c# wpf free pdf viewer : Convert selected pages of pdf to word online application control utility html azure wpf visual studio 2106811-part217

on all levels; they cannot function effectively without 
collecting, processing, and using intelligence. 
D
ec
i
s
i
o
nmakin
g
Gathering information and deciding what to do with 
it are common occurrences in law enforcement 
operations. Law enforcement officers and managers are 
beset by large quantities of information, yet decisions 
are often based on information that may be incomplete, 
inaccurate, or misdirected. The move from information 
gathering to informed decisionmaking depends on the 
intelligence/analytic process, and results in a best 
estimate of what has happened or will happen. 
Questions have been asked about the extent to which 
substantive analysis was performed prior to September 
11 to test hypotheses of attacks by foreign terrorist 
groups against the United States, and whether 
domestic agencies were told to assess these threats 
or to develop a plan of action and present it to 
decisionmakers. It appears that decisionmakers relied 
on raw intelligence reports that may have raised 
concerns but did not guide informed decisions. 
Experience shows that intelligence and analysis must 
be strengthened to meet the threat of terrorism against 
the United States. Law enforcement personnel have a 
key role to play in making this happen. 
Plannin
g
Intelligence is critical to effective planning and 
subsequent action. In many law enforcement agencies, 
planning is performed without an understanding of the 
crime problems facing the jurisdiction and without 
sufficient operational input. In these instances, 
strategic planning bears no resemblance to strategic 
analysis or strategic intelligence. Instead, it relates 
only to funding issues and operational constraints. 
Essentially a budget exercise, this type of planning 
suffers from a disconnect between the major issues 
facing a community and the manner in which funds 
are spent to address those needs. 
Law enforcement executives are being encouraged to 
view policing as a business. The United Kingdom’s 
National Intelligence Model notes that: 
The law enforcement business is about the 
successful management and reduction of crime 
and other law enforcement problems. . . . The 
vital central ingredient in successful planning 
is identification and understanding 
■ 
an accurate picture of the business, 
■ 
what is actually happening on the ground, 
■ 
the nature and extent of the problem, 
■ 
the trends, and 
■ 
where the main threats lie. 
L
a
w
en
f
orcement
e
x
ecut
iv
es
are
be
i
ng
encouraged
to
vi
e
w
po
li
c
i
ng
as
a
bus
i
ness
.
By adhering to these principles, commanders can 
create responsive enforcement plans that meet the 
needs of the community. This cannot be done through 
sheer managerial vision. It must be embedded in 
critical thinking based on intelligence and analysis. 
S
t
ra
teg
i
c
Tar
get
in
g
Strategic targeting and prioritization are other critical 
roles of intelligence. Law enforcement agencies with 
tight budgets and personnel reductions or shortages 
must use their available resources carefully, targeting 
individuals, locations, and operations that promise the 
greatest results and the best chances for success. Case 
or lead overloads can reduce investigators’ efficiency 
unless they know how to identify the most fruitful leads. 
Intelligence enables officers to work more efficiently. 
For example, to help fight terrorism and domestic 
extremism, the California Department of Justice 
examines group characteristics, criminal predicates, 
target analyses, and intervention consequences to 
determine which groups pose the greatest threat to the 
state.
By reviewing and comparing this information, the 
agency can prioritize which groups require the earliest 
intervention. In addition, response strategies can be 
selected based on an understanding of the group’s 
activities and an awareness of what resources are 
available. 
Crim
e
Pr
e
v
e
n
t
i
o
n 
The final area in which intelligence is critical is crime 
prevention. Using intelligence from previous crimes 
in local and other jurisdictions, indicators can be 
created and shared among law enforcement agencies. 
Comparing the indicators from local neighborhoods, 
analysts can anticipate crime trends and agencies can 
take preventive measures to intervene or mitigate the 
impact of those crimes. 
Convert selected pages of pdf to word online - copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Easy to Use C# Code to Extract PDF Pages, Copy Pages from One PDF File and Paste into Others
cut pages from pdf reader; delete pages from pdf preview
Convert selected pages of pdf to word online - VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed VB.NET Guide for Extracting Pages from Microsoft PDF Doc
delete page from pdf file; delete pages from pdf in preview
H
ow
W
e
G
ot
Wh
e
r
e
W
e
Ar
e
T
o
day:
AnOv
e
rvi
ew
of
I
n
te
lli
ge
n
ce
Hi
sto
ry
L
aw enforcement intelligence is an outgrowth of 
military and national security intelligence. Military 
intelligence dates back to ancient times; references to 
it can be found in Chinese writings (Sun Tzu) and the 
Bible (Numbers 13). Security intelligence was adapted 
for use in law enforcement operations after World War 
II. Today, communications intelligence methods used 
by the military influence how law enforcement 
analyzes telephone records, and techniques used to 
manage human intelligence sources inform the 
management of confidential informants. 
The original blueprint for intelligence work was 
published by the Law Enforcement Assistance 
Administration of the U.S. Department of Justice in 
1971. In 1973, the National Advisory Commission on 
Criminal Justice Standards and Goals made a strong 
statement about intelligence. It called on every law 
enforcement agency and every state to immediately 
establish and maintain the capability to gather and 
evaluate information and to disseminate intelligence in a 
manner that protects every individual’s right to privacy 
while it curtails organized crime and public disorder.
The standards went on to note that every state should 
establish a “central gathering, analysis and storage 
capability, and intelligence dissemination system” in 
which law enforcement agencies participate by 
providing information and receiving intelligence from 
the system. It further stated that every agency with 
more than 75 personnel should have a full-time 
intelligence capability.
10 
When first instituted, intelligence units within law 
enforcement departments were not governed by policies 
that protected civil liberties and prevented intelligence 
excesses. During the 1970s, a number of intelligence 
units ran afoul of good practices, and, as a result, 
some agencies shut down their intelligence functions 
voluntarily, by court order, or from political pressure. 
In 1976, in response to the problem of intelligence 
abuses, standards were developed that required a 
criminal predicate for subjects to be entered in 
criminal intelligence files. During this time, the Law 
Enforcement Intelligence Unit (LEIU) File Guidelines 
were developed, along with those of the California 
Department of Justice and the New Jersey State Police. 
Between the late 1970s and the turn of the century, 
major intelligence initiatives were underway. Some of 
these initiatives, such as the Regional Information 
Sharing Systems (RISS) centers, did not even use the 
term “intelligence.” The primary basis for intelligence 
sharing in the 1980s and 1990s was the Criminal 
Intelligence System Operating Policies (28 C.F.R. Part 
23), which was written to apply to the RISS centers. 
By 2004, more than 7,100 agencies or agency branches 
were members of the nationwide RISS network. 
When the RISS centers were being developed in 1980, 
the International Association of Law Enforcement 
Intelligence Analysts (IALEIA) was formed. Its annual 
meetings were held in conjunction with those of the 
International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP). 
The 1990s saw the creation of several federal centers 
to support intelligence and information sharing. The 
National Drug Intelligence Center (NDIC) was 
established in Johnstown, Pennsylvania, and the 
Financial Crimes Enforcement Network (FinCEN) was 
formed in northern Virginia. Both had tactical and 
strategic intelligence responsibilities. Concurrently, the 
High Intensity Drug Trafficking Areas (HIDTAs) 
system was formed as a model of federal, state, and 
local cooperative efforts and information sharing. 
A month after September 11, 2001, the Investigative 
Operations Committee of IACP recommended to its 
leadership that an Intelligence Sharing Summit be held 
in March 2002. The summit was attended by more 
than 100 intelligence experts representing federal, 
state, local, and tribal law enforcement from the 
United States and Europe. Summit attendees examined 
the General Criminal Intelligence Plan and the United 
Kingdom’s National Intelligence Model (NCIS 2000) 
as potential blueprints for intelligence-led policing in 
the United States. 
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
page2 }; // Specify a position for inserting the selected pages. doc2.InsertPages( pages, pageIndex); // Output the new document Insert Blank Page to PDF File in
acrobat export pages from pdf; delete page from pdf reader
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
page2} ' Specify a position for inserting the selected pages. doc2.InsertPages(pages, pageIndex) ' Output the new document. Insert Blank Page to PDF File Using
extract page from pdf preview; delete pages of pdf online
Key recommendations from the IACP summit were as 
follows: 
■ 
Promote intelligence-led policing. 
■ 
Provide the critical counterbalance of civil rights. 
■ 
Increase opportunities for building trust. 
■ 
■ 
Plan (NCISP), 
NCISP 
recommendations appear in this document. 
U
nders
tand
i
ng
the
I
nte
lli
gence
P
rocess
NCISP 
Fi
gure
1.T
he
I
nte
lli
gence
P
rocess
Plannin
g
andDir
ect
i
o
n 
Remedy analytic and information deficits. 
Address training and technology issues. 
The primary outgrowth of the summit was the creation 
of the Global Intelligence Working Group (GIWG), 
which comprises approximately 30 intelligence 
professionals. GIWG met quarterly during 2003 and 
developed the National Criminal Intelligence Sharing 
which was released and approved by 
the U.S. Attorney General in October 2003. 
contained 28 recommendations for major changes in 
how policing is approached. Where appropriate, those 
categorizes the intelligence process according 
to six steps: planning and direction, collection, 
processing/collation, analysis, dissemination, and 
reevaluation (see figure 1). 
Planning how data will be collected is key to the 
intelligence process. Effective planning assesses 
existing data and ensures that additional data collected 
will fill any gaps in the information already on file. As 
one federal manager put it, “Don’t tell me what I 
know; tell me what I don’t know.” 
To be effective, intelligence collection must be planned 
and focused; its methods must be coordinated, and its 
guidelines must prohibit illegal methods of obtaining 
information.
11 
Inaccurate collection efforts can result in a 
flawed result, regardless of the analytical skills employed. 
Planning and collection are a joint effort that requires 
a close working relationship between analysts, who 
understand how to manage, compile, and analyze 
information, and intelligence officers, who know the 
best ways to obtain information. 
Planning requires an agency to identify the outcomes 
it wants to achieve from its collection efforts. This 
identification directs the scope of the officers’ and agents’ 
investigations—for example, a straightforward inquiry to 
identify crime groups operating in a jurisdiction or a more 
complex inquiry to determine the likelihood that criminal 
extremists will attack a visiting dignitary. 
C
o
ll
ect
i
o
n 
Intelligence analysis requires collecting and processing 
large amounts of information.
12 
Data collection is the 
most labor-intensive aspect of the intelligence process. 
Traditionally, it has been the most emphasized segment 
of the process, with law enforcement agencies and 
prosecutors dedicating significant resources to 
gathering data. New technology and new or updated 
laws have supported this emphasis. 
Historically, the following have been the most common 
forms of data collection used in intelligence units: 
■ 
Physical surveillance (either in person or by 
videotape). 
■ 
Electronic surveillance (trap and trace or wiretap). 
■ 
Confidential informants. 
■ 
Undercover operators. 
■ 
Newspaper reports (now also Internet sources). 
■ 
Public records (e.g., deeds, property tax records). 
VB.NET PDF - Annotate PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
Support to insert note annotation to replace PDF text. Ability to insert a text note after selected text. VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer: Annotate PDF Online.
acrobat remove pages from pdf; delete pages from pdf document
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to annotate PDF document online in C#.NET
Support to insert note annotation to replace PDF text. Ability to insert a text note after selected text. C# HTML5 PDF Viewer: Annotate PDF Online.
cut pdf pages online; extract pdf pages acrobat
Today many other overt and covert sources are available. 
Contact information for some organizations and 
commercial databases are available in the appendixes. 
Pr
ocess
in
g/
C
o
lla
t
i
o
n
Processing/collation involves sifting through available 
data to eliminate useless, irrelevant, or incorrect 
information and to put the data into a logical 
order. This organization makes it easier to identify 
relationships among entities and uncover relevant 
information.
13 
Today, collation is performed using 
sophisticated databases with text-mining capabilities. 
Database design is critical for retrieving and comparing 
data. Many computer software companies offer database 
products, but most require fine-tuning to tailor them 
to law enforcement agencies’ needs. Smaller agencies 
often use “off-the-shelf” software to reduce costs. 
Fortunately, technology now allows different databases 
to interact through text-mining features. 
Processing and collation also involve evaluating the 
data being entered. Information placed into an 
intelligence file is evaluated for the validity of the 
information and the reliability of its source. 
Information placed into an intelligence system must 
meet a standard of relevance—i.e., it must be relevant 
to criminal activity associated with the informant (28 
C.F.R. Part 23.20.a.). 
Analy
s
i
s
Analysis converts information into intelligence. As one 
authority on the subject notes, “Without the explicit 
performance of this function [analysis], the 
intelligence unit is nothing but a file unit.”
14 
Analysis is quite simply a process of deriving meaning 
from data. The analytic process tells what information 
is present or missing from the facts or evidence. In law 
enforcement intelligence operations, data are analyzed 
to provide further leads in investigations, to present 
hypotheses about who committed a crime or how it 
was committed, to predict future crime patterns, and to 
assess threats facing a jurisdiction. Thus, analysis 
includes synthesizing data, developing inferences or 
conclusions, and making recommendations for action 
based on the data and inferences. These inferences 
constitute the finished intelligence product. 
The process, along with investigative experience, also 
points out what has been done and what operational 
steps need to be taken. Thus, potential areas for further 
investigation may be recommended.
15 
It is important to 
remember that the analyst recommends but does not 
direct or decide on policy alternatives to minimize 
crime problems.
16 
In 2004, a broad range of analytic techniques and 
methods were available to support law enforcement: 
■ 
■ 
■ 
Di
sse
mina
t
i
o
n 
mission.
17 
current dissemination protocol is to share by rule and 
R
ee
valua
t
i
o
n 
assessment comes from the consumers of intelligence; 
whom the intelligence is directed. 
18 
A
na
ly
s
i
s
i
s
qu
i
te
s
i
mp
ly
a
process
o
f
der
ivi
ng
mean
i
ng
f
rom
data
Crime analysis: Crime pattern analysis, geographic 
analysis, time-series analysis, frequency-distribution 
analysis, behavioral analysis, and statistical analysis. 
Investigative (evidential) analysis: Network 
analysis; telephone record analysis; event, commodity, 
and activity-flow analysis; timeline analysis; visual 
investigative analysis; bank record analysis; net 
worth analysis; business record analysis; content 
analysis; postseizure analysis; case analysis; and 
conversation analysis. 
Strategic analysis: Threat assessments, premonitories, 
vulnerability assessments, risk assessments, 
estimates, general assessments, warnings, problem 
profiles, target profiles, and strategic targeting. 
Dissemination requires getting intelligence to those 
who have the need and the right to use it in whatever 
form is deemed most appropriate. Intelligence reports 
kept within the intelligence unit fail to fulfill their 
Those who need the information are most 
often outside the intelligence unit; therefore, the 
to withhold by exception. 
Reevaluation is the task of examining intelligence 
products to determine their effectiveness. Part of this 
that is, the managers, investigators, and officers to 
One way to reevaluate intelligence is to include a 
feedback form with each product that is 
disseminated.  To make sure the comments are 
valuable, the feedback form should ask specific 
questions relating to the usefulness of the intelligence. 
VB.NET PDF Image Redact Library: redact selected PDF images in vb.
Text. PDF Export. Convert PDF to Word (.docx). Convert to Text. Convert PDF to JPEG. Convert PDF to Png Page: Create Thumbnails. Page: Insert PDF Pages. Page: Delete
delete pages from pdf acrobat; extract page from pdf document
C# Word - Insert Blank Word Page in C#.NET
doc1 = new DOCXDocument(inputFilePath1); // Specify a position for inserting the selected page. Add and Insert Multiple Word Pages to Word Document Using C#.
extract one page from pdf acrobat; extract pages pdf
Wh
e
r
e
W
e
S
t
andT
o
day
S
everal current strategies and philosophies in law 
enforcement have a direct bearing on intelligence-
led policing. 
I
nte
lli
gence
­
L
ed
P
o
li
c
i
ng
The term “intelligence-led policing” originated in 
Great Britain. The Kent Constabulary developed the 
concept in response to sharp increases in property-
related offenses (e.g., burglary and automobile theft) at 
a time when police budgets were being cut. Officials 
believed that a relatively small number of people were 
responsible for a comparatively large percentage of 
crimes. They believed that police officers would have 
the best effect on crime by focusing on the most 
prevalent offenses occurring in their jurisdiction.
19 
The Kent Policing Model, as it was originally called, 
de-emphasized responses to service calls by 
prioritizing calls and referring less serious calls for 
general nonpolice services to other agencies. Thus, 
more police time was available to create intelligence 
units to focus, initially, on property-related offenses in 
each of the jurisdiction’s nine service areas. The result 
was a 24-percent drop in crime over 3 years.
20 
Intelligence-led policing focuses on key criminal 
activities. Once crime problems are identified and 
quantified through intelligence assessments, key 
criminals can be targeted for investigation and 
prosecution. Because the groups and individuals 
targeted in Kent were those responsible for significant 
criminal activity, the ultimate reduction in crime was 
considerable. The constabulary noted that “It has given 
the Kent Constabulary the ability to confront crime in 
an active, rational fashion and to build continually on 
each success.”
21 
Intelligence-led policing in the United States has 
benefited from the recent development of “fusion 
centers,” which serve multiagency policing needs. 
These fusion centers—derived from the watch centers 
of old—provide information to patrol officers, 
detectives, management, and other participating 
personnel and agencies on specific criminals, crime 
groups, and criminal activities. For example, they may 
support anti-terrorism and other crime-specific 
objectives. The centers may search numerous public 
and private databases to gather and analyze information. 
They may also generate intelligence products of their 
own, providing overviews of terrorist or other crime 
groups, analysis of trends, and other items of 
information for dissemination to participating 
agencies. 
Since 2003, fusion centers have been established in 
many states. Currently, there are fusion centers in at 
least 25 states with more under development or being 
planned. The Iowa Fusion Center is part of that state’s 
Law Enforcement Terrorism Prevention Program and a 
product of its State Homeland Security Strategy. The 
center serves as a clearinghouse for all potentially 
relevant, domestically generated homeland security 
data and information, leading to proper interpretation, 
assessment, and preventive actions.
22 
It has several 
objectives, including providing a center for statewide 
strategic intelligence, centralized information 
management systems, regional operations support, and 
a 24-hour, 7-day-a-week watch center. It also supports 
multiagency information exchange and assigns an 
intelligence officer to each region.
23 
Funding for fusion centers is available through federal 
and state sources. As such, a center’s mission can be 
limited to anti-terrorism, but many times includes all 
significant crimes, or targets different types of crime, 
such as identity theft, insurance fraud, money 
laundering, cigarette smuggling, armed robbery, 
and document fraud. The “all crimes” approach has 
recently been endorsed and recommended by many 
criminal intelligence advisory and policy groups. 
Good policing is good terrorism prevention. In other 
words, professional policing of any kind is instrumental 
in uncovering intelligence associated with both 
terrorist activities and conventional crimes. Encouraging 
this perspective enables local police departments to 
involve line officers more actively and to reinforce the 
C# PDF Page Rotate Library: rotate PDF page permanently in C#.net
Online C# class source codes enable the ability to rotate int rotateInDegree = 270; // Rotate the selected page. C#.NET Demo Code to Rotate All PDF Pages in C#
delete page from pdf acrobat; copy pdf page to clipboard
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
Access to freeware download and online VB.NET class to provide users the most individualized PDF page image as Png, Gif and TIFF, to any selected PDF page with
extract page from pdf acrobat; delete pages from pdf online
fact that enforcement, crime prevention, and terrorism 
prevention are interrelated. This approach helps to 
balance the current emphasis on anti-terrorism 
activities with traditional anticrime efforts. Many line 
officers want to define their role in the fight against 
terrorism. Intelligence-led policing can help clarify 
their contributions in this regard. 
10 
N
at
i
ona
lI
nte
lli
gence
M
ode
l— 
U
n
i
ted
Ki
ngdom
(NIM) considers the desired outcomes of an intelligence 
■ 
■ 
operation. 
■ 
of policing. 
■ 
25 
circumstances: 
■ 
■ 
looks for similar methods of operation that may 
G
ood
po
li
c
i
ng
i
s
good
terror
i
sm
pre
v
ent
i
on
The United Kingdom’s National Intelligence Model 
function to be community safety, crime reduction, 
criminal control, and disorder control.
24 
To achieve 
these results, the model outlines the following 
objectives: 
Establish a task and coordination process. 
Develop core intelligence products to drive the 
Develop rules for best training practices at all levels 
Develop systems and protocols to facilitate 
intelligence. 
Regular meetings keep participants focused on the 
stated goals and sustain the intelligence cycle. 
Following are a few examples of how this model 
concept might function when adapted to U.S. 
A county sheriff’s office identifies narcotics 
control as its top priority and develops strategies 
accordingly. The office targets known offenders and 
groups, shuts down open-air drug markets and 
crackhouses, and participates in school-based drug 
awareness programs to help prevent drug use. 
A statewide agency identifies vehicle insurance 
fraud as a top area for enforcement. The agency 
targets those involved in staged accidents, identifies 
communities in which insurance fraud is prevalent, 
indicate ongoing fraudulent activity, and mounts a 
public education campaign. 
■ 
A police agency in a small city makes safe 
streets a priority. The agency focuses on directed 
enforcement in identified hotspots. It also targets 
career criminals whose apprehension will 
significantly reduce the number of crimes being 
committed. Preventive measures include enhanced 
patrols, improved street lighting, and crime watch 
programs.
26 
Each of these examples shows how prioritizing a 
particular criminal activity helps identify appropriate 
response strategies. Some of these responses are 
enforcement solutions, while others are environmental, 
educational, or community-oriented solutions. 
P
rob
l
em
­
O
r
i
ented
P
o
li
c
i
ng
Problem-oriented policing (POP) is a policing 
philosophy developed by Herman Goldstein.
27 
As 
originally conceived, problem-oriented policing views 
crime control as a study of problems that leads to 
successful enforcement and corrective strategies. The 
model contends that “analysis, study, and evaluation 
are at the core of problem-oriented policing.”
28 
POP requires assessing each new problem and 
developing a tailored response. This approach requires 
ongoing creativity, not simply finding one good idea 
and applying it unilaterally. 
The SARA (Scanning, Analyzing, Responding, and 
Assessing) model is sometimes considered to be 
synonymous with problem-oriented policing, but 
it is a broader analytic model used in many fields. 
Nonetheless, the SARA model can be applied to 
collecting and applying intelligence. Scanning may 
be viewed as part of the collection process. Analysis 
and assessment are part of the intelligence process, 
and response is the outcome of the intelligence 
process. 
Bl
end
i
ng
I
nte
lli
gence
and
P
rob
l
em
­
O
r
i
ented
P
o
li
c
i
ng
As noted earlier, intelligence operations are compatible 
with problem-oriented policing. Although the 
problem-oriented policing and SARA models align 
with intelligence processes, the intelligence aspects 
associated with problem-oriented policing often have 
been ignored. 
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to annotate PDF document in C#.NET
1. Highlight text. Click to highlight selected PDF text content. 2. Underline text. Click to underline selected PDF text. 3. Wavy underline text.
export pages from pdf reader; cut pdf pages
VB.NET PDF - Annotate PDF with WPF PDF Viewer for VB.NET
1. Highlight text. Click to highlight selected PDF text content. 2. Underline text. Click to underline selected PDF text. 3. Wavy underline text.
export pages from pdf online; delete pages from pdf file online
Both community-oriented policing (COP) and 
problem-oriented policing have been used for crime 
analysis, which is statistical and incident-based, rather 
than strategic intelligence analysis, which looks at 
large-scope problems or models. Intelligence is a 
formal process of taking information and turning it 
into knowledge while ensuring that the information is 
collected, stored, and disseminated appropriately. 
Crime analysis data, usually collected for investigative 
purposes, typically does not meet the same standards 
as intelligence data—even though inferences may be 
drawn and recommendations may be made based on 
crime data. Confusion about the distinction between 
crime analysis data and intelligence data interferes 
with proper analysis and data handling in the police 
environment. 
However, intelligence efforts do not always apply 
the first step in SARA (i.e., “Scan”) and may benefit 
from developing more robust scanning mechanisms. 
At this point in the process, intelligence meets with 
standard patrolling and community-oriented policing 
because scanning occurs on the street. Research 
suggests that problem-solving analysts should 
“embrace both SARA and NIM” in the United 
Kingdom and show how the two merge.
29 
Incorporating 
POP and SARA into intelligence-led policing is an 
excellent recommendation for U.S. agencies as well. 
The U.S. model for intelligence-led policing 
incorporates the intelligence capabilities of all agencies. 
Traditionally, municipal agencies have relied on crime 
analysts, whereas agencies at the regional, state, and 
federal levels have used intelligence analysts. However, 
keeping crime analysis and intelligence analysis 
separate is not necessary. Agencies that can afford 
only one or two analysts must use professionals who 
can perform all types of analyses, not just statistical, 
network, or financial analyses. 
Now is the time to eradicate the artificial barriers 
between local and regional-state-federal analysts. 
Analysts need to become familiar with a range of 
sources and techniques, rather than specializing in 
niche areas such as burglaries, gangs, or organized 
crime. Although some agencies may assign analysts to 
particular tasks, agencies will be best served by 
analysts who can perform all intelligence tasks 
regarding past, current, and potential crimes. This 
flexibility is made possible by a model that blends 
intelligence-led and problem-oriented policing. 
This kind of intelligence blending also needs to take 
place at the beat level. Patrol officers are the eyes and 
ears of the police effort, and they must be encouraged 
and trained to look and listen intelligently. Information 
from field interviews, interactions with business 
people, and other activities and observations must be 
captured and forwarded to intelligence staff members 
11 
■ 
Community policing partnerships. 
■ 
■ 
30
31 
who can analyze the data, arrive at appropriate courses 
of action, and send information back to the beat 
officers. The common practice of hoarding information 
or sharing it only with patrol officers should not 
continue; everyone with a need to know should receive 
intelligence results. For example, when intelligence 
officers are made aware of suspicious activities, they 
can analyze the information and provide officers on 
the street with pertinent guidance regarding officer 
safety and crime trends. 
P
o
li
ce
­
C
ommun
i
t
yP
artnersh
i
ps
COP has been an accepted policing strategy in the 
United States for the past decade. The tenets of COP 
include the following: 
Crime prevention. 
Problem solving. 
The fight against terrorism calls for locating and 
measuring terrorist risks to prevent terrorist actions, 
and local police have been enlisted in these efforts. 
How do local police determine potential threats in a 
given jurisdiction? They must know the community— 
i.e., its makeup, its ties to other countries or particular 
belief structures, and its potential for containing 
extremist or terrorist group members. Police officers 
are particularly familiar with a community and its 
norms. For example, while on patrol, officers get to 
know who among community members associates 
with whom; they have firsthand knowledge of people’s 
work and leisure habits. 
Goldstein recognized the need to make greater use of 
rank-and-file police officers. He believed that rank-
and-file officers should be given greater latitude to 
think and be creative in their daily work and that 
P
atro
l
o
ffi
cers
are
the
e
y
es
and
ears
o
f
the
l
a
w
en
f
orcement
e
ff
ort
,
and
the
y
must
be
encouraged
and
tra
i
ned
to
l
oo
k
and
li
sten
i
nte
lli
gent
ly. 
management should tap their accumulated knowledge 
and expertise, enabling officers to be more satisfied 
with their jobs and providing the citizenry with a 
higher return on their police investment.
32 
Empowering local officers with decisionmaking 
authority and making them aware of terrorist 
indicators may be key in preventing a terrorist attack.
33 
Community- and problem-oriented policing support 
local awareness and involvement in solving crime 
problems. This involvement extends to anti-terrorism 
efforts. However, in the wake of the September 11 
terrorist attacks, some agencies shifted officers from 
community policing to anti-terrorism efforts,
34 
which 
may be counterproductive in helping to deter a 
terrorist attack. 
Local law enforcement has been brought into the 
anti-terrorism fight and recognized for the role it 
plays. Alerts and information are being shared with 
local police more broadly than ever before. Methods 
for reporting suspicious activity to federal agencies 
have been created through regional and state links. 
Private citizens also have been included in the 
intelligence matrix through suspicious-activity tip 
lines, working groups with critical infrastructure 
managers, and other mechanisms to encourage 
reporting of unusual behavior that may be related 
to terrorism or other criminal activities. 
These models illustrate that community- and 
problem-oriented policing are not at odds with 
policing against terrorism; instead, they are 
collaborative and complementary approaches. 
L
e
v
e
l
s
of
I
nte
lli
gence
For intelligence to work effectively, it must be a 
function that every department, regardless of size, 
can use. In general, law enforcement agencies can be 
categorized according to four levels of intelligence 
operations. The following categories are examples, not 
precise descriptors of any one agency’s capabilities. 
Many variations in intelligence capabilities exist, and 
looking at an agency’s size and resource capability is 
only one way of explaining those differences. For 
purposes of discussion, however, the following 
categories are used to identify a plan of action. 
Level 1 intelligence is the highest level, the ideal 
intelligence-led policing scenario wherein agencies 
produce tactical and strategic intelligence products 
that benefit their own department as well as other law 
enforcement agencies. The law enforcement agency 
at this level employs an intelligence manager, 
intelligence officers, and professional intelligence 
analysts. Examples of level 1 intelligence agencies 
include the High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area 
(HIDTA) Intelligence Support Centers, the Financial 
Crimes Enforcement Network, and some state 
agencies that provide intelligence products, 
by request, to local law enforcement, such as the 
California Department of Justice, the Florida 
Department of Law Enforcement, the Arizona 
Department of Public Safety, and the Illinois State 
Police. Probably fewer than 300 agencies in the 
United States operate at level 1. These agencies may 
have hundreds or even thousands of sworn personnel. 
The National Drug Intelligence Center is another 
example of a level 1 intelligence operation. NDIC, 
which has a higher ratio of analysts to sworn 
personnel than perhaps any U.S. agency, provides 
both tactical and strategic products in support of 
other agencies. It produces individual drug threat 
assessments for each state and a national drug threat 
assessment. It also uses “flying teams” of analysts 
who provide exploitation and postseizure analysis 
of documentation collected during investigations 
by other agencies. It does not, however, have an 
investigative mission of its own, as state and federal 
police agencies do. 
Level 2 intelligence includes police agencies that 
produce tactical and strategic intelligence for internal 
consumption. In other words, these agencies generally 
use intelligence to support investigations rather than 
to direct operations. Such agencies may have a 
computerized database that is accessible to other 
departments, but they typically do not assign personnel 
to provide significant intelligence products to other 
agencies. These departments may have intelligence 
units and intelligence officers, analysts, and an 
intelligence manager. Some examples of level 2 
intelligence agencies are state police agencies, large 
city police departments, and some investigating 
commissions. Agencies at this level may have hundreds 
to thousands of sworn personnel. Probably fewer than 
500 agencies in the United States operate at this level. 
An example of this type of agency might be a state-
level law enforcement agency with police and/or 
prosecutorial powers. Such agencies use intelligence 
12 
analysis to support investigations into complex crimes 
such as organized crime, insurance fraud, and 
environmental crime. From time to time, this type of 
agency might produce a threat assessment or other 
strategic product to help guide its efforts. Most of its 
investigations are conducted independently, although 
the agency may sometimes join task force operations. 
Level 3 intelligence is the most common level of 
intelligence function in the United States. It includes 
law enforcement agencies with anywhere from dozens 
to hundreds of sworn employees. These agencies 
may be capable of developing intelligence products 
internally, but they are more likely to rely on products 
developed by partner agencies, such as RISS centers, 
HIDTAs, federal intelligence centers, and state 
agencies. Some level 3 agencies may hire private 
intelligence analysts for complex cases. These types 
of departments do not normally employ analysts or 
intelligence managers, but they may have named 
one or more sworn individuals as their “intelligence 
officers” and may have sent them to intelligence 
and/or analytic training. Thousands of agencies 
nationwide are in this category. One authority notes that 
while smaller agencies may not be able to devote a 
full-time position to the criminal intelligence 
function . . . [they] need to understand the 
proactive concept of criminal intelligence and 
recognize that most law enforcement agencies, 
regardless of size, are susceptible to organized 
criminal activity that may extend beyond 
jurisdictional boundaries. Their personnel should 
be trained to recognize and report indications of 
organized crime, gang activity, and criminal 
extremist and terrorist activity. The information 
should then be shared with intelligence-trained 
personnel from neighboring agencies. . . .
35 
The same authority notes that “A viable option for . . . 
a medium-sized agency is to enter into a networking 
or mutual aid criminal intelligence agreement . . . with 
any number of surrounding law enforcement 
jurisdictions.”
36 
Level 4 intelligence is the category that comprises 
most agencies in the United States. These agencies, 
often with a few dozen employees or less, do not 
employ intelligence personnel. If they assign someone 
13 
multiple responsibilities and is often a narcotics 
Although some of these departments may be RISS 
A
genc
i
es
that
current
ly
ha
v
e
no
k
no
wl
edge
o
f
or
use
f
or
i
nte
lli
gence
ana
ly
s
i
s
shou
l
d
str
iv
e
to
ach
i
e
v
e
th
i
s
bas
i
c
to intelligence operations, that person generally has 
officer, gang officer, or counter-terrorism officer. 
members, most are involved in a limited information-
sharing network made up of county or regional 
databases. Some departments have received intelligence 
awareness training and may be able to interpret 
analytic products. 
Agencies that currently have no knowledge of or use 
for intelligence analysis should strive to achieve this 
basic intelligence capability. Such agencies can 
enhance their knowledge through online and other 
free training services. When properly trained, these 
agencies will be able to use any intelligence materials 
provided to them and to apply basic intelligence 
techniques to enhance their daily police operations. 
A number of agencies may not fit strictly into one 
of these four categories. Some agencies may fall 
somewhere between level 3 and level 4, with a 
centralized database providing data support to numerous 
agencies but with no direct analytic support. Others 
may have analysts who support the mission of a 
specific bureau or section but who have no agencywide 
responsibility to provide products and direction. 
The key to intelligence-led policing is that sufficient 
interest and training should exist to create a culture of 
knowledge and intelligence in agencies nationwide. 
i
nte
lli
gence
capab
ili
t
y. 
Wha
t
W
e
N
ee
dT
o
D
o
B
efore an agency can develop intelligence-led 
policing, it must address several critical areas. 
Among these areas are the following: 
■ 
Blending intelligence and POP. 
■ 
Building stronger police-community partnerships. 
■ 
Blending strategic intelligence and police planning. 
■ 
Instituting information-sharing policies. 
■ 
Building analytic support for police agencies. 
B
as
i
c
S
teps
to
D
e
v
e
l
op
i
ng
a
C
r
i
m
i
na
lI
nte
lli
gence
C
apab
ili
t
y
The resources that an agency needs to establish or 
renew intelligence operations depend on its existing 
capability and its managers’ expectations. 
Most guidance on this topic presumes that an agency 
can assign individuals to help develop the intelligence 
operation. One expert
37 
suggests that agencies should 
follow the steps outlined below: 
1.  Create a proper environment, which includes 
obtaining the active support of the agency’s chief 
executive officer, gaining political and budgetary 
support from the appropriate elected officials, and 
educating the agency and the community 
concerning the benefits of having a criminal 
intelligence function. 
2.  Establish the criminal intelligence unit as a 
proactive crime prevention operation that supports 
the concepts of community-oriented policing. 
3.  Design a unit mission statement focused on 
specific criminal activities and disseminate it to 
the entire agency. 
4.  Select qualified personnel, including a trained 
analyst, to staff the unit. 
5.   Obtain separate, secure quarters for the unit. 
6.  Implement and enforce professional guidelines for 
unit procedures, file procedures, security, special 
expense funds (confidential funds), and informant 
control. 
7.  Provide training for the chief executive officer, 
appropriate elected officials, criminal intelligence 
managers and supervisors, criminal intelligence 
officers and analysts, the remainder of the 
agency’s personnel, and its legal advisor. 
8.  Liaison with neighboring agencies and participate 
in regional and state criminal intelligence 
networks. Join the Regional Information Sharing 
Systems and the Law Enforcement Intelligence 
Unit. 
9.  Require both strategic and tactical products from 
the unit and evaluate its operations on a regular 
schedule. 
15 
10. 
Sharing Plan
38
1. 
action steps in NCISP
2. 
Ensure the chief executive officer meets regularly 
with the supervisor of the criminal intelligence 
unit to provide appropriate direction. 
This model would be appropriate for level 1 and 
level 2 intelligence functions, but it is generally 
beyond the capabilities of levels 3 and 4. 
In 2004, the Global Intelligence Working Group 
designed “10 Simple Steps to Help Your Agency 
Become Part of the National Criminal Intelligence 
.” This document helps agencies become 
more involved in intelligence sharing and provides 
useful advice, as shown in the excerpts below
Recognize your responsibilities and lead by 
example—implement or enhance your 
organization’s intelligence function using the 
Establish a mission statement and a policy for 
developing and sharing information and 
intelligence within your agency. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested