c# wpf free pdf viewer : Cut paste pdf pages control application platform web page azure asp.net web browser 2106813-part219

Protecting Your Community From Terrorism: Strategies 
for Local Law Enforcement, Volume 4: The Production 
and Sharing of Intelligence 
(www.cops.usdoj.gov/mime/open.pdf?Item=1438) 
This document discusses the importance of 
intelligence-led policing and its correlation with 
problem-oriented policing principles. The report 
outlines criteria for an effective intelligence function 
at all levels of government. Sidebars highlight 
contributions from key players in the fields of 
intelligence and policing. 
U.S. Department of Justice—Office of Justice 
Programs 
www.ojp.usdoj.gov 
The U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) Office of 
Justice Programs (OJP) has initiated several programs 
regarding information technology and information 
sharing through its bureaus and offices including the 
Bureau of Justice Assistance, National Institute of 
Justice, and Bureau of Justice Statistics. 
OJP’s Information Technology web site 
(www.it.ojp.gov) provides a wealth of information on 
a variety of programs and initiatives, including online 
tools that support information sharing at all levels of 
government, and the recommendations of DOJ’s 
Global Justice Information Sharing Initiative. 
The web site also provides information on: 
■ 
Justice Standards Clearinghouse for Information 
Sharing. 
■ 
DOJ’s Global Justice XML Data Model (GJXDM). 
■ 
National Information Exchange Model (NIEM), a 
partnership between DOJ and DHS. 
■ 
Privacy policies and public access. 
■ 
National Criminal Intelligence Sharing Plan. 
■ 
An information technology and information sharing 
event calendar and a document library. 
Regional Information Sharing Systems 
www.rissinfo.com 
The Regional Information Sharing Systems (RISS) 
comprise six regional intelligence centers operating in 
mutually exclusive geographic regions. It provides 
criminal information exchange, secure communications, 
and other related services to local, state, tribal, and 
federal law enforcement member agencies. RISS 
disseminates critical information for investigative 
support in combating multijurisdictional crime that 
requires interagency cooperation. 
RISS is a federally funded program administered by 
the U.S. Department of Justice Office of Justice 
Programs’ Bureau of Justice Assistance. Information 
retained in RISS criminal intelligence databases must 
also comply with the Criminal Intelligence Systems 
Operating Policies (28 C.F.R. Part 23). 
The executive director and policy board chairperson of 
each center constitute the RISS Directors National 
Policy Group, which has direct control over the 
policies and operations of the secure, nationwide law 
enforcement communications and information sharing 
network (RISSNET) and related resources. 
RISS membership has grown to serve more than 7,100 
law enforcement and criminal justice agencies 
representing more than 700,000 sworn officers. 
Membership includes local, state, federal, and tribal 
law enforcement member agencies in all 50 states, the 
District of Columbia, U.S. territories, Australia, 
Canada, and England. Agencies must join their 
regional RISS center through an application process 
established by the center. 
RISS history includes many achievements and 
successes in helping member agencies share 
information and combat multijurisdictional crime 
problems. A few milestones are mentioned below. 
In 1997, RISS implemented RISSNET. Today, this 
network allows member agencies to access many 
resources electronically. RISSNET features include 
online access to a RISS bulletin board, databases, 
RISS web pages, secure e-mail, and a RISS search 
engine. To use the network, officers of member 
agencies must obtain a security package and enroll in 
RISSNET. The more than 7,100 law enforcement 
member agencies all have access to RISSNET 
nationwide. 
During 1999, RISS began expanding RISSNET to link 
to state and federal law enforcement agency systems 
and provide additional resources to all users. As of 
26 
Cut paste pdf pages - copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Easy to Use C# Code to Extract PDF Pages, Copy Pages from One PDF File and Paste into Others
delete pages from pdf without acrobat; export pages from pdf preview
Cut paste pdf pages - VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed VB.NET Guide for Extracting Pages from Microsoft PDF Doc
extract pages from pdf document; copy pdf page to powerpoint
April 2004, 16 High Intensity Drug Trafficking Areas, 
15 state agencies, and 8 other federal and regional 
systems were connected to RISSNET. 
In September 2002, the Federal Bureau of 
Investigation (FBI) Law Enforcement Online (LEO) 
system was connected with RISS. In October 2003, 
the RISS/LEO interconnection was recommended in 
the National Criminal Intelligence Sharing Plan 
(NCISP) as the initial sensitive but unclassified 
communications backbone for implementing a 
nationwide criminal intelligence sharing capability. 
NCISP encourages agencies to connect their system to 
RISS/LEO. 
In April 2003, RISS expanded its services and 
implemented the Automated Trusted Information 
Exchange (ATIX) to provide additional users with 
access to information on homeland security, disaster 
response, and terrorist threats. RISS member agencies 
and officials from first responder agencies and critical 
infrastructure entities can access ATIX. 
Contact information for each RISS center is as follows. 
MAGLOCLEN 
Middle Atlantic-Great Lakes Organized Crime 
Law Enforcement Network
140 Terry Road, Suite 100 
Newtown, PA 18940  
www.info@magloclen.riss.net
MOCIC 
Mid-States Organized Crime Information Center 
1610 East Sunshine Drive, Suite 100 
Springfield, MO 65804 
www.info@mocic.riss.net 
NESPIN 
New England State Police Information Network 
Grove Street, Suite 305 
Franklin, MA 02038 
www.info@nespin.riss.net 
RMIN 
Rocky Mountain Information Network 
2828 North Central Avenue, Suite 1000 
Phoenix, AZ 85004 
www.info@rmin.riss.net 
ROCIC 
Regional Organized Crime Information Center 
545 Marriott Drive, Suite 850 
Nashville, TN 37214 
www.info@rocic.riss.net 
WSIN 
Western States Information Network 
1825 Bell Street, Suite 205 
Sacramento, CA 92403 
www.info@wisn.riss.net 
U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration 
www.dea.gov 
The U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) 
has several programs to assist state and local law 
enforcement intelligence efforts. One of these is the 
National Drug Pointer Index (NDPIX). 
In 1992, DEA was designated by the Office of 
National Drug Control Policy to develop a national 
drug pointer system to help federal, state, and local 
law enforcement agencies investigate drug trafficking 
organizations and to enhance officer safety by 
preventing duplicate investigations. The DEA 
recognized that the development of this system would 
require a cooperative effort among state, local, and 
federal law enforcement agencies. 
The DEA drew from the experience of state and local 
agencies to make certain that their concerns were 
addressed and that they had extensive input and 
involvement in the development of the system. 
Nominees from 19 states and 24 law enforcement 
organizations formed a project steering committee and 
6 working groups. 
NDPIX became operational nationwide in October 
1997. The National Law Enforcement 
Telecommunications System—a familiar, fast, and 
effective network that connects to almost every police 
entity in the United States—is the backbone for 
NDPIX. Participating agencies are required to submit 
active case targeting information to NDPIX to receive 
pointer information. The greater the number of data 
elements entered, the greater the likelihood of 
identifying possible matches. Designed to be a true 
pointer system rather than an intelligence system, 
NDPIX serves as a switchboard that provides timely 
27 
VB.NET PDF copy, paste image library: copy, paste, cut PDF images
VB.NET PDF - Copy, Paste, Cut PDF Image in VB.NET. Copy, paste and cut PDF image while preview without adobe reader component installed.
extract page from pdf acrobat; acrobat remove pages from pdf
C# PDF copy, paste image Library: copy, paste, cut PDF images in
C#.NET PDF SDK - Copy, Paste, Cut PDF Image in C#.NET. C# Guide cutting. C#.NET Project DLLs: Copy, Paste, Cut Image in PDF Page. In
delete page from pdf document; delete page from pdf acrobat
notification of common investigative targets. The 
actual case information is shared only when telephonic 
contact is made between the officers and agents who 
have been linked to NDPIX by their agencies. DEA is 
a full participant in NDPIX and had entered 86,000 
drug investigative targets into the system as of June 
2000. As more and more law enforcement agencies 
participate in NDPIX, the system will provide far-
reaching assistance in the effort to dismantle drug 
organizations. 
The publications section of the DEA web site 
(www.dea.gov/pubs/publications.html) provides 
28 
dozens of reports in a downloadable format. The 
intelligence section has both country profiles and drug 
reports. Recent country profiles include reports on 
Australia, Belize, China, and India. Recent drug 
reports include the following: 
■ 
Heroin Signature Program: 2001. 
■ 
2002 Domestic Monitor Program. 
■ 
Heroin Trafficking in Russia’s Troubled East. 
■ 
Drug Trade in the Caribbean: Threat Assessment. 
VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.
Page: Delete Existing PDF Pages. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Delete PDF Page. How to VB.NET: Delete Consecutive Pages from PDF.
export one page of pdf preview; delete pages of pdf
C# PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
Page: Delete Existing PDF Pages. Provide C# Users with Mature .NET PDF Document Manipulating Library for Deleting PDF Pages in C#.
extract pdf pages; extract page from pdf reader
App
e
ndixB:S
o
ur
ces
of
I
n
te
lli
ge
n
ce
Pr
o
du
cts
Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives 
www.atf.gov 
Now a part of the U.S. Department of Justice, the 
Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives 
produces intelligence publications on arsons and 
explosives. Two such publications include the Bomb 
Threat Checklist and 2000 Threat Assessment Guide 
for Houses of Worship. 
California Department of Justice 
www.caag.state.ca.us 
The California Department of Justice publishes 
intelligence bulletins, alerts, and reports on gangs, 
organized crime, and other topics. Some, such as 
Organized Crime in California 2003, are available on 
its web site; others are available only through a secure 
intranet. 
El Paso Intelligence Center 
www.dea.gov/programs/epic.htm 
The El Paso Intelligence Center (EPIC) was formed 
in 1974 to establish a Southwest Border Intelligence 
Service Center staffed by representatives from the 
DEA, Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS), 
and U.S. Customs Service (U.S. Department of the 
Treasury). The director is a representative from the 
U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA), and 
the deputy director is from INS. 
A number of EPIC programs are dedicated to 
postseizure analysis and establishing links between 
recent enforcement actions and ongoing investigations. 
EPIC personnel coordinate and conduct training 
seminars throughout the United States, covering topics 
such as indicators of trafficking and concealment 
methods used by couriers. Through its Operation 
Pipeline program, EPIC trains state and local officers 
in highway drug and drug currency interdiction. 
In a continuing effort to stay abreast of changing trends, 
EPIC developed the National Clandestine Laboratory 
Seizure Database. EPIC’s future course will be driven 
by the National General Counterdrug Intelligence Plan. 
As a major national center in the new drug intelligence 
architecture, EPIC will serve as a clearinghouse for the 
High Intensity Drug Trafficking Areas (HIDTA) 
Intelligence Centers, gathering state and local law 
enforcement drug information and providing drug 
intelligence to the centers. 
EPIC includes 15 federal agencies, and it has 
established information sharing agreements with law 
enforcement agencies from all 50 states, the District 
of Columbia, Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, Guam, 
and Canada. 
Federal Bureau of Investigation 
www.fbi.gov 
Online Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) 
publications include current and back issues of the 
29 
and a number of 
Another publication, 
can also be 
published by the Congressional Research Service, 
FBI Law Enforcement Bulletin 
reports. Terrorism in the United States is available for 
1996, 1997, 1998, and 1999. Countering Terrorism: 
Integration of Practice and Theory is available in 
a downloadable format, as is CONPLAN: U.S. 
Government Interagency Domestic Terrorism Concept 
of Operations. 
The School 
Shooter: A Threat Assessment Perspective, 
found on the FBI web site. This web site also provides 
information on the National Law Enforcement Data 
Exchange (N–DEx), the Regional Data Exchange 
(R–DEx), and Sentinel. 
Federation of American Scientists—Intelligence 
Research Program 
www.fas.org/irp/crs 
This web site provides intelligence-related documents 
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Page: Insert PDF Pages. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Insert PDF Page. Add and Insert Multiple PDF Pages to PDF Document Using VB.
export pages from pdf acrobat; cut pages from pdf online
How to C#: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF for .NET
example, you may easily create, load, combine, and split PDF file(s), and add, create, insert, delete, re-order, copy, paste, cut, rotate, and save PDF page(s
delete pages from pdf acrobat; extract pages pdf
including many studies on intelligence efforts and 
terrorist groups. 
Financial Crimes Enforcement Network 
www.ustreas.gov/fincen 
The Financial Crimes Enforcement Network (FinCEN) 
was established in April 1990. Its original mission was 
to provide a governmentwide, multisource intelligence 
and analytical network to support the detection, 
investigation, and prosecution of domestic and 
international money laundering and other financial 
crimes. In 1994, its mission was broadened to include 
regulatory responsibilities. 
FinCEN’s current mission is to support law 
enforcement investigative efforts, foster interagency 
and global cooperation against domestic and 
international financial crimes, and provide U.S. 
policymakers with strategic analysis of domestic and 
worldwide money laundering developments, trends, 
and patterns. FinCEN achieves this mission by 
collecting and analyzing information, providing 
technological assistance, and implementing U.S. 
Treasury regulations. 
FinCEN controls more than 170 million reports filed 
under the Bank Secrecy Act and other similar laws. 
These reports are accessed by federal, state, and local 
law enforcement agencies through the Gateway 
Program. 
FinCEN’s web site offers a number of open-source 
publications relating to financial intelligence, 
including monographs on terrorist financing through 
informal value transfer systems, trend reports, and 
other publications. The site also links to publications 
produced by the Financial Action Task Force and lists 
money service businesses registered in the United 
States by state. 
Florida Department of Law Enforcement 
www.fdle.state.fl.us 
The Florida Department of Law Enforcement 
publishes a number of online informational reports and 
studies on topics such as check fraud, identity theft, 
narcotics, voter fraud, and Internet safety. 
High Intensity Drug Trafficking Areas 
www.whitehousedrugpolicy.gov/hidta 
The Anti-Drug Abuse Act of 1988 authorized the 
Director of the Office of National Drug Control Policy 
(ONDCP) to designate areas within the United States 
that exhibit serious drug trafficking problems and 
harmfully affect other areas of the country as High 
Intensity Drug Trafficking Areas (HIDTAs). The 
HIDTA program provides federal funds to those areas 
to help eliminate or reduce drug trafficking and its 
harmful consequences. Since 1990, 31 areas have been 
designated as HIDTAs. 
The HIDTA program facilitates cooperation between 
drug control organizations by providing them with 
resources and information and by helping them 
reorganize and pool resources, coordinate and focus 
efforts, and implement joint initiatives. The key 
priorities of the program are as follows: 
■ 
Assessing regional drug threats. 
■ 
Designing strategies that focus on combating drug 
trafficking threats. 
■ 
Developing and funding initiatives to implement 
strategies. 
■ 
Facilitating coordination between federal, state, and 
local efforts. 
■ 
Improving the effectiveness and efficiency of drug 
control efforts to reduce or eliminate the harmful 
impact of drug trafficking. 
The HIDTA program has 31 regional offices operating 
in 40 states. Each HIDTA is governed by its own 
executive committee composed of approximately 
16 members—8 federal members and 8 state or local 
members. These committees ensure that threat-specific 
strategies and initiatives are developed, employed, 
supported, and evaluated. 
HIDTA Intelligence Service Centers have been 
mandated to facilitate the timely exchange of 
information among participating agencies. They 
also were tasked with the following: 
30 
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
Page: Insert PDF Pages. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› C# PDF: Insert PDF Page. Add and Insert Multiple PDF Pages to PDF Document Using C#.
cut pages out of pdf file; copying a pdf page into word
C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
PDF ›› C# PDF: Extract PDF Image. How to C#: Extract Image from PDF Document. Support PDF Image Extraction from a Page, a Region on a Page, and PDF Document.
acrobat export pages from pdf; extract one page from pdf
■ 
Establishing event and case deconfliction systems, 
where needed. 
■ 
Developing drug threat assessments for HIDTA 
areas of responsibility. 
■ 
Conducting postseizure analysis of major drug 
seizures related to HIDTA. 
■ 
Assisting state and local agencies in reporting drug 
seizures to the El Paso Intelligence Center. 
■ 
Participating in online intelligence reporting 
systems. 
■ 
Providing photo-imaging network capability in 
concert with NCIC 2000 and the Integrated 
Automated Fingerprint Identification System.
63 
The HIDTA program established Investigative Support 
Centers (ISCs) in designated areas to facilitate 
information sharing, intelligence collection, analysis, 
and dissemination. ISCs also provide technical and 
strategic support to HIDTA initiatives and participating 
agencies. A state or local law enforcement agency 
and a federal law enforcement agency jointly manage 
ISCs. The multiagency personnel at ISCs provide 
event and subject deconfliction services for HIDTA 
task forces and other law enforcement agencies inside 
and outside the HIDTA region for increased officer 
safety. They also provide intelligence to increase the 
effectiveness and efficiency of task forces by analyzing 
information and identifying drug trafficking 
organizations and their vulnerabilities. HIDTA ISCs 
provide secure sites and information systems that 
participating law enforcement agencies can use to 
store and appropriately share information and 
intelligence. 
Each HIDTA produces an annual drug threat 
assessment, which is created with information received 
from regional drug control agencies. The threat 
assessments identify the regional drug threat to help 
departments and agencies develop strategies and learn 
about intelligence gaps. The assessments also help 
policymakers determine drug threat priorities and 
resource allocations. HIDTA drug threat assessments 
are integrated and coordinated with the National Drug 
Intelligence Center (NDIC), which is responsible for 
producing the national drug threat assessment. 
The National HIDTA Assistance Center at 
www.nhac.org is an overall HIDTA assistance center 
in Miami that provides training and other resources 
to HIDTA participants. 
Law Enforcement Intelligence Unit 
www.leiu.org 
On March 29, 1956, representatives from 26 law 
enforcement agencies met in San Francisco and 
formed the Law Enforcement Intelligence Unit 
(LEIU). LEIU records and exchanges confidential 
criminal information that is not available through 
regular police communication channels. 
LEIU has performed a valuable coordinating function 
among law enforcement agencies throughout the 
United States, Canada, and Australia. Its membership 
is divided geographically into four zones: the Eastern 
Zone, Central Zone, Northwestern Zone, and 
Southwestern Zone. Each zone has a chairperson and 
a vice chairperson. The governing body of LEIU is the 
executive board, which establishes policy and oversees 
the admission of law enforcement agencies applying 
for membership. The board is composed of national 
officers, zone officers, the past general chairperson, a 
legal adviser, and a representative from the California 
Department of Justice (which is the Central 
Coordinating Agency for LEIU). 
31 
intelligence issues of interest to its members. It also 
LEIU membership is open to state and local law 
enforcement agencies that have a criminal intelligence 
function. Applicants must be sponsored by a current 
member. LEIU has approximately 250 members. 
LEIU holds one annual training conference on general 
matters and one on gaming issues. It has a central 
repository pointer index that its members can query 
confidentially. LEIU produces publications on 
offers a gaming index containing the names and 
identifiers of individuals applying for gaming licenses. 
An analyst is available to respond to members’ 
inquiries for information on suspected criminals and 
their activities. 
LEIU may be reached at the California Department 
of Justice, Bureau of Investigation, Intelligence 
Operations Program, Central Coordinating Agency, 
P.O. Box 163029, Sacramento, CA 95816–3029. 
Library of Congress—Federal Research Division 
www.loc.gov/rr/frd/terrorism.html 
This division of the Library of Congress houses a 
Terrorism and Crime Studies section with bibliographies 
on particular topics and numerous reports covering 
subjects such as terrorism, organized crime, narcotics 
distribution, and transnational organized crime. 
National Drug Intelligence Center 
www.usdoj.gov/ndic 
The National Drug Intelligence Center (NDIC) 
supports national policy and law enforcement 
decisionmakers by providing timely, strategic 
assessments focusing on the production, trafficking, 
and consumption trends and patterns of illicit drugs 
inside U.S. national borders and territories. 
The National Drug Threat Assessment, NDIC’s major 
intelligence product, is a comprehensive annual report 
on national drug trafficking and abuse trends within 
the United States. The assessment identifies the 
primary drug threat to the nation, monitors fluctuations 
in consumption levels, tracks drug availability by 
geographic market, and analyzes trafficking and 
distribution patterns. The report highlights the most 
current quantitative and qualitative information on 
drug availability, demand, production and cultivation, 
transportation, and distribution. The assessment also 
examines the effects of particular drugs on abusers and 
society as a whole. 
State Drug Threat Assessments provide a detailed 
threat assessment of drug trends within most states. 
Each report identifies the primary drug threat in the 
state and gives a detailed overview of the most current 
trends by drug type. 
Bulletins and briefs are developed in response to new 
trends or high-priority drug issues. They are quickly 
relayed to the law enforcement and intelligence 
communities and warn law enforcement officials of 
emerging trends. These products are all available on 
the NDIC web site. 
The intelligence analysis staff at NDIC provide strategic 
and tactical products. The agency has developed software 
called Realtime Analytic Investigative Database 
(RAID), which it provides, free of charge, to state and 
local law enforcement departments. It also provides 
database training and documentation materials. NDIC 
staff use RAID when they go into the field to examine 
documents for major cases. 
NDIC also gives training in analysis to personnel at 
other agencies. It uses distance learning, interactive 
video training, and other multimedia technologies. Its 
web site includes access to a number of its threat 
assessments and bulletins. 
National White Collar Crime Center 
www.nw3c.org 
Through funding from the Bureau of Justice 
Assistance, the National White Collar Crime Center 
(NW3C) provides a nationwide support system for 
agencies involved in the prevention, investigation, and 
prosecution of economic and high-tech crimes. This 
nonprofit corporation also supports and partners with 
other appropriate entities in addressing homeland 
security initiatives as they relate to economic and 
high-tech crimes. 
NW3C is a member-affiliated organization comprising 
law enforcement agencies, state regulatory bodies, 
and state and local prosecution offices. Its growing 
membership totals more than 1,000 agencies 
nationwide, and its training programs have delivered 
up-to-date training in economic and high-tech crime 
to more than 1,400 agencies. 
Through its National Fraud Complaint Management 
Center (NFCMC) and Internet Crimes Complaint 
Center (IC3), NW3C provides support services in five 
main categories: economic and computer crime 
training, intelligence and analytical services, funding 
for designated cases, research, and referral and 
analysis of fraud complaints. 
NW3C developed NFCMC to apply technological 
innovations to the management of economic crime 
complaints and to improve prevention, investigation, 
and prosecution efforts resulting from complaints. A 
significant part of this project was partnering with the 
FBI to establish IC3. The center represents a unique 
approach to the growing problem of fraud on the 
Internet. For law enforcement and regulatory agencies, 
IC3 offers a central repository for complaints related 
to Internet fraud, uses the information to quantify 
fraud patterns, and provides timely statistical data on 
current fraud trends. 
32 
U.S. Department of Homeland Security— 
Information Analysis and Infrastructure Protection 
www.nipc.gov 
The Information Analysis and Infrastructure Protection 
Directorate of the Department of Homeland Security 
includes publications previously generated and 
distributed by the National Infrastructure Protection 
Center of the FBI. Daily reports addressing open-
source information are available as are Cyber Notes. 
U.S. Department of State 
www.state.gov 
The State Department provides reports on foreign 
countries, including their history, economy, political 
situation, population, and leadership (“Background 
Notes”), which are updated frequently. It also 
publishes a yearly Narcotics Control Strategy Report 
(last published in March 2004) and Patterns of Global 
Terrorism (last published in April 2004). 
U.S. Secret Service 
www.secretservice.gov/ntac 
The U.S. Secret Service is charged with protecting the 
president and the vice president, their families, heads 
of state, and other designated individuals. It plans and 
implements security designs for designated national 
special security events. The Secret Service also 
investigates violations of laws relating to counterfeiting 
of obligations and securities of the United States; 
financial crimes that include access device fraud, 
financial institution fraud, identity theft, and computer 
fraud; and computer-based attacks on the nation’s 
financial, banking, and telecommunications 
infrastructure. 
It houses the National Threat Assessment Center and 
has a substantial inventory of assessment products on 
its web site, which include those listed below: 
■ 
Protective Intelligence and Threat Assessments: A 
Guide for State and Local Law Enforcement 
Officials. 
■ 
Threat Assessment: An Approach to Targeted 
Violence. 
■ 
Threat Assessment: Defining an Approach to 
Evaluating Risk of Targeted Violence. 
■ 
Threat Assessment in Schools. 
■ 
Assassination in the United States: An Operational 
Study of Recent Assassins, Attackers and Near 
Lethal Approaches. 
33 
App
e
ndixC:
I
n
te
lli
ge
n
ce
Trainin
g
and 
R
eso
ur
ces
Bureau of Justice Assistance 
www.ojp.usdoj.gov/BJA 
The U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) Office of 
Justice Programs’ Bureau of Justice Assistance 
(BJA) provides leadership and services in grant 
administration and criminal justice policy development 
to support local, state, and tribal justice strategies to 
achieve safer communities. BJA’s overall goals are to 
(1) reduce and prevent crime, violence, and drug 
abuse and (2) improve the functioning of the criminal 
justice system. To achieve these goals, BJA programs 
emphasize enhanced coordination and cooperation 
of federal, state, and local efforts. In the area of 
intelligence training, BJA provides many intelligence-
related resources and training: 
■ 
The State and Local Anti-Terrorism Training 
(SLATT) Program provides specialized counter
­
terrorism and intelligence training for law 
enforcement personnel in combating terrorism and 
extremist criminal activity. For more information, 
visit www.ojp.usdoj.gov/BJA/tta/index.html. 
■ 
The Criminal Intelligence Systems Operating 
Policies (28 C.F.R. Part 23) Training and Technical 
Assistance program helps law enforcement agencies 
learn how to comply with the 28 C.F.R. Part 23 
guideline. Training courses are half-day, no-cost 
events held at sites throughout the country. 
■ 
The Criminal Intelligence Training for Law 
Enforcement Chief Executives course assists law 
enforcement executives in understanding the 
intelligence function and improving their 
department’s intelligence efforts. 
■ 
The National Criminal Intelligence Resource Center 
(NCIRC) is a new initiative created by BJA to 
provide support to law enforcement agencies in a 
secure environment on intelligence policies and 
procedures, best practices, and training. The 
NCIRC will be a collaborative effort with other 
federal agencies involved in intelligence and can 
be accessed through the RISS network. 
■ 
BJA also administers a comprehensive web site that 
provides access to many other intelligence and 
information sharing products, including those 
supported by DOJ’s Global Justice Information 
Sharing Initiative. Visit www.it.ojp.gov to access 
these resources. 
For more information on BJA’s training and technical 
assistance related to information sharing and 
intelligence, see BJA’s Menu of Training Opportunities 
at www.ojp.usdoj.gov/BJA/tta/index.html. 
Counter-Terrorism Training and Resources for 
Law Enforcement 
www.counterterrorismtraining.gov 
A product of DOJ and BJA, this web site serves as a 
single point of access to counter-terrorism training 
opportunities and related materials available 
throughout the federal government and from private 
and nonprofit organizations. Materials cover a 
wide range of topics, including cyber-terrorism, 
35 
and maintain a web site that will contain intelligence-
environmental protection and food and water security, 
issues relating to first responders and medical 
response, transportation security, and weapons of 
mass destruction. 
Federal Bureau of Investigation—Virtual Academy 
http://fbiva.fbiacademy.edu 
The FBI is currently pursuing a project to develop 
related information and training information to 
increase the proficiency levels of street intelligence 
officers and intelligence analysts. 
Federal Law Enforcement Training Center 
www.fletc.gov 
The Computer and Financial Investigations Division 
(formerly the Financial Fraud Institute) at the Federal 
Law Enforcement Training Center (FLETC) has a 
72-hour Intelligence Analyst Training Program onsite 
in Glynco, Georgia. The curriculum includes legal 
aspects for intelligence personnel, methodology and 
analytic skills, research techniques, report writing, 
collection and documentation of data, identification 
and document fraud, and information sharing. The 
course includes hands-on computer and Internet use. 
An examination is given at the end of the first week of 
training. The program serves federal, state, and local 
personnel who are assigned to intelligence or analysis 
within their agencies or who have a need for 
intelligence training. 
International Association of Chiefs of Police 
www.theiacp.org 
The International Association of Chiefs of Police 
(IACP) supports police commanders regarding a 
range of issues, including intelligence. Its web site 
contains intelligence policies, information on training 
workshops, and publications (e.g., the 2002 Criminal 
Intelligence Sharing Summit Report, A Police Chief ’s 
Primer on Information Sharing, and Leading from the 
Front: Combating and Preparing for Domestic 
Terrorism). IACP has been involved in the Criminal 
Justice Information Sharing project with the Global 
Intelligence Working Group and the Institute for 
Intergovernmental Research. IACP provides training 
on topics of interest to the intelligence field, from 
organized crime and nontraditional organized crime 
to undercover operations, informant management, 
analysis, and principles of report writing. 
International Association of Law Enforcement 
Intelligence Analysts, Inc. 
www.ialeia.org 
The International Association of Law Enforcement 
Intelligence Analysts, Inc. (IALEIA), an organization 
of analysts, intelligence officers, and police managers, 
was founded in 1980 and has approximately 1,800 
members in more than 50 countries. A nonprofit 
organization dedicated to educating the police 
community about the benefits of intelligence and 
analysis, IALEIA trains analysts to meet high 
standards of professionalism. 
In the past decade, it has published a number of 
documents relating to intelligence and analysis, 
including: 
■ 
Successful Law Enforcement Using Analytic 
Methods. 
■ 
Guidelines for Starting an Analytic Unit. 
■ 
Intelligence Models and Best Practices. 
■ 
Intelligence-Led Policing. 
■ 
Starting an Analytic Unit for Intelligence-Led 
Policing. 
■ 
IALEIA Journal 20th Anniversary CD–ROM. 
■ 
Intelligence 2000: Revising the Basic Elements 
(produced jointly with the Law Enforcement 
Intelligence Unit (LEIU). 
■ 
Turnkey Intelligence: Unlocking Your Agency’s 
Intelligence Capability (a CD–ROM produced 
jointly with LEIU and the National White Collar 
Crime Center). 
IALEIA participated in the development of the 
Foundations of Intelligence Analysis Training program 
(with LEIU, RISS centers, and the National White 
Collar Crime Center) and offers the course, which is 
taught by experienced analytic instructors. The 
IALEIA web site lists available training and reference 
materials. 
Multijurisdictional Counterdrug Task Force 
Training Program 
www.mctft.com 
The Multijurisdictional Counterdrug Task Force 
Training program is a partnership between the Florida 
National Guard and St. Petersburg (Florida) College. 
It offers several free courses nationwide, including a 
basic intelligence analysis course. 
New Jersey Division of Criminal Justice 
www.njdcj.org 
The New Jersey Division of Criminal Justice offers 
basic, financial, advanced, and strategic analytic 
training in Trenton, New Jersey. Its courses are free 
and are open to law enforcement and military 
personnel. 
Office of Community Oriented Policing Services 
www.cops.usdoj.gov 
The Office of Community Oriented Policing Services 
(COPS) offers a range of publications and tools to 
assist with problem-oriented policing and analysis. 
Its web site has a problem-oriented policing center 
36 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested