c# wpf free pdf viewer : Deleting pages from pdf in preview control software platform web page windows wpf web browser 426721-part247

Figure 39.   Variable speed IC engine configuration with power electronics..........................45 
Figure 40.   IC engine configuration with DFIG and partially rated power electronics ..........45 
Figure 41.   Synchronous/Induction generator with DC-link power electronics topology......46 
Figure 42.   DFIG Power Electronics Topology with AC-DC-AC Converters .......................46 
Figure 43.   Power electronics configuration for hybrid IC engine-battery system.................47 
Figure 44.   Generalized power electronics and control of an IC engine and permanent  
magnet synchronous generator system .................................................................48 
Figure 45.   Lead-acid energy storage (NREL 2008)...............................................................51 
Figure 46.   BESS configuration with single inverter ..............................................................52 
Figure 47.   BESS configuration with cascaded DC-DC and DC-AC converters....................53 
Figure 48.   Hybrid system configuration with BESS and wind energy system......................53 
Figure 49.   Single-stage power electronics topologies with (a) Single-phase inverter;  (b) 
Three-phase inverter .............................................................................................54 
Figure 50.   Cascaded power electronic topologies with DC-DC and DC-AC converters ......55 
Figure 51.   Bidirectional isolated DC-DC power electronics topology..................................55 
Figure 52.   Generalized power electronics and control of a battery energy storage system...57 
Figure 53.   Flywheel energy storage module..........................................................................60 
Figure 54.   FESS with back-to-back DC-link converters (a) Single system; (b) Multiple 
systems..................................................................................................................61 
Figure 55.   FESS with back-to-back HFAC-link PDM converters.........................................61 
Figure 56.   Hybrid system configuration with FESS and wind energy system.......................62 
Figure 57.   DC-link based power electronic topology............................................................62 
Figure 58.   DC-link based power electronic topology with additional boost converter .........63 
Figure 59.   HFAC-link based power electronic topology.......................................................63 
Figure 60.   Generalized power electronics and control of a flywheel energy storage system 65 
Figure 61.   Plug-in prototypes (a) Ford Edge PFCV; (b) AC Propulsion Tzero V2G EV;   
(c) Toyota Prius PHEV; (d) GM Chevrolet Volt..................................................67 
Figure 62.   Typical EV configuration.....................................................................................68 
Figure 63.   Typical parallel HEV configuration......................................................................69 
Figure 64.   Prius HEV configuration.......................................................................................69 
Figure 65.   HEV fuel mileage comparison (Karner and Francfort 2007) ...............................70 
Figure 66.   Prius PHEV configuration....................................................................................71 
Figure 67.   Fuel cell vehicle configuration..............................................................................71 
Figure 68.   PFCV configuration..............................................................................................72 
Figure 69.   ISO controlled V2G..............................................................................................74 
Figure 70.   PE configuration with V2G ..................................................................................75 
Figure 71.   General AIPM PE schematic................................................................................77 
Figure 72.   Air-cooled AIPM package....................................................................................77 
Figure 73.   AC propulsion V2G model AC-150 electrical schematic.....................................78 
Figure 74.   AC propulsion V2G model AC-150 electronic package......................................79 
Figure 75.   Modular power electronics design for wind energy system .................................81 
Figure 76.   Typical integrated power electronics module.......................................................82 
Figure 77.   Generalized IPEM-based power electronics for different distributed energy 
systems..................................................................................................................84 
Figure 78.   Block diagrams of power electronics for (a) DC sources; (b) Variable  
frequency AC sources and storages; (c) DC storages...........................................88 
Deleting pages from pdf in preview - copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Easy to Use C# Code to Extract PDF Pages, Copy Pages from One PDF File and Paste into Others
crop all pages of pdf; extract pages from pdf
Deleting pages from pdf in preview - VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed VB.NET Guide for Extracting Pages from Microsoft PDF Doc
export pages from pdf preview; extract pages from pdf online tool
Figure 79.   Hierarchical division of control functionality for IPEMs.....................................89 
Figure 80.   PE costs compared to total capital costs for DE systems......................................93 
Figure 81.   Estimated component cost distribution for Semikron’s 200 kW inverter.............94 
Figure GL-1.  Power Electronic Topologies (a) Half Bridge, (b) Full Bridge/H-Bridge,   
(c) Three-Phase Bridge.......................................................................................104 
Figure B-1.   Distribution of three-phase and quadrature stationary axes................................112 
Figure B-2.   Quadrature stationary and synchronous reference frames..................................113 
Figure B-3.   Transformation from three-phase to synchronous reference frame....................114 
Figure B-4.   Block diagram of utility inverter and controls in d-q reference frame...............114 
Figure B-5.   Block diagram of droop power controllers.........................................................115 
Figure B-6.   Block diagram of d-q based voltage and current controllers..............................116 
Figure B-7.   Block diagram of utility inverter and controls in stationary ds-qs frame...........117 
Figure B-8.   Block diagram of utility inverter and controls in stationary a-b-c frame ...........118 
 
xi 
C# Word - Delete Word Document Page in C#.NET
C# Word - Delete Word Document Page in C#.NET. Provides Users with Mature Document Manipulating Function for Deleting Word Pages. Overview.
copy one page of pdf; delete pages out of a pdf file
C# PowerPoint - Delete PowerPoint Document Page in C#.NET
C# PowerPoint - Delete PowerPoint Document Page in C#.NET. Provides Users with Mature Document Manipulating Function for Deleting PowerPoint Pages. Overview.
extract pages from pdf files; extract pages from pdf document
List of Tables 
Table 1.  
Power electronics systems for different power conversions...................................4 
Table 2.  
Summary of typical fuel cell characteristics for DE applications.........................34 
Table 3.  
Generalized Control Functions with IPEM Based Power Electronics for  
Different Distributed Energy Systems..................................................................86 
xii 
C# PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in C#.
comment annotate PDF, VB.NET delete PDF pages, VB.NET Provide C# Demo Code for Deleting and Removing Image Remove PDF image in preview without adobe PDF reader
pdf extract pages; copy pages from pdf to word
VB.NET PDF delete text library: delete, remove text from PDF file
Free VB.NET PDF SDK library for deleting PDF text in Visual Studio .NET application. Delete text from PDF file in preview without adobe PDF reader component
add remove pages from pdf; delete pages from pdf without acrobat
 Introduction 
Several distributed energy (DE) systems are expected to have a significant impact on the 
California energy market in near future. These DE systems include, but are not limited to: 
photovoltaics (PV), wind, microturbine, fuel cells, and internal combustion (IC) engines (Byron 
2002). In addition, several energy storage systems such as batteries and flywheels are under 
consideration for DE to harness excess electricity produced by the most efficient generators 
during low loading. This harvested energy can be released onto the grid, when needed, to 
eliminate the need for high-cost generators. Inclusion of storage in the distributed generation 
system actually provides the user dispatchability of its distributed resources which generally are 
renewable energy sources, like PV and solar, having no dispatchability by their own. In the 
future, using hybrid electric vehicles along with the utility grid in the form of plug-in hybrid 
electric vehicles (PHEV) and vehicle-to-grid systems (V2G) will be a very promising option to 
be included in the DE classification. All of these DE technologies require specific power 
electronics capabilities to convert the power generated into useful power that can be directly 
interconnected with the utility grid and/or can be used for consumer applications. Because of 
similar functions of these power electronics interfaces, the development of scalable, modular, 
low cost, highly reliable power electronic interfaces will improve the overall cost and durability 
of distributed and renewable energy systems.  
Although most DE systems are not new in a technological respect, they are receiving increased 
attention today because of their ability to provide combined heat and power, peak power, 
demand reduction, backup power, improved power quality, and ancillary services to the power 
grid. Out of all DE systems, the visibility of renewable energy sources are increasing 
significantly due to several state governments’ adoption of Renewable Portfolio Standards (RPS) 
that require a certain percentage of energy be produced using renewable energy sources. A large 
factor in whether or not DE systems are installed is the initial capital cost. Although power 
electronics are the integral part of most of the DE technologies, in order to convert the power 
generated into useful power that can be directly used on the grid, they can cost up to 40% of the 
costs of a distributed energy system (Blazewicz 2005). Therefore, the improvement of the DE 
economics strongly requires decreased costs for the power electronics. Another important aspect 
to the life-cycle cost of the DE systems is reliability. Many of the power electronics used for DE 
applications have a low reliability rate, typically operating less than five years before a failure 
occurs. This rate can be improved with modern reliability testing techniques and needs to be 
fully examined to improve the economics of DE systems.  
The current plans of the California Energy Commission Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) 
program are to implement projects to accelerate the use of DE systems, in part by addressing the 
cost and reliability of the common element of all of the distributed and renewable technologies: 
the power electronics interface. This objective is being accomplished through a recently 
announced Advanced Power Electronics Interface (APEI) initiative. The objectives of the APEI 
initiative include (Treanton 2004): 
•  Developing an architecture for standardized, highly integrated, modularized power 
electronics interconnection technologies that will come as close as possible to “plug-and-
play” for distributed energy platforms; 
C# PDF delete text Library: delete, remove text from PDF file in
Delete text from PDF file in preview without adobe illustrates how to perform PDF text deleting function in C#.NET PDF: Delete Text from Consecutive PDF Pages.
deleting pages from pdf document; cut pages from pdf
C# Excel - Delete Excel Document Page in C#.NET
C# Excel - Delete Excel Document Page in C#.NET. Provides Users with Mature Document Manipulating Function for Deleting Excel Pages. Overview.
copy pdf page to powerpoint; convert few pages of pdf to word
•  Reducing costs and improving the reliability for DE and interconnections by developing 
standardized, high production volume power electronic modules; and  
•  Improving the flexibility and scalability for power electronic modules and systems to 
provide advanced functionality at a range of power levels. 
The purpose of this report is to provide a consolidated resource describing the current state-of-
the-art in power electronic interfaces for DE applications and outline possible power electronic 
topologies that will lead to a low-cost, reliable APEI. 
1.1  General Topology 
A generalized block diagram representation of power electronics interface associated with DE 
systems is shown in Figure 1. The power electronics interface accepts power from the distributed 
energy source and converts it to power at the required voltage and frequency. For the storage 
systems, bidirectional flow of power between the storages and the utility is required. Figure 1 
illustrates a design approach to organize the interface into modules, each of which can be 
designed to accommodate a range of DE systems and/or storages. For this example, four major 
modules for a power electronics interface are depicted. They include the source input converter 
module, an inverter module, the output interface module and the controller module. The blue 
unidirectional arrows depict the power flow path for the DE sources whereas the red arrows 
show the bidirectional power flows for the DE storages.  
The design of the input converter module depends on the specific energy source or storage 
application. The DE systems that generate AC output, often with variable frequencies, such as 
wind, microturbine, IC engine, or flywheel storage needs an AC-DC converter. For DC output 
systems like PV, fuel cells, or batteries, a DC-DC converter is typically needed to change the DC 
voltage level. The DC-AC inverter module is the most generic of the modules and converts a DC 
source to grid-compatible AC power. The output interface module filters the AC output from the 
inverter and the monitoring and control module operates the interface, containing protection for 
the DE and utility point-of-common-coupling (PCC).  
The power electronic (PE) interface also contains some level of monitoring and control 
functionality to ensure that the DE system can operate as required. The monitoring and control 
module also contains protective functions for the DE system and the local electric power system 
that permit paralleling and disconnection from the electric power system. These functions would 
typically meet the IEEE 1547-2003 interconnection requirements (Basso and DeBlasio 2004), 
but should have the flexibility for modifications of the settings depending on the application or a 
utility’s interconnection requirements. In addition, the monitoring and control module may also 
provide human-machine interface, communications interface, and power management. 
Monitoring functions typically include real-power, reactive power, and voltage monitoring at the 
point of the DE connection with the utility at the PCC. These functions are necessary because, in 
order to synchronize the DE system, its output must have the same voltage magnitude, 
frequency, phase rotation, and phase angle as the utility. Synchronization is the act of checking 
that these four variables are within an acceptable range before paralleling two energy sources.  
VB.NET PDF copy, paste image library: copy, paste, cut PDF images
Copy, paste and cut PDF image while preview without adobe reader So, below example explains how to cut image from PDF file page by using image deleting API
deleting pages from pdf in reader; delete page from pdf document
C# PDF insert text Library: insert text into PDF content in C#.net
Supports adding text to PDF in preview without adobe reader installed in ASP PDF document imaging application, such as inserting text to PDF, deleting text from
extract pdf pages; extract one page from pdf preview
Figure 1. General block diagram of typical DE power electronic systems 
Every power electronics circuit consists of different semiconductor devices fabricated with 
appropriate impurities (known as “doping”) in order to achieve particular electrical properties 
such as conduction, resistance, turn on/turn-off times, power dissipation, etc. The fundamental 
power electronics device is the semiconductor-based switch, a technology that has existed for 
many decades, but is continuously being improved in terms of power density and reliability. In 
general, the term “power electronics” refers to the device switches (e.g., IGBT and SCR), and the 
various modules that they comprise. In power applications, these devices are most often used to 
convert electrical energy from one form to a more usable form. Benefits of power electronic 
devices include increased efficiency, lower cost, and reduced packaging size.  
A rectifier is a power electronics topology that converts AC to DC. Rectifier circuits are 
generally used to generate a controlled DC voltage from either an uncontrolled AC source (i.e., 
microturbine, wind turbine) or a controlled AC source (i.e., utility supply) (Kroposki et al. 
2006). When converting from a utility supply, a rectifier application is usually for linking DC 
systems or providing DC voltage for specific load applications such as battery regulators and 
variable frequency drive (VFD) inputs.  
Some DE systems like photovoltaics and fuel cells produce DC power. In order to make this 
power useful for grid-tied applications, it must be converted to AC; therefore, inverters are used 
to convert DC to AC. Inverter circuits generate a regulated AC supply from a DC input. They are 
commonly found in systems providing standalone AC power, utility-connected DE systems, and 
on the motor side of a VFD. 
There are a number of applications for DC-to-DC systems. These systems are used to convert the 
DC voltage magnitude from one level to another with or without galvanic isolation. They take an 
uncontrolled, unregulated input DC voltage and condition it for the specific load application. An 
example for such topology can be found in PV applications, where the dedicated DC-DC units 
are often designed to extract the maximum power output of the PV array. 
VB.NET PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in
extract, copy, paste, C#.NET rotate PDF pages, C#.NET Provide VB.NET Demo Code for Deleting and Removing Remove PDF image in preview without adobe PDF reader
extract pages pdf preview; delete page from pdf
C# PDF Page Move Library: re-order PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
or adjust the order of all or several PDF document pages, or just PDF page rotating, PDF image extracting, PDF page inserting, PDF page deleting and PDF
cut pages from pdf online; delete pages from pdf
AC-to-AC converters can be used convert the AC source voltage magnitude and frequency to a 
fixed amplitude and frequency, making it compatible with the utility grid. The AC-to-AC 
converters are not typically used in modern DE applications due to some inherent disadvantages. 
A summary of the different power converters that are used for DE applications are given in Table 
1 (Shepherd et al. 2004; DeBlasio et al. 2006). 
Table 1. Power electronics systems for different power conversions 
Power Conversion
Common Module Names
AC-DC
Rectifier
DC-AC
Inverter
DC-DC
Boost, Buck, Buck-Boost, Chopper
AC-DC
Cycloconverter, Matrix Converter
AC-DC-AC
Back-to-Back Converter, Rectifier-Inverter
1.2  Report Structure 
This report focuses on commercially available DE systems and is organized into eight 
application-specific areas: 
•  Photovoltaic Systems  
•  Wind Systems 
•  Microturbine Systems 
•  Fuel Cell Systems 
•  Internal Combustion Engine Systems 
•  Battery Storage Systems 
•  Flywheel Storage Systems 
•  Plug-In Vehicles. 
Different power electronics topologies are discussed for each of these DE systems and a 
generalized topology is selected for understanding the control design. Based on these generalized 
power electronics topologies, a section on modular power electronics is presented based on the 
available power electronics devices and topologies. The future requirements for modular design 
(i.e., standard interfaces), which can lead to modular and flexible design of the power electronics 
converters for the DE applications, are also discussed in this section. An interesting section on 
plug-in hybrid vehicles is also included in this report that helps explain the new vehicle 
technologies that are viable to include in the DE framework. All the topologies described in this 
report are for the grid interconnected systems. Although some power electronic devices are used 
in off-grid applications for stand-alone applications or in village or hybrid power systems, those 
systems are not considered in this report. 
 
 
 Photovoltaic  
2.1  General Description 
Photovoltaic (PV) technology involves converting solar energy directly into electrical energy by 
means of a solar cell. A solar cell is typically made of semiconductor materials such as 
crystalline silicon and absorbs sunlight and produces electricity through a process called the 
photovoltaic effect. The efficiency of a solar cell is determined by its ability to convert available 
sunlight into usable electrical energy and is typically around 10%-15%. Therefore, to produce 
significant amount of electrical energy, the solar cells must have large surface areas. 
Individual solar cells are usually manufactured and combined into modules that consist of 36 to 
72 cells, depending on the output voltage and current of the module. The modules vary in size by 
manufacturer, but are typically between 0.5 to 1 m2 and generate around 100 W/m2 of energy 
during peak solar conditions for a 10% efficient module (Blaabjerg et al. 2004). Additionally, the 
modules can also be grouped together in various quantities and configurations (as discussed in 
the following section) to form arrays with unique voltage and current characteristics. The 
distinction between modules and arrays is important when considering power electronics 
interfaces, as power electronics manufacturers design their products using either module-centric 
or array-based approaches.  
Figure 2 shows typical PV panels configured into arrays. For a PV system, the voltage output is a 
constant DC whose magnitude depends on the configuration in which the solar cells/modules are 
connected. On the other hand, the current output from the PV system primarily depends on the 
available solar irradiance. The main requirement of power electronic interfaces for the PV 
systems is to convert the generated DC voltage into a suitable AC for consumer use and utility 
connection. Generally, the DC voltage magnitude of the PV array is required to be boosted to a 
higher value by using DC-DC converters before converting them to the utility compatible AC. 
The DC-AC inverters are then utilized to convert the voltage to 60 Hz AC. The process of 
controlling the voltage and current output of the array must be optimized based on the weather 
conditions. Specialized control algorithms have been developed called maximum power point 
tracking (MPPT) to constantly extract the maximum amount of power from the array under 
varying conditions (Blaabjerg et al. 2004). The MPPT control process and the voltage boosting 
are usually implemented in the DC-DC converter, whereas the DC-AC inverter is used for grid-
current control.  
Figure 2. PV panels (NREL 2008) 
2.2  Photovoltaic System Configurations 
PV modules are connected together into arrays to produce large amounts of electricity. The array 
is then connected with system components such as inverters to convert the DC power produced 
by the arrays to AC electricity for consumer use. The inverter for PV systems performs many 
functions. It converts the generated DC power into AC power compatible with the utility. It also 
contains the protective functions that monitor grid connections and the PV source and can isolate 
the PV array if grid problems occur. The inverter monitors the terminal conditions of the PV 
module(s) and contains the MPPT for maximizing the energy capture. The MPPT maintains the 
PV array operation at the highest possible efficiency, over a wide range of input conditions that 
can vary due to the daily (morning-noon-evening) and seasonal (winter-summer) variations 
(Blaabjerg et al. 2004).  
PV Systems can be structured into several operational configurations. Each configuration has the 
basic power electronic interfaces that interconnect the system to the utility grid. Figure 3 shows 
the configuration where a centralized inverter is used. This has been the most common type of 
PV installation in the past. PV modules are connected in series and/or parallel and connected to a 
centralized DC-AC converter. The primary advantage of this design is the fact that if the inverter 
is the most costly part in the installed PV system, this system has the lowest cost design because 
of the presence of only one inverter. The primary disadvantage of this configuration is that the 
power losses can be high due to the mismatch between the PV modules and the presence of 
string diodes (Blaabjerg et al. 2004). Another disadvantage is that this configuration has a single 
point failure at the inverter; therefore, it has less reliability (Kjaer et al. 2005). 
Figure 3. Centralized PV configuration 
Figure 4 (a) shows the configuration of a string-array PV system. The series of PV panels are 
connected in the form of a single string. Typically, 15 panels are strung together in series and 
interconnected through the utility with one inverter per string. The primary advantage of this 
topology is that there are no losses associated with the string diodes and a maximum power point 
tracker can be applied for each string. This is especially useful when multiple strings are 
mounted on fixed surfaces in different orientations. The disadvantage to this configuration is the 
increased cost due to additional inverters (Blaabjerg et al. 2004; Kjaer et al. 2005).  
The input voltage coming from the PV strings may be high enough to avoid the need for voltage 
amplification. As the cost of the PV modules is still rather expensive, voltage amplification can 
be added together with the string inverter in order to allow for fewer modules to be connected to 
the inverter.  Multi-string inverters, a development of the string-inverter, have several strings that 
are interfaced with their own DC-DC converter for voltage boosting and are then connected to a 
common DC bus. A common DC-AC inverter is then used for utility interfacing. A multi-string 
PV system is shown in Figure 4 (b) (Kjaer et al. 2005). 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested