this estimate with 
an estimate for the overlapping but unaligned OA and identify the difference. 
4.5 Figure 2 shows that the difference between the two geographies produces a ‘sliver’ 
containing two households. By taking one estimate from another it is possible to expose 
very small numbers of households or persons. This is called ‘disclosure by differencing’, 
and this problem applies to all exact-fit estimates produced using the same data source for 
different overlapping geographies.  
WARD 1
OA 1
OA 3
Fig 2. In 2011, the difference between WARD 1 
and the OAs means a disclosive sliver is 
produced
OA 4
OA 2
4.6 In 2001, the risk of disclosure was addressed by adjusting cells in tables that had very small 
values and which could be disclosive. This small cell adjustment proved unpopular with 
users and was not favoured for use as part of the 2011 Census.    
4.7 It is possible to provide estimates for different overlapping geographies from the same data 
by always aggregating OA estimates for each geography, using a best-fit methodology to 
determine the OAs that are allocated to each geography. This is the approach prescribed 
by the Geography Policy for National Statistics and the solution adopted for 2011 Census 
outputs.  It means that estimates for any geography are always aggregations of whole OAs’ 
estimates.   
4.8 Best-fit has also been adopted for the 2011 Census because the population weighted 
centroids that are used to create the allocations can be provided as part of the 2011 
Census Geography Outputs. Doing this allows users to produce their own best-fit estimates 
in line with the Geography Policy for National Statistics. Having access to the population 
weighted centroid makes best-fitting a far more flexible methodology than alternative 
methods because it allows statistical users to produce their own estimates to any 
geography during the intercensal period. 
SDK control service:VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Ability to create a blank PDF page with related by using following online VB.NET we suggest you go to C# Imaging - how to insert a new empty page to PDF file
www.rasteredge.com
SDK control service:VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
Since images are usually or large size, images size reducing can help to reduce PDF file size effectively. Delete unimportant contents Embedded page thumbnails.
www.rasteredge.com
Building 2011 Census estimates from Output Areas
2012 v1 
Office for National Statistics 
5. What impact does best-fitting have on statistical 
estimates?
5.1 ONS has previously conducted research into the impact of adopting a best-fit policy which 
was used to inform the Geography Policy for National Statistics.
2
5.2 Overall, the research found that the adoption of best-fit as for producing estimates did not 
have a signficant impact, and was an adequate methodology to be used for 2011 Census 
outputs. 
5.3 Analysis of best-fitting 2001 OAs to 2009 electoral wards found that 94.4 per cent of wards 
had best-fit estimates that were within 10 per cent tolerance of exact-fit estimates to the 
same ward. 
6. What about instances of geographies that are smaller 
than an OA? 
6.1 In 2001 some wards and parishes contained less than 100 people or 40 households so 
therefore fell below the population threshold required for the Census Area Statistics (CAS) 
outputs.  Each of these wards and parishes with small population were merged with a 
neighbouring ward or parish until the minimum population threshold was reached.   
6.2 These merged wards and parishes were added to the unmerged wards and parishes to 
become two separate geographies, known as the 2001 CAS parishes and the 2001 CAS 
wards, adding to an already complex geographic hierarchy.  
6.3 As estimates were produced using the best-fit approach for 2011, it is not possible to 
identify geographies with exact-fit populations below the minimum population threshold for 
OAs of 100 population and 40 households. 
6.4  It was however possible to identify those geographies that were smaller than an OA and 
which did not contain an OA population weighted centroid. Figure 3 shows an area where a 
ward does not contain an OA population weighted centroid. Without applying some 
additional adjustment to the data, this ward will not have any OA estimates attached to it 
and the ward would be returned as having no population or households. For this reason, 
ONS made the decision to apply a manual adjustment to the data to allocate population 
weighted centroids to geographies without them.  
2
http://www.ons.gov.uk/ons/guide-method/census/2011/the-2011-census/producing-and-delivering-
data/output-geography/best-fit-policy/exploring-the-performance-of-best-fitting-to-produce-ons-data-for-non-
standard-geographical-areas.pdf 
SDK control service:C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document online in C#.NET
File: Merge PDF; C# File: Split PDF; C# Page: Insert PDF pages; C# Page: Delete PDF pages; C# Read: PDF Text Extract; C# Read: PDF
www.rasteredge.com
SDK control service:VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple
PDF document file to one-page PDF files or they can separate source PDF file to smaller PDF documents by every given number of pages. This online VB tutorial
www.rasteredge.com
Building 2011 Census estimates from Output Areas
2012 v1 
Office for National Statistics 
Fig 3. Best fit showing a ward (WARD 1) with a small population. As it contains no OA 
population weighted centroids, it would not be included in the best fit lookup without a 
manual adjustment being applied.
WARD 1
WARD 2
WARD 3
OA 1
OA 2
OA 1 
OA 2
WARD 2
WARD 1
WARD 3
OA
WARD
Ward-OA Lookup
no allocation
6.5 In the majority of cases, such as figure 4, geographies with a small population are 
contained within an OA that has its population weighted centroid attached to another 
geography within the OA. Users accessing the OA level statistics will therefore be seeing 
the estimates for both geographies. 
Fig 4. Best fit showing a ward (WARD 2)with a small population contained within a single OA. For 
2011, as the ward is within a single OA, it will be allocated the OA centroid nearest to its 
boundary
OA 1 
OA 1*
WARD 1
WARD 2
OA
WARD
Ward-OA Lookup
* nearest population weighted centroid
WARD 1
WARD 2
OA 1
6.6 ONS decided not to merge geographies together as they did for the CAS tables in 2001and 
also that they would allocate every instance of a geography to an OA, even without a 
population weighted centroid. ONS identified instances where an area contained no OA 
population weighted centroid, and ensured that at least one population weighted centroid is 
allocated based on the nearest OA population weighted centroid for an OA that overlaps 
the higher geography. This means that a single OA can be allocated to more than one 
instance of a geography. This also means that each instance of a geography is allocated to 
an OA, even one which has a very small population and doesn’t contain a OA population 
weighted centroid.  
Users of these estimates for wards and parishes with very small populations should 
therefore be aware that the estimates produced for wards and parishes cannot be 
aggregated together to produce totals for higher geographical areas,  as this would be 
double counting the same OA’s estimates.   
Building 2011 Census estimates from Output Areas
2012 v1 
Office for National Statistics 
6.7 ONS is aware of the risk of double counting, but an indicator within the lookups will clearly  
set out where areas with very small populations have been allocated to the same OA. 
Users who want to access estimates at a higher geographic level will be able to do this 
directly from the census tables (where estimates for this geography are available) or by 
best-fitting OA population weighted centroids themselves to a higher geography, rather than 
by aggregating wards or parishes. 
6.8 The problems created by geographies with a small population are limited to administrative 
wards, parishes and communities, and built up areas. These instances are limited in the 
context of the overall geographies for which statistics are published and are limited to 0.2 
per cent (18) of wards, 10 per cent (1141) of parishes and 10 per cent (626) of built up 
areas. 
7. Are there any instances where best-fitting cannot be 
applied? 
7.1 There are some geographies for which best-fitting directly from OA is not appropriate. ONS 
has identified three of these for which a more appropriate solution was provided. 
a) Local authority districts 
7.2 Local authority districts (LADs) are the most common output geography for which statistics 
are produced. Due to the large amount of change at this geographic level 2011 OAs have 
been realigned to LAD boundaries as at 31 December 2011. As the primary administrative 
geography used as a basis for funding allocation OAs and SOAs were designed not to 
cross LAD boundaries as it would mean two different LADs being responsible for the same 
OA’s population. This change only affects two local authorities in Wales as demonstrated 
for Merthyr Tydfil in figure 5. This ensures that exact-fit estimates can still be produced for 
local authorities by aggregating OAs that constrain to LAD boundaries, consistent with 
ONS’s 2001 Census approach. The exact-fit of data to changed LAD boundaries will only 
be done for Census and as part of any future Census maintenance to the OA /SOA 
hierarchy. ONS will not modify OAs to fit any LADs as they change.  
Building 2011 Census estimates from Output Areas
2012 v1 
Office for National Statistics 
Fig 5. Changes in the local authority boundary for Merthyr Tydfil between 2003 and 2011
b) National parks 
7.3 National parks are a unique geography that do not align with any other geographic 
boundaries in England and Wales.  They tend to be sparsely populated and the small 
pockets of population that do live within a national park are often in an OA that straddles 
the national park boundary. The OA population weighted centroid often fall outside the 
national park as shown in figure 6. This means the OA’s estimates would not be included 
in the estimates for the national park. 
7.4 Other research has concluded that best-fit estimates for national parks can have large 
differences to exact-fit estimates and are therefore not fit for purpose. 
Fig 6. The villages within the national park 
boundary (red/yellow line) are excluded from any 
best fit counts for the national park as the 
population weighted centroid falls outside the 
park boundary
Building 2011 Census estimates from Output Areas
2012 v1 
Office for National Statistics 
10 
7.5 For this reason, ONS decided that exact-fit estimates will be produced for national parks 
from the 2011 Census. This will be the only geography outside that will take its estimates 
directly from the census data rather than from aggregations of OAs, apart from the OA, 
LSOA and MSOA geographies. 
c) 2011 Census merged wards  
7.6 In 2001 Standard Table (ST) wards were used to produce multivariate statistics at a higher 
population threshold than OA. For ST wards, higher thresholds of 1,000 persons and 400 
households were applied. Wards that fell below this threshold were merged with adjacent 
wards until they reached the threshold. ST wards are roughly equivalent to the 2011 
Detailed Theme tables.   
7.7 For the purpose of providing multivariate statistics, in 2011 wards below the population 
threshold of 1000 persons or 400 households were merged with an adjacent ward until the 
population of the merged wards are above threshold (see figures 7 and 8). This will 
effectively form a separate geography to the 2011 wards (called 2011 Census merged 
wards). In line with the policy, estimates for the 2011 Census merged wards are best-fitted 
from OA.  
Fig 7. Ward estimates best fitted from the OA population weighted centroid. As WARD 1 
contains less than 1000 population, it will need to be merged to provide enough 
population to take it above the lower threshold.
WARD 1
WARD 2
WARD 3
WARD 5
WARD 4
800
1200
1500
1300
WARD 1
WARD 4
WARD 3
WARD 2
Count
WARD
Ward Counts
1100
WARD 5
7.8 The solution is to identify the nearest OA population weighted centroid to the disclosive 
ward and merge the ward containing the OA population weighted centroid with the ward 
with the disclosive population. This creates a new geography (roughly comparable with ST 
wards in 2001) for which detailed characteristics tables can be produced without the risk of 
disclosure, by best-fitting OAs to the instances of 2011 Census merged wards. As this is a 
new and separate geography all the areas will be coded differently even where they 
represent the same boundary for the 2011 wards. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested