c# wpf free pdf viewer : Export pages from pdf online SDK Library project wpf asp.net winforms UWP 2106810-part216

U.S. Department of Justice 
Office of Justice Programs 
Bureau of Justice Assistance 
Intelligence-Led 
B
u
r
e
a
u of 
J
u
s
t
ic
Assis
t
a
n
c
e
/
Policing: The New 
Intelligence 
Architecture 
N E W R E A L I T I E S 
Law Enforcement in the Post­911 Era 
Export pages from pdf online - copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Easy to Use C# Code to Extract PDF Pages, Copy Pages from One PDF File and Paste into Others
extract pages from pdf online; deleting pages from pdf document
Export pages from pdf online - VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed VB.NET Guide for Extracting Pages from Microsoft PDF Doc
delete page from pdf; extract one page from pdf file
U.S.Depa
r
tmentofJustice
OfficeofJusticeP
r
og
r
ams 
810SeventhStreetNW. 
Washington, DC20531 
Albe
r
toR.Gonzales 
AttorneyGeneral 
ReginaB.Schofield 
AssistantAttorneyGeneral 
DomingoS.He
rr
aiz 
Director, Bureauof
J
usticeAssistance 
OfficeofJusticeP
r
og
r
ams 
PartnershipsforSaferCommunities 
www.ojp.usdoj.gov 
Bu
r
eauofJusticeAssistance 
www.ojp.usdoj.gov
/
B
J
A 
NCJ2
1
068
1
W
r
ittenbyMa
r
ilynPete
r
son 
ThisdocumentwaspreparedbytheInternationalAssociationofChiefsofPoliceunder 
cooperative agreementnumber2003–DD–BX–K002awardedbytheBureauofJustice 
Assistance, OfficeofJusticePr ograms, U.S. DepartmentofJustice. Theopinions, findings, 
andconclusionsorrecommendationsexpressedinthisdocumentarethoseoftheauthors 
anddonotnecessarilyrepresenttheofficialpositionorpoliciesoftheU.S. Departmentof 
Justice. 
TheBureauofJusticeAssistanceisacomponentoftheOfficeofJusticePrograms,  whichalso 
includestheBureauofJusticeStatistics,  theNationalInstituteofJustice, theOfficeofJuvenile 
JusticeandDelinquencyPrevention, andtheOfficeforVictimsofCrime. 
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to convert and export PDF document to
An advanced PDF converter tool, which supports to be integrated in .NET project, and compatible with all Windows Export multiple pages PDF document to
deleting pages from pdf in preview; cut pages out of pdf file
VB.NET PDF - Convert PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
An advanced PDF converter tool, which supports to be integrated in .NET project, and compatible with all Windows Export multiple pages PDF document to
export pages from pdf preview; copy page from pdf
Intelligence-Led 
Policing: The New 
Intelligence 
Architecture 
September 2005 
NCJ 210681 
B
u
r
e
a
u of 
J
u
s
t
ic
Assis
t
a
n
c
e
VB.NET PDF - Convert PDF with VB.NET WPF PDF Viewer
document. Create multiple pages Tiff file from PDF document. Export PDF text content to TXT file with original layout. Convert
delete page from pdf online; copy pages from pdf to new pdf
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to convert and export PDF document to other
NET project. Create multiple pages Tiff file from PDF document. Export PDF text content to TXT file with original layout. Convert PDF
cut pages out of pdf; cut pages out of pdf online
A
c
kn
ow
l
e
d
g
m
e
n
ts
P
os
t
­
9
/
11P
o
li
c
i
ng
P
ro
j
ec
t
S
taff
The Post-9/11 Policing Project is the work of the 
International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP), 
National Sheriffs’ Association (NSA), National 
Organization of Black Law Enforcement Executives 
(NOBLE), Major Cities Chiefs Association (MCCA), and 
Police Foundation. Jerry Needle, Director of Programs 
and Research, IACP, provided overall project direction. 
■ 
International Association of Chiefs of Police 
Phil Lynn served as IACP’s Project Director, 
managed development and publication of the 
four Promising Practices Briefs, and authored 
Mutual Aid: Multijurisdictional Partnerships for 
Meeting Regional Threats. Andrew Morabito 
coauthored Engaging the Private Sector To 
Promote Homeland Security: Law Enforcement-
Private Security Partnerships, and analyzed 
Post-9/11 survey data. Col. Joel Leson, Director, 
IACP Center for Police Leadership, authored 
Assessing and Managing the Terrorism Threat. 
Walter Tangel served as initial Project Director. 
Dr. Ellen Scrivner, Deputy Superintendent, 
Bureau of Administrative Services, Chicago 
Police Department, contributed to all phases of 
project design and cofacilitated the Post-9/11 
Roundtables with Jerry Needle. Marilyn 
Peterson, Management Specialist–Intelligence, 
New Jersey Division of Criminal Justice, 
authored this monograph—Intelligence-Led 
Policing: The New Intelligence Architecture. 
■ 
National Sheriffs’ Association 
Fred Wilson, Director of Training, directed 
NSA project activities, organized and managed 
Post-9/11 Roundtables, and worked closely with 
IACP staff throughout the course of the project. 
NSA project consultants included Chris Tutko, 
Director of NSA’s Neighborhood Watch Project; 
John Matthews; and Dr. Jeff Walker, University 
of Arkansas, Little Rock. 
■ 
National Organization of Black Law 
Enforcement Executives 
Jessie Lee, Executive Director, served as 
NOBLE’s Project Director and conducted most 
staff work. 
■ 
Major Cities Chiefs Association 
Dr. Phyllis McDonald, Division of Public Safety 
Leadership, Johns Hopkins University, directed 
the work of the Major Cities Chiefs Association. 
The MCCA team included Denis O’Keefe, 
Consultant; Corinne Martin, Program 
Coordinator; and Shannon Feldpush. 
Dr. Sheldon Greenberg, Director of the Division 
of Public Safety Leadership, coauthored 
Engaging the Private Sector To Promote 
Homeland Security: Law Enforcement-Private 
Security Partnerships. 
■ 
The Police Foundation 
Edwin Hamilton directed Police Foundation 
project activities and managed Post-9/11 survey 
formatting and analysis, assisted by Rob Davis. 
Foundation consultants included Inspector Garth 
den Heyer of the New Zealand Police and Steve 
Johnson of the Washington State Patrol. 
P
rom
i
s
i
ng
P
rac
t
i
ces
R
e
vi
ews
Promising Practices drafts were critiqued and enriched 
by a series of practitioners/content experts, including 
Richard Cashdollar, Executive Director of Public 
Safety, City of Mobile, AL; George Franscell, 
Attorney-at-Law, Franscell, Strickland, Roberts and 
Lawrence, Los Angeles, CA; Mary Beth Michos, State 
Mutual Aid Coordinator, Prince William County, VA; 
David Bostrom, Manager, Community Policing 
Consortium, IACP; John P. Chase, Chief of Staff, 
Information Analysis and Infrastructure Protection, 
Department of Homeland Security; John M. Clark, 
iii
VB.NET PDF Converter Library SDK to convert PDF to other file
PDF Export. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: PDF Export. One is to convert and render selected PDF pages or files to desired document and image formats
acrobat extract pages from pdf; delete pages of pdf preview
C# PDF Converter Library SDK to convert PDF to other file formats
Online C# source code for convert PDF to various document and Support to convert multi-page PDF file to multi-page Able to export PDF document to HTML file.
copy pages from pdf to word; copying a pdf page into word
Assistant Vice President/Chief of Police, Burlington
Northern Santa Fe Railroad; John A. LeCours,
Director/Intelligence, Transport Canada; Ronald W.
Olin, Chief of Police, Lawrence, KS; 
Ed Jopeck, Analyst, Veridian; Jerry Marynik,
Administrator, State Terrorism Threat Assessment
Center, California Department of Justice; and Bart
Johnson, Office of Counter-Terrorism, New York 
State Police.
Ex
ecut
iv
e
Ov
ers
i
ght
The Post-9/11 Policing Project was initially 
conceptualized by the Office of Justice Programs, 
U.S. Department of Justice. Since its inception, the 
project has been guided throughout by the chief 
executive officers of the partner associations: 
■ 
Daniel N. Rosenblatt, Executive Director, 
International Association of Chiefs of Police 
i
■ 
Thomas N. Faust, Executive Director, National 
Sheriffs’ Association 
■ 
Jessie Lee, Executive Director, National 
Organization of Black Law Enforcement Executives 
■ 
Thomas C. Frazier, Executive Director, Major 
Cities Chiefs Association 
■ 
Hubert Williams, President, The Police Foundation 
Bureau of Justice Assistance Guidance 
We gratefully acknowledge the technical guidance 
and patient cooperation of executives and program 
managers who helped fashion project work: James H. 
Burch II, Deputy Director; Michelle Shaw, Policy 
Advisor; and Steven Edwards, Ph.D., Senior Policy 
Advisor for Law Enforcement. 
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to view, annotate, convert and print PDF in
Create PDF Online. Convert PDF Online. WPF PDF Viewer. RTF. Create PDF from Text. PDF Export. Convert PDF Page: Create Thumbnails. Page: Insert PDF Pages. Page: Delete
convert few pages of pdf to word; convert selected pages of pdf to word online
VB.NET PDF- HTML5 PDF Viewer for VB.NET Project
Online. Create PDF Online. Convert PDF Online. WPF PDF Create PDF from Text. PDF Export. Convert PDF to Page: Create Thumbnails. Page: Insert PDF Pages. Page: Delete
delete pages from pdf acrobat reader; extract pdf pages online
C
o
n
te
n
ts
A
c
kn
ow
l
e
d
g
m
e
n
ts
...............................................................iii
Ex
ec
u
t
iv
e
Summary..............................................................vii
I
n
t
r
o
du
ct
i
o
n .....................................................................1
I
n
te
lli
ge
n
ce
Iss
u
es
................................................................3
H
ow
W
e
G
ot
Wh
e
r
e
W
e
Ar
e
T
o
day:AnOv
e
rvi
ew
of
I
n
te
lli
ge
n
ce
Hi
sto
ry ................5
Wh
e
r
e
W
e
S
t
andT
o
day............................................................9
Wha
t
W
e
N
ee
dT
o
D
o
.............................................................15
App
e
ndixA:
I
n
fo
rma
t
i
o
nSharin
g
and
I
n
fo
rma
t
i
o
nT
ec
hn
o
l
og
yR
eso
ur
ces
.............25
App
e
ndixB:S
o
ur
ces
of
I
n
te
lli
ge
n
ce
Pr
o
du
cts
.......................................29
App
e
ndixC:
I
n
te
lli
ge
n
ce
Trainin
g
andR
eso
ur
ces
....................................35
App
e
ndixD:Criminal
I
n
te
lli
ge
n
ce
M
o
d
e
lP
o
li
c
y .....................................39
Endn
otes
.......................................................................45
Bibli
og
raphy ....................................................................49
VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to
Convert multiple pages PowerPoint to fillable and editable PDF Export PowerPoint hyperlink to PDF. Create PDF file from PowerPoint free online without email.
delete pages out of a pdf file; cut pages from pdf file
VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.
Enable specified pages deleting from PDF in Visual Basic .NET class. Free trial SDK library download for Visual Studio .NET program. Online source codes for
delete pages from pdf in reader; extract page from pdf online
Ex
ec
u
t
iv
e
Summary
T
he terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001 revealed 
the life-and-death importance of enhancing U.S. 
intelligence operations. Since that day, a tremendous 
amount of attention has been focused on the need for 
constructive changes in law enforcement intelligence. 
Intelligence operations have been reviewed, studied, 
and slowly but steadily transformed. Most efforts have 
focused on reorganizing intelligence infrastructures at 
the federal level; however, corresponding efforts have 
been made to enhance state and local law enforcement 
intelligence operations. Such enhancements make it 
possible for state and local law enforcement agencies 
to play a role in homeland security. Perhaps more 
important, improvements to intelligence operations 
help local law enforcement respond to “traditional” 
crimes more effectively. 
Because effective intelligence operations can be 
applied equally well to terrorist threats and crimes in 
the community, homeland security and local crime 
prevention are not mutually exclusive. Officers “on 
the beat” are an excellent resource for gathering 
information on all kinds of potential threats and 
vulnerabilities. However, the intelligence operations 
of state and local law enforcement agencies often are 
plagued by a lack of policies, procedures, and training 
for gathering and assessing essential information. 
To correct this problem, fundamental changes are 
needed in the way information is gathered, assessed, 
and redistributed. Traditional, hierarchical intelligence 
functions need to be reexamined and replaced with 
cooperative, fluid structures that can collect information 
and move intelligence to end users more quickly. 
Intelligence in today’s policing environment must 
adapt to the new realities presented by terrorism and 
conventional crimes. 
These new realities require increased collaboration in 
information gathering and intelligence sharing. Critical 
community infrastructures such as those related to 
food, agriculture, public health, telecommunications, 
energy, transportation, and banking are now seen as 
potential terrorist targets. As a result, parts of the 
community that previously did not receive much 
notice from state and local law enforcement agencies 
now require keen attention. Personnel who work in 
these and other key industries are now partners in 
terrorism prevention and crime control. Similarly, 
community- and problem-oriented policing must 
be integrated into intelligence operations to address 
conventional crime issues. Engaging and collaborating 
with the community at all levels are essential. 
Intelligence-led policing is a collaborative enterprise 
based on improved intelligence operations and 
community-oriented policing and problem solving, 
which the field has considered beneficial for many 
years. To implement intelligence-led policing, police 
organizations need to reevaluate their current policies 
and protocols. Intelligence must be incorporated into 
the planning process to reflect community problems 
and issues. Information sharing must become a policy, 
not an informal practice. Most important, intelligence 
must be contingent on quality analysis of data. The 
development of analytical techniques, training, and 
technical assistance needs to be supported. 
Because of size and limited budgets, not all agencies 
can employ intelligence analysts or intelligence officers. 
Nonetheless, all law enforcement agencies have a role 
in the transformation of national intelligence operations. 
This document identifies four levels of intelligence 
capabilities for state and local agencies. At each 
level, steps can be taken to help agencies incorporate 
intelligence-led policing strategies. These steps include 
adopting mission statements, writing intelligence 
policies and procedures, participating in information 
sharing, establishing appropriate security, and adopting 
legal safeguards to protect the public’s privacy and 
civil liberties. 
v
ii
More than 20 years ago, some in law enforcement 
their call. Their plea, espoused years ago, is even more 
argued for similar changes and an expanded 
urgent today. “Law enforcement administrators,” they 
application of intelligence operations. A national 
said, “can no longer afford to respond to contemporary 
catastrophe was required to confirm the wisdom of 
and future problems with the ‘solutions’ of yesterday.”
v
iii
I
n
t
r
o
du
ct
i
o
n
A
critical lesson taken from the tragedy of 
September 11, 2001 is that intelligence is 
everyone’s job. A culture of intelligence and 
collaboration is necessary to protect the United 
States from crimes of all types. Likewise, for 
intelligence to be effective, it should support an 
agency’s entire operation. Crime prevention and 
deterrence must be based on all-source information 
gathering and analysis. 
However, not all agencies have the resources to mount 
full-scale intelligence operations. The average city 
police department in the United States had 41 sworn 
personnel in 2001
and would not be expected to 
have intelligence analysts on staff. How then can an 
intelligence model be established that will provide 
support for all agencies? 
The needs of agencies—from the very small to the 
very large—must be considered if intelligence-led 
policing is to be established in the United States. 
This document examines how law enforcement 
agencies can enhance their intelligence operations for 
homeland security and traditional enforcement and 
crime prevention, regardless of how sophisticated 
their intelligence operations are. It explores the 
meaning and uses of intelligence, provides examples 
of intelligence practices, and explores how to 
establish and maintain an intelligence capability. 
I
n
te
lli
ge
n
ce
Iss
u
es
I
ntroducing intelligence-led policing into U.S. law 
enforcement agencies is problematic for several 
reasons. First, many agencies do not understand what 
intelligence is or how to manage it. Second, agencies 
must work to prevent and respond to day-to-day crime 
at the same time they are working to prevent terrorism. 
Third, the realities of funding and personnel resources 
are often obstacles to intelligence-led policing. 
Although the current intelligence operations of most 
law enforcement agencies prevent them from 
becoming active participants in the intelligence 
infrastructure, this problem is not insurmountable. 
W
hat
I
s
I
nte
lli
gence?
Because of misuse, the word “intelligence” means 
different things to different people. The most common 
mistake is to consider “intelligence” as synonymous 
with “information.” Information is not intelligence. 
Misuse also has led to the phrase “collecting 
intelligence” instead of “collecting information.” 
Although intelligence may be collected by and shared 
with intelligence agencies and bureaus, field 
operations generally collect information (or data). 
Despite the many definitions of “intelligence” that 
have been promulgated over the years, the simplest 
and clearest of these is “information plus analysis 
equals intelligence.” 
The formula above clarifies the distinction between 
collected information and produced intelligence. It 
notes that without analysis, there is no intelligence. 
Intelligence is not what is collected; it is what is 
produced after collected data is evaluated and analyzed. 
I
nte
lli
gence
i
s
not
w
hat
i
s
co
ll
ected
;i
t
i
s
w
hat
i
s
produced
a
f
ter
co
ll
ected
data
i
s
e
v
a
l
uated
and
ana
ly
zed
If intelligence is analyzed information, what is 
analysis? Some agencies contend that computer 
software can perform analysis for them; thus, they 
invest in technology rather than in trained analysts. 
However, analysis requires thoughtful contemplation 
that results in conclusions and recommendations. 
Thus, computers may assist with analysis by compiling 
large amounts of data into an easily accessible format, 
but this is only collated data; it is not analyzed data or 
information, and it falls far short of intelligence. For 
information to be useful, it must be analyzed by a 
trained intelligence professional. In other words, 
intelligence tells officials everything they need to 
know before they knowledgeably choose a course of 
action. For example, intelligence provides law 
enforcement executives with facts and alternatives that 
can inform critical decisions. 
T
ac
t
i
ca
lI
nte
lli
gence
V
ersus
S
trateg
i
c
I
nte
lli
gence
The distinction between tactical and strategic 
intelligence is often misconstrued. Tactical intelligence 
contributes directly to the success of specific 
investigations. Strategic intelligence deals with 
“big-picture” issues, such as planning and manpower 
allocation.
Tactical intelligence directs immediate 
action, whereas strategic intelligence evolves over time 
and explores long-term, large-scope solutions. 
Some professionals refer to “evidential intelligence,” 
in which certain pieces of evidence indicate where 
other evidence may be found.
Evidential intelligence 
can help prove a criminal violation or provide leads 
for investigators to follow.
The term “operational intelligence” is sometimes used 
to refer to intelligence that supports long-term 
investigations into multiple, similar targets. Operational 
intelligence is concerned primarily with identifying, 
targeting, detecting, and intervening in criminal activity
.6 
W
h
yI
nte
lli
gence
I
s
C
r
i
t
i
ca
Intelligence is critical for decisionmaking, planning, 
strategic targeting, and crime prevention. Law 
enforcement agencies depend on intelligence operations 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested