c# wpf free pdf viewer : Extract pages from pdf file SDK application service wpf html .net dnn 2106814-part220

(www.popcenter.org) with publications including 
Using Analysis for Problem Solving, “Assessing 
Responses to Problems: An Introductory Guide for 
Police Problem Solvers,” and other reports and 
articles, some of which are reprinted from other 
sources. 
COPS also offers documents on intelligence, including: 
Law Enforcement Intelligence: A Guide for State, 
Local, and Tribal Law Enforcement Agencies 
(www.cops.usdoj.gov/default.asp?Item=118) 
This intelligence guide was prepared in response 
to requests from law enforcement executives for 
guidance on intelligence functions in a post-September 
11 world. It will help law enforcement agencies 
develop or enhance their intelligence capacity and 
enable them to fight terrorism and other crimes while 
preserving community policing relationships. 
“Connecting the Dots for a Proactive Approach” 
(www.cops.usdoj.gov/mime/open.pdf?Item=1046) 
Community policing is an important part of preparing 
for and responding to acts of terrorism. This article in 
Border and Transportation Security magazine details 
the work of three COPS staffers who harness the 
power of community policing to enhance homeland 
security. 
Protecting Your Community From Terrorism: 
Strategies for Local Law Enforcement, Volume 4: 
The Production and Sharing of Intelligence 
(www.cops.usdoj.gov/mime/open.pdf?Item=1438) 
This document discusses the importance of 
intelligence-led policing and its correlation with 
problem-oriented policing principles. The report 
outlines criteria for an effective intelligence function 
at all levels of government. Sidebars highlight 
contributions from key players in the fields of 
intelligence and policing. 
Regional Information Sharing Systems 
www.rissinfo.com 
RISS centers host a variety of intelligence programs at 
their sites and in the field. These programs range from 
those taught by RISS staff members to those taught by 
experts from federal, state, and local agencies. Many 
RISS training programs are free or low-cost. Contact 
the local RISS center for details. (See appendix A for 
more information about RISS.) 
U.S. Department of Homeland Security—Office for 
Domestic Preparedness 
www.ojp.usdoj.gov/odp 
The Office for Domestic Preparedness (ODP) is the 
principal component of the Department of Homeland 
Security (DHS) responsible for preparing the United 
States for acts of terrorism. In carrying out its mission, 
ODP is responsible for providing training, funds for 
the purchase of equipment, support for the planning 
and execution of exercises, technical assistance, and 
other support to assist states and local jurisdictions in 
preventing, responding to, and recovering from acts of 
terrorism. 
U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration 
37 
www.usdoj.gov/dea/programs/training.htm 
The U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration manages 
the Justice Training Center in Quantico, Virginia, 
which hosts a 4-week Federal Law Enforcement 
Analytic Training (FLEAT) program for federal, state, 
and local law enforcement personnel. The FLEAT 
program is also offered as a 2-week course at HIDTAs 
nationwide. Contact: 202–305–8500. 
Extract pages from pdf file - copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Easy to Use C# Code to Extract PDF Pages, Copy Pages from One PDF File and Paste into Others
export pages from pdf reader; delete page from pdf reader
Extract pages from pdf file - VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed VB.NET Guide for Extracting Pages from Microsoft PDF Doc
delete pages from pdf file online; cut pages from pdf reader
App
e
ndixD:Criminal
I
n
te
lli
ge
n
ce
M
o
d
e
lP
o
li
c
y 
Note: A discussion paper is available from the International Association of Chiefs of Police at www.theiacp.org. 
Effective Date: June 2003 
Subject: Criminal Intelligence 
I. Purpose 
It is the purpose of this policy to provide law enforcement officers in general, and officers assigned to the 
intelligence function in particular, with guidelines and principles for the collection, analysis, and distribution of 
intelligence information. 
II. Policy 
Information gathering is a fundamental and essential element in the all-encompassing duties of any law enforcement 
agency. When acquired, information is used to prevent crime, pursue and apprehend offenders, and obtain 
evidence necessary for conviction. It is the policy of this agency to gather information directed toward specific 
individuals or organizations where there is reasonable suspicion (as defined in 28 C.F.R., Part 23, Section 23.3 c) 
that said individuals or organizations may be planning or engaging in criminal activity, to gather it with due 
respect for the rights of those involved, and to disseminate it only to authorized individuals as defined. While 
criminal intelligence may be assigned to specific personnel within the agency, all members of this agency are 
responsible for reporting information that may help identify criminal conspirators and perpetrators. 
It is also the policy of this agency to adopt the standards of the Commission on Accreditation for Law 
Enforcement Agencies (CALEA) for intelligence gathering, specifically that: If an agency performs an intelligence 
function, procedures must be established to ensure the legality and integrity of its operations, to include: 
■ 
Procedures for ensuring information collected is limited to criminal conduct and relates to activities that 
prevent a threat to the community. 
■ 
Descriptions of the types or quality of information that may be included in the system. 
■ 
Methods for purging out-of-date or incorrect information. 
■ 
Procedures for the utilization of intelligence personnel and techniques. 
The policy contained herein is intended to remain at all times consistent with the current language of 28 C.F.R., 
Part 23. 
III. Definitions 
Criminal Intelligence. Information compiled, analyzed, and/or disseminated in an effort to anticipate, prevent, or 
monitor criminal activity. 
39 
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
File: Merge PDF; C# File: Split PDF; C# Page: Insert PDF pages; C# Page: Delete PDF pages; C# Read: PDF Text Extract; C# Read: PDF Image
cut pages from pdf; extract page from pdf file
C# PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in
to C#: Extract Text Content from PDF File. textMgr = PDFTextHandler.ExportPDFTextManager( doc); // Extract text content for text extraction from all PDF pages.
reader extract pages from pdf; delete page from pdf file online
Strategic Intelligence. Information concerning existing patterns or emerging trends of criminal activity designed 
to assist in criminal apprehension and crime control strategies, for both short- and long-term investigative goals. 
Tactical Intelligence. Information regarding a specific criminal event that can be used immediately by operational 
units to further a criminal investigation, plan tactical operations, and provide for officer safety. 
Threshold for Criminal Intelligence. The threshold for collecting information and producing criminal intelligence 
shall be the “reasonable suspicion” standard in 28 C.F.R., Part 23, Section 23.3 c. 
IV. Procedures 
A. Mission
It is the mission of the intelligence function to gather information from all sources in a manner consistent 
with the law and to analyze that information to provide tactical and/or strategic intelligence on the existence, 
identities, and capabilities of criminal suspects and enterprises generally and, in particular, to further crime 
prevention and enforcement objectives/priorities identified by this agency. 
1. Information gathering in support of the intelligence function is the responsibility of each member of 
this agency although specific assignments may be made as deemed necessary by the officer-in-charge 
(OIC) of the intelligence authority. 
2. Information that implicates or suggests implication or complicity of any public official in criminal 
activity or corruption shall be immediately reported to this agency’s chief executive officer or another 
appropriate agency. 
B. Organization 
Primary responsibility for the direction of intelligence operations; coordination of personnel; and collection, 
evaluation, collation, analysis, and dissemination of intelligence information is housed in this agency’s 
intelligence authority under direction of the intelligence OIC. 
1. The OIC shall report directly to this agency’s chief executive officer or his designate in a manner and 
on a schedule prescribed by the chief. 
2. To accomplish the goals of the intelligence function and conduct routine operations in an efficient and 
effective manner, the OIC shall ensure compliance with the policies, procedures, mission, and goals 
of the agency. 
C. Professional Standards 
The intelligence function is often confronted with the need to balance information-gathering requirements for 
law enforcement with the rights of individuals. To this end, members of this agency shall adhere to the 
following: 
1. Information gathering for intelligence purposes shall be premised on circumstances that provide a 
reasonable suspicion (as defined in 28 C.F.R., Part 23, Section 23.3 c) that specific individuals or 
organizations may be planning or engaging in criminal activity. 
2. Investigative techniques employed shall be lawful and only so intrusive as to gather sufficient 
information to prevent criminal conduct or the planning of criminal conduct. 
40 
VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF
Extract and get partial and all text content from PDF file. Extract highlighted text out of PDF document. Extract Text Content from PDF File in VB.NET.
copy page from pdf; copy pdf page into word doc
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
Add and Insert Blank Pages to PDF File in C#.NET. This C# demo explains how to insert empty pages to a specific location of current PDF file.
add and remove pages from pdf file online; delete pages from pdf document
3. The intelligence function shall make every effort to ensure that information added to the criminal
intelligence base is relevant to a current or ongoing investigation and the product of dependable and
trustworthy sources of information. A record shall be kept of the source of all information received
and maintained by the intelligence function.
4. Information gathered and maintained by this agency for intelligence purposes may be disseminated
only to appropriate persons for legitimate law enforcement purposes in accordance with law and
procedures established by this agency. A record shall be kept regarding the dissemination of all such
information to persons within this or another law enforcement agency. 
D. Compiling Intelligence 
1. Intelligence investigations/files may be opened by the intelligence OIC with sufficient information and
justification. This includes but is not limited to the following types of information.
a. subject, victim(s), and complainant as appropriate; summary of suspected criminal activity; 
b. anticipated investigative steps to include proposed use of informants, and photographic or electronic
surveillance;
c. resource requirements, including personnel, equipment, buy/flash monies, travel costs, etc; 
d. anticipated results; and
e. problems, restraints, or conflicts of interest. 
2. Officers shall not retain official intelligence documentation for personal reference or other purposes but
shall submit such reports and information directly to the intelligence authority.
3. Information gathering using confidential informants as well as electronic, photographic, and related
surveillance devices shall be performed in a legally accepted manner and in accordance with procedures
established for their use by this agency. 
4. All information designated for use by the intelligence authority shall be submitted on the designated report
form and reviewed by the officer’s immediate supervisor prior to submission.
E. Analysis
1. The intelligence function shall establish and maintain a process to ensure that information gathered is
subjected to review and analysis to derive its meaning and value.
2. Where possible, the above-described process should be accomplished by professional, trained analysts. 
3. Analytic material (i.e., intelligence) shall be compiled and provided to authorized recipients as soon as
possible where meaningful trends, patterns, methods, characteristics, or intentions of criminal enterprises or
individuals emerge.
41 
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Moreover, you may use the following VB.NET demo code to insert multiple pages of a PDF file to a PDFDocument object at user-defined position.
extract pdf pages reader; copy web pages to pdf
C# PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files
note, PDF file will be divided from the previous page of your defined page number which starts from 0. For example, your original PDF file contains 4 pages.
extract one page from pdf online; extract page from pdf preview
F. Receipt/Evaluation of Information 
Upon receipt of information in any form, the OIC shall ensure that the following steps are taken: 
1. Where possible, information shall be evaluated with respect to reliability of source and validity of 
content. While evaluation may not be precise, this assessment must be made to the degree possible in 
order to guide others in using the information. A record shall be kept of the source of all information 
where known. 
2. Reports and other investigative material and information received by this agency shall remain the 
property of the originating agency, but may be retained by this agency. Such reports and other 
investigative material and information shall be maintained in confidence, and no access shall be 
given to another agency except with the consent of the originating agency. 
3. Information having relevance to active cases or that requires immediate attention shall be forwarded to 
responsible investigative or other personnel as soon as possible. 
4. Analytic material shall be compiled and provided to authorized sources as soon as possible where 
meaningful trends, patterns, methods, characteristics, or intentions of criminal enterprises or figures 
emerge. 
G. File Status
Intelligence file status will be classified as either “open” or “closed,” in accordance with the following: 
1. Open 
Intelligence files that are actively being worked will be designated as “Open.” In order to remain open, 
officers working such cases must file intelligence status reports covering case developments at least 
every 180 days. 
2. Closed 
“Closed” intelligence files are those in which investigations have been completed, where all logical 
leads have been exhausted, or where no legitimate law enforcement interest is served. All closed files 
must include a final case summary report prepared by or with the authorization of the lead 
investigator. 
H. Classification/Security of Intelligence 
1. Intelligence files will be classified in order to protect sources, investigations, and individual’s rights to 
privacy, as well as to provide a structure that will enable this agency to control access to intelligence. 
These classifications shall be reevaluated whenever new information is added to an existing 
intelligence file. 
a. Restricted 
“Restricted” intelligence files include those that contain information that could adversely affect an 
on going investigation, create safety hazards for officers, informants, or others and/or compromise 
their identities. Restricted intelligence may only be released by approval of the intelligence OIC or 
the agency chief executive to authorized law enforcement agencies with a need and a right to know. 
b. Confidential 
“Confidential” intelligence is less sensitive than restricted intelligence. It may be released to 
agency personnel when a need and a right to know has been established by the intelligence OIC or 
his designate. 
42 
C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
Page, a Region on a Page, and PDF Document. C#.NET extract image from multiple page adobe PDF file library for Visual Studio .NET.
delete pages from pdf online; delete pages of pdf preview
VB.NET PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images
By using RsterEdge XDoc PDF SDK for .NET, VB.NET users are able to extract image from PDF page or file and specified region on PDF page, then get image
extract pdf pages online; extract pages from pdf without acrobat
c. Unclassified 
“Unclassified” intelligence contains information from the news media, public records, and other 
sources of a topical nature. Access is limited to officers conducting authorized investigations that 
necessitate this information. 
2. All restricted and confidential files shall be secured, and access to all intelligence information shall be 
controlled and recorded by procedures established by the intelligence OIC. 
a. Informant files shall be maintained separately from intelligence files. 
b. Intelligence files shall be maintained in accordance with state and federal law. 
c. Release of intelligence information in general and electronic surveillance information and 
photographic intelligence, in particular, to any authorized law enforcement agency shall be 
made only with the express approval of the intelligence OIC and with the stipulation that such 
intelligence not be duplicated or otherwise disseminated without the approval of this agency’s OIC. 
d. All files released under freedom of information provisions or through disclosure shall be carefully 
reviewed. 
I. Auditing and Purging Files 
1. The OIC is responsible for ensuring that files are maintained in accordance with the goals and 
objectives of the intelligence authority and include information that is both timely and relevant. To 
that end, all intelligence files shall be audited and purged on an annual basis as established by the 
agency OIC through an independent auditor. 
2. When a file has no further information value and/or meets the criteria of any applicable law, it shall be 
destroyed. A record of purged files shall be maintained by the intelligence authority. 
43 
Every effort has been made by the IACP National Law Enforcement Policy Center staff and advisory board to 
ensure that this model policy incorporates the most current information and contemporary professional 
judgment on this issue. However, law enforcement administrators should be cautioned that no “model” policy 
can meet all the needs of any given law enforcement agency. Each law enforcement agency operates in a 
unique environment of federal court rulings, state laws, local ordinances, regulations, judicial and 
administrative decisions, and collective bargaining agreements that must be considered. In addition, the 
formulation of specific agency policies must take into account local political and community perspectives and 
customs, prerogatives, and demands; often divergent law enforcement strategies and philosophies; and the 
impact of varied agency resource capabilities, among other factors. 
This project was supported by grant number 2000-DD-VX-0020 awarded by the Bureau of Justice Assistance, 
Office of Justice Programs, U.S. Department of Justice. The Assistant Attorney General, Office of Justice 
Programs, coordinates the activities of the following program offices and bureaus: the Bureau of Justice 
Assistance, the Bureau of Justice Statistics, the National Institute of Justice, the Office of Juvenile Justice and 
Delinquency Prevention, and the Office for Victims of Crime. Points of view or opinions in this document are 
those of the author and do not represent the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice or 
the International Association of Chiefs of Police. 
Endn
otes
Dintino and Martens, p. 58. 
Federal Bureau of Investigation, p. 319.
Godfrey and Harris, p. 2. 
Ibid., p. 28.
Peterson, 2002, “Basics of Intelligence Revisited,”
p. 3.
McDowell, pp. 12–13. 
National Criminal Intelligence Service UK, p. 11. 
Marynik, p. 22.
National Advisory Committee on Criminal Justice
Standards and Goals, p. 250.
10 
Ibid.
11 
California Peace Officers’ Association, 1988, p. 4. 
12 
King, 2002, p. 79. 
13 
Godfrey and Harris, p. 23. 
14 
Harris, p. 27.
15 
Robert C. Fahlman and Marilyn B. Peterson, 1997,
“From Conclusions to Recommendations: The Next
Step,” IALEIA Journal 10(2):26–28.
16 
Dintino and Martens, p. 115.
17 
Godfrey and Harris, p. 29. 
18 
Ibid., p. 21.
19 
Anderson, p. 5.
20 
Ibid., p. 6.
21 
Ibid., p. 8.
22 
Iowa Department of Public Safety, p. 13. 
23 
Ibid., pp. 20–27.
24 
National Criminal Intelligence Service UK, p. 8.
25 
Ibid., p. 9.
26 
Peterson, 2002, “Toward a Model for Intelligence-
Led Policing in the United States,” p. 5. 
27 
Goldstein, 1990. 
28 
Goldstein, 2003, p. 14. 
29 
Clarke and Eck, p. 2. 
30 
Peterson, 2002, “Local and State Anti-Terrorism
Analysis,” p. 79.
31 
Goldstein, 1990, p. 27.
32 
Ibid., pp. 28–29.
45 
33 
34 
35 
36 
37 
38 
39 
40 
41 
Scheider and Chapman, p. 3. 
Ibid., p. 2. 
Wright, 2001, p. 69. 
Ibid., p. 70. 
Wright, 1998, p. 1. 
National Criminal Intelligence Sharing Plan, 
retrieved from http://it.ojp.gov/topic.jsp?topic_id=93, 
August 15, 2003. 
California Peace Officers’ Association, 1998, p. 8. 
Global Intelligence Working Group, 2003, pp. 35–40. 
New Jersey Department of Law and Public Safety, 
Statewide Intelligence Training Strategy Working 
Group, p. 12. 
46 
42 
Ibid., p. 22. 
43 
National Advisory Committee on Criminal Justice
Standards and Goals, p. 250.
44 
International Association of Law Enforcement
Intelligence Analysts, p. 4.
45 
Ibid., p. 66. 
46 
Ibid., p. 6.
47 
Godfrey and Harris, p. 92.
48 
Ibid., p. 98.
49 
Ibid., p. 94. 
50 
Global Intelligence Working Group, 2003, p. 50. 
51 
National White Collar Crime Center.
52 
Two exceptions are Pennsylvania and New Jersey.
Pennsylvania has a law on criminal intelligence, and 
New Jersey has Attorney General Intelligence 
Guidelines (available at www.njdcj.org/agguide/
intelligence.pdf).
53 
Bureau of Justice Assistance, p. 4. 
54 
Ibid., pp. 12–16.
55 
Ibid., p. 22.
56 
National Law Enforcement Policy Center, 2003, p. v. 
57 
U.S. Department of Justice, p. 2.
58 
Dintino and Martens, p. 123.
59 
Godfrey and Harris, p. 21.
60 
Federal Bureau of Investigation, p. 330. 
61 
Porter, pp. 23–27. 
62 
Office of Community Oriented Policing Services,
pp. 11–14
63 
Council on Counter-Narcotics, p. 37. 
Bibli
og
raphy
The 9/11 Commission. 2004. The 9/11 Commission 
Report: Final Report of the National Commission on 
Terrorist Attacks Upon the United States. 2004. New 
York, NY: Norton & Co. 
Anderson, Richard. 1997. “Intelligence-Led Policing: 
A British Perspective.” In Intelligence Led Policing: 
International Perspectives on Policing in the 21st 
Century. Lawrenceville, NJ: International Association 
of Law Enforcement Intelligence Analysts. 
Bouza, Anthony V. 1976. Police Intelligence—The 
Operations of an Investigative Unit. New York, NY: 
AMS Press. 
Bureau of Justice Assistance. 1998. The Statewide 
Intelligence Systems Program. Washington, DC: U.S. 
Department of Justice, Office of Justice Programs, 
Bureau of Justice Assistance. 
Bynum, Timothy S. 2001. Using Analysis for Problem 
Solving: A Guidebook for Law Enforcement. 
Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Justice, Office 
of Justice Programs, Office of Community Oriented 
Policing Services. 
California Peace Officers’ Association. 1988. Criminal 
Intelligence Program for the Smaller Agency. 
Sacramento, CA: California Peace Officers’ 
Association. 
———. 1998. Criminal Intelligence Program for the 
Smaller Agency. Sacramento, CA: California Peace 
Officers’ Association. 
Clarke, Ronald V., and John Eck. 2003. Become a 
Problem-Solving Crime Analyst in 55 Small Steps. 
London, England: Jill Dando Institute of Crime 
Science. 
Council on Counter-Narcotics. 2000. General 
Counterdrug Intelligence Plan. Retrieved July 23, 
2005 from www.whitehousedrugpolicy.gov/ 
publications/gcip/gcip.pdf. 
Dintino, Justin J., and Frederick T. Martens. 1983. 
Police Intelligence Systems in Crime Control. 
Springfield, IL: Charles C Thomas. 
Fahlman, Robert C., and Marilyn B. Peterson. 1997. 
“Developing Recommendations: The Next Step in 
Analysis.” IALEIA Journal 10(2):25-35. 
Federal Bureau of Investigation. 2002. Crime in the 
United States. Washington, DC: Federal Bureau of 
Investigation. 
Global Intelligence Working Group. 2004. “10 Simple 
Steps To Help Your Agency Become a Part of the 
National Criminal Intelligence Sharing Plan.” Revised 
brochure. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of 
Justice, Office of Justice Programs. 
———. 2003. National Criminal Intelligence Sharing 
Plan. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Justice, 
Office of Justice Programs. 
47 
Basic 
Administration. 
Crime 
15:13–57. 
———. 1990. 
Global Justice Information Sharing Initiative. 2003. 
Applying Security Practices to Justice Information 
Sharing. CD–ROM. Washington, DC: U.S. 
Department of Justice, Office of Justice Programs. 
Godfrey, E. Drexel, and Don R. Harris. 1971. 
Elements of Intelligence. Washington, DC: U.S. 
Department of Justice, Office of Criminal Justice 
Assistance, Law Enforcement Assistance 
Goldstein, Herman. 2003. “On Further Developing 
Problem-Oriented Policing: The Most Critical Need, 
the Major Impediments, and a Proposal.” 
Prevention Studies 
Problem-Oriented Policing. 
Philadelphia, PA: Temple University Press. 
Harris, Don R. 1976. Basic Elements of 
Intelligence–Revised. Washington, DC: U.S. 
Department of Justice, Office of Criminal Justice 
Assistance, Law Enforcement Assistance 
Administration. 
International Association of Law Enforcement 
Intelligence Analysts. 2001. Starting an Analytic Unit 
for Intelligence-Led Policing, edited by M. Peterson. 
Lawrenceville, NJ: International Association of Law 
Enforcement Intelligence Analysts. 
Iowa Department of Public Safety. 2004. “Iowa Fusion 
Center Concept.” PowerPoint presentation. Retrieved 
July 23, 2005 from www.iowahomelandsecurity.org. 
King, John W. “Collection.” 2001. In Intelligence 
2000: Revising the Basic Elements, edited by M.B. 
Peterson, B. Morehouse, and R. Wright. 
Lawrenceville, NJ: International Association of Law 
Enforcement Intelligence Analysts and Law 
Enforcement Intelligence Unit. 
———. Criminal Intelligence File Guidelines. 2002. 
Sacramento, CA: Law Enforcement Intelligence Unit. 
Martens, Frederick T. 2001. “Use, Misuse and Abuse 
of Intelligence.” In Intelligence 2000: Revising the 
Basic Elements. Lawrenceville, NJ: International 
Association of Law Enforcement Intelligence Analysts 
and Law Enforcement Intelligence Unit. 
Marynik, Jerry. 1998. Threat Assessment Guide: 
Evaluating and Analyzing Criminal Extremist Groups. 
Sacramento, CA: California Department of Justice. 
McDowell, Don. 1998. Strategic Intelligence: A 
Handbook for Practitioners, Managers, and Users. 
Cooma, Australia: Istana Enterprises Pty. Ltd. 
National Advisory Committee on Criminal Justice 
Standards and Goals. 1973. Police. Washington, DC: 
U.S. Department of Justice, Office of Criminal Justice 
Assistance, Law Enforcement Assistance 
Administration. 
National Criminal Intelligence Service UK. 2000. The 
National Intelligence Model. London, England: 
National Criminal Intelligence Service. 
National Criminal Justice Association. 2002. Justice 
Information Privacy Guidelines. Washington, D.C.: 
National Criminal Justice Association. 
National Law Enforcement Policy Center. 2003. 
Criminal Intelligence Model Policy. Alexandria, VA: 
International Association of Chiefs of Police. 
———. 2002. Criminal Intelligence Sharing Summit 
Report. Alexandria, VA: International Association of 
Chiefs of Police. 
———. 2000. Toward Improved Criminal Justice 
Information Sharing: An Information Integration 
Planning Model. Alexandria, VA.: International 
Association of Chiefs of Police. 
National White Collar Crime Center. Securing Law 
Enforcement Computer Systems for Law Enforcement 
Executives and Managers. CD–ROM. Richmond, VA: 
International Association of Chiefs of Police and 
National White Collar Crime Center. 
New Jersey Department of Law and Public Safety, 
Statewide Intelligence Training Strategy Working 
Group. 2004. Statewide Intelligence Training Strategy. 
Trenton, NJ: New Jersey Department of Law and 
Public Safety. 
Office of Community Oriented Policing Services. 
2003. Promising Strategies From the Field: 
Community Policing in Smaller Jurisdictions. 
Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Justice, Office 
of Justice Programs, Office of Community Oriented 
Policing Services. 
Peterson, Marilyn B. 2002. “The Basics of Intelligence 
Revisited.” In Turnkey Intelligence: Unlocking Your 
Agency’s Intelligence Capability. Richmond, VA: 
International Association of Law Enforcement 
Intelligence Analysts, Law Enforcement Intelligence 
Unit, and National White Collar Crime Center. 
———. 2002. “Local and State Anti-Terrorism 
Analysis.” Illinois Law Enforcement Executive 
Institute Forum 2(1): 78-84. 
———. 2002. “Strategic Targeting & Prioritization: A 
Pro-Active Approach to Targeting Criminal Activity.” 
Intersec: The Journal of International Security 
12(May):161–163. 
48 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested