c# wpf free pdf viewer : Extract pages from pdf online tool Library application component asp.net windows web page mvc Anne-Frank-The-Diary-Of-A-Young-Girl22-part243

everything; goes along with the opinion of the majority.
Peter van Daan. Is learning English, French (correspondence course), shorthand in
Dutch, English and German, commercial correspondence in English, woodworking,
economics and sometimes math; seldom reads, sometimes geography.
Margot Frank. Correspondence courses in English, French and Latin, shorthand in
English, German and Dutch, trigonometry, solid geometry, mechanics, phys- ics,
chemistry, algebra, geometry, English literature, French literature, German literature,
Dutch literature, bookkeeping, geography, modern history, biology, economics; reads
everything, preferably on religion and medicine.
Anne Frank. Shorthand in French, English, German and Dutch, geometry, algebra,
history, geography, art history, mythology, biology, Bible history, Dutch literature; likes
to read biographies, dull or exciting, and history books (sometimes novels and light
reading).
FRIDAY, MAY 19, 1944
Dearest Kitty,
I felt rotten yesterday. Vomiting (and that from Anne!), headache, stomachache and
anything else you can imagine. I'm feeling better today. I'm famished, but I think I'll
skip the brown beans we're having for dinner.
Everything's going fine between Peter and me. The poor boy has an even greater need
for tenderness than I do. He still blushes every evening when he gets his good-night
kiss, and then begs for another one. Am I merely a better substitute for Boche? I
don't mind. He's so happy just knowing somebody loves him.
After my laborious conquest, I've distanced myself a little from the situation, but you
mustn't think my love has cooled. Peter's a sweetheart, but I've slammed the door to
my inner self; if he ever wants to force the lock again, he'll have to use a harder
crowbar!
Yours, Anne M. Frank
SATURDAY, MAY 20, 1944
Dearest Kitty,
Extract pages from pdf online tool - Library application component:C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Easy to Use C# Code to Extract PDF Pages, Copy Pages from One PDF File and Paste into Others
www.rasteredge.com
Extract pages from pdf online tool - Library application component:VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed VB.NET Guide for Extracting Pages from Microsoft PDF Doc
www.rasteredge.com
Last night when I came down from the attic, I noticed, the moment I entered the
room, that the lovely vase of carnations had fallen over. Mother was down on her
hands and knees mopping up the water and Margot was fishing my papers off the
floor. "What happened?" I asked with anxious foreboding, and before they could reply,
I assessed the damage from across the room. My entire genealogy file, my notebooks,
my books, everything was afloat. I nearly cried, and I was so upset I started speaking
German. I can't remember a word, but according to Margot I babbled something about
"unlioersehbarer Schaden, schrecklich, entsetzlich, nie zu ersetzen"* [* Incalculable
loss, terrible, awful, irreplaceable.] and much more. Fadier burst out laughing and
Modier and Margot joined in, but I felt like crying because all my work and elaborate
notes were lost.
I took a closer look and, luckily, die "incalculable loss" wasn't as bad as I'd expected.
Up in die attic I carefully peeled apart die sheets of paper diat were stuck togedier
and dien hung diem on die clodiesline to dry. It was such a funny sight, even I had to
laugh. Maria de' Medici alongside Charles V, William of Orange and Marie Antoinette.
"It's Rassenschande,"* Mr. van Daan joked. [An affront to racial purity.]
After entrusting my papers to Peter's care, I went back downstairs.
"Which books are ruined?" I asked Margot, who was going dirough them.
"Algebra," Margot said.
But as luck would have it, my algebra book wasn't entirely ruined. I wish it had fallen
right in the vase. I've never loathed any book as much as that one. Inside the front
cover are the names of at least twenty girls who had it before I did. It's old,
yellowed, full of scribbles, crossed-out words and revisions. The next time I'm in a
wicked mood, I'm going to tear the darned thing to pieces!
Yours, Anne M. Frank
MONDAY, MAY 22,1944
Dearest Kitty,
On May 20, Father lost his bet and had to give five jars of yogurt to Mrs. van Daan:
the invasion still hasn't begun. I can safely say that all of Amsterdam, all of Holland,
in fact the entire western coast of Europe, all the way down to Spain, are talking
about the invasion day and night, debating, making bets and . . . hoping.
Library application component:C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document online in C#.NET
NET convert PDF to text, VB.NET extract PDF pages, VB.NET can view PDF document in single page or continue pages. PDF file is loaded as sample file for viewing
www.rasteredge.com
Library application component:VB.NET PDF- View PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
PDF file & pages edit, C#.NET PDF pages extract, copy, paste view PDF document in single page or continue pages. PDF file is loaded as sample file for viewing on
www.rasteredge.com
The suspense is rising to fever pitch; by no means has everyone we think of as
"good" Dutch people kept their faith in the English, not everyone thinks the English
bluff is a masterful strategical move. Oh no, people want deeds-great, heroic deeds.
No one can see farther than the end of their nose, no one gives a thought to the fact
that the British are fighting for their own country and their own people; everyone
thinks it's England's duty to save Holland, as quickly as possible. What obligations do
the English have toward us? What have the Dutch done to deserve the generous help
they so clearly expect? Oh no, the Dutch are very much mistaken. The English,
despite their bluff, are certainly no more to blame for the war than all the other
countries, large and small, that are now occupied by the Germans. The British are not
about to offer their excuses; true, they were sleeping during the years Germany was
rearming itself, but all the other countries, especially those bordering on Germany,
were asleep too. England and the rest of the world have discovered that burying your
head in the sand doesn't work, and now each of them, especially England, is having to
pay a heavy price for its ostrich policy.
No country sacrifices its men without reason, and certainly not in the interests of
another, and England is no exception. The invasion, liberation and freedom will come
someday; yet England, not the occupied territories, will choose the moment.
To our great sorrow and dismay, we've heard that many people have changed their
attitude toward us Jews. We've been told that anti-Semitism has cropped up in circles
where once it would have been unthinkable. This fact has affected us all very, very
deeply. The reason for the hatred is understandable, maybe even human, but that
doesn't make it right. According to the Christians, the Jews are blabbing their secrets
to the Germans, denouncing their helpers and causing them to suffer the dreadful fate
and punishments that have already been meted out to so many. All of this is true. But
as with everything, they should look at the matter from both sides: would Christians
act any differently if they were in our place? Could anyone, regardless of whether
they're Jews or Christians, remain silent in the face of German pressure? Everyone
knows it's practically impossible, so why do they ask the impossible of the Jews?
It's being said in underground circles that the German Jews who immigrated to Holland
before the war and have now been sent to Poland shouldn't be allowed to return here.
They were granted the right to asylum in Holland, but once Hitler is gone, they should
go back to Germany.
When you hear that, you begin to wonder why we're fighting this long and difficult
war. We're always being told that we're fighting for freedom, truth and justice! The
Library application component:C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to view, annotate, convert and print PDF in
convert PDF to text, VB.NET extract PDF pages, VB.NET comment annotate PDF, VB.NET delete PDF pages, VB.NET WPF PDF Viewer is an advanced PDF tool, which is
www.rasteredge.com
Library application component:VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Ability to create a blank PDF page with related by using following online VB.NET source code. Add and Insert Multiple PDF Pages to PDF Document Using VB.
www.rasteredge.com
war isn't even over, and already there's dissension and Jews are regarded as lesser
beings. Oh, it's sad, very sad that the old adage has been confirmed for the umpteenth
time: "What one Christian does is his own responsibthty, what one Jew does reflects
on all Jews."
To be honest, I can't understand how the Dutch, a nation of good, honest, upright
people, can sit in judgment on us the way they do. On us-the most oppressed,
unfortunate and pitiable people in all the world.
I have only one hope: that this anti-Semitism is just a passing thing, that the Dutch
will show their true colors, that they'll never waver from what they know in their
hearts to be just, for this is unjust!
And if they ever carry out this terrible threat, the meager handful of Jews still left in
Holland will have to go. We too will have to shoulder our bundles and move on, away
from this beautiful country, which once so kindly took us in and now turns its back on
us.
I love Holland. Once I hoped it would become a fatherland to me, since I had lost my
own. And I hope so still!
Yours, Anne M. Frank
THURSDAY, MAY 25, 1944
Dearest Kitty,
Bep's engaged! The news isn't much of a surprise, though none of us are particularly
pleased. Bertus may be a nice, steady, athletic young man, but Bep doesn't love him,
and to me that's enough reason to advise her against marrying him.
Bep's trying to get ahead in the world, and Bertus is pulling her back; he's a laborer,
without any interests or any desire to make something of himself, and I don't think
that'll make Bep happy. I can understand Bep's wanting to put an end to her
indecision; four weeks ago she decided to write him off, but then she felt even worse.
So she wrote him a letter, and now she's engaged.
There are several factors involved in this engagement. First, Bep's sick father, who
likes Bertus very much. Second, she's the oldest of the Voskuijl girls and her mother
teases her about being an old maid. Third, she's just turned twenty-four, and that
matters a great deal to Bep.
Library application component:VB.NET PDF - Convert PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
convert PDF to text, VB.NET extract PDF pages, VB.NET comment annotate PDF, VB.NET delete PDF pages, VB.NET An advanced PDF converter tool, which supports to
www.rasteredge.com
Library application component:C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to convert and export PDF document to
convert PDF to text, VB.NET extract PDF pages, VB.NET comment annotate PDF, VB.NET delete PDF pages, VB.NET An advanced PDF converter tool, which supports to
www.rasteredge.com
Mother said it would have been better if Bep had simply had an affair with Bertus. I
don't know, I feel sorry for Bep and can understand her loneliness. In any case, they
can get married only after the war, since Bertus is in hiding, or at any rate has gone
underground. Besides, they don't have a penny to their name and nothing in the way
of a hope chest. What a sorry prospect for Bep, for whom we all wish the best. I
only hope Bertus improves under her influence, or that Bep finds another man, one
who knows how to appreciate her!
Yours, Anne M. Frank
THE SAME DAY
There's something happening every day. This morning Mr. van Hoeven was arrested.
He was hiding two Jews in his house. It's a heavy blow for us, not only because
those poor Jews are once again balancing on the edge of an abyss, but also because
it's terrible for Mr. van Hoeven.
The world's been turned upside down. The most decent people are being sent to
concentration camps, prisons and lonely cells, while the lowest of the low rule over
young and old, rich and poor. One gets caught for black marketeering, another for
hiding Jews or other un- fortunate souls. Unless you're a Nazi, you don't know what's
going to happen to you from one day to the next.
Mr. van Hoeven is a great loss to us too. Bep can't possibly lug such huge amounts of
potatoes all the way here, nor should she have to, so our only choice is to eat fewer
of them. I'll tell you what we have in mind, but it's certainly not going to make life
here any more agreeable. Mother says we'll skip breakfast, eat hot cereal and bread
for lunch and fried potatoes for dinner and, if possible, vegetables or lettuce once or
twice a week. That's all there is. We're going to be hungry, but nothing's worse than
being caught.
Yours, Anne M. Frank
FRIDAY, MAY 26, 1944
My dearest Kitty,
At long, long last, I can sit quietly at my table before the crack in the window frame
and write you everything, everything I want to say.
Library application component:VB.NET PDF - Annotate PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
Best online HTML5 PDF Viewer PDF Viewer library as well as an advanced PDF annotating software for Visual Studio .NET. An advanced PDF annotating tool, which is
www.rasteredge.com
Library application component:C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to annotate PDF document online in C#.NET
Best online HTML5 PDF Viewer PDF Viewer library as well as an advanced PDF annotating software for Visual Studio .NET. An advanced PDF annotating tool, which is
www.rasteredge.com
I feel more miserable than I have in months. Even after the break-in I didn't feel so
utterly broken, inside and out. On the one hand, there's the news about Mr. van
Hoeven, the Jewish question (which is discussed in detail by everyone in the house),
the invasion (which is so long in coming), the awful food, the tension, the misera-
ble atmosphere, my disappointment in Peter. On the other hand, there's Bep's
engagement, the Pentecost reception, the flowers, Mr. Kugler's birthday, cakes and
stories about cabarets, movies and concerts. That gap, that enormous gap, is always
there. One day we're laugh- ing at the comical side of life in hiding, and the next day
(and there are many such days), we're frightened, and the fear, tension and despair
can be read on our faces.
Miep and Mr. Kugler bear the greatest burden for us, and for all those in hiding-Miep
in everything she does and Mr. Kugler through his enormous responsibthty for the
eight of us, which is sometimes so overwhelming that he can hardly speak from the
pent-up tension and strain. Mr. Kleiman and Bep also take very good care of us, but
they're able to put the Annex out of their minds, even if it's only for a few hours or
a few days. They have their own worries, Mr. Kleiman with his health and Bep with
her engagement, which isn't looking very promising lat the moment. But they also have
their outings, their visits with friends, their everyday lives as ordinary people, so that
the tension is sometimes relieved, if only for a short while, while ours never is, never
has been, not once in the two years we've been here. How much longer will this
increasingly oppressive, unbearable weight press I down on us?
The drains are clogged again. We can't run the wa- ter, or if we do, only a trickle;
we can't flush the toilet, so we have to use a toilet brush; and we've been putting our
dirty water into a big earthenware jar. We can man- age for today, but what will
happen if the plumber can't fix it on his own? The Sanitation Department can't come
until Tuesday.
Miep sent us a raisin bread with "Happy Pentecost" written on top. It's almost as if
she were mocking us, since our moods and cares are far from "happy."
We've all become more frightened since the van Hoeven business. Once again you hear
"shh" from all I sides, and we're doing everything more quietly. The police forced the
door there; they could just as easily do that here too! What will we do if we're ever.
. . no, I mustn't write that down. But the question won't let itself be pushed to the
back of my mind today; on the contrary, all the fear I've ever felt is looming before
me in all its horror.
I had to go downstairs alone at eight this evening to use the bathroom. There was no
one down there, since they were all listening to the radio. I wanted to be brave, but it
Library application component:VB.NET PDF - Create PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
PDF file & pages edit, C#.NET PDF pages extract, copy, paste, C#.NET rotate PDF pages, C#.NET An advanced PDF loading and creation tool, which supports to
www.rasteredge.com
was hard. I always feel safer upstairs than in that huge, silent house; when I'm alone
with those mysterious muffied sounds from upstairs and the honking of horns in the
street, I have to hurry and remind myself where I am to keep from getting the
shivers.
Miep has been acting much nicer toward us since her talk with Father. But I haven't
told you about that yet. Miep came up one afternoon all flushed and asked Father
straight out if we thought they too were infected with the current anti-Semitism.
Father was stunned and quickly talked her out of the idea, but some of Miep's
suspicion has lingered on. They're doing more errands for us now and showing more
of an interest in our troubles, though we certainly shouldn't bother them with our
woes. Oh, they're such good, noble people!
I've asked myself again and again whether it wouldn't have been better if we hadn't
gone into hiding, if we were dead now and didn't have to go through this misery,
especially so that the others could be spared the burden. But we all shrink from this
thought. We still love life, we haven't yet forgotten the voice of nature, and we keep
hoping, hoping for. . . everything.
Let something happen soon, even an air raid. Nothing can be more crushing than this
anxiety. Let the end come, however cruel; at least then we'll know whether we are to
be the victors or the vanquished.
Yours, Anne M. Frank
WEDNESDAY, MAY 31, 1944
Dearest Kitty,
Saturday, Sunday, Monday and Tuesday it was too hot to hold my fountain pen, which
is why I couldn't write to you. Friday the drains were clogged, Saturday they were
fixed. Mrs. Kleiman came for a visit in the afternoon and told us a lot about Jopiej
she and Jacque van Maarsen are in the same hockey club. Sunday Bep dropped by to
make sure there hadn't been a break-in and stayed for breakfast. Monday (a holiday
because of Pentecost), Mr. Gies served as the Annex watchman, and Tuesday we
were finally allowed to open the windows. We've seldom had a Pentecost weekend that
was so beautiful and warm. Or maybe "hot" is a better word. Hot weather is horrible
in the Annex. To give you an idea of the numerous complaints, I'll briefly describe
these sweltering days.
Saturday: "Wonderful, what fantastic weather," we all said in the morning. "If only it
weren't quite so hot," we said in the afternoon, when the windows had to be shut.
Sunday: "The heat's unbearable, the butter's melt- ing, there's not a cool spot
anywhere in the house, the bread's drying out, the milk's going sour, the windows
can't be opened. We poor outcasts are suffocating while everyone else is enjoying
their Pentecost." (According to Mrs. van D.)
Monday: "My feet hurt, I have nothing cool to wear, I can't do the dishes in this
heat!" Grumbling from early in the morning to late at night. It was awful.
I can't stand the heat. I'm glad the wind's come up today, but that the sun's still
shining.
Yours, Anne M. Frank
FRIDAY, JUNE 2, 1944 J
Dear Kitty,
"If you're going to the attic, take an umbrella with you, preferably a large one!" This
is to protect you from "household showers." There's a Dutch proverb: "High and dry,
safe and sound," but it obviously doesn't apply to wartime (guns!) and to people in
hiding (cat box!). Mouschi's gotten into the habit of relieving herself on some
newspapers or between the cracks in the floor boards, so we have good reason to fear
the splatters and, even worse, the stench. The new Moortje in the warehouse has the
same problem. Anyone who's ever had a cat that's not housebroken can imagine the
smells, other than pepper and thyme, that permeate this house.
I also have a brand-new prescription for gunfire jitters: When the shooting gets loud,
proceed to the nearest wooden staircase. Run up and down a few times, making sure
to stumble at least once. What with the scratches and the noise of running and falling,
you won't even be able to hear the shooting, much less worry about it. Yours truly
has put this magic formula to use, with great success!
Yours, Anne M. Frank
MONDAY, JUNE 5, 1944
Dearest Kitty,
New problems in the Annex. A quarrel between Dussel and the Franks over the
division of butter. Capitulation on the part of Dussel. Close friendship between the
latter and Mrs. van Daan, flirtations, kisses and friendly little smiles. Dussel is
beginning to long for female companionship.
The van Daans don't see why we should bake a spice cake for Mr. Kugler's birthday
when we can't have one ourselves. All very petty. Mood upstairs: bad. Mrs. van D.
has a cold. Dussel caught with brewer's yeast tablets, while we've got none.
The Fifth Army has taken Rome. The city neither destroyed nor bombed. Great
propaganda for Hitler.
Very few potatoes and vegetables. One loaf of bread was moldy.
Scharminkeltje (name of new warehouse cat) can't stand pepper. She sleeps in the cat
box and does her business in the wood shavings. Impossible to keep her.
Bad weather. Continuous bombing of Pas de Calais and the west coast of France.
No one buying dollars. Gold even less interesting.
The bottom of our black moneybox is in sight. What are we going to live on next
month?
Yours, Anne M. Frank
TUESDAY, JUNE 6, 1944
My dearest Kitty,
"This is D Day," the BBC announced at twelve.
"This is the day." The invasion has begun!
This morning at eight the British reported heavy bombing of Calais, Boulogne, Le
Havre and Cherbourg, as well as Pas de Calais (as usual). Further, as a precautionary
measure for those in the occupied territories, everyone living within a zone of twenty
miles from the coast was warned to prepare for bombardments. Where possible, the
British will drop pamphlets an hour ahead of time.
According to the German news, British paratroopers have landed on the coast of
France. "British landing craft are engaged in combat with German naval units,"
according to the BBC.
Conclusion reached by the Annex while breakfasting at nine: this is a trial landing, like
the one two years ago in Dieppe.
BBC broadcast in German, Dutch, French and other languages at ten: The invasion has
begun! So this is the "real" invasion. BBC broadcast in German at eleven: speech by
Supreme Commander General Dwight Eisenhower.
BBC broadcast in English: "This is 0 Day." General Eisenhower said to the French
people: "Stiff fighting will come now, but after this the victory. The year 1944 is the
year of complete victory. Good luck!"
BBC broadcast in English at one: 11,000 planes are shuttling back and forth or
standing by to land troops and bomb behind enemy lines; 4,000 landing craft and small
boats are continually arriving in the area between Cher- bourg and Le Havre. English
and American troops are already engaged in heavy combat. Speeches by Gerbrandy,
the Prime Minister of Belgium, King Haakon of Norway, de Gaulle of France, the King
of England and, last but not least, Churchill.
A huge commotion in the Annex! Is this really the beginning of the long-awaited
liberation? The liberation we've all talked so much about, which still seems too good,
too much of a fairy tale ever to come true? Will this year, 1944, bring us victory? We
don't know yet. But where there's hope, there's life. It fills us with fresh courage and
makes us strong again. We'll need to be brave to endure the many fears and hardships
and the suffering yet to come. It's now a matter of remaining calm and steadfast, of
gritting our teeth and keeping a stiff upper lip! France, Russia, Italy, and even
Germany, can cry out in agony, but we don't yet have that right!
Oh, Kitty, the best part about the invasion is that I have the feeling that friends are
on the way. Those terrible Germans have oppressed and threatened us for so long that
the thought of friends and salvation means everything to us! Now it's not just the
Jews, but Holland and all of occupied Europe. Maybe, Margot says, I can even go back
to school in October or September.
Yours, Anne M. Frank
P.S. I'll keep you informed of the latest news!
This morning and last night, dummies made of straw and rubber were dropped from
the air behind German lines, and they exploded the minute they hit the ground. Many
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested