c# wpf free pdf viewer : Deleting pages from pdf software Library cloud windows .net web page class 2106812-part218

3. Connect to your state criminal justice network 
and regional intelligence databases and participate 
in information sharing initiatives. 
4.  Ensure that privacy issues are protected by policy 
and practice. These can be addressed without 
hindering the intelligence process and will reduce 
your organization’s liability concerns. 
5.  Access law enforcement web sites, subscribe to 
law enforcement listservs, and use the Internet as 
an information resource. 
6.  Provide your agency members with appropriate 
training on criminal intelligence. 
7.  Partner with public and private infrastructure 
sectors for the safety and security of the citizens 
in your community. 
This checklist might serve those looking to establish a 
level 3 agency. Two steps that might be added are the 
following: 
1.  Designate one person, either an officer or a 
civilian analyst, as the agency contact for 
intelligence. Doing so will streamline training, 
information sharing, and intelligence 
interpretation functions (numbers 3, 5, and 6 
above). Make certain that reports of suspicious 
activity from patrol officers and others are 
channeled to this individual. 
2.  Join a regional intelligence center or, if one is not 
available, work with other local agencies to form 
a regional center. 
A level 4 agency might use the following steps, some 
taken from the lists above, to create its intelligence 
function: 
1.   Implement or enhance your organization’s 
intelligence function using the steps shown. 
2.   Establish a mission statement and policies to 
address developing and sharing information and 
intelligence within your agency. Ensure that patrol 
officers’ reports of suspicious activities are 
channeled to appropriate personnel. 
3.  Connect to your state criminal justice network 
and regional intelligence databases and participate 
in information sharing initiatives. 
4.  Ensure that privacy issues are protected by policy 
and practice. These can be addressed without 
hindering the intelligence process, and protecting 
privacy will reduce your organization’s liability 
concerns. 
These lists contain key concepts for implementing a 
successful intelligence operation. These concepts—i.e., 
developing a mission statement and policies, training, 
management and staffing, security, legal/privacy 
concerns, information sharing, and developing 
evaluation criteria—are described in more detail below. 
D
e
v
e
l
o
pin
g
aMi
ss
i
o
nS
t
a
te
m
e
n
t
andP
o
li
c
i
es
Regardless of the size and scope of its intelligence 
operations, every agency should have a mission 
statement and written policies that support those efforts. 
Policies can help define the support of command staff 
for intelligence-led policing and delineate department 
guidelines regarding intelligence operations. 
P
o
li
c
i
es
enab
l
e
the
command
sta
ff 
to
c
l
ear
ly
de
fi
ne
the
i
r
support
f
or
i
nte
lli
gence
­l
ed
po
li
c
i
ng
and
a
l
so
de
li
neate
the
gu
i
de
li
nes
the
department
willf
o
ll
o
w
regard
i
ng
an
y
i
nte
lli
gence
operat
i
ons
.
For agencies with an existing intelligence unit, a 
sample mission statement could be as follows: 
The _______________ Department’s Criminal 
Intelligence Unit will collect and analyze 
information on individuals and groups who are 
suspected of being involved in ______________ 
and will provide this information to the chief 
executive officer for crime prevention and 
decisionmaking purposes.
39 
For agencies that do not have an intelligence unit 
(i.e., levels 3 and 4) but want to adopt an intelligence 
mission to support intelligence-led policing, the 
mission statement could be that given below: 
The ____________________ Department’s 
intelligence mission is to actively participate in 
intelligence sharing initiatives by providing 
information and receiving intelligence products 
that will be used to enhance the department’s 
ability to prevent and deter crime while abiding 
by legal constraints and being sensitive to the 
public’s rights and privacy. 
16 
Deleting pages from pdf - copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Easy to Use C# Code to Extract PDF Pages, Copy Pages from One PDF File and Paste into Others
delete pages from pdf reader; extract pdf pages for
Deleting pages from pdf - VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed VB.NET Guide for Extracting Pages from Microsoft PDF Doc
extract pages from pdf online tool; delete page from pdf file online
Like a well-written mission statement, intelligence 
policies and procedures may also curtail unwanted 
legal challenges to a department’s authority (or may 
be the best defense against such legal challenges). 
Whereas policies outline an agency’s requirements 
for and expectations of an intelligence operation, 
procedures delineate how those requirements should 
be implemented on a day-to-day basis. 
Additional information to include in intelligence 
policies is contained in Criminal Intelligence System 
Operating Policies (28 C.F.R. Part 23) and the model 
intelligence policy developed by the International 
Association of Chiefs of Police National Law 
Enforcement Policy Center. The IACP model policy 
(see appendix D) is intended for agencies with 
intelligence units and for those with an intelligence 
function but no unit. 
It should be noted that the IACP model policy 
discussion paper goes into greater detail on how an 
intelligence unit should function and is available from 
IACP. Several guidelines and standards have been 
adopted regarding criminal intelligence: 28 C.F.R. 
Part 23 and the Law Enforcement Intelligence Unit 
Criminal Intelligence File Guidelines. A copy of 28 
C.F.R. Part 23 can be found on the Institute for 
Intergovernmental Research web site (www.iir.com); 
the LEIU guidelines are available at www. 
leiu-homepage.org/history/fileGuidelines.pdf. 
Although 28 C.F.R. Part 23 is mandated only for 
those agencies receiving federal monies to fund 
intelligence systems (hardware or software), all 
agencies involved in intelligence operations will 
benefit from adopting these policies and the LEIU 
guidelines, as recommended by NCISP. 
Trainin
g
Training is the key to change in any organization. 
The recent emphasis on intelligence reveals that many 
people involved in law enforcement, from commanders 
to patrol officers, do not fully understand the 
intelligence function and what it can accomplish. 
This misunderstanding is perhaps the greatest 
impediment to establishing intelligence-led policing. 
NCISP recommends that training be provided to all 
law enforcement personnel involved in criminal 
intelligence, and suggests that NCISP training standards 
be considered the minimum training standards. 
Appendix D of NCISP
40 
contains the “Core Criminal 
Intelligence Training Standards for United States Law 
Enforcement and Other Criminal Justice Agencies” 
(available at http://it.ojp.gov/documents/200507_ncisp. 
pdf). The standards call for training police executives, 
intelligence managers, intelligence officers, patrol 
officers, and analysts and includes a train-the-trainers 
module. It also includes training objectives for each 
level of training and notes a number of resources that 
may be tapped to support training. 
For law enforcement executives, the NCISP core 
training standards recommend that a 4-hour block 
of training be provided within a police chiefs’ 
association or another executive briefing environment. 
This training should focus on the philosophy of 
intelligence-led policing; legal, privacy, and ethical 
issues relating to criminal intelligence; existing 
information sharing networks and resources; and the 
intelligence process and the role it plays in supporting 
executive decisionmaking. 
For law enforcement officers, the standards 
recommend a 2-hour block of training that could be 
provided during the recruits’ basic training course or 
during inservice training. This block should focus 
on the officers’ role in providing information to the 
intelligence process; the intelligence products that 
officers might obtain; available data systems, networks, 
and resources; and key signs of criminal activity. 
For intelligence commanders, the standards 
recommend a 24-hour block of instruction in a 
classroom environment. The training should encompass 
training, evaluation, and assessment and effective 
criminal intelligence functions; personnel selection, 
ethics, policies and procedures, and intelligence 
products; intelligence-led policing and the criminal 
intelligence process; legal and privacy issues; tactical 
and strategic intelligence production; information 
sharing networks and resources; the development and 
implementation of collection plans; and practices for 
handling sensitive information, informant policies, and 
corruption prevention and recognition. 
For intelligence officers, a 40-hour training session is 
recommended. This curriculum should address the 
intelligence process; legal, ethical, and privacy issues; 
resources found on the Internet and information 
sharing systems, networks, and other sources of 
information; proper handling of intelligence 
information, including file management and information 
17 
C# PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
C#.NET PDF Library - Delete PDF Document Page in C#.NET. Provide C# Users with Mature .NET PDF Document Manipulating Library for Deleting PDF Pages in C#.
pdf extract pages; copy pages from pdf into new pdf
VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.
Document Page in VB.NET Class. Free PDF edit control and component for deleting PDF pages in Visual Basic .NET framework application.
delete pages of pdf reader; delete page from pdf preview
evaluation standards; processes for developing tactical 
and strategic intelligence products; the development of 
intelligence through critical thinking and inference 
analyses; and the development and implementation of 
information collection plans. 
Analysts’ training should also be 40 hours in length 
and should encompass the intelligence process; the 
importance of NCISP; proper handling of intelligence 
information; the analytic process; the development and 
implementation of collection and analytic plans; legal, 
privacy, and ethical issues relating to intelligence; 
research methods and sources; analytic methods and 
techniques; analytic skills; and computerized analytic 
tools. 
NCISP core training standards also call for a train-the-
trainer course for intelligence officers and intelligence 
commanders who will be training others. Such a 
course would be scheduled for 40 hours and would 
encompass the topics in the intelligence officers’ and 
commanders’ training courses, plus additional material 
on methods of instruction and adult learning. 
Agencies that cannot designate personnel as intelligence 
officers or analysts may want to have officers with 
intelligence responsibilities trained in these techniques. 
A recent survey in New Jersey found that although 
fewer than 300 intelligence officers and analysts were 
assigned in the state, the requests for intelligence 
and analysis training totaled almost 900 seats.
41 
Whatever level of intelligence an agency pursues, 
personnel involved in intelligence functions should 
have appropriate training. (Additional training 
resources are included in the appendixes.) 
Mana
ge
m
e
n
t
andS
t
a
ff
in
g
Successful intelligence operations depend on the 
responsibility and support of agency personnel. In a 
28 C.F.R. Part 23 setting, the chief executive, or an 
appointee, is responsible for the intelligence operation. 
According to NCISP’s first recommendation regarding 
the management of intelligence operations, the chief 
executive officer and the manager of intelligence 
functions should do the following: 
■ 
Seek ways to enhance intelligence sharing efforts 
and foster information sharing by participating in 
task forces and state, regional, and federal 
information sharing initiatives. 
■ 
Implement a mission statement for the intelligence 
process within the agency. 
■ 
Define the management and supervision of the 
intelligence operation. 
■ 
Select qualified personnel for assignment to the 
intelligence operation. 
■ 
Ensure that standards are developed for background 
investigations of staff and system users to ensure 
that system facilities are secure and to protect 
access to the system or network. 
■ 
Ensure appropriate training for all personnel 
assigned to or affected by the intelligence process. 
■ 
Ensure that individuals’ privacy and constitutional 
rights are considered at all times. 
■ 
Support the development of sound, professional 
analytic products (intelligence). 
■ 
Implement a system for disseminating information 
appropriately. 
■ 
Implement a policies and procedures manual. The 
manual should establish agency accountability 
for the intelligence operation and should include 
policies and procedures regarding all aspects of the 
intelligence process. 
■ 
Promote a policy of openness when communicating 
with the public and other interested parties 
regarding the criminal intelligence process—that is, 
when doing so does not affect the security and 
integrity of the process.
42 
More than 30 years ago, the National Advisory 
Commission on Criminal Justice Standards and Goals 
supported the idea that any law enforcement agency 
with at least 75 sworn personnel should employ at 
least 1 full-time intelligence professional.
43 
Best 
practices suggest having 1 intelligence analyst for 
every 75 sworn officers in generalized law enforcement 
agencies, with 1 for every 12 sworn officers in agencies 
with complex criminal investigative responsibilities, 
such as organized crime, narcotics, gangs, terrorism, 
and fraud.
44 
Opinions differ on who make the best analysts. Some 
agencies hire recent college graduates so the agencies 
can mold the new employees’ training and experience. 
18 
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
Deleting Pages. You may feel free to define some continuous PDF pages and delete. Certainly, random pages can be deleted from PDF file as well. Sorting Pages.
deleting pages from pdf file; add and delete pages from pdf
C# Word - Delete Word Document Page in C#.NET
C# Word - Delete Word Document Page in C#.NET. Provides Users with Mature Document Manipulating Function for Deleting Word Pages. Overview.
crop all pages of pdf; copy pdf page into word doc
Others use a combination of experienced and 
inexperienced analysts, pairing them so that the newer 
analysts learn from their colleagues. Others draw from 
the academic community on an occasional basis.
45 
Another model, often used in Canada, is to use a mix 
of sworn officers and civilians. Promoting clerical 
support personnel with no research ability or experience 
into analytic positions is discouraged. 
In most environments, significant pay inequities exist 
between the salaries of investigative and analytic staff. 
This disparity is changing slowly; however, as long as 
it exists, analysts will find other, more lucrative jobs 
after a few years in the law enforcement field. The 
International Association of Law Enforcement 
Intelligence Analysts recommends that analysts 
with the same number of years of experience as 
investigators receive similar pay.
46 
S
ec
uri
t
y 
Intelligence operations involve several levels of 
security: physical, programmatic, personnel-related, 
and procedural. Security is paramount for intelligence 
operations because the materials found in intelligence 
files may be unproved allegations rather than facts. 
Protecting the public and the agency’s operations 
requires keeping information secure. 
S
ecur
i
t
yi
s
paramount
f
or
i
nte
lli
gence
operat
i
ons
because
the
mater
i
a
l
s
f
ound
i
n
i
nte
lli
gence
fil
es
ma
y
be
unpro
v
ed
a
ll
egat
i
ons
rather
than
f
acts
Proper security restricts unauthorized access to 
information, protects information circulated within the 
department, and encourages the flow of data from the 
rest of the agency to the intelligence unit.
47 
Physical 
security should reflect strict adherence to the 
safekeeping of files, computer access, and the office.
48 
Visitors’ logs should be kept for nonunit members 
entering the intelligence unit. The building and its 
internal spaces should have adequate security features. 
Computer equipment should be locked to prevent 
unauthorized access by nonintelligence personnel. 
Programmatic security protects the computer hardware 
and software used for intelligence work. The most 
basic form of this type of protection is to password-
protect computers so they cannot be operated by 
unauthorized personnel. Encrypting files and file 
transmissions is another level of programmatic security. 
Firewalls and virtual private networks provide 
additional security for information sharing. 
Personnel security measures should include 
conducting background investigations of new 
employees, updating background investigations of 
current employees on a routine basis, and using 
polygraphs as necessary.
49 
NCISP recommends that 
. . . law enforcement agencies must conduct 
fingerprint-based background checks on individuals, 
both sworn and non-sworn, prior to allowing law 
enforcement access to the sensitive but unclassified 
communications capability. . . . [A]dditionally a 
name-based records check must be performed on 
law enforcement personnel every 3 years after the 
initial fingerprint-based records check is performed.
50 
Policies and procedures also need to address security. 
According to 28 C.F.R. Part 23, administrative, 
technical, and physical safeguards must be adopted 
to prevent unauthorized access and intentional or 
unintentional damage (23.20[g]). It requires 
implementation of the following security measures: 
■ 
Adoption of effective and technologically advanced 
computer hardware and software designed to 
prevent unauthorized access. 
■ 
Restricted access to facilities, operating 
environments, and documents. 
■ 
Information storage such that information cannot 
19 
without proper authorization. 
■ 
■ 
51 
L
ega
l
/
P
r
iv
ac
yC
oncerns
be modified, destroyed, accessed, or purged 
Procedures to protect criminal information from 
unauthorized access, theft, sabotage, fire, flood, or 
other natural or manmade disasters. 
Promulgation of rules and regulations to screen, 
reject from employment, transfer, or remove 
personnel who have direct access to the system (28 
C.F.R. Part 23.20(g), 1–5). 
Some best practices in security identified by the 
National White Collar Crime Center are found in 
Secure Law Enforcement Computer Systems for Law 
Enforcement Executives and Managers.
Respecting citizens’ right to privacy and civil liberties 
is a primary concern when establishing or maintaining 
an intelligence operation. The activities of some 
VB.NET PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for vb.net, ASP.NET
You may feel free to define some continuous PDF pages through deleting pages in VB.NET demo code. Certainly, random pages can be deleted from PDF file as well.
a pdf page cut; add and remove pages from pdf file online
C# PowerPoint - Delete PowerPoint Document Page in C#.NET
C# PowerPoint - Delete PowerPoint Document Page in C#.NET. Provides Users with Mature Document Manipulating Function for Deleting PowerPoint Pages. Overview.
copy pdf pages to another pdf; add remove pages from pdf
agencies in the 1970s and 1980s resulted in laws and 
regulations, primarily at the federal level, that support 
a lawful intelligence capability. However, few states 
have laws or guidelines concerning intelligence 
activities.
52 
The Criminal Intelligence Systems Operating Policies 
(28 C.F.R. 23.20) were created in the 1980s and were 
first applied to RISS centers. These regulations were 
then expanded to cover Organized Crime Narcotics 
projects and other database programs funded by the 
U.S. Department of Justice, Office of Justice Programs’ 
Bureau of Justice Assistance. All criminal intelligence 
systems operating under the Omnibus Crime Control 
and Safe Streets Act of 1968, using federal funds, are 
required to conform with 28 C.F.R. Part 23, which 
protects the privacy and constitutional rights of 
individuals. (A copy of 28 C.F.R. Part 23 can be 
found at www.iir.com.) 
NCISP recommends that all states voluntarily adopt 28 
C.F.R. Part 23 to cover any intelligence system they 
use, regardless of federal funding. It also notes that 
agencies should use the LEIU Intelligence File 
Guidelines as a model for maintaining intelligence 
files. These two documents complement each other 
and endorse the same basic principles: 
■ 
Information entering the intelligence system should 
meet a criminal predicate or reasonable suspicion 
and should be evaluated to check the reliability of 
the source and the validity of the data. 
■ 
Information entering the intelligence system should 
not violate the privacy or civil liberties of its 
subjects. 
■ 
Information maintained in the intelligence system 
should be updated or purged every 5 years. 
■ 
Agencies should keep a dissemination trail of who 
received the information. 
■ 
Information from the intelligence system should be 
disseminated only to those personnel who have a 
right and a need to know in order to perform a law 
enforcement function. 
Most states now have laws concerning the public’s 
access to government records. Some states have an 
exemption in this law for intelligence and similar files. 
Some municipalities have laws that relate to collecting 
and maintaining intelligence files pertaining to 
individuals. 
NCISP encourages law enforcement agencies involved 
in criminal intelligence sharing to use, when applicable, 
the policy guidelines provided in Justice Information 
Privacy Guideline—Developing, Drafting and Assessing 
Privacy Policy for Justice Information Systems. 
Intelligence work must be conducted in an open 
manner, but doing so should not unreasonably conflict 
with the work itself. When the New Jersey State Police 
Department first developed intelligence policies in the 
1970s, it provided the policies to the media and the 
public to demonstrate that the department was operating 
in an open manner in accordance with established 
agency policy. Such actions help to build community 
trust and police-community cooperation. 
I
nte
lli
gence
w
or
k
must
be
conducted
i
n
an
open
manner
,
but
do
i
ng
so
shou
l
d
not
unreasonab
ly
con
fli
ct
wi
th
the
w
or
ki
tse
lf.
I
n
fo
rma
t
i
o
nSharin
g
Law enforcement agencies have focused on information 
collection during the past decade, but they have also 
increased their emphasis on information sharing. For 
example, the Bureau of Justice Assistance created a 
statewide intelligence systems program in 1993 to 
develop and facilitate statewide intelligence models
53 
in compliance with 28 C.F.R. Part 23. Program 
grantees included the Tennessee Bureau of Investigation 
(which created the Automated Criminal Intelligence 
System of Tennessee), the Wisconsin Department of 
Justice (which created the Wisconsin Law Enforcement 
Intelligence Network), the North Dakota Office of the 
Attorney General (which created the North Dakota 
Law Enforcement Intelligence Network), the 
Connecticut State Police (which created the Statewide 
Police Intelligence Network), and the Utah Department 
of Public Safety (which enhanced the existing Utah 
Law Enforcement Intelligence Network).
54 
A 1998 monograph on statewide intelligence systems 
found that many state governments had established, 
or were in the process of establishing, statewide 
information systems. Forty-three state agencies either 
operated criminal intelligence databases or were 
planning to do so.
55 
20 
VB.NET TIFF: Modify TIFF File by Adding, Deleting & Sort TIFF
Please check following TIFF page deleting methods and &ltsummary> ''' Sort TIFF document pages in designed & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
deleting pages from pdf in preview; copy pdf page to clipboard
VB.NET TIFF: An Easy VB.NET Solution to Delete or Remove TIFF File
also empowers users to insert blank pages into TIFF I have tried the function of deleting page from powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
convert selected pages of pdf to word; extract one page from pdf reader
From 1999 to 2000, IACP conducted a study that 
indicated that integrated information sharing systems 
are the most effective statewide systems.
56 
The study 
included a review of justice system information 
sharing and onsite examinations in California, 
Colorado, Louisiana, Michigan, and North Carolina. 
A 2003 survey by the Global Intelligence Working 
Group found 22 information sharing systems or 
initiatives in the United States, with RISS centers at 
the top of the list and a host of state and local systems 
nationwide. Other information sharing systems 
included CLEAR-Chicago, CISAnet (in southwest 
border states), JNET-Pennsylvania, MATRIX 
(Multistate Anti-Terrorism Information Exchange), 
SIN-Oklahoma, LEIU, ThreatNet-Florida, and 
HIDTAs. 
Typically, these systems are hosted by a federal or 
large state agency and have up to several hundred 
agencies connected to them. Most of the systems 
surveyed included information on general crimes, 
terrorism, drugs, and gangs. In most systems, the data 
contributors retained ownership of the information. 
A number of federal efforts are bringing together law 
enforcement in regional areas to combat crime. In the 
Houston area, for example, the Federal Bureau of 
Investigation (FBI) piloted a Field Intelligence Group 
(FIG) that is being used throughout the country. The 
Houston FIG’s mission was to ensure that intelligence 
gathering and sharing functions within the Houston 
FBI were coordinated across investigative programs, 
with FIG serving as a one-stop shop for the analysis 
and processing of raw data gathered in the course of 
investigative activity. FIG created a multiagency 
clearinghouse for Super Bowl XXXVIII, in cooperation 
with a dozen agencies at the federal, state, and local 
levels, to ensure safety at that major event. 
In May 2004, the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) 
shared draft copies of its Law Enforcement Information 
Sharing (LEIS) strategy with state and local law 
enforcement professionals. The LEIS strategy calls 
for: 
■ 
Law enforcement agencies throughout the country 
to access shareable DOJ information on a timely 
and secure basis. 
■ 
DOJ to provide its law enforcement partners with 
effective new capabilities and services for 
accessing, analyzing, and disseminating 
investigative and intelligence information. 
■ 
LEIS partners to share information with each other 
and to abide by strict guidelines to ensure 
accountability, security, and privacy.
57 
DOJ is continuing to work on implementing LEIS. 
The Joint Terrorism Task Forces (JTTFs), 
headquartered in FBI offices nationwide, have also 
encouraged information sharing and cooperative 
efforts. For example, the JTTF in Houston created a 
Counter Terrorism Intelligence Group (CTIG) that has 
provided state and local agencies with indicators of 
suspicious activities. The CTIG provides a bulletin to 
local agencies containing the latest information on 
suspicious activities in the region. In 6 months, 173 
agencies signed up to participate. By affirming that 
information sharing is a two-way street, the Houston 
CTIG increased its input of information from local 
agencies to the FBI by 50 percent. Today, the Houston 
CTIG provides training for other state and local law 
enforcement agencies. 
D
e
v
e
l
o
pin
g
Evalua
t
i
o
nCri
te
ria 
One reason why intelligence operations are not 
always understood or appreciated is because they 
cannot be evaluated by traditional measures of law 
21 
58 
■ 
it did last month? 
■ 
■ 
enforcement success, such as the number of arrests 
and indictments attributable to law enforcement 
officers, units, or agencies. The inability of law 
enforcement administrators to evaluate intelligence 
has in some ways undermined its credibility. 
There are, however, concrete ways to evaluate 
intelligence. A monthly evaluation of intelligence 
operations might ask the following questions: 
Does the unit know more this month about 
organized crime activities in its jurisdiction than 
What has been learned? How? Could more have 
been learned by better approaches? Can specific 
cases be developed? Should there be a shift in 
investigative efforts? 
Has information been provided from other agency 
personnel? Have the reports from patrol officers 
been dealt with appropriately? 
C#: How to Delete Cached Files from Your Web Viewer
PDF pages extract, copy, paste, C#.NET rotate PDF pages, C#.NET VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word Visual C#.NET Developers the Ways of Deleting Cache Files.
extract pages from pdf on ipad; cut pdf pages
C# PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in C#.
VB.NET comment annotate PDF, VB.NET delete PDF pages, VB.NET C# PDF - Remove Image from PDF Page. Provide C# Demo Code for Deleting and Removing Image from PDF
extract pages from pdf acrobat; extract page from pdf online
■ 
Has the filing system effectively handled the 
questions directed to it? 
■ 
Have the consumers been queried as to the usefulness 
and accuracy of the intelligence materials?
59 
S
uccess
S
tor
i
es
Success stories in the areas of intelligence and analysis 
are not as numerous as one might hope. However, 
once agencies begin to use intelligence more fully, 
success stories should be easier to identify. Some 
examples of effective intelligence and analysis 
operations appear below. 
J
effe
r
so
nC
o
un
t
y,C
o
l
o
rad
o
In the early 1990s, the Jefferson County Sheriff’s 
Office and the Lakewood Police Department combined 
their vice and intelligence units’ functions to improve 
their resources. Part of this merger included access to 
each other’s agency records and intelligence 
information. In 2001, the two agencies adopted the 
CrimNtel software program to help manage their 
intelligence information. This database complies with 
28 C.F.R. Part 23 and supports the collection, 
maintenance, and dissemination of police intelligence 
records, including criminal information about gangs, 
criminal extremists, and vice and narcotics activities. 
In 2003, the City of Arvada Police Department joined 
the Jefferson and Lakewood merger by connecting to 
CrimNtel. As of 2004, the Jefferson County Sheriff’s 
Office Detentions Division was in the final stages of 
linking to the database, which will increase the 
amount of available data. Although the database was 
not completely regionalized, it gave these agencies 
access to some of the largest agency record pools in 
the Denver area, fostering cooperation and facilitating 
intelligence sharing. 
Charl
otte
­M
ec
kl
e
nbur
g
,N
o
r
t
hCar
o
lina, 
P
o
li
ce
D
e
par
t
m
e
n
t
The Charlotte and Mecklenburg police departments 
joined forces in the 1990s (for a total of 1,501 
combined officers in 2001). They then brought in 
Herman Goldstein, the “father of problem-oriented 
policing,” to audit the department to see how 
consistently community-policing and problem-solving 
models were being applied. He and Ronald Clarke, of 
Rutgers University, worked with the police to create 
different approaches to crime in the area. They found 
that many officers quickly scanned a crime problem 
and then moved immediately to the response phase, 
bypassing any analysis of available data to determine 
the most appropriate response. Consequently, problems 
were not solved as effectively as they might have been. 
Analyzing the data, Goldstein and Clarke concluded 
that four major crime problems were occurring in the 
area: appliance burglaries from single-family homes 
under construction, vehicle larceny in central city 
parking lots, drug-related violence in the Belmont 
community, and the possible connection of pawnshops 
to burglaries. On the basis of this intelligence, they 
then analyzed the circumstances surrounding each 
crime problem to develop appropriate action plans. 
Because each circumstance was different, differing 
strategies were used. In all cases, however, data 
analysis allowed them to identify strategies that 
reduced crime. (Information taken from “Advancing 
Community Policing” grantee site report, available at 
www.cops.usdoj.gov.) 
R
oc
klandC
o
un
t
y,N
ew
Y
o
rk 
The Rockland County Intelligence Center (RCIC) was 
formed in 1995 in Rockland County to coordinate and 
disseminate intelligence information among law 
enforcement agencies. Representatives from seven 
local agencies participate in RCIC. The salaries of 
these representatives are reimbursed by the county; 
five county personnel are also employees. RCIC and 
its operations are governed by an oversight committee 
composed of county police chiefs and three municipal 
and two county representatives. 
RCIC accesses several databases, including 
MAGLOCLEN (Middle Atlantic-Great Lakes 
Organized Crime Law Enforcement Network, a RISS 
center), the Rockland County Police Information 
Network (which has nine agencies contributing to it), 
the New York City Construction Authority Mobnet 
database, the New York/New Jersey HIDTA database, 
the National Insurance Crime Bureau, Auto-Trak, New 
York State Parole, the Photo Imaging Network, and 
the New York Division of Criminal Justice Services 
Sex Offender Registry. RCIC also cooperates with 
UNYRIC (Upstate New York Regional Intelligence 
Center, managed by the New York State Police). 
RCIC disseminates information bulletins on new crime 
trends or high-priority issues. It provides monthly 
22 
burglary/robbery analysis reports, gang awareness 
patterns, telephone toll analysis, and crime mapping. 
Hay
w
ard,Cali
fo
rnia,P
o
li
ce
D
e
par
t
m
e
n
t
Hayward is a municipality near San Francisco with a 
population of about 144,600. Its police department 
has almost 200 sworn officers.
60 
After receiving a 
Department of Homeland Security grant, the Hayward 
Police Department created a full-time detective 
position focused specifically on homeland security 
issues. By contacting the Financial Investigations 
Program (FIP) of the California Department of 
Justice’s Bureau of Narcotics Enforcement, the 
Hayward Police Department was able to access 
FinCEN data regarding suspicious financial 
transactions. The department requested reports on 
suspicious activity by ZIP Code and received 450 
suspicious activity reports. An analysis of the reports 
revealed links to an outlaw motorcycle gang, possible 
organized crime groups, and terrorist financing. 
As a result, the Hayward Police Department is 
conducting a joint investigation with the U.S. Bureau 
of Immigration and Customs into a subject with ties to 
terrorist financing and who has laundered more than 
$100 million during a 3-year period. 
The Hayward Police Department also has been able to 
access investigative and analytic support from the U.S. 
Department of Justice’s FIP, including access to a 
wide range of commercial databases. One outcome of 
this work is the improved relationship between the 
police department and its local financial institutions. 
The institutions now contact the police proactively 
about suspicious financial activity reports, cutting the 
lag time between when a suspicious activity occurs 
and when police learn about it. 
As a result of this success in the financial investigative 
area, the Hayward Police Department now requests a 
FinCEN check on every subject who is investigated 
for possible terrorist connections. 
N
ew
J
e
r
se
yD
e
par
t
m
e
n
t
of
C
o
rr
ect
i
o
n
s
Few states have coordinated efforts between police 
and corrections to share information on gangs. Law 
enforcement intelligence suggests that gang leaders 
in prison delegate responsibility to members on the 
street, which allows gangs to prosper despite the 
incarceration of gang leaders. After several attacks 
on staff and inmates, the New Jersey Department of 
Corrections (NJDOC) began an initiative in 1997 to 
identify and monitor gang-affiliated inmates. 
More than 8,000 gang members have been identified, 
and half of them are currently incarcerated. The 
NJDOC Intelligence Section has made managing 
gangs within the prison and disseminating gang-
related intelligence to other departments a priority. 
To keep abreast of changing gang activity codes and 
crimes, NJDOC reviews correspondence and other 
research containing information on gang organizations, 
structure, codes, affiliations, and membership. In 
addition to generic intelligence, several agencies with 
established gang identification databases help NJDOC 
identify the gang affiliation of incoming state prison 
inmates. This additional intelligence is one of several 
identification criteria used when an inmate arrives at 
intake. 
Inmates must meet two of eight standard criteria 
to be classified as gang members (criteria 
include self-admission, group/gang photo, and 
correspondence from other gang members). NJDOC 
shares this information through four initiatives: 
the Inter-Institutional Intelligence Committee, 
identification lists, ad hoc inquiries, and the Gang 
Reduction and Aggressive Supervised Parole program. 
Soon after NJDOC recognized the importance of 
gang identification and the sharing of intelligence, 
it developed the Inter-Institutional Intelligence 
Committee. This committee comprises investigators 
and detectives from multiple agencies throughout the 
state and meets once a month. Attendees include 
members from federal, state, regional, county, and 
local law enforcement agencies. A monthly bulletin, 
distributed to those in attendance, highlights new 
tattoos, codes, graffiti, statewide trends, identification 
statistics, recent news, and incident reviews. 
To provide information throughout the state, gang 
identification lists are generated by geographic region. 
Ad hoc inquiries on gang members are also available. 
The fourth information sharing program (Gang 
Reduction and Aggressive Supervised Parole) focuses 
on paroled inmates. Every identified gang inmate on 
parole is assigned to a special caseload and monitored 
closely by a parole officer who understands gang 
issues. The program is a collaborative effort between 
NJDOC, the New Jersey State Police, and the New 
Jersey State Parole Board. 
23 
Iow
a
L
a
w
En
fo
r
ce
m
e
n
t
I
n
fo
rma
t
i
o
n 
N
etwo
rk 
In 1984, Iowa law enforcement agencies joined to 
form the first state-level effort to regularly exchange 
information on suspected offenders. The Iowa Law 
Enforcement Intelligence Network (LEIN) consists of 
state and local law enforcement officers who complete 
a 2-week criminal intelligence course conducted by 
the Iowa Department of Public Safety (DPS). As of 
2004, LEIN’s membership consisted of about 730 
officers from more than 200 agencies. 
After attending the criminal intelligence course, 
intelligence officers gather information and forward 
it to the Iowa DPS Intelligence Bureau, where it is 
analyzed and disseminated back to LEIN members. A 
yearly conference updates the officers on new trends 
and activities in a range of criminal areas. A similar 
program has been implemented in Illinois, Kansas, 
Nebraska, North Dakota, South Dakota, and 
Wisconsin. 
One example of LEIN’s effectiveness is illustrated by 
a 1998 case in which LEIN members worked together 
to investigate a series of bank robberies occurring in 
the Iowa City area. Officers from six departments 
participated in a surveillance investigation that resulted 
in the bank robber’s arrest. Another example, in 1999, 
involved seasonal, transient home repair workers who 
engaged in fraudulent criminal activity, particularly 
against senior citizens. The LEIN program conducted 
a 2-day training seminar and intelligence briefing on 
these activities in advance of the summer season, and 
fewer incidents of fraud were reported that year than 
in earlier years.
61 
In July 2002, the Iowa DPS cooperated with a number 
of local law enforcement agencies to conduct an 
undercover operation in the Des Moines metro area. 
Working out of a storefront, undercover officers 
contacted individuals who agreed to sell narcotics, 
stolen merchandise, and a significant number of 
stolen vehicles. These items included property taken 
from several burglaries in central Iowa. About 50 
potential defendants were identified. Narcotics and 
stolen property with an estimated total value of $1.25 
million, including more than 100 stolen vehicles, were 
seized or recovered. 
Participating as LEIN members in this investigation, 
several agencies joined forces to resolve a large 
number of burglary, theft, fraud, and narcotics cases. 
Through this effort, officers identified, in a relatively 
short period, many individuals involved in multiple 
crimes. 
C
o
v
e
n
t
ry,C
o
nn
ect
i
c
u
t
,P
o
li
ce
D
e
par
t
m
e
n
t
Coventry, a rural town of 11,500 in northeastern 
Connecticut, has 13 sworn officers. The Coventry 
Police Department (CPD) believed that areas in the 
community with a high proportion of student rental 
properties accounted for a significant increase in crime 
and calls for service. However, CPD’s paper-based 
reporting system made it difficult to retrieve and 
analyze information about suspects, victims, 
witnesses, and locations. 
A Community-Oriented Policing Services grant 
helped CPD buy a computer-aided dispatch system 
and upgrade its records management system in 2002. 
The new system offered case management and crime 
analysis functions. The crime analysis data allowed 
CPD to see that domestic violence was one of the 
highest calls-for-service problems in the lakeside 
communities. It also revealed a burglary problem in 
the downtown area, so officers worked with businesses 
and residents to find a solution. The automated booking 
program saved officers considerable time. As a result 
of the updated technology, officers now have more 
effective tools with which to analyze and respond to 
neighborhood problems.
62 
Lo
ui
s
ianaS
t
a
te
P
o
li
ce
The analytical unit of the Louisiana State Police’s 
investigative office includes a sergeant, 2 analyst 
chiefs, 12 analysts, and a clerk chief. The unit provides 
case support and tactical response on a daily basis. 
Recently, the analytical unit worked with investigators 
from the Louisiana State Police Gaming Section on 
an illegal gambling case. The analysts read reports 
pertaining to the case and prior cases relevant to the 
subjects involved; completed background checks on 
all subjects, querying various databases and sources; 
analyzed subpoenaed telephone records; and prepared 
charts of associations, phone calls, and money 
transactions. The analysts reviewed evidence taken 
from the suspects’ trash and helped collect evidence 
when the search warrant was served. As a result of this 
intelligence effort, seven people were arrested and 
case files were opened for several others. 
24 
App
e
ndixA:
I
n
fo
rma
t
i
o
nSharin
g
and 
I
n
fo
rma
t
i
o
nT
ec
hn
o
l
og
yR
eso
ur
ces
International Association of Chiefs of Police 
www.theiacp.org 
The International Association of Chiefs of Police 
(IACP) supports police commanders regarding a 
range of issues, including intelligence. Its web site 
contains intelligence policies, information on training 
workshops, and publications (e.g., the 2002 Criminal 
Intelligence Sharing Summit Report, A Police Chief ’s 
Primer on Information Sharing, and Leading from the 
Front: Combating and Preparing for Domestic 
Terrorism). IACP has been involved in the Criminal 
Justice Information Sharing project with the Global 
Intelligence Working Group and the Institute for 
Intergovernmental Research. IACP provides training 
on topics of interest to the intelligence field, from 
organized crime and nontraditional organized crime 
to undercover operations, informant management, 
analysis, and principles of report writing. 
International Association of Law Enforcement 
Intelligence Analysts, Inc. 
www.ialeia.org 
The International Association of Law Enforcement 
Intelligence Analysts, Inc. (IALEIA), an organization 
of analysts, intelligence officers, and police managers, 
was founded in 1980. It has about 1,800 members in 
more than 50 countries. A nonprofit organization 
dedicated to educating the police community about the 
benefits of intelligence and analysis, IALEIA trains 
analysts to meet high standards of professionalism. 
In the past decade, it has published a number of 
documents relating to intelligence and analysis, 
including the following: 
■ 
Successful Law Enforcement Using Analytic 
Methods. 
■ 
Guidelines for Starting an Analytic Unit. 
■ 
Intelligence Models and Best Practices. 
■ 
Intelligence-Led Policing. 
■ 
Starting an Analytic Unit for Intelligence-Led 
Policing. 
■ 
IALEIA Journal 20th Anniversary CD–ROM. 
■ 
Intelligence 2000: Revising the Basic Elements 
(produced jointly with the Law Enforcement 
Intelligence Unit (LEIU). 
■ 
Turnkey Intelligence: Unlocking Your Agency’s 
Intelligence Capability (a CD–ROM produced 
jointly with LEIU and the National White Collar 
Crime Center). 
IALEIA participated in the development of the 
Foundations of Intelligence Analysis Training program 
(with LEIU, RISS centers, and the National White 
Collar Crime Center) and offers the course, which is 
taught by experienced analytic instructors. The IALEIA 
web site lists available training and reference materials. 
Office of Community Oriented Policing Services 
25 
Its web site has a problem-oriented policing center 
Community policing is an important part of preparing 
www.cops.usdoj.gov 
The Office of Community Oriented Policing Services 
(COPS) offers a range of publications and tools to 
assist with problem-oriented policing and analysis. 
(www.popcenter.org) with publications including 
Using Analysis for Problem Solving, “Assessing 
Responses to Problems: An Introductory Guide for 
Police Problem Solvers,” and other reports and articles, 
some of which are reprinted from other sources. 
COPS also offers documents on intelligence sharing 
that include the two listed below: 
“Connecting the Dots for a Proactive Approach” 
(www.cops.usdoj.gov/mime/open.pdf?Item=1046) 
for and responding to acts of terrorism. This article in 
Border and Transportation Security magazine details 
the work of three COPS staffers who harness the 
power of community policing to enhance homeland 
security. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested