count pages in pdf without opening c# : Cut pages from pdf reader SDK software project winforms wpf .net UWP aol-tw00-public2-part341

21
access the internet through any other ISP or internet access company, thereby eliminating 
competition in the internet access provider market.”
59
3.4.4. TW / Disney /ABC Dispute 
In May of this year, Time Warner used its monopoly power in local MVPD markets to 
foreclose Disney from access to distribution to 3.5 million homes in seven local markets.  
This naked exercise of power appeared to be an attempt to tilt negotiations concerning 
content fees Time Warner would pay to Disney.  With the negotiations deadlocked, 
Disney had proposed that the deadline be extended 24 days.  Instead, viewers tuning into 
ABC channels found a blue screen with the message, posted by Time Warner, “Disney 
has taken ABC away from you… Disney has pulled the ABC TV signal off Time Warner 
Cable systems…”  The move occurred during a sweeps month, a critical ratings period, 
and at a time when Disney was scheduled to air (and consumers expected to see) the 
season finales of many of its series, and the Kentucky Derby.  The FCC ruled that Time 
Warner violated FCC rules prohibiting deletion of a local commercial television station 
during a sweeps period.  FCC Chairman Kennard said that “The television sets of average 
consumers should never be held hostage in these disputes.”  Senator John McCain, head 
of the Senate Commerce Committee, scheduled hearings to address the issue New York 
Mayor Rudolph Giuliani condemned Time Warner as an “out-of-touch monopoly,” and 
other politicians either urged Time Warner to restore ABC or threatened to hold hearings 
on the issue.  Time Warner ultimately bowed to public pressure just before the FCC was 
about to rule in favor of Disney’s request to force Time Warner to restore ABC.  In the 
39 hours that Time Warner blacked out ABC, Disney lost about $4 million dollars in 
advertising revenue.
60
3.4.5. Foreclosing Advertising Space From Competitors 
Both AOL and Time Warner have blocked competitors’ advertising from their systems.  
At least two of AOL’s content partners terminated long-term relationships with AOL 
after AOL strictly enforced its prohibition on content partners’ providing advertising to 
other ISPs.  They allege that AOL routinely bullies smaller businesses into accepting its 
terms.  AOL’s leverage over the smaller firms is derived from its power in the portal 
market.  The executive director of the nonprofit Center for Media Education says that 
“Those Web sites that don’t have resources to market themselves like big media 
59
Rowland and Burton v. America Online. 
60
The loss arises due to the fact that advertisers who bought ads during the blackout 
period will have to be compensated in the future with free ads.  The New York Times 
cites media industry executives as saying that ABC could expect to lose $2 to $3 million 
per day in advertising revenues due to the blackout; I averaged these figures and then 
prorated the result for 39 hours.  See “Blackout of ABC on Cable Affects Millions of 
Homes,” New York Times, 5/2/2000, and “Heavily Pressured Time Warner Puts ABC 
Back on Cable, for Now,” New York Times, 5/3/2000, and “FCC Wallops Warner for 
‘Sweeping’ Out ABC,” NYPost.com, http://208.248.87.252/05042000/3279.htm
Cut pages from pdf reader - SDK software project:C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Easy to Use C# Code to Extract PDF Pages, Copy Pages from One PDF File and Paste into Others
www.rasteredge.com
Cut pages from pdf reader - SDK software project:VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed VB.NET Guide for Extracting Pages from Microsoft PDF Doc
www.rasteredge.com
22
companies will fade into the digital twilight.”
61
In a similar move, Time Warner Cable 
also terminated advertising by a local ISP in upstate New York because it competed with 
the Time Warner-affiliated ISP Road Runner there.
62
4. Anti-Competitive Effects of the Merger 
4.1. 
Monopolization of Online Services 
4.1.1. Horizontal Concentration 
The merger will unite the economic interests of AOL and Road Runner, eliminating one 
of the few firms that has the potential to constrain AOL’s power in the future.  Prior to 
the merger, Road Runner was particularly well-positioned to challenge AOL because of 
its first-mover advantage in broadband online services, the extent to which it has 
developed its portal services, and its contracts with local cable operators that give it 
exclusive access to cable broadband facilities that pass 30 million U.S. homes.
63
Assuming Road Runner’s market share in its areas is the same as the nationwide share for 
cable provision of broadband, Road Runner likely has a 70-88% share of broadband 
access services in its markets.
64
Being the access service provider also confers a specific 
advantage: the firm is the physical
gateway to the Internet, giving it the first opportunity 
to capture the customer as the content distribution (virtual) gateway to the Internet. 
In addition to eliminating direct competition from Road Runner in those significant parts 
of the country in which it currently offers service, the merger will eliminate competitive 
pressure by Road Runner as a potential competitor in the remainder of the country.  Entry 
by Road Runner nationwide would not be difficult; it could be accomplished in one of 
two ways.  First, Road Runner could simply unbundle its portal services and sell them to 
consumers who use a different ISP, as AOL does with its “bring your own access” 
service.  Subscribers to this service would arrange for broadband access from, for 
example, a DSL provider, and could then enjoy Road Runner’s proprietary content by 
subscribing to its unbundled portal service.   
The second way Road Runner could enter the market nationwide is to do what AOL is 
doing outside of the Time Warner cable distribution area: make arrangements with 
broadband last-mile transport suppliers in the areas of the country where it is not 
affiliated with cable operators, such as DSL providers, cable operators offering open 
access, and satellite providers, to offer bundled portal and broadband Internet access 
services. 
61
See “AOL’s Squeeze Play,” CNET News.com, March 1, 2000, 
http://news.cnet.com/news/0-1005-201-1556048-0.html?tag=st. 
62
See “Cable Co. Won't Run ISP's Ads,” Central New York Business Journal (Dewitt, 
NY), February 18, 2000 
63
“These systems together pass approximately 30 million homes, almost all of which are 
in areas that will be upgraded and capable of receiving Road Runner by year-end 2000.”  
Road Runner's online Company Profile at http://www.rr.com/rdrun/
.  
64
See footnote 3 for sources. 
SDK software project:VB.NET PDF copy, paste image library: copy, paste, cut PDF images
Copy, paste and cut PDF image while preview without adobe reader component installed. Image resize function allows VB.NET users to zoom and crop image.
www.rasteredge.com
SDK software project:C# PDF copy, paste image Library: copy, paste, cut PDF images in
C#.NET PDF SDK - Copy, Paste, Cut PDF Image in C#.NET. C#.NET Demo Code: Cut Image in PDF Page in C#.NET. PDF image cutting is similar to image deleting.
www.rasteredge.com
23
Absent the merger, the relative ease with which Road Runner could enter the online 
services market nationwide would have acted as a constraint on the exercise of market 
power by AOL as it develops its broadband offerings; post-merger, Road Runner will 
exert no competitive restraint on AOL.
65
The merger will harm consumers because it will lead to higher prices for online services.  
While many portals (such as Yahoo) do not currently charge users directly for their 
content aggregation and distribution services, others charge for aggregation and 
distribution of content either as a standalone service or bundled with Internet access.  
Firms that charge for aggregation and distribution include the two dominant broadband 
firms, Road Runner and Excite@Home
.  AOL, of course, charges for its online services.  
Thus, particularly when presented as a complete package, online services have substantial 
consumer value, and price is likely to increase if competition is harmed by the AOL/TW 
merger.  
Consumers will suffer another harm from the increased concentration in the online 
services.  Service providers with market power will be able to increase the cost of 
advertising and marketing products. Ultimately, some or all of the higher cost of goods 
advertised on the properties of a dominant firm will be passed on to consumers. 
Even if Road Runner were not a potential entrant outside its current distribution area, the 
effects of the reduction in horizontal competition would be borne by consumers 
nationwide.  The elimination of an important competitor in the market, even one whose 
distribution area is not nationwide, would permit AOL to increase its price for 
advertising, and advertisers would recover this increased cost from consumers 
nationwide. 
4.1.2. Vertical Foreclosure 
4.1.2.1.  Content Foreclosure and Discrimination 
Time Warner will have the ability to withhold content, or provide content at 
disadvantageous terms, to online service providers in competition with AOL, contributing 
to AOL’s power in the online services market.   
Time Warner is the largest supplier of media content in the world.
66
As an example, 
AOL and Time Warner together will control six of the top 15 news, information and 
65
In many instances, divestitures can solve the problem otherwise created by the 
combination of horizontal competitors.  Here, however, that is not likely to be the case.  
Road Runner depends on its exclusivity arrangements with co-owned cable companies 
and the content of Time Warner.  Road Runner without Time Warner is not likely to be 
nearly as effective a competitor.  For one thing, it would have no guarantee of non-
discriminatory access to customers over Time Warner cable facilities that would be 
necessary to compete effectively against AOL / Time Warner. 
66
“Mergers, Divestitures and the Internet: Is Ownership of the Media Industry Becoming 
too Concentrated?”, Benjamin M. Compaine, Telecommunications Policy Research 
Conference, September 26, 1999, http://www.bcompany.com/ben/tprc99.htm
, Based on 
SDK software project:VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.
doc.Save(outPutFilePath). How to VB.NET: Delete Consecutive Pages from PDF. doc.Save(outPutFilePath). How to VB.NET: Delete Specified Pages from PDF.
www.rasteredge.com
SDK software project:VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Page: Insert PDF Pages. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Insert PDF Page. Add and Insert Multiple PDF Pages to PDF Document Using VB.
www.rasteredge.com
24
entertainment digital properties and six of the top 50 Web domains.
67
As the online 
services market increasingly serves consumers with broadband access, the content that 
consumers will demand will include music and video, which I call “broadband content.”  
Time Warner controls the rights to a substantial fraction of broadband content.  Time 
Warner is one of the major music distributors in the world.
68
Because music recordings 
are differentiated products (i.e. each is “unique”), and because of the size of its holdings, 
Time Warner has some degree of market power in music.  Time Warner owns several 
premium or “crown jewel” cable networks, including CNN, TBS, TNT, the Cartoon 
Network, and HBO.  It also, of course, owns one of the largest movie studios, Warner 
Brothers.   
Foreclosure, or discriminatory pricing of this much content could severely disadvantage 
AOL’s rivals in the online services market.  Web sites make money by supplying 
advertisers with consumers’ “eyeballs.”  In order to attract consumers, Web sites must 
provide them with attractive content.  Since Time Warner controls a significant share of 
the most attractive broadband content, it may be able to raise the cost to AOL’s rivals of 
attracting “eyeballs.”
69
This would disadvantage AOL’s rivals, and increase AOL’s 
power in the online services market. 
Chapter 10 of Who Owns the Media?, 3rd ed., 2000.  In its investigation of the Time 
Warner-EMI merger, the European Commission, said that “‘strong indications’ also exist 
that Time Warner-EMI could become dominant in the digital delivery of music over the 
Internet, particularly because of the proposed AOL-Time Warner merger.”  Reuters, “EU 
digs into Time Warner-EMI merger plans,” June 14, 2000, http://news.cnet.com/news/0-
1005-200-2077807.html?tag=st.ne.1002.bgif.ni
67
"Traffic to AOL-Time Warner Sites," The Standard, June 26, 2000 at 
www.thestandard.net/article/display/0,1151,8712,00.html
.  
68
Time Warner is one of the “Big Five” music recording companies, which sell about 7 
out of 8 CDs; Warner Music Group’s share was 17.3% in 1998.  (Compaine, Benjamin, 
and Douglas Gomery, “Who Owns the Media,” Third edition, 2000, Lawrence Erlbaum 
Associates, Mahway, NJ, pp. 319-320.)  Warner/Chappell Music Publishing is a leader, 
with copyrights valued at half a billion dollars.  (Ibid., p. 334).  Warner Music Group’s 
record labels include Warner Bros. Records, Atlantic, and Electra.  
(http://www.timewarner.com/corp/about/music/wmg/selected.html). 
69
Economists recognize “raising rivals’ cost” as a strategy for acquiring market power: 
“To a predator, raising rivals’ costs has obvious advantages over predatory pricing.  It is 
better to compete against high-cost firms than low-cost ones.  Thus, raising rivals’   costs  
can be   profitable  even  if  the rival does not exit from the market.  Nor is it necessary to 
sacrifice profits in the short run for ‘speculative and indeterminate’ profits in the long 
run.  A higher-cost rival quickly reduces output, allowing the predator to immediately 
raise price or market share.  Third, unlike classical predatory pricing, cost-increasing 
strategies do not require a ‘deeper pocket’ or superior access to financial resources.  In 
contrast to pricing conduct, where the large predator loses money in the short run faster 
than its smaller ‘victim’, it may be relatively inexpensive for a dominant firm to raise 
rivals’ costs substantially...  Moreover, unlike predatory pricing, cost-increasing 
SDK software project:C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
doc2.Save(outPutFilePath); Add and Insert Multiple PDF Pages to PDF Document Using C#. Add and Insert Blank Pages to PDF File in C#.NET.
www.rasteredge.com
SDK software project:C# PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
doc.Save(outPutFilePath); Demo Code: How to Delete Consecutive Pages from PDF in C#.NET. Demo Code: How to Delete Specified Pages from PDF in C#.NET.
www.rasteredge.com
25
Concern about vertical leveraging of proprietary content was reportedly quite high in the 
European review of the proposed Time Warner / EMI merger.  In that setting, EMI 
reportedly pledged that for three years it would not provide preferential access to its 
music to Internet service providers affiliated to AOL-Time Warner.
70
The collapse of the 
Time Warner-EMI merger moots that pledge, yet the merged AOL-Time Warner would 
still be capable of much the same harm to consumers, even without EMI. 
As noted above, the online services market is similar to the MVPD market: both online 
service providers and MVPDs are aggregators and distributors of content.  The potential 
for foreclosure of content foreseen by the FTC when it opposed the TW / Turner merger
71
may be realized in the Internet content distribution market.  In the TW / Turner consent 
agreement, Time Warner was prohibited from price discriminating against rival cable 
operators.
72
However, the merged firm is not barred from discriminating against rival 
portals.  Such discrimination (and, moreover, foreclosure of content
73
) would harm 
competition in the online services market. 
Similarly, in order to protect entrants in the MVPD market, FCC program access rules 
prohibit vertically-integrated cable programmers from price discriminating across 
distributors.  No such rule exists for vertically-integrated Internet content 
providers/distributors. 
4.1.2.1.1. 
Related Examples 
Two recent headline cases, one involving Intel and the other involving Microsoft, offer 
additional examples of firms using vertical leveraging to protect market power in 
industries with strong network effects.  Intel sold microprocessors, chipsets, 
motherboards and other components to PC manufacturers (OEMs).  Intel also shared 
technical information and advance product samples with OEMs to aid them in using Intel 
products in their computers.  Intel clearly benefited substantially from doing so – this 
allowed the firms to introduce new computers more quickly.  However, on several 
occasions different downstream firms interfered with Intel’s activities in its chosen 
strategies can often be made irreversible, and thus more credible.” (Salop, Steven and 
Scheffman, David, “Raising Rivals’ Costs”, American Economic Review, May 1983, Vol. 
73 No. 2, at p. 267).   
70
Michael Mann, “EMI Aims for Deal with EU on Warner Music”, Reuters, 15 Sept 
2000. 
71
See The Statement of Chairman Pitofsky and Commissioners Steiger and Varney, In 
the Matter of Time Warner Inc., Docket No. C-3709: “The complaint alleges that post-
acquisition Time Warner and TCI would have the power to: … (2) disadvantage 
competing MVPDs, by engaging in price discrimination.”   
72
FTC press release, “FTC Gives Final Approval to Time Warner/Turner Deal,” 2/7/97. 
73
Foreclosure of content is equivalent to setting prices so discriminately as to ensure rival 
distributors will not purchase it. 
SDK software project:C# PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in C#.
NET comment annotate PDF, VB.NET delete PDF pages, VB.NET Able to cut and paste image into another PDF PDF image in preview without adobe PDF reader component.
www.rasteredge.com
SDK software project:How to C#: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF for .NET
example, you may easily create, load, combine, and split PDF file(s), and add, create, insert, delete, re-order, copy, paste, cut, rotate, and save PDF page(s
www.rasteredge.com
26
markets by asserting intellectual property rights against Intel.
74
In each instance Intel 
responded by cutting off the flow of information and advance product to the OEM.  Thus, 
Intel used its bottleneck control over a necessary input in the OEM market to protect its 
power in various component markets. 
Microsoft’s actions against IBM, highlighted in the recent Department of Justice case 
against Microsoft, show similar vertical leveraging.  IBM’s negotiations with Microsoft 
over a license to install the (then) forthcoming Windows 95 operating system on the IBM 
PC Company’s products proceeded smoothly until IBM acquired Lotus and announced 
that it would promote Lotus’ SmartSuite office productivity applications suite and bundle 
them on IBM PC Company PCs.  Microsoft responded by delaying negotiations for the 
Windows 95 license and explicitly telling IBM that IBM promoting its own software 
instead of Microsoft’s software was a problem in the companies’ relationship and that 
various issues between the companies could be more readily resolved if IBM would 
refrain from promoting its own products.
75
4.1.2.2.  Foreclosure of Content Suppliers From Distribution Channels 
Uniting the interests of AOL and Road Runner will increase monopsony power
76
in the 
upstream market in which Internet content is sold to online service providers.  The 
merged firm can use this power to foreclose content producers from access to distribution 
channels, to the harm of rival content producers. AOL will have the incentive and ability 
to favor its own content and to discriminate against the content of rival producers.  Given 
AOL’s power, foreclosure from its services may deny these content producers the critical 
mass they need to become viable.  Because of the vast size of the Internet, favorable 
access on AOL’s portal may well be critical to success.   
In the parallel market in which video programming is sold to MVPDs, the FTC 
recognized this danger due to the aligned interests of Time Warner and TCI when Time 
Warner and Turner merged, saying that “post-acquisition Time Warner and TCI would 
have the power to: (1) foreclose unaffiliated programming from their cable systems to 
protect their programming interests.”
77
Similarly, concern about monopsony power’s 
anticompetitive effect on the diversity of content available has resulted in the imposition 
74
Compaq Computer asserted that Packard Bell, and indirectly Intel, infringed Compaq 
intellectual property (IP) relating to motherboards.  Digital Computer and Intergraph each 
asserted Intel had infringed IP they owned relating to microprocessors (Intergraph 
initially asserted that other OEMs infringed the Intergraph IP and only made assertions 
directly against Intel after Intel began withholding information and advance product 
samples from Intergraph). 
75
See Judge Jackson’s Findings of Fact in the U.S.A. v. Microsoft, ¶116-132. 
76
Pure monopsony is the flip-side of pure monopoly: there is a single buyer.  If there are 
few or very large buyers in a market, economic inefficiency is likely. 
77
See The Statement of Chairman Pitofsky and Commissioners Steiger and Varney In the 
Matter of Time Warner Inc., Docket No. C-3709. 
27
of a cap on the proportion of cable subscribers any single cable operator may serve.  The 
cap on the size of cable companies is 30%; AOL’s and Road Runner’s combined share of 
the online services market, measured by subscribers, is 41%. 
Similarly, preferential treatment by AOL is so valuable to other content providers that 
these providers may agree to distribute their content solely on AOL in exchange for that 
preferential treatment.  The FTC recognized this risk, too, in its review of the Time 
Warner/Turner merger, prohibiting the post-merger firm from obtaining exclusive rights 
in third party content marketed to MVPD competitors. 
4.1.2.3.  Both Time Warner and AOL Have Practiced Vertical 
Foreclosure 
Both Time Warner and AOL have demonstrated a proclivity for the exercise of market 
power by foreclosing to their services or facilities.  As described above (see Section 
3.4.4), Time Warner foreclosed access to its cable distribution facilities to ABC in order 
to gain leverage in negotiations with Disney.  Both Time Warner and AOL have 
foreclosed access to their distribution facilities to competing advertisers (see Section 
3.4.5).  And AOL has foreclosed access to its instant messaging network to competing 
service providers (see Section .3.4.1). 
4.2. 
Harm to Competition in Broadband Conduit 
The merger will cause harm in local markets for broadband conduit, particularly, but not 
exclusively, within Time Warner Cable’s distribution area.  Currently, only two 
technologies are widely available for broadband last-mile conduit, cable modem and 
DSL.  Of these two, to date, cable modem service has a dominant share nationally, 78%-
88%.
78
Despite the hopes some have pinned on other technologies, good alternatives to 
cable and DSL are not likely to be widely available in the foreseeable future.
79
Time Warner is the second largest provider of broadband conduit nationwide, and the 
dominant broadband conduit provider in its geographic coverage area.  ISPs and OSPs 
who are unaffiliated with cable television system owners have not been able to offer 
high-speed services over cable modems.  In fact, prior to this announced merger, AOL 
led the charge to require cable systems to provide “open access” to other ISPs.  Absent 
78
See footnote 3. 
79
Forrester Research recently predicted that in 2005, cable modem and DSL will retain 
86% of the local broadband transport markets.  Fixed wireless service, which is plagued 
by interference from buildings or even large trees between an antenna and a home, is 
likely to remain a lower-priced niche technology.  A Forrester Research analyst said, 
“Cable and DSL are going to jostle for the leading role for the foreseeable future.”   (See 
“Fixed-wireless technology cast in supporting role,” CNET News.com, 10/4/2000, 
http://news.cnet.com/news/0-1004-200-2931019.html?tag=st.ne.1430735..ni).  For a 
detailed discussion of the broadband last-mile transport market, see Appendix A of my 
Ex Parte Comments in CS Docket No. 99-251, “Investment in Cable Broadband 
Infrastructure: Open Access is not an Obstacle,” November 5, 1999. 
28
this merger and “open access,” AOL’s primary method of delivering high-speed services 
would likely be DSL.  Through this merger, however, AOL is acquiring one of the largest 
cable system operators in the nation and its interest in promoting services that compete 
with cable system services, including cable modem services, will be reduced. 
This effect will be substantial within Time Warner’s cable service areas.  By using Time 
Warner cable modem service, AOL will avoid paying a DSL provider for broadband last-
mile transport.  This fee is a substantial portion of end-users’ subscription fees, perhaps 
70% of the $40 broadband ISPs typically receive from end-users.
80
In addition, AOL 
may be able to charge more for broadband ISP service if it succeeds in reducing 
competition in the broadband ISP market by foreclosing cable modem access from 
competing broadband ISPs, or providing it to them at disadvantageous terms. 
In general, to the extent that there are economies of scale in promoting DSL usage (as 
there are, for example, through national advertising), AOL’s reduced incentive to 
promote DSL in the large portion of the country with Time Warner cable facilities will 
extend to rest of the country as well.  AOL will do less to develop, promote and expand 
customer DSL service nationwide. 
Active competition between broadband conduit suppliers is very important to consumer 
welfare.  Broadband Internet service will surely supplant narrowband in the future, so 
consumers will become increasingly dependent on broadband conduit suppliers.
81
For 
most consumers, the only facilities-based suppliers of broadband conduit will be the 
incumbent local cable operator and telephone company providers of DSL.  If DSL fails to 
provide vigorous competition, the incumbent local cable operator will have monopoly 
power.  As if to provide a foretaste of what the exercise of monopoly power by cable 
operators may be like, Time Warner Cable required, in deals with many smaller ISPs, 
that it be given 75% of the ISPs’ subscriber revenue and 25% of their revenue from other 
sources, such as advertising in order for the ISPs to gain access to Time Warner Cable’s 
cable modem facilities.  More ominously, Time Warner Cable also required approval 
control over the ISPs’ home pages, and demanded “prominent above-the-fold areas on 
the home page of the service for use.”
82
EarthLink says that Time Warner Cable not only 
demanded a large share of its advertising revenue as a condition of acquiring cable 
80
Merrill Lynch says AOL reached agreements with RBOCs for DSL transport for $25 - 
$28 per subscriber, which is 63% - 70% of a $40 monthly subscription fee. (Merrill 
Lynch analyst’s report, “AT&T Gets UMG and (Amazingly) Comcast JV Without 
Bidding War – Very Positive!,” 5/7/99).  Credit Suisse First Boston Corporation says 
MediaOne takes 70% of the $40 charged consumers by Road Runner (“Media One 
Group,” Credit Suisse First Boston Corporation report, 1/7/99).  Jupiter Communications 
says that @Home pays 70% - 80% if the monthly subscriber fee to the cable broadband 
provider (“Last Mile Strategies,” Jupiter Communications, August, 1998). 
81
See footnote 11. 
82
See “Paper: Time Warner Sets Terms for Access,” Yahoo News, 10/8/2000, 
http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/nm/20001008/wr/timewarner_dc_3.html, reporting on a 
story in the Washington Post. 
29
modem access, it also demanded the ability to set the price of EarthLink’s service.
83
Another ISP, NorthNet, voiced many of the same concerns, and, in addition, said that 
“Time Warner insisted that it be given a great deal of information before the discussion 
started,” and that “the pre-qualification letter made it clear that the ISP's did not have any 
right to interconnect, rather Time Warner was picking and choosing who would go on its 
systems.”
84
4.3. 
Controlling and Manipulating Standards 
One of the most important ways that the AOL / Time Warner merger may hurt consumers 
is through the proprietary control and manipulation of service, application and data 
format standards.  It was primarily Microsoft’s control of the proprietary standards for 
application interface to the Windows operating system that allowed it to maintain and 
extend its monopoly power, and to harm competition and consumers, as found by Judge 
Jackson in U.S. v. Microsoft. 
4.3.1. Strategies for Acquiring Market Power in Network Markets 
The boundaries of networks are defined by compatibility, and, often, compatibility is a 
strategic choice by firms.  The size of a communications network is determined by the 
number users that employ a compatible communications technology.  The boundaries of 
“software” markets are determined by the “hardware” with which the software is 
compatible.  Since the size of networks is determined by the compatibility choices of 
firms, and larger networks are more valuable to consumers, firms’ choices with respect to 
compatibility are important determinants of market performance.
85
The characteristics of network markets induce strategic behavior in firms that would not 
work, or would work less well in markets without network effects.  Low prices for 
newly-introduced durable goods (“penetration pricing”) is common in network markets, 
because acquisition of a large installed base early may cause the market to tip, conferring 
monopoly profits later.
86
The pre-announcement of products may cause consumers to 
83
See “EarthLink Finds Open Access to Time Warner Elusive,” Yahoo News, 9/27/2000, 
http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/nm/20000929/wr/timewarner_earthlink_dc_2.html. 
84
See “AOL, FTC Looking at Possible Deal by Month's End, “ Yahoo News, 10/11/2000, 
http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/nm/20001011/wr/timewarner_usa_dc_1.html 
85
See Katz, Michael and Shapiro, Carl, “Network Externalities, Competition and 
Compatibility,” American Economic Review, July 1985, 75, 424-40 at pp. 424-425, 434. 
86
See Besen, Stanley, and Farrell, Joseph, “Choosing How to Compete: Strategies and 
Tactics in Standardization,” Journal of Economic Perspectives, Sprint 1994, 8, pp. 117-
131 at p. 122.  Similarly, once a firm has become established in a network market, 
predatory pricing in the face of entry by a firm with a new, incompatible technology may 
be rational because recoupment of the lost profits by pricing supracompetitively is 
possible once the installed base is large enough to create a barrier to entry.  See Farrell, 
Joseph, and Saloner, Garth, “Installed Base and Compatibility: Innovation, Product 
30
defer acquisition of existing durables, resulting in the adoption of a technology that 
decreases social welfare, and that would not have been adopted absent the 
preannouncement.
87
Vertical integration, or exclusive contracts for access to 
complementary goods can serve to deny competing durables manufacturers access to 
complementary products, enhancing the durable supplier’s market power.  For example, 
Nintendo obtained contracts with third-party game developers, foreclosing its rivals from 
access to software.
88
Perhaps most significantly, firms decide whether to make their products compatible with 
the products of other firms.  When firms decide to make their products compatible, the 
network bounded by the standards they adopt encompasses all of their products, and the 
firms compete against each other within the standard they have agreed to.  In contrast, a 
firm may decide to keep its product incompatible, and to establish competition between 
standards.  Since network markets tend to tip, conferring a monopoly on the winner of the 
standards battle, this strategy is favored by firms that are positioned to win the standards 
battle.  These include firms with a large installed base, firms with good technology, and 
firms with a reputation that will lead consumers to expect them to win the standards 
battle.
89
Some firms may have the ability to unilaterally set standards for their industries; 
IBM and AT&T are widely believed to have this power,
90
and Microsoft has emerged as 
another such firm.
91
Not surprisingly, economists have recognized that manipulation of 
standards or the decision to keep products incompatible can be anticompetitive.
92
Preannouncements, and Predation,” American Economic Review, December 1986, 76, pp. 
940-55 at p. 943, 950-951. 
87
The preannouncement can prevent the “old” technology from acquiring an installed 
base that would have acted as an entry barrier absent the preannouncement.  This may 
reduce welfare by “stranding” users of the old technology.  See Farrell, Joseph, and 
Saloner, Garth, “Installed Base and Compatibility: Innovation, Product 
Preannouncements, and Predation,” American Economic Review, December 1986, 76, pp. 
940-55 at pp. 942, 948-949, and Farrell, Joseph, and Saloner, Garth, “Economic Issues in 
Standardization,” in Telecommunications and Equity: Policy Research Issues, J. Miller 
(ed.), Elsevier Science Publishers, North Holland, 1986, p. 171. 
88
See Katz, Michael and Shapiro, Carl, “Systems Competition and Network Effects,” 
Journal of Economic Perspectives, Spring 1994, 8, pp. 93-115 at p. 107. 
89
See Besen, Stanley, and Farrell, Joseph, “Choosing How to Compete: Strategies and 
Tactics in Standardization,” Journal of Economic Perspectives, Spring 1994, 8, pp. 117-
131 at p. 126. 
90
Farrell, Joseph, and Saloner, Garth, “Economic Issues in Standardization,” in 
Telecommunications and Equity: Policy Research Issues, J. Miller (ed.), Elsevier Science 
Publishers, North Holland, 1986, p. 171. 
91
Judge Jackson found that Microsoft behaved anticompetitively by manipulating the 
standards for the Java programming language, and the standards for the HTML markup 
language. In addition, in recent years there have been other examples of firms with 
market power resisting open standards while the trailing firms push hard for such 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested