count pages in pdf without opening c# : Extract pdf pages online software Library dll windows .net winforms web forms aol-tw00-public0-part339

An AOL / Time Warner Merger Will Harm 
Competition in Internet Online Services 
Jeffrey K. MacKie-Mason 
Arthur W. Burks Professor of Information and Computer Science 
Professor of Economics and Public Policy 
University of Michigan 
http://www-personal.umich.edu/~jmm/
October 17, 2000 
Extract pdf pages online - SDK application service:C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Easy to Use C# Code to Extract PDF Pages, Copy Pages from One PDF File and Paste into Others
www.rasteredge.com
Extract pdf pages online - SDK application service:VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed VB.NET Guide for Extracting Pages from Microsoft PDF Doc
www.rasteredge.com
2
1.  SUMMARY................................................................................................................3 
1.1. M
ARKET 
B
ACKGROUND
...........................................................................................3 
1.2. H
ORIZONTAL 
E
FFECTS
.............................................................................................4 
1.3. V
ERTICAL 
E
FFECTS
..................................................................................................5 
2.  MARKET DEFINITION..........................................................................................6 
2.1. I
NDUSTRY 
L
AYERS
...................................................................................................6 
2.1.1.  Aggregation and Distribution of Content........................................................7 
2.1.2.  Conduit............................................................................................................8 
2.1.3.  Internet Access................................................................................................9 
2.1.4.  Content............................................................................................................9 
2.2. O
NLINE 
S
ERVICES 
M
ARKET
...................................................................................10 
3.  MARKET POWER.................................................................................................12 
3.1. P
OWER IN 
A
GGREGATION AND 
D
ISTRIBUTION OF 
C
ONTENT AND  
S
ERVICES
..........12 
3.2. P
OWER IN 
I
NTERNET 
A
CCESS
.................................................................................15 
3.3. C
HARACTERISTICS OF 
N
ETWORK 
M
ARKETS
...........................................................15 
3.4. P
RIOR 
B
EHAVIOR 
C
ONSISTENT WITH 
M
ARKET 
P
OWER
..........................................18 
3.4.1.  AOL Pricing..................................................................................................18 
3.4.2.  Instant Messaging.........................................................................................18 
3.4.3.  AOL 5.0.........................................................................................................20 
3.4.4.  TW / Disney /ABC Dispute............................................................................21 
3.4.5.  Foreclosing Advertising Space From Competitors.......................................21 
4.  ANTI-COMPETITIVE EFFECTS OF THE MERGER.....................................22 
4.1. M
ONOPOLIZATION OF 
O
NLINE 
S
ERVICES
...............................................................22 
4.1.1.  Horizontal Concentration.............................................................................22 
4.1.2.  Vertical Foreclosure.....................................................................................23 
4.2. H
ARM TO 
C
OMPETITION IN 
B
ROADBAND 
C
ONDUIT
................................................27 
4.3. C
ONTROLLING AND 
M
ANIPULATING 
S
TANDARDS
..................................................29 
4.3.1.  Strategies for Acquiring Market Power in Network Markets.......................29 
4.3.2.  An Example of AOL Time Warner’s Ability to Manipulate  Standards to 
Acquire Market Power..............................................................................................31 
5.  OTHER EFFECTS OF THE MERGER ON CONSUMERS.............................33 
6.  EFFICIENCY JUSTIFICATIONS.......................................................................34 
7.  CONCLUSION........................................................................................................35 
SDK application service:C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
Free components and online source codes for .NET framework 2.0+. doc2.Save( outPutFilePath); Add and Insert Multiple PDF Pages to PDF Document Using C#.
www.rasteredge.com
SDK application service:C# PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in
Free online source code for extracting text textMgr = PDFTextHandler. ExportPDFTextManager(doc); // Extract text content for text extraction from all PDF
www.rasteredge.com
3
1. Summary 
America Online (AOL) is the largest, and in some aspects dominant, firm in the 
aggregation and distribution of content and services over the Internet.  AOL is also the 
largest provider of Internet access in the U.S.  Overall, it is the most successful firm in 
the business of online services, or the joint provision of Internet access and content and 
service distribution.  This is a business that AOL essentially invented, and no other firm 
has been able to compete effectively with AOL. 
The merger between AOL and Time Warner will horizontally and vertically increase 
AOL’s power in the market for Internet online services.  The anti-competitive effects of 
this merger will harm consumers. 
Time-Warner (including its Road Runner subsidiary) is one of the most important present 
and future competitors in this business because it is the number two aggregator and 
distributor via high-speed (broadband) Internet connections, the next generation of 
Internet access.  This merger thus combines AOL and one of its most significant 
competitors in online services, creating significant horizontal anti-competitive effects. 
Time Warner is also the largest provider of content in the world, and for households in 
many major U.S. markets is the dominant provider of high-speed Internet conduit 
(infrastructure) and access (service).  The leading conduit for high-speed Internet access 
today is cable modem service provided by cable television system operators, such as 
Time Warner.  The most significant competitive conduit is digital subscriber line (DSL) 
service provided by telephone companies.  As a result of this merger, AOL will have a 
reduced incentive to promote DSL service as a competitor to cable modems in high-speed 
conduit services.  This is another direct anti-competitive effect of the merger. 
Vertical power will be exerted through foreclosure of, exclusion from and less 
preferential access to Time Warner content by other online service providers.  Some of 
the greatest harm will come through AOL/TW’s opportunity to gain proprietary control 
over crucial content formats and applications standards and to manipulate these to 
maintain and extend its market power, much as Judge Jackson found that Microsoft did in 
the desktop computer industry. 
1.1. 
Market Background 
The aggregation and distribution of content and services has been an important industry 
throughout modern history.  In popular jargon, this is the business of “the media”, 
although media companies may also engage in other activities (such as the creation of 
content).  Newspapers, magazines, broadcast and cable TV operators, radio stations, 
bookstores and so forth all participate in this industry.  For antitrust purposes, there are 
several different markets that divide these firms based on the degree of competitive 
substitutability between their products and services.  For example, in 1997 the FTC found 
SDK application service:C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
image. Extract image from PDF free in .NET framework application with trial SDK components and online C# class source code. A powerful
www.rasteredge.com
SDK application service:VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF
Online Visual Basic .NET class source code for quick evaluation. If you want to extract text from a PDF document using Visual Basic .NET programming language
www.rasteredge.com
4
a market for sale of cable television programming services to households.
1
The 
participants in this market (multichannel video programming distributors, or MVPDs) are 
aggregators and distributors of content and services over cable TV networks.  In some 
cases, including the MVPD market, the content aggregator and distributor also provides 
the access service for customers to reach the content. 
There are four fundamental layers of economic activity involved in bringing content and 
communications services to Internet consumers.  First, there must be conduit, physical 
plant such as cable and switching equipment.  For competitive analysis, the key 
component of this conduit is the last mile of access, because there are few suppliers, and 
entry barriers for facilities-based entry are comparatively high.  Second, there must be an 
access service provider (commonly called an Internet Service Provider, or ISP), who 
provides software and support to connect users via the last mile conduit to the rest of the 
Internet.  Third, there are content aggregators and distributors who provide portals or 
gateways to Internet content.  Fourth, there are the providers of content itself. 
AOL is the largest provider of online services in the U.S., providing access as well as 
aggregation and distribution of content and services.  Time Warner is the second largest 
aggregator and distributor serving high-speed access customers in the nation.  Time 
Warner is also the largest provider of unique, proprietary content in the world. 
If we study the activity layers separately, AOL is the largest provider of aggregation and 
distribution, and also the largest provider of access.  Through the proposed merger with 
Time Warner, AOL will be able to further tie together three layers throughout the U.S. 
(by becoming the largest owner of proprietary content), and all four layers in areas of the 
U.S. served by Time Warner cable systems (by becoming a broadband conduit provider 
in those local markets).   
1.2. 
Horizontal Effects 
The merger will eliminate an important competitive restraint on AOL in the online 
services market.  AOL is the largest online service provider (OSP).  Road Runner is the 
second largest online service provider for high-speed (broadband) residential access 
customers.
2
Road Runner has a first-mover advantage in broadband, a well-developed 
portal, business relationships with cable operators and content owners, and is owned by 
Time Warner, the world’s largest provider of audio and video content (the types of 
content that distinguish broadband usage). 
Further, because access is provided over fixed networks, broadband access is provided in 
local geographic markets.  For example, no customers in the U.S. have a choice between 
broadband service from Road Runner and Excite@Home over cable systems: at most one 
service passes a given home.  In many local markets, Road Runner is the largest (78%-
1
In the Matter of Time Warner Inc., Turner Broadcasting System, Inc., Tele-
Communications, Inc., Liberty Media Corporation, FTC Docket No. C-3709. 
2
Road Runner has doubled its subscriber base since January 2000, to over one million 
subscribers.  See “Road Runner Hits a Million,” Road Runner press release, 23 Aug 
2000, http://www.rr.com/rdrun/.  
SDK application service:VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.
Enable specified pages deleting from PDF in Visual Basic .NET class. Free trial SDK library download for Visual Studio .NET program. Online source codes for
www.rasteredge.com
SDK application service:VB.NET PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images
Extract image from PDF free in .NET framework application with trial SDK components for .NET. Online source codes for quick evaluation in VB.NET class.
www.rasteredge.com
5
88% market share
3
) provider of high-speed access.  Road Runner is probably the most 
important competitor to AOL in these markets, and the merger will severely lessen the 
competitive pressure on AOL. 
1.3. 
Vertical Effects 
Time Warner will have the ability to withhold content, or provide content at 
disadvantageous terms, to content aggregators and distributors in competition with AOL, 
increasing AOL’s power in the online services market.  This is essentially the same 
problem that the FCC and FTC have addressed in the MVPD market by imposing rules 
and conditions on content producers, aggregators and distributors (cable operators or 
MVPDs).
4
The merger will also have anti-competitive effects in the conduit market.  Time Warner is 
the second largest provider of broadband conduit nationwide, and the dominant 
broadband conduit provider in its geographic coverage area.
5
Cable modem services are 
the leading means by which residential users obtain broadband services, and DSL is 
seeking to challenge cable modem service.  ISPs and OSPs who are unaffiliated with 
cable television system owners have not been able to offer high-speed services over cable 
modems.  In fact, prior to this announced merger, AOL led the charge to require cable 
systems to provide “open access” to other ISPs.  Absent this merger and “open access,” 
AOL’s primary method of delivering high-speed services would likely be DSL.  Through 
this merger, however, AOL is acquiring one of the largest cable system operators in the 
nation and its interest in promoting services that compete with cable system services, 
including cable modem services, will be reduced.  The merger, therefore, reduces 
competition in high-speed conduit services. 
The merger increases the ability of AOL/TW to further harm competition and consumers 
by controlling and manipulating standards for crucial consumer services and content 
formats.  With the largest user base and control of unique and important content, 
AOL/TW will be able to set or manipulate standards for communications and information 
services that are subject to network effects.  These include audio formats, video formats, 
3
According to the FCC’s August 2000 Broadband Survey, cable operators’ average share 
of “advanced telecommunications services” (at least 200 Kbps in each direction) over all 
local geographic markets nationwide was 87.5% on 12/31/99.  Cable’s share of “high 
speed” (200 Kbps or faster in at least one direction) was 77.8%.  See “Deployment of 
Advanced Telecommunications Capability: Second Report,” FCC, August 2000, ¶8 for 
definitions, ¶¶71, 72 for cable’s share). 
4
See, e.g., In the Matter of Time Warner Inc., Turner Broadcasting System, Inc., Tele-
Communications, Inc., Liberty Media Corporation, FTC Docket No. C-3709. 
5
As mentioned above, in Section 1.1, and detailed below in Section 2.1, access service 
and conduit are separate economic activities.  Most Internet access is sold separately 
from, and by separate providers than, conduit access, and online services are provided by 
companies like AOL, Microsoft, Yahoo/Bluelight and so forth; conduit is provided by 
SBC, Verizon, Bell South, etc. 
SDK application service:VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
add and insert one or multiple pages to existing adobe PDF document in VB.NET. Ability to create a blank PDF page with related by using following online VB.NET
www.rasteredge.com
SDK application service:C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document online in C#.NET
PDF, C# print PDF, C# merge PDF files, C# view PDF online, C# convert PDF to tiff, C# read PDF, C# convert PDF to text, C# extract PDF pages, C# comment
www.rasteredge.com
6
instant messaging, interactive TV, and other current and future Internet-delivered 
services. 
In addition, by uniting the interests of AOL and Road Runner, the merger will increase 
buying power in the upstream market in which Internet content is sold to online service 
providers.  In the parallel market in which video programming is sold to MVPDs, 
concern about the anticompetitive effect of monopsony power on the diversity of content 
available has resulted in the imposition of a cap on the proportion of cable subscribers 
any single cable operator may serve.  The cap on the size of cable companies is 30%; 
AOL and Road Runner’s combined share of the online services market measured by 
subscribers is 41%.  Thus, it is likely that AOL will be able to manipulate and distort the 
market for content creation and provision to distributors. 
2. Market Definition 
2.1. 
Industry Layers 
There are four fundamental layers of economic activity involved in bringing content and 
communications services to Internet consumers.  To illustrate, consider the following 
simple transaction: an end user with BellSouth phone service uses AOL to connect to the 
Internet, uses the AOL portal to find information, and reads a Time Warner magazine 
article featured there.  The first layer encountered by the user is her access provider 
(AOL in this example), which provides software and support to connect users to the 
Internet.  The second layer encountered (AOL in this example) is a content aggregator 
and distributor, generally called a portal.  The third layer (Time Warner in this example) 
is a content provider.  The fourth layer is the conduit, or physical plant that transmits data 
(with Bell South the local conduit provider in this example). 
7
2.1.1. Aggregation and Distribution of Content 
Portal services are offered by such firms as AOL, MSN, Lycos, and Yahoo!.  In some 
cases, users access content directly, bypassing the content aggregation and distribution 
layer.  But the vastness of the Internet makes portals’ content aggregation services 
essential: the Web has over a billion pages,
6
and the typical user’s range of “travel,” is 
only six Web sites and approximately 30 pages per online session.
7
Because content 
aggregators help users find the information they want, and offer some proprietary 
6
Inktomi, 18 January 2000, “Web surpasses one billion documents,” Press release 
available at www.inktomi.com/news/press/billion.html 
7
The typical “surfer” visits only 6 unique sites per session and views roughly 200 (not 
necessarily unique) pages per week.  Nielsen//NetRating Report, 27 January 2000 
8
information themselves, there has been tremendous growth in their usage.  A recent study 
found that almost 90 percent of Web surfers visited a portal during November 1999.
8
Most portals are financed by advertising revenue, although e-commerce commissions are 
growing in importance.  Portals thus seek to: (a) attract and retain visitors, in order to 
increase their “reach” and number of advertisements viewed, which determine ad 
revenue, and (b) maximize the amount of online shopping done from the portal, which 
determines e-commerce commissions. 
Much like newspapers and yellow pages, portal operators are driven by two 
interdependent concerns: providing desirable content to attract viewers and then selling 
access to those viewers by selling display space to advertisers.
9
The portal tries to create 
a product that will attract viewers.  In addition to content aggregation and distribution, 
portals also offer applications, such as search tools, e-mail, instant messaging, “chat 
rooms”, shared calendars, image (e.g., digital photo) storage, address books, and so forth.   
The need to attract visitors is the reason portals are seeking to become the primary 
platform through which users can perform most or all of their Internet transactions.  If the 
portal is successful at increasing user holding time and the number of ads viewed (and 
possibly clicked), then it can induce advertisers to pay for more advertising space, and at 
higher rates.  The ad revenue allows the portal to gain market control over more content 
and applications, thereby driving out competitors and allowing it to extract more profit 
from users and advertisers. 
2.1.2. Conduit 
Conduit that connects end users to nodes of the Internet is known as the “last mile.”  The 
last mile is the critical portion of the conduit for antitrust analysis, because there are 
relatively few suppliers and entry barriers for facilities-based entry are relatively high.  
Bandwidth over the last mile of conduit is a major determinant of the transmission speeds 
that end users experience.  Currently, most end users employ their ordinary phone lines 
for last-mile connections; these are known as dial-up connections, and provide 
narrowband Internet service, with transmission speeds below 56 Kbps.  Increasingly, 
however, end users are employing broadband
10
last-mile conduit, and experiencing 
8
Forbes magazine reports Nielsen//NetRating statistics that show 87.8% of Web surfers 
visited a portal in November 1999.  Forbes, “Portals cement online domination,” 29 
December 1999. 
9
AOL gets about 63% of its revenue from subscribers, and 30% from advertising, 
product placement and e-commerce commissions.  Newspapers generate about 19% of 
revenue from subscribers, according to the Newspaper Association of America 
(http://www.naa.org/info/facts00/07.html and .../08.html).  AOL data for first three 
months of 2000, from AOL form 10Q.  
10
See footnote 3 for the FCC’s definitions of high-speed Internet access. 
9
transmission speeds of 1 Mbps (1,000 Kbps) or better.  There can be little doubt that, just 
as 1200 baud modems gave way to 56 K modems, broadband last-mile transport will 
ultimately supplant dial-up connections.
11
2.1.3. Internet Access 
An Internet access provider (commonly called an Internet Service Provider, or ISP) 
connects end-users to the Internet.  The connection is in two hops, the last-mile conduit 
between the end-user and the ISP’s facilities, and from the ISP’s facilities to an Internet 
backbone supplier’s facilities, from which the ISP purchases transport services.  Internet 
access service is differentiated by the conduit used over the last mile.  ISP service that 
uses ordinary telephone lines is called dial-up service.  To supply other forms of access 
service, ISPs purchase last-mile transport from conduit providers, such as ISDN lines, 
DSL lines, and access to cable modem facilities.  Unless end-users configure their 
systems otherwise (and most do not), the ISP’s Web page is the first screen users see 
when they connect to the Internet.  ISPs take advantage of this to differentiate their 
service to appeal to market niches, such as Hispanics, Catholics, gays, and residents of 
the local geographic areas by providing links to Web sites of interest to those 
communities.  In short, ISPs are the interface between end-users and the Internet, 
bringing together backbone service, last-mile conduit, communications software, billing 
services,
12
and content. 
2.1.4. Content 
The Internet began as a place to share technical information, and some Internet content is 
supplied by engineers and academicians to a very narrow audience.  In addition, some 
small “virtual” communities use the Internet as a place to share information.  One of the 
distinguishing features of the Internet is that the cost of creating a Web site is so low that 
it is possible for individuals to make content available to the world.  The Internet has 
become, however, a mass-market medium, and content is supplied by the traditional 
media industries:  newspaper, magazine, music, and radio suppliers, and in a limited way, 
the television and film industries.  Once broadband is commonplace, the television and 
film industries are likely to become much larger suppliers of content than they are now.   
Since merger analysis must address the effects that the proposed merger will have in the 
future, it is appropriate to consider the effect the AOL - Time Warner merger will have 
on the Internet as it will exist in the near future, in which broadband access is common, 
and the Internet is even more of a mass-market medium that it is now, supplying 
television, film, and music to a wide audience. 
11
The FCC reports that a range of analysts expect that by the end of 2004, 35 million 
households, about a third to a half of online households, will have high-speed Internet 
service.  (See “Deployment of Advanced Telecommunications Capability: Second 
Report,” FCC, August 2000, ¶186). 
12
Except for cable modem ISPs, which employ cable operators’ billing services. 
10
2.2. 
Online Services Market 
For the analysis of this merger, I believe it is proper to define a market for “online 
services”, which include the provision of Internet access and portal service (aggregation 
and distribution of content and applications).  Access and portal services are technically 
distinct layers, and need not be provided together.  However, due to technical and 
customer preference reasons, they are increasingly provided jointly, and will be even 
more so in the near future.  In addition, AOL bundles the two services, so the definition I 
have chosen facilitates analysis of this proposed merger.  Indeed, AOL describes itself as 
“the world’s leader in interactive services.”
13
For technical reasons, access and portal services are increasingly provided jointly as an 
online service. With narrowband access network congestion between the information 
servers and the end-user can make surfing tedious, but it does not necessarily destroy the 
customer’s experience.  With broadband content (such as streaming video), network 
congestion can be fatal.  By combining portal and ISP services, the portal can store 
(“cache”) the most popular broadband content at the ISP point-of-presence (“POP”) to 
which the end-user connects, drastically reducing network congestion.   
Distributed caching has already become an important feature of portal services delivered 
over narrowband Internet connections.  Narrowband caching is dominated by 
independent firms, the most notable of which is Akamai.
14
Akamai and its competitors 
provide services to most of the major portals, demonstrating the increasing necessity of 
caching for a successful portal business.
15
However, high-speed Internet online service 
providers are building their own caching facilities, to ensure sufficient control and service 
quality for the much more demanding broadband content.  The two most successful 
broadband service providers – Road Runner and Excite@Home – provide access, portal 
service and local caching.
16
In addition, there is an important marketing and customer service advantage to joint 
provision of access and portal (aggregation and distribution) services.  The ISP is the first 
point of contact between the customer and the Internet.  Most customers, particularly 
less-experienced users, can be steered to the ISP’s Web site as their first point of entry.  
Although the user can potentially reconfigure their starting point, or just surf to another 
13
See, e.g., “Who we are”, http://corp.aol.com/whoweare.html
.  
14
Akamai started operations in April, 1999.  It currently has a market capitalization of 
approximately $1 billion. 
15
Caching is used by AOL, Yahoo, Microsoft, GO.com, Lycos, Quicken.com, Reuters, 
Intuit, CNBC and many others. 
16
In fact, Road Runner and Excite@Home go further, also providing the physical conduit 
over which access service is delivered.  In this they are following the model of the multi-
channel video programming distributors (cable TV companies) of which they are 
subsidiaries. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested