count pages in pdf without opening c# : Extract pages from pdf files software SDK dll windows wpf azure web forms aol-tw00-public1-part340

11
portal, only a relatively small minority actually do this.
17
Thus, being the physical 
gateway translates into having a substantial market share as the virtual portal service. 
Indeed, in the past couple of years, most major ISPs and portals have formed partnerships 
to provide joint services.
18
ISPs use portals to differentiate their Internet access offerings, 
which are rapidly becoming low-margin commodity services.  Portal services, in part by 
inducing customers to engage in site-specific database creation (things like getting the 
user to enter her stock portfolio, developing a non-transferable home-page, and 
distributing an email address that is not portable) can reduce customer turnover for 
ISPs.
19
ISPs have also recognized that their control over the first page viewed by Internet 
users is a valuable asset.
20
It is to their advantage to encourage their users to spend more 
time on the ISP site, increasing the potential for advertising revenue. In addition, rates for 
targeted advertising are higher, and online service providers with both an ISP service and 
a portal have user data that facilitate targeted advertising. 
The markets examined here are similar to MVPD markets: in both cases, there are 
upstream markets in which content providers sell to content aggregators/distributors 
(portals or MVPDs), who in turn provide an access service to a downstream market in 
which they sell content to consumers.   
17
“28% of households have substituted the start page pre-installed with their browser 
software with an alternative, such as a directory page.  25% of households have 
personalized their start page – either that of their ISP/online service provider or an 
alternative they have substituted.”  Personalizing the Internet access start page – all 
things in moderation,” Gartner Group EHTO-US-DP-9911, Overview accessed 2/2/00 
1:09 pm. 
18
Several major “independent” portals have recently concluded they need to develop 
close relationships with ISPs.  For example, AltaVista and Excite have teamed up with 
1stup.com,  and Yahoo has teamed up with BlueLight.   
19
Typical portal services that require non-transferable customer database creation and 
customization include email service, Web page hosting, stock portfolio tracking, calendar 
sharing, chat and instant messaging profiles, local weather and sports reporting, local 
entertainment listings, personalized news pages, etc.  See http://www.aol.com
and 
http://www.yahoo.com
to see the large number of services offered that require non-
transferable data entry and customization. 
20
For example, “In the first quarter of 1998 EarthLink began reporting incremental  
revenues derived from programs such as advertising and electronic commerce  that 
leverage the Company's growing member base and user traffic. ... Incremental revenues 
were $392,000 and  $1.1 million during the three months ended March 31, 1998 and June 
30, 1998,  respectively.” EarthLink 10Q for June 30, 1998.  In the second quarter 2000, 
EarthLink earned $8.24 million in advertising and e-commerce revenues.  EarthLink 10Q 
for June 30, 2000. 
Extract pages from pdf files - software SDK dll:C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Easy to Use C# Code to Extract PDF Pages, Copy Pages from One PDF File and Paste into Others
www.rasteredge.com
Extract pages from pdf files - software SDK dll:VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed VB.NET Guide for Extracting Pages from Microsoft PDF Doc
www.rasteredge.com
12
3. Market Power 
3.1. 
Power in Aggregation and Distribution of Content and 
Services  
The provision of portal services (the aggregation and distribution of content and services) 
is concentrated, and becoming more so.  AOL has been the top portal destination for as 
long as data measuring such patterns have been consistently collected.
21
Indeed, it could 
be said that AOL invented the portal concept before the Internet was even a commercial 
network. 
AOL  is also the largest and most successful Internet property.  The single clearest 
measure of AOL’s dominance is that  thirty-eight percent of total time online in January 
2000 was spent on AOL’s “walled garden” sites.  That amount is more than five times 
greater than the next most popular site (e.g, Microsoft’s property only had seven percent 
of total time online).
22
Unfortunately, time online statistics were not collected prior to January 2000.  To get a 
longer perspective on AOL’s top position in online services, it is necessary to rely on 
“reach” or “unique visitors” data.  These statistics measure the number of unique visitors 
to a company’s Web properties during a month.  They do not fully reflect AOL’s 
dominance because they do not show the number of repeat visits during the month, nor 
the total amount of time spent online.     
Nonetheless, reach statistics do demonstrate the growing power of AOL as the largest 
portal.  In August 2000, #1 AOL reached 79% of the U.S. users of the Internet.  AOL 
reached 21% more users than did the #2 property, Yahoo.  AOL reached four times as 
many users as did Amazon, the #10 Web property.
23
That general relationship is 
evidenced in essentially all reported statistics on Web usage.
24
21
AOL Web properties are ranked as number one in unique visits by Nielsen 
(http://209.249.142.27/nnpm/owa/NRpublicreports.toppropertiesmonthly
), PC Data 
(http://www.pcdataonline.com/reports/topmonthlyfreep.asp
) and Media Metrix 
(http://www.mediametrix.com/usa/data/thetop.jsp
) as of May 2000. 
22
See Patricia Jacobus, AOL, Tax sites make headway in traffic, Feb. 22, 2000 
<http://home.cnet.com/category/0-1005-200-1554872.html> (visited Aug. 17, 2000) 
(hereinafter “AOL Sites”); Marc Gunther, These Guys Want It All, F
ORTUNE
, Feb. 7, 
2000, at 70.  In addition, The Economist reports that “almost three-quarters of AOL 
members’ time, and nearly 40% of the time that all Americans spend on the web, is 
currently spent within AOL’s ‘walled garden’ of content and services.”  See A Theory of 
the Case, The Economist, Jan. 15, 2000. 
23
Media Metrix, August 2000 data, viewed 10 October 2000 at 
http://www.mediametrix.com/data/thetop.jsp?language=us
.  
24
Data from various market watchers using various metrics reveal a common picture: 
compared to the #1 ranked observation, #10 receives about 20% as much traffic, #20 
receives 10% as much. I say the “#1 ranked observation” because some surveys give 
software SDK dll:C# PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in
extraction from PDF images and image files. textMgr = PDFTextHandler. ExportPDFTextManager(doc); // Extract text content for text extraction from all PDF
www.rasteredge.com
software SDK dll:VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF
Extract highlighted text out of PDF document. Image text extraction control provides text extraction from PDF images and image files.
www.rasteredge.com
13
AOL’s economic power in terms of its claim on advertising revenues is far greater than a 
simple comparison of relative reach statistics would indicate, in part because the 
relationship between reach and advertising revenues is not a linear one.  Smaller portals 
are not of sufficient size to attract advertising dollars.   It was recently reported that even 
the portals Go and NBC Internet, the sixth and ninth-most popular properties on the Web, 
have failed to attract enough advertising revenue to survive in their present form.
25
Even 
larger portals do not attract advertising revenues in proportion to their reach statistics.  
For example, although Lycos, the #4 Web property, had 72% as many unique visitors as 
did Yahoo! in September 1999, it received only 36% as much advertising revenue.
26
The 
relevance of reach statistics alone is further limited because they do not reflect AOL’s 
position as the dominant ISP, providing residential connections to the Internet, nor its 
already substantial position in content, even without merging with Time-Warner.   
Thus, in portal activities AOL has five times as many online minutes as its nearest 
competitors, and it reaches 20% more unique users than Yahoo!, the #2 property.  But, as 
the stock market recognizes, there really is no comparison to Yahoo!.  AOL’s market 
capitalization (on 10 October 2000) is 2.3 times larger than Yahoo!’s.  Its annual 
revenues are twice as large ($2 billion vs. $1 billion).   
Due to the economics underlying portals, concentration once achieved will not be 
reversed by market forces.  Portal provision exhibits three economic characteristics that 
tend toward industry concentration.  The first is a network effect: positive feedback loops 
due to network externalities.  The network externalities are of the classic fax machine 
variety – certain aspects of portals become more valuable to current customers as more 
customers join the portal.  Instant messaging is the most obvious example of this: a given 
messaging network becomes more valuable to me as the number of people with whom I 
can use it increases.  This effect can be quite powerful.  For example, both Juno and 
EarthLink, firms striving to compete with AOL in the ISP market, have felt compelled to 
enter agreements with AOL whereby the Juno and EarthLink customers use AOL Instant 
results by “properties” (all the sites owned by a given company are aggregated at the 
company level), while some give results by “sites” (e.g. results for Hotmail.com and 
MSN.com are reported separately). 
25
“‘Right now investors are not rewarding the Internet activities of Disney [Go], NBC 
[Snap], and Viacom,’ said Tom Wolzien, an analyst with Sanford C. Bernstein.  ‘They 
are small, and the market prefers the big players like Yahoo and America Online.’”  Both 
portals have lost market share over the past year.  “The best days of both Go and Snap 
seem to be behind them.”  “NBC Internet, citing slow ad sales, said it would lay off 20 
percent of its work force.”  Disney decided earlier this year to pull back from the portal 
business.  (“The Medium Gets the Message; TV’s Monoliths Have Learned The Web Is a 
Fragmented World, New York Times, 14 Aug 2000).  Indeed, as of August 2000, NBC 
Internet reached only 23% as many unique visitors as did AOL. 
http://www.mediametrix.com/data/thetop.jsp?language=us. 
26
Unique visitors from Media Metrix.  Ad revenues from each company’s 10Q reports to 
the SEC. 
software SDK dll:C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
DotNetNuke), SharePoint. Get JPG, JPEG and other high quality image files from PDF document. Able to extract vector images from PDF. Extract
www.rasteredge.com
software SDK dll:C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
how to merge PDF document files by C# code, how to rotate PDF document page, how to delete PDF page using C# .NET, how to reorganize PDF document pages and how
www.rasteredge.com
14
Messenger.  That is, the network externality generated by AOL’s IM users is so strong 
that Juno and EarthLink feel compelled to send their customers to their strongest 
competitor to acquire this service. 
Second, as with any publishing business, there are substantial economies of scale.  The 
fixed cost of aggregating and indexing content are significant while the marginal cost of 
distributing the results are low.
27
Third, despite the fact that essentially anyone can create and set up a portal-like Web site, 
entry barriers are very high.  That is because “entry,” in the antitrust sense, means 
“substantial entry that produces real pressure on established firms’ profits.”
28
As noted 
above, given the magnitude of the Web and typical breadth of travel, most consumers are 
never aware of most sites.
29
“Substantial entry” requires very significant effort to gain 
mind-share in addition to the effort required to create and maintain a major portal. 
Economic theory predicts that these three economic characteristics of portals will protect 
large, established firms and disadvantage smaller firms.  The effect of this concentration, 
and in particular the top-heaviness of the concentration, is obvious in the data.  
AOL and a very few other top Web properties have grown substantially, while lower-
ranked properties haven’t seen similar gains.  Since October 1998, AOL’s reach has 
increased by 30.8 points, from 47.9% of all online users per month to 78.7%.  Although 
the comparable numbers for Yahoo and Microsoft have also increased (17.7 points, from 
47.6% to 65.3% and 18.9 points, from 46.3% to 65.2%, respectively), they have not 
increased as much.
30
This trend has recently been noted in the popular press as well.
31
Similarly, for a supposedly dynamic industry with “free” entry, the top 10 firms show 
remarkable stability.  The top four firms in April 2000 (AOL, Yahoo!, Microsoft, and 
Lycos) were the top four firms in October 1988.  The only new entrant in the top 10 is the 
27
These costs are fixed and marginal with respect to additional viewers, not with respect 
to additional content. 
28
“In general, a clear signal of low barriers is provided only by effective, viable entry 
that takes a nontrivial market share. . . . Particularly where scale economies are 
important, there is a basic difference between toehold entry that never gets any bigger 
and substantial entry that produces real pressure on established firms’ profits.” Richard 
Schmalensee, “Ease of Entry: Has the Concept Been Applied Too Readily?,” 56 Antitrust 
L.J. 41 (1987). 
29
Nielsen//NetRatings reports that the typical home user viewed 634 pages in January 
2000.  At that rate, it would take over 131,000 years
to view the 1 billion pages that 
existed at the time. 
30
Media Metrix. 
31
“The biggest names—AOL, Yahoo! and Microsoft—have benefited at the expense of 
second-rankers such as Lycos and Excite@Home.”  The Economist, August 26, 2000, p. 
55. 
software SDK dll:VB.NET PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in vb.net
Merge two or several separate PDF files together and into one PDF document in VB.NET. Combine multiple specified PDF pages in into single one file.
www.rasteredge.com
software SDK dll:C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
PDF, C# print PDF, C# merge PDF files, C# view PDF online, C# convert PDF to tiff, C# read PDF, C# convert PDF to text, C# extract PDF pages, C# comment
www.rasteredge.com
15
search portal About.com (now in the seventh spot).  Three firms in the top 10 in October 
1998 have been acquired by or merged with other firms in the top 10.
32
Thus, the current 
top 10 is basically the October 1998 top 12 plus one new member. 
3.2. 
Power in Internet Access  
AOL is by far the largest provider of Internet access services.  With over 21 million 
subscribers in the US, it likely has a market share of approximately 40%.
33
No other ISP 
is even close.  EarthLink and MSN are the next largest ISPs in terms of subscribers and, 
based on recent public data, neither one of them has as many as 4 million subscribers. 
In the many important local markets in which it participates, Road Runner is one firm 
that holds the promise of competing successfully in Internet access services because of its 
first-mover advantage in broadband services, its captive access to cable households, and 
the access to content owned or controlled by its corporate affiliates.  This merger clearly 
eliminates this strong competitor to AOL. 
As discussed in the next section, the online services market is one in which network 
effects exist.  Because of its huge subscriber base, and through closed applications that 
exclude competitors (such as chat groups and IM), AOL may already have the market 
power which dominant firms have in network industries.  Because of these network 
effects, it is not likely that firms other than Road Runner (in its markets), with its unique 
advantages, will be in nearly as good a position to challenge AOL’s dominance.   
3.3. 
Characteristics of Network Markets 
Network effects can help the firm to retain its market power, essentially by creating a 
high barrier to entry.  Network effects arise when the value of a good is increasing in the 
number of other consumers who purchase the good.  There are two fundamental reasons 
this may occur.
34
First, participation in a communications network is more valuable when 
there are more network participants with which one can communicate.  Instant messaging 
is a prototypical example: being a registered user of MSN’s instant messaging service 
32
Netscape, GeoCities, and Infoseek (ranked numbers 5, 6, and 9, respectively, in 1988) 
were subsumed into other members of the top 10 in 2000 (AOL, Yahoo!, and Go/Disney, 
respectively). 
33
The underlying data on number of subscribers for each ISP is the June 30, 2000 figure 
reported in TR’s Online Census, Telecommunications Reports International Inc., August 
2000.  TR reports AOL’s total subscribers worldwide; AOL reports its US subscriber 
count in its quarterly SEC reports (10Qs).  I applied the ratio (US subscribers / worldwide 
subscribers) from March 31, 2000 to TRO’s figure for June 30. 
The estimate of AOL subscribers does not include 1.5 million subscribers to 
Gateway.net, an ISP that AOL manages. 
34
See Katz, Michael and Shapiro, Carl, “Network Externalities, Competition and 
Compatibility,” American Economic Review, July 1985, 75, 424-40 at p. 424 for a 
discussion of how network effects arise. 
software SDK dll:C# PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files
can split target PDF document file by specifying a page or pages. If needed, developers can also combine generated split PDF document files with other PDF
www.rasteredge.com
software SDK dll:VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple
split target multi-page PDF document file to one-page PDF files or they can separate source PDF file to smaller PDF documents by every given number of pages.
www.rasteredge.com
16
would be more valuable if one could use that service to communicate with all instant 
messaging users.  AOL, however, prevents communications between MSN’s IM service 
and its own.  The second reason network effects arise is the greater availability of 
complementary goods (e.g., software) that are likely to be available when there is a larger 
installed base of a durable good (e.g., hardware).  Internet audio players and audio 
content are an example of network effects due to complementarity: the greater the 
installed base of audio players using a given standard for audio distribution over the 
Internet (“hardware”), the more audio content (“software”) will be available that uses that 
standard, so the value to consumers (and content producers) of adopting a standard is 
greater when more consumers use the standard.
35
Markets with network effects have some unusual characteristics.  First, equilibrium 
depends critically on consumers’ expectations of other consumers’ behavior,
36
and 
multiple equilibria are common.
37
For example, in the market in which operating 
systems are “hardware” and applications software is “software,” there is an equilibrium 
in which everyone expects that Linux will become a popular operating system and it is 
accepted in the market, and there is an equilibrium in which everyone expects 
Microsoft’s operating systems to continue to dominate, and Linux fails.  The importance 
of consumers’ expectations means that network markets are particularly sensitive to such 
things as firm reputation, announcements, and bandwagon effects, for these may 
determine which of the multiple equilibria is realized in the real world.
38
35
In both communications networks and hardware/software networks, there is an 
externality associated with joining a network: the decision to join the network is made 
based on the private benefit from joining, and doesn’t take into account the benefit that 
accrues to other network members due to expansion of the network.  For this reason, 
network effects are often called “network externalities.”  Network effects are also called 
“demand side economies of scale” because the value of the network to each consumer is 
greater when the network is larger. 
36
“[E]xpectations about the ultimate size of a network are crucial” in determining 
winners in network markets.  Besen, Stanley, and Farrell, Joseph, “Choosing How to 
Compete: Strategies and Tactics in Standardization,” Journal of Economic Perspectives, 
Spring 1994, 8, pp. 117-131 at p. 118. 
37
Multiplicity of equilibria exist even when expectations are assumed to be rational 
(equilibria are restricted to those in which consumers expectations are fulfilled).  See 
Katz, Michael and Shapiro, Carl, “Systems Competition and Network Effects,” Journal 
of Economic Perspectives, Spring 1994, 8, pp. 93-115 at pp. 96-97. 
38
“[F]irms’ reputations may play a major role in determining which equilibrium actually 
obtains.”  Katz, Michael and Shapiro, Carl, “Network Externalities, Competition and 
Compatibility,” American Economic Review, July 1985, 75, 424-40 at p. 439.  
Bandwagon effects and product preannouncements are discussed in Farrell, Joseph, and 
Saloner, Garth, “Installed Base and Compatibility: Innovation, Product 
Preannouncements, and Predation,” American Economic Review, December 1986, 76, pp. 
940-55 at pp. 942-943, 945, 948-949. 
software SDK dll:C# PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in C#.net
How to Use C#.NET Demo Code to Convert PDF Document to HTML5 Files in C#.NET Class. Add necessary references: RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.dll.
www.rasteredge.com
17
Network markets are characterized by “tipping,” or the adoption of one system or 
standard to the exclusion of others
39
– the demand-side equivalent of monopoly due to 
economies of scale in production.  Tipping has been observed in markets for AM stereo 
radio, FM vs. AM radio, color vs. black and white television, VHS vs. Beta videocassette 
recorders, and typewriter keyboards.
40
Once a market has tipped, it may be resistant to 
the adoption of superior incompatible technologies, a phenomenon called “excess 
inertia”.
41
As the examples and theoretical results show, in network markets, a large 
installed base can be a barrier to entry.
42
This barrier creates a “first-mover advantage” – 
a tendency for network markets to tip in the direction of early entrants, because they can 
establish installed bases that create a barrier to subsequent entrants.
43
39
“[N]etwork markets are tippy: the coexistence of incompatible products may be 
unstable, with a single winning standard dominating the market.”  Besen, Stanley, and 
Farrell, Joseph, “Choosing How to Compete: Strategies and Tactics in Standardization,” 
Journal of Economic Perspectives, Spring 1994, 8, pp. 117-131 at p. 118. 
40
In theoretical models, tipping is characterized by multiple corner equilibria in static 
models, and, in dynamic models, zero sales of existing systems after the introduction of 
new technology.  See Katz, Michael and Shapiro, Carl, “Systems Competition and 
Network Effects,” Journal of Economic Perspectives, Spring 1994, 8, pp. 93-115 at pp. 
105-106. 
41
“With network effects, it can be very difficult to switch horses in midstream to a 
system that later proves superior.”  Katz, Michael and Shapiro, Carl, “Systems 
Competition and Network Effects,” Journal of Economic Perspectives, Spring 1994, 8, 
pp. 93-115 at p. 106.  However, theoretical results show that both “excess inertia” and, as 
noted above the opposite tendency, “excess momentum” are possible in network markets.  
See Farrell, Joseph, and Saloner, Garth, “Installed Base and Compatibility: Innovation, 
Product Preannouncements, and Predation,” American Economic Review, December 
1986, 76, pp. 940-55 at p. 943. 
42
See Farrell, Joseph, and Saloner, Garth, “Installed Base and Compatibility: Innovation, 
Product Preannouncements, and Predation,” American Economic Review, December 
1986, 76, pp. 940-55 at p. 942.  Saloner notes that “de novo entry into a market occupied 
by vendors with large installed bases is exceedingly difficult.”  Saloner, Garth, Economic 
Issues in computer Interface Standardization, 1 Econ. Innovation & New Technology 
135, 140 (1990). 
43
See Katz, Michael and Shapiro, Carl, “Systems Competition and Network Effects,” 
Journal of Economic Perspectives, Spring 1994, 8, pp. 93-115 at pp. 405-406, and Besen, 
Stanley, and Farrell, Joseph, “Choosing How to Compete: Strategies and Tactics in 
Standardization,” Journal of Economic Perspectives, Sprint 1994, 8, pp. 117-131 at pp. 
118-119, 122. 
18
3.4. 
Prior Behavior Consistent with Market Power 
3.4.1. AOL Pricing 
Evidence of AOL’s market power can be found in the fact that AOL’s price for online 
service has increased while the prices of most other online service providers have held 
steady or declined.  AOL introduced its unlimited usage plan for $19.95 in December 
1996;
44
many other service providers followed suit, and $19.95 unlimited usage plans 
became an industry standard.   
In February, 1998, shortly after acquiring its biggest competitor (Compuserve), AOL 
raised its price to $21.95.  Compuserve raised its price, too, while at the same time some 
service providers, such as MCI, were cutting their rates.
45
Advertising-supported (“free”) service, which began by 1997, was well-established by 
late 1999.
46
Fee-based service providers still averaged $20 around that time.
47
However, 
substantial discounting was starting to become common.  For example, MSN offered 3 
months of Internet access to CostCo members for $11.99 per month.
48
AOL charges more for its online services than most other service providers.  AOL’s 
ability to sustain its price while retaining market share is evidence of the value that 
AOL’s aggregation and distribution of content contributes to its service. 
3.4.2. Instant Messaging 
Instant messaging is a communications service that allows users to see when friends, 
family, and co-workers are online.  It allows them to communicate in real time, with 
faster response than email.  Users can receive stock price and other alerts, share photos, 
pictures and sound, find and chat with new people with similar interests.  It also has a 
presence detection feature that allows others (selected by the user) to know whether the 
44
See AOL press release 12/2/96, “America Online Launches New Unlimited Use 
Pricing,” 
http://media.web.aol.com/media/press_view.cfm?release_num=124&title=America%20O
nline%20Launches%20New%20Unlimited%20Use%20Pricing. 
45
See “AOL raising prices,” CNET News.com, 2/9/98, http://news.cnet.com/news/0-
1005-200-326374.html  
46
See “Access for nothing?,” CNET News.com, 12/22/96, http://news.cnet.com/news/0-
1005-200-315347.html?tag=st.ne.1.srchres.ni;” “Free Net services gain ground on 
leaders,” CNET News.com, 11/30/99, http://news.cnet.com/news/0-1004-200-
1474678.html?tag=st.ne.1.srchres.ni.  Subscribers to free Internet access “pay” for the 
service, of course, by viewing ads. 
47
“Free ISP claims 500,000 users,” CNET News.com, 3/17/99, 
http://news.cnet.com/news/0-1004-200-340054.html?tag=st.ne.1.srchres.ni. 
48
“MSN, Costco offer low-cost Net access,” CNET News.com, 8/9/99, 
http://news.cnet.com/news/0-1005-200-345869.html. 
19
user is online.  This service has proven to be wildly popular, and every significant portal 
service has tried to offer some version of instant messaging.  Both the real-time nature of 
the service and its presence detection feature make it likely that IM services will be even 
more important and have wider application in the near future than they are today. 
Instant messaging is characterized by network externalities: the value to each user 
increases as the number of other users with whom she can communicate increases.  AOL 
is the dominant provider of instant messaging, controlling 90 percent of the market.
49
AOL has over 64 million registered users for its AIM service, and over 75 million 
registered users for its ICQ service.
50
ICQ has increased its registered user base by 50% 
since December 1999;
51
AIM has increased its registered user base by 42% in the past 12 
months.
52
AOL has refused to allow consumers of other services to interconnect with its customers.  
AOL has vigorously opposed providing access to rival online service providers, including 
Microsoft, AT&T, Prodigy, Tribal Voice, iCast, Odigo and AltaVista.
53
This has the 
same effect on the success of instant messaging services from other providers as would 
have a (successful) refusal by AT&T to interconnect the phone calls of GTE and other 
providers before the 1984 breakup.
54
49
See “David-and-Goliath Battle in Cyberspace,” New York Times, 6/24/2000 at A16.  
See also, “FTC unlikely to use messaging against AOL Time Warner,” CNET News, 
August 21, 2000 at http://news.cnet.com/news/0-1005-200-2574878.html
, which states 
“About 80 percent of all IM users favor AOL’s proprietary software.” 
50
For AIM users, see http://www.aol.com/aim/home.html
.  For ICQ users, see 
http://web.icq.com/
.   
51
See “ICQ surpasses 50 million registered users”, 
http://www.icq.com/press/press_release32.html
.   
52
See “AIM surpasses 45 million registered users”, 
http://media.web.aol.com/media/press_view.cfm?release_num=10100420&title=AMERI
CA%20ONLINE%20INTRODUCES%20NEXT%2DGENERATION%20AOL%20INS
TANT%20MESSENGER%2C%20VERSION%203%2E0%2C%20FOR%20WINDOWS
%20AND%20MAC%20USERS
.   
53
See “Odigo, AOL fight over instant messaging connections,” CNET News.com, 
6/13/2000, http://news.cnet.com/news/0-1005-200-
2111220.html?tag=st.ne.1002.srchres.ni
.  AOL has reached agreement with Lycos (as 
well as IBM, Novell EarthLink, Apple Computer and Juno Online Services) to distribute 
AIM to its members.  See "Messaging rivals call AOL on privacy, security issues," 
CNET News.com, 7/21/2000) 
54
For example, “The top request from our customers for the instant messaging service is 
interoperability.  Users don’t understand why they can’t talk to AOL or ... MSN people 
so we get plenty of e-mails from users who wish there was the ability to talk to all their 
friends.”  Yahoo!’s Brian Park, quoted by Reuters, “AOL looks safe on Instant 
Messaging – analysts,” August 25, 2000, at http://www.reuters.com
.  
20
The effect of interconnection denial is so strong that both Juno and EarthLink, struggling 
competitors to AOL, have felt compelled to enter agreements with AOL whereby the 
Juno and EarthLink customers use AOL Instant Messenger.  That is, the network 
externality generated by AOL’s users is so strong that Juno and EarthLink feel compelled 
to send their customers to their strongest competitor to acquire this service.   
AOL’s control of this remarkably popular service is thus implemented in two parts: 
online service providers who compete head-on with AOL are denied interconnection to 
AOL users, while service providers that limit themselves to access service and do not 
challenge AOL in content aggregation and distribution (e.g., Juno and EarthLink) are 
allowed to license AOL’s branded service. 
Firms attempting to compete with AOL have started a public standards-setting process to 
create an interconnection standard that would allow all instant messaging customers of 
different services to communicate.  There have been numerous reports that AOL is not 
cooperating with the open standards body.
55
3.4.3. AOL 5.0 
Early this year, at least forty-five lawsuits were filed against AOL alleging that Version 
5.0 of its access software interferes with access to competing ISP services.
56
Allegations 
include attempted monopoly.
57
I have personal experience with the exclusionary effects 
of AOL’s behavior.
58
According to the lawsuits, during the installation procedure for Version 5.0, the user is 
asked if she wants AOL’s browser to be the default browser on the computer.  If the 
consumer accepts AOL as the default, the computer will use AOL’s browser and Internet 
access service for every online procedure (surfing, dialing-up for access, downloading or 
uploading files or e-mail) unless specifically instructed otherwise.  But some users have 
been unable to access non-AOL ISPs after installing AOL Version 5.0.  For example, the 
plaintiffs in one of the lawsuits allege that AOL impaired “the ability of AOL 5.0 users to 
55
See, e.g., “AltaVista enters instant messaging fray,” CNET News.com, 6/19/2000, 
http://news.cnet.com/news/0-1005-200-2111220.html?tag=st.ne.1002.srchres.ni
; “Instant 
messaging battle goes to Washington,” CNET News.com, 6/7/2000, 
http://news.cnet.com/news/0-1005-200-2033664.html
.   
56
See “AOL 5.0 lawsuits consolidated in Florida”, Mealey's Cyber Tech Litigation 
Report, vol. 2, no. 4 (June 2000).   See also “Lawsuit claims AOL 5.0 blocks rival 
services,” The Associated Press, February 2, 2000, 10:25 a.m. PT at 
http://home.cnet.com/category/0-1005-200-1540024.html 
and “AOL Rivals File Suit 
Over Its New Software,” Washington Post, 8 February 2000, p. E3.   
57
See, e.g., Rowland and Burton v. America Online, Sup. Ct. Wash. (King County), No. 
00-2-04648-1-KNT (24 Feb 2000). 
58
“Limited testing by [ITD] staff members has shown that AOL 5.0 can also disrupt 
normal usage of U-M dial-up access, U-M LAN access, and use of other Internet Service 
Provider (ISP) services.”  “Current news from the U-M Information Technology 
Division,” at http://www.itd.umich.edu/news
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested