c# wpf document viewer pdf : Delete pages from pdf preview software control cloud windows web page .net class wp7330-part1869

Research Institute of Industrial Economics 
P.O. Box 55665 
SE-102 15 Stockholm, Sweden
info@ifn.se
www.ifn.se
IFN Working Paper No. 733, 2008 
Gazelles as Job Creators – A Survey and 
Interpretation of the Evidence 
Magnus Henrekson and Dan Johansson  
Delete pages from pdf preview - copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Easy to Use C# Code to Extract PDF Pages, Copy Pages from One PDF File and Paste into Others
cut pages out of pdf; deleting pages from pdf file
Delete pages from pdf preview - VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed VB.NET Guide for Extracting Pages from Microsoft PDF Doc
copy pages from pdf into new pdf; extract one page from pdf reader
Gazelles as Job Creators – A Survey and Interpretation 
of the Evidence
Magnus Henrekson
and Dan Johansson
January 22, 2009 
Abstract
It is often
claimed that small and young firms account for a disproportionately large 
share of net employment growth. We conduct a meta analysis of the empirical evidence 
regarding whether net employment growth rather is generated by a few rapidly growing firms – 
so-called Gazelles – that are not necessarily  small  and young. Gazelles are found to be 
outstanding job creators. They create all or a large share of new net jobs. On average, Gazelles 
are younger and smaller than other firms, but it is young age more than small size that is 
associated  with  rapid  growth.  Gazelles  exist  in  all  industries.  They  seem  not  to  be 
overrepresented in high-tech industries, but there is some evidence that they are overrepresented 
in services.  
Keywords
: Entrepreneurship; Firm growth; Flyers; Gazelles; High-growth firms; High-impact firms; 
Job creation; Rapidly growing firms. 
JEL
Codes
: D21; L25; M13; O10; O40. 
Corresponding author. Research Institute of Industrial Economics (IFN), P.O. Box 55665, SE-102 15 
Stockholm, Sweden. Ph: +46-8-665 45 02. E-mail: Magnus.Henrekson@ifn.se
. Personal website: 
www.ifn.se/mh
.  
The Ratio Institute, P.O. Box 3203, SE-103 64 Stockholm, Sweden. E-mail: dan.johansson@ratio.se
. Personal 
website: www.ratio.se/eng/johansson
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.Word
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.Word. Get Preview From File. You may get document preview image from an existing Word file in C#.net.
extract pages from pdf document; copy pages from pdf to word
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.PowerPoint
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.PowerPoint. Get Preview From File. You may get document preview image from an existing PowerPoint file in C#.net.
extract pages from pdf on ipad; delete pages from pdf preview
1. Introduction 
Research on the economic importance of small firms was negligible until David Birch (1979) 
claimed that they generated a disproportionately large share of new net jobs.
1
Birch’s findings 
have been criticized by, e.g., Brown et al. (1990); Davis et al. (1996a, 1996b) and 
Haltiwanger and Krizan (1999), but they sparked small business research. It is now a vigorous 
research field with a wide coverage, encompassing issues such as the importance of 
entrepreneurship, firm demography and firm dynamics for job creation and economic 
growth.
2
Van Praag and Versloot (2008) review the empirical literature on the economic 
contribution of “entrepreneurial firms”, i.e., small and young firms, which are found to have 
positive effects on employment, productivity, innovation and utility. With reference to 
employment Van Praag and Versloot conclude (p. 135): “Entrepreneurs create more 
employment than their counterparts, relative to their size. This result is unambiguous. Small 
and young firms are required to boost employment.”
3
The purpose of this article is to go one step further and survey the empirical evidence on 
whether, in fact, net employment growth is generated by a few rapidly growing, not 
necessarily small and young, firms, so-called “Gazelles”. The term was launched by Birch 
some twenty years ago (Landström 2005, p. 170) to denote a small group of high-growth 
firms that according to him generated most of the new net jobs in the economy. This stands in 
contrast to the few large (often publicly traded) companies, “Elephants”, that according to 
Birch had a large employment share, but generated few new jobs, and to the vast majority of 
all firms that started out small, grew very little and hence contributed only marginally to 
employment growth. The latter firms were named “Mice”.
4
In addition, we are interested in 
whether Gazelles, in fact, are young and small, and whether Gazelles are overrepresented in 
high-tech industries.
5
Much economic policy has been targeting high-tech firms since 
1
See also Birch (1981, 1987). 
2
See, for instance, Kirchhoff and Greene (1998) for a summary of the discussion.  
3
Moreover, they maintain that the methodology of the critics strengthens this conclusion (p. 135): “The results 
from studies following the Davis-Haltiwanger methodology, which are not reported here, only add credibility of 
this result.”  
4
Gallagher and Miller (1991) instead use the terms ”flyers” and ”sinkers” to denote high- and low-growth firms, 
respectively.  
5
There is an extensive literature studying micro level characteristics of (high-)growth firms. In his wide-ranging 
survey of this literature Storey (1994) identified 35 such factors, which he classified into three categories (p. 
122): i) The resources of the entrepreneur(s), e.g., motivation and education; ii) the firm, e.g., age and size; and 
iii) strategy, e.g., management training and market positioning. See Barringer et al. (2005) for a recent survey of 
this literature. The studies identified in our survey generally do not report on any other characteristics than firm 
age, size and industry affiliation. Still, it is interesting to include those three characteristics in the survey 
considering the discussion on the importance of new and small firms and considering the expectation by many 
on high-tech firms to generate employment (and growth).  
1
VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
a preview component enables compressing and decompressing in preview in ASP images size reducing can help to reduce PDF file size Delete unimportant contents:
delete pages from pdf; copy web pages to pdf
C# WinForms Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit PDF
Erase PDF images. • Erase PDF pages. Miscellaneous. • Select PDF text on viewer. • Search PDF text in preview. • View PDF outlines. Related Resources.
convert selected pages of pdf to word online; extract pages from pdf files
politicians have relied on high-tech firms and industries to boost economic growth and job 
creation. The research questions may be stated as four propositions: 
Proposition 1
: In a population of firms, net employment growth is generated by a small 
number of high-growth firms, so-called Gazelles. 
Proposition 2
: On average, Gazelles are younger than other firms. 
Proposition 3
: On average, Gazelles are smaller than other firms. 
Proposition 4
: Gazelles are overrepresented in high-tech industries.  
In the next section we discuss the definition of Gazelles and the method used in our survey. 
Section 3 reports the results from the identified studies. These results are analyzed in Section 
4, where we also offer our conclusions.  
2. Definitions and Method 
There is no general agreement on the definition of Gazelles. Birch (e.g., Birch et al. 1995, p. 
46) defines them as “A business establishment which has achieved a minimum of 20% sales 
growth each year over the interval, starting from a base-year revenue of at least $100,000.” 
Hence, the definition is based on firms growing at least at a particular pace (e.g., that firms 
exhibit a certain annual growth rate or more for a certain number of years). Another way is to 
use a high-growth threshold and define Gazelles as the 
x
percent fastest growing firms. 
Recently, OECD (Ahmad 2006) proposed defining high-growth enterprises as enterprises 
with an average employment growth rate exceeding 20 percent p.a. over a three-year period 
and with 10 or more employees at the beginning of the period. They also proposed that the 
term Gazelle should only apply to young high-growth firms, or more specifically to 
enterprises less than five years old and with an average employment growth rate exceeding 20 
percent p.a. over a three-year period and with 10 or more employees at the beginning of the 
period. Consequently, the literature is quite disparate.  
Delmar et al. (2003, p. 192–197) systematize the literature on high-growth firms. Several 
issues are addressed showing large heterogeneity among studies:  
(i)
Choice of growth indicator. Employment, market share, physical output, profits 
and sales are by far the most commonly used.  
(ii)
Measurement of growth. Growth is measured in several ways, both in absolute and 
relative terms. Multiple or composite growth indicators and growth measures are 
also employed.  
2
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
document files by C# code, how to rotate PDF document page, how to delete PDF page using C# .NET, how to reorganize PDF document pages and how
copy pages from pdf to new pdf; delete page from pdf online
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.excel
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.Excel. Get Preview From File. You may get document preview image from an existing Excel file in C#.net.
extract page from pdf preview; extract pdf pages
(iii)
The regularity of firm growth over time. Firm growth fluctuates substantially over 
time. The choice of time period over which growth is measured, annual growth, 
growth between initial and final year etc., therefore affects observed growth rates.  
(iv)
The process by which firms grow, i.e., organic or acquired growth.
6
(v)
Firm demographics. Firm size, firm age and industry affiliation have been shown 
empirically to have a large impact on firm growth, and therefore need to be 
considered.  
We have also noted that two different kinds of benchmarks are used to evaluate the job 
contribution of Gazelles: either by comparing it to the job contribution of non-Gazelles in the 
investigated population or by relating it to aggregates such as total employment growth, total 
unemployment and the job contribution of new firms. The former is preferred in studies 
investigating a smaller sample of firms. Studies investigating large samples of firms, such as 
all firms in the private sector, also use the latter. Population refers to three types of firms: 
continuing firms (also called permanent firms or ongoing firms), i.e., firms existing 
throughout the studied period; new firms, i.e., one or several cohorts of new firms established 
during the studied period; or all firms, i.e., continuing firms as well as new firms established 
during the studied period.  
Job contribution can be discussed in terms of gross job creation, i.e., total employment 
gains in studied units; gross job destruction, i.e., total employment losses in studied units; and 
net job creation, i.e., the difference between the two during the same time period (e.g., Davis 
and Haltiwanger 1999, Section 2.1). All identified studies measure net job creation, and when 
nothing else is stated this is what we refer to.  
Net job creation is measured at different levels: firm, groups of firms (notably small, 
young and industries) and at the aggregate level. This means that net job creation may differ 
across levels and across groups of firms. For instance, even though total employment may 
decrease, certain groups of firms, e.g., new ones, may experience net job growth.  
Organic growth is supposed to have a larger effect on net employment than acquired 
growth. Some studies investigate single establishments to deal with this alleged “problem”. It 
is conceivable that single-establishment firms mostly grow organically. To remain a single 
establishment when acquiring other firms implies that acquired establishments have to be shut 
down and employment reallocated to the establishment of the acquiring company. This is not 
particularly likely; rather, one or several of the acquired establishments are likely to remain in 
operation.  
6
Organic growth is growth through new appointments in a firm, while acquired growth is growth through 
acquisitions and/or mergers. Organic growth and acquired growth may also be denoted internal growth and 
external growth, respectively. Throughout the text, the sum of organic and acquired growth will be denoted total 
growth. 
3
VB.NET PDF delete text library: delete, remove text from PDF file
Visual Studio .NET application. Delete text from PDF file in preview without adobe PDF reader component installed. Able to pull text
pdf extract pages; export pages from pdf preview
C# Word - Delete Word Document Page in C#.NET
doc.Save(outPutFilePath); Delete Consecutive Pages from Word in C#. int[] detelePageindexes = new int[] { 1, 3, 5, 7, 9 }; // Delete pages.
extract page from pdf document; deleting pages from pdf document
However, acquired growth is important for reallocating employment and other resources 
to more productive uses. Hence, Gazelles growing externally may be of crucial importance for 
productivity growth. Klepper and Simons (2005), for instance, show that growing industries 
typically experience shakeouts in which the number of firms after some time falls sharply due 
to exits, mergers and acquisitions. Hence, a natural pattern in the course of the evolution of an 
industry is that the number of firms is initially very large, but when the industry grows and 
matures the selection process rapidly reduces the number of firms. It therefore seems normal 
that Gazelles in mature industries grow through acquisitions of less efficient competitors. 
Klepper (2002) provides many interesting examples in this regard. The U.S. automobile 
industry consisted of 271 firms in 1909. This number was down 60 percent by 1923, and by 
the mid 1960s, only four car manufacturers remained in business. The television industry 
shows a similar pattern. 
The studies in our survey have been identified by searching the following databases: the 
American Economic Association’s electronic bibliography of economic literature (Econlit), 
Google Scholar, Journal Storage (JSTOR), Research Papers in Economics (RePEc), and 
Social Science Research Network (SSRN). We first searched for “Gazelle”, “high-growth 
firm”, “rapidly growing firm” and similar words and phrases in titles, abstracts, keywords, 
and, when possible (Econlit, JSTOR and RePEc), in the main text.
7
In total, there were 
thousands of hits. We browsed the hits and selected the papers that investigate the 
employment contribution of Gazelles, or high-growth firms, relative to one or both of the 
identified benchmarks during a particular time period. In what follows we will use Gazelles 
and high-growth firms synonymously. The identified studies were then complemented by 
references found in the identified studies and studies we know of. We confined the survey to 
studies published after 1990, partly because we did not find that many studies before 1990 
(earlier studies are surveyed in Storey 1994), partly because the quality of data has improved 
substantially in the last two decades. The primary purpose of some of the papers was not the 
study of the job contribution of Gazelles 
per se
.  
7
The search in Google Scholar was restricted to ”Gazelle” due to the unmanageable number of hits resulting 
from searches for the other words and phrases. We also restricted the search to results in English.  
4
C# PDF delete text Library: delete, remove text from PDF file in
Delete text from PDF file in preview without adobe PDF reader component installed in ASP.NET. C#.NET PDF: Delete Text from Consecutive PDF Pages.
extract pages from pdf acrobat; deleting pages from pdf online
C# PowerPoint - Delete PowerPoint Document Page in C#.NET
doc.Save(outPutFilePath); Delete Consecutive Pages from PowerPoint in C#. int[] detelePageindexes = new int[] { 1, 3, 5, 7, 9 }; // Delete pages.
extract pdf pages online; extract page from pdf file
3. Results 
In total we identified 20 studies in our search, which was a much smaller number than we had 
expected, especially given the importance of the issue.
8
The key explanation for the small 
number of studies is the lack of suitable data. A systematic analysis of the importance of 
Gazelles requires data on a large number of individual firms that can be followed over time, 
preferably covering all ages, sizes and industries. By their very nature such analyses are time-
consuming and costly, especially for new and small firms. Appropriate data do not even exist 
in many countries (Schreyer 2000; Hoffman and Junge 2006). As mentioned, academic 
research on these issues is also of relatively recent vintage. To begin with, research addressed 
fundamental issues such as whether Gibrat’s Law (that a firm’s growth rate is independent of 
its size) holds and the impact of the turnover and mobility of firms on employment and 
economic growth (see, e.g., Sutton 1997, Caves 1998, Lotti et al. 2003, and Audretsch et al. 
2004 for surveys). 
Table 1
summarizes the studies in chronological order based on Delmar et 
al.’s (2003) systematization, and we now offer a summarizing comment and evaluation on 
each of them. 
Table 1 about here 
Birch and one of his critics, James Medoff, co-author of Brown et al. (1990), summarized 
what Birch and his protagonists agreed upon regarding the job contribution of small and large 
firms. About Gazelles they concluded (Birch and Medoff 1994) that a relatively small number 
of firms create a disproportionately large share of new jobs.
9
During the 1988–92 period, four 
percent of the firms generated 70 percent of all new jobs among ongoing firms in the U.S. 
These four percent accounted for about 60 percent of all new jobs in the whole economy 
during the same period. They were relatively small; in 1993, the average Gazelle firm 
employed 61 people. Gazelles were found in all industries and every industry had about the 
same proportion of rapidly growing firms.  
Kirchhoff (1994) studies the job contribution of firms in the 1977 and 1978 cohorts of 
firms in the nonagricultural private sector of the U.S. economy. The analysis is based on the 
8
Storey (1994) reports findings from 14 studies investigating the employment contribution of rapidly growing 
firms and Schreyer (2000) presents seven studies on high-growth firms and employment. We count Storey’s 
survey of 14 early studies as one study, while Schreyer’s country studies are treated separately. Several studies 
concern Sweden, including one of the studies reported by Schreyer. As they are based on the same data set and 
draw similar conclusions, we treat them as one study. In total our survey therefore encompasses 20 studies. 
9
The section on the employment contribution of Gazelles draws on Birch et al. (1993), who base their analysis 
on data from Dun and Bradstreet for the 1988–92 period.  
5
Small Business Data Base (SBDB) and includes all firms established in 1977 and 1978. 
Multi-establishment firms and firms with more than 500 employees are excluded.
10
The 
remaining firms (95 percent of the original population) are followed throughout 1984. 
Adjustments are made to exclude firms growing rapidly as a result of mergers and 
acquisitions.
11
Firm growth is calculated as the percentage change of employment between 
the beginning and end of the period. The firms are ranked according to their employment 
growth rate, and the uppermost decile is classified as high-growth firms. Kirchhoff finds that 
a small number of high-growth firms create a disproportionate share of net jobs. Four percent 
of the new firms produce 75 percent of employment for the entire cohort during the first six 
years of life. The entire 1977–78 cohort of firms made a net contribution of 3.4 million jobs in 
1984 (20.6 percent of the 16.5 million net new jobs created between 1976 and 1984). 
Furthermore, they amounted to four percent of total employment in 1984. However, Kirchhoff 
(1994, p. 188) also finds that the total job contribution of the 1977–78 cohort falls by 25 
percent during their first six years of life compared to the initial number of employees at the 
time of their start-up, when jobs lost due to exits and job loss among survivors are deducted 
from employment growth among surviving firms. 
Storey (1994) summarizes research on the role and functioning of small firms. Among 
other things he reports findings from 14 studies investigating the job contribution of rapidly 
growing firms (p. 113–119).
12
One study concerns the U.S. and 13 studies concern the U.K. 
Most studies look at manufacturing, but some examine services. Based on the survey Storey (p. 
119) estimates that among studied firms “… approximately 4 percent of firms create 
approximately half the new jobs over a decade.” In follow up studies of the characteristics of 
rapidly growing firms Storey (1996, 1997, 1998, 1999) investigates limited companies, or 
groups of companies, that in 1996 had achieved an annual compound growth in turnover of at 
least 30 percent in the last four years. The companies/groups of companies were not 
subsidiaries and also had a turnover of between 5 and 100 million pounds in 1996. The 
investigation was based on data from the ICC/OneSource UK Companies database. About 10 
10
The purpose was to try to only include truly new firms in the investigated population. Large firms and multi-
establishment firms are supposed to be large firms that appear as new firms in the statistics due to ownership 
changes.  
11
Firms that exhibited employment growth of more than 400 percent any biennial period, had more than 50 
employees and added more than three establishments during the same biennial period were assumed to grow 
through mergers and acquisitions and were therefore excluded. These firms represented less than 0.1 percent of 
the surviving firms in the investigated population. The adjustments are crude compared to, e.g., Davidsson and 
Delmar (2003), and we therefore classify Kirchhoff (1994) as studying total growth. 
12
The studies are: Storey (1985), Rajan and Pearson (1986), Storey et al. (1987), NIERC (1988), Reynolds and 
Miller (1988), Johnson (1989a, 1989b, 1991), Daly et al. (1991), Gallagher and Miller (1991), Jones (1991), 
North and Smallbone (1993), Smallbone et al. (1993), and Woods et al. (1993). 
6
percent of the population fulfilled the criteria, hence they were denoted “the Ten Percenters”.
13
Young and small firms were overrepresented among the Ten Percenters. They were found in a 
diverse range of industries and the sectoral variations in the concentration of Ten Percenters 
were moderate. Storey does not, however, compare the job contribution of the Ten Percenters 
to that of other firms. Consequently, we do not include these reports in Table 1.  
Birch et al.
(1995) study the job contribution of different types of firms. They use Dun and 
Bradstreet data for 1990–94 covering all size classes and industries in the U.S. Despite the 
fact that Gazelles only represent three percent of the firm population, Birch et al. (1995) 
report that they account for all employment growth between 1990 and 1994.
14
In 1990, 82 
percent of them employed fewer than 19 people and only 3.6 percent employed at least 100 
people. However, the 3.6 percent of Gazelles that start from a base employment of at least 100 
are, on the other hand, “spectacular” job creators. They account for more than half (53 
percent) of the jobs created by Gazelles. Birch et al. (1995, p. 8) call them “Superstars”. Some 
of them were already Fortune 500 companies while others were heading rapidly in that 
direction.
15
Gazelles are found in all industries. In fact, the share of high-growth firms is 
about the same across sectors. Only 1.8 percent of all Gazelles are in high-tech industries.  
Picot and Dupuy (1998) analyze the job contribution by size class in Canadian firms.
16
They employ a longitudinal data set covering all firms in the business sector for the years 
1978–92 (annual data). Irrespective of the measures of growth, small firms generate a 
disproportionate share of net jobs in the whole economy. The result is largely due to new 
firms. Excluding firm entry, the disparity between the small and large firm sector disappears. 
The job contribution is very unevenly distributed among growing firms. It is heavily 
concentrated to a few rapidly growing firms. Among continuing small firms (studied for the 
1983–86 period), 5 percent accounted for 43 percent of jobs gained. High-growth firms are 
found in all size classes and a number of large firms create a significant share of new 
employment. The correlation of a firm’s growth is low between adjacent periods, suggesting 
that past growth is a poor predictor of future growth. 
Autio et al.
(2000) study the impact of Finnish Gazelles. Gazelles are defined as 
independent single-establishments increasing their sales by at least 50 percent during three 
13
Parker et al. (2005) use the same data to analyze why Gibrat’s Law does not hold for Gazelles by testing 
hypotheses derived from dynamic management theories. 
14
Gazelles generated 5.0 million net jobs, while total net job growth in the whole economy only amounted to 4.2 
million.  
15
Birch et al. (1995) do not report the age of the Gazelles. However, they conclude that old and large firms were 
major job losers (large Gazelles being notable exceptions) and that young and small firms do better. They also 
write that this is a common pattern during recessions.  
16
Data on firm age and industry are not reported.  
7
consecutive years from 1994 to 1997. To qualify as a Gazelle a firm also requires a turnover 
of at least FIM 1 million by the end of the period.
17
All establishments meeting the Gazelle 
criteria are included. They find Gazelles to be important job contributors, especially a few 
Gazelles showing an “ultra-rapid” growth. Altogether the Gazelles increased their 
employment by more than 400 percent during the studied period. Most Gazelles were found in 
trade or in services. High-technology firms were not over-represented among the Gazelles. No 
information is provided on the age of the Gazelles and the effect of firm size is not discussed.  
Brüderl and Preisendörfer (2000) study the employment effects and growth of new firms 
in Bavaria, Germany. The data are part of the Munich Founder Study. The analysis is based 
on a stratified sample of firms established in 1985 and 1986, and interviews are made to 
examine whether there are any factors predisposing a firm to grow rapidly. Agricultural 
businesses, architects, crafts, lawyers and physicians, making up about 20 percent of all 
newcomers, were not covered by the data and therefore excluded. To qualify as rapidly 
growing firms had to fulfill three criteria: survival until 1990, growth by at least 100 percent 
by the end of the period and an employment increase by at least 5 employees during the same 
period. About one fourth of the initial employment in the studied firms was lost due to 
closures. Job losses due to contraction of firms were small. The expansion of surviving firms 
more than compensated for the losses and total employment increased by 20 percent during 
the period. Fast-growing firms, constituting about 4 percent of the initial sample and about 6.5 
percent of the surviving firms, were the main job contributors. By the end of the period, they 
had expanded their employment at the year of establishment by close to 400 percent. Their 
contribution to aggregate employment growth in the whole population of studied firms 
exceeded 150 percent.  
Schreyer (2000) presents the result from six OECD country studies (France, Germany, 
Italy, the Netherlands, Spain and Sweden) and from Quebec in Canada.
18
The data are not 
fully comparable and the applied methodology varies somewhat across countries. All studies 
investigate permanent firms employing 20 or more (10 in Spain and no threshold in Germany) 
people at the beginning (end in the Netherlands and in Sweden). They investigate different 
time periods; see Table 1. All studies include manufacturing. Italy, Spain, Germany and 
Sweden also include services. Firm growth is measured as a composite index.
19 
Gazelles are 
17
In 1997 the exchange rates were roughly FIM/EURO = 5.9 and FIM/USD = 5.2.  
18
See also OECD (2002).  
19
The composite index is calculated as 
m
= (
x
t1
– 
x
t0
) × (
x
t1
/x
t0
), where 
x
t1
and 
x
t0
denote employment size by the 
end and the beginning of the period. Germany is the exception; for German firms growth is calculated as 
logarithmic AARG (average annual rate of growth).  
8
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested