count pages in pdf without opening c# : Delete pages from pdf reader software application dll windows html wpf web forms ap07_englit_teachersguide0-part354

AP
®
English Literature 
and Composition 
Teacher's Guide 
Ellen Greenblatt 
The Bay School 
San Francisco, California 
connect to college success
www.collegeboard.com
Delete pages from pdf reader - software application dll:C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Easy to Use C# Code to Extract PDF Pages, Copy Pages from One PDF File and Paste into Others
www.rasteredge.com
Delete pages from pdf reader - software application dll:VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed VB.NET Guide for Extracting Pages from Microsoft PDF Doc
www.rasteredge.com
AP
®
English Literature 
and Composition Teacher's Guide 
Ellen Greenblatt 
The Bay School 
San Francisco, California 
software application dll:VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.
doc.Save(outPutFilePath). How to VB.NET: Delete Consecutive Pages from PDF. doc.Save(outPutFilePath). How to VB.NET: Delete Specified Pages from PDF.
www.rasteredge.com
software application dll:C# PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
doc.Save(outPutFilePath); Demo Code: How to Delete Consecutive Pages from PDF in C#.NET. Demo Code: How to Delete Specified Pages from PDF in C#.NET.
www.rasteredge.com
ii
The College Board: Connecting Students to College 
Success
The College Board is a not-for-profit membership association whose mission is to connect students 
to college success and opportunity. Founded in 1900, the association is composed of more than 5,000 
schools, colleges, universities, and other educational organizations. Each year, the College Board serves 
seven million students and their parents, 23,000 high schools, and 3,500 colleges through major programs 
and services in college admissions, guidance, assessment, financial aid, enrollment, and teaching and 
learning. Among its best-known programs are the SAT
®
, the PSAT/NMSQT
®
, and the Advanced Placement 
Program
®
(AP
®
). The College Board is committed to the principles of excellence and equity, and that 
commitment is embodied in all of its programs, services, activities, and concerns.
For further information, visit www.collegeboard.com.
© 2007 The College Board. All rights reserved. College Board, Advanced Placement Program, AP, AP 
Central, AP Vertical Teams, Pre-AP, SAT, and the acorn logo are registered trademarks of the College 
Board. AP Potential and connect to college success are trademarks owned by the College Board. PSAT/
NMSQT is a registered trademark of the College Board and National Merit Scholarship Corporation. All 
other products and services may be trademarks of their respective owners. Visit the College Board on the 
Web: www.collegeboard.com.
ii
software application dll:C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
VB.NET Page: Insert PDF pages; VB.NET Page: Delete PDF pages; VB.NET Annotate: PDF Markup & Drawing. XDoc.Word for XImage.OCR for C#; XImage.Barcode Reader for C#
www.rasteredge.com
software application dll:C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
how to merge PDF document files by C# code, how to rotate PDF document page, how to delete PDF page using C# .NET, how to reorganize PDF document pages and how
www.rasteredge.com
iii
Contents
Welcome Letter from the College Board .............................................................v
Equity and Access ....................................................................................................vii
Participating in the AP
®
Course Audit ...............................................................xi
Preface ..........................................................................................................................xii
Chapter 1. About AP English Literature and Composition .....................................1
Overview: Past, Present, Future .............................................................................................1
Course Description Essentials ................................................................................................2
Key Concepts and Skills ...........................................................................................................4
Chapter 2. Advice for AP English Literature and Composition Teachers ..............7
Frequently Asked Questions and Answers ...........................................................................7
AP Teachers and Their Colleagues ........................................................................................9
Parents and AP English Literature and Composition ..........................................................9
Getting Started: There’s No Need to Reinvent the Wheel .................................................10
Teaching Strategies and Suggestions .................................................................................11
Adding New Texts to AP English Literature and Composition ........................................14
Student Evaluation .................................................................................................................15
Additional Resources .............................................................................................................15
Strategies for AP Teachers of English ..................................................................................16
Making Do Isn’t Good Enough..............................................................................................19
Making the Summer Count—All Year Long .......................................................................21
Chapter 3. Course Organization ...............................................................................31
Syllabus Development ............................................................................................................31
Sample Syllabus 1 ...................................................................................................................34
Sample Syllabus 2 ...................................................................................................................46
Sample Syllabus 3 ...................................................................................................................62
Sample Syllabus 4  ..................................................................................................................73
Chapter 4. The AP Exam in English Literature and Composition .......................86
Exam Format ...........................................................................................................................86
Preparing Students .................................................................................................................87
software application dll:VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Page: Insert PDF Pages. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Insert PDF Page. Add and Insert Multiple PDF Pages to PDF Document Using VB.
www.rasteredge.com
software application dll:VB.NET PDF delete text library: delete, remove text from PDF file
Visual Studio .NET application. Delete text from PDF file in preview without adobe PDF reader component installed. Able to pull text
www.rasteredge.com
iv
Administering the Exam .......................................................................................................88
Scoring the Exams .................................................................................................................88
Using the AP Instructional Planning Report .......................................................................88
What to Do After the Exam ...................................................................................................88
Chapter 5. Resources for Teachers ...........................................................................90
How to Address Limited Resources .....................................................................................90
Resources ................................................................................................................................91
Professional Development .....................................................................................................96
Contents
software application dll:C# PDF Page Rotate Library: rotate PDF page permanently in C#.net
batch changing PDF page orientation without other PDF reader control. NET, add new PDF page, delete certain PDF page, reorder existing PDF pages and split
www.rasteredge.com
software application dll:C# PDF delete text Library: delete, remove text from PDF file in
Delete text from PDF file in preview without adobe PDF reader component installed in ASP.NET. C#.NET PDF: Delete Text from Consecutive PDF Pages.
www.rasteredge.com
v
Welcome Letter from the College Board
Dear AP
®
Teacher:
Whether you are a new AP teacher, using this AP Teacher’s Guide to assist in developing a syllabus for the 
first AP course you will ever teach, or an experienced AP teacher simply wanting to compare the teaching 
strategies you use with those employed by other expert AP teachers, we are confident you will find this 
resource valuable. We urge you to make good use of the ideas, advice, classroom strategies, and sample 
syllabi contained in this Teacher’s Guide.
You deserve tremendous credit for all that you do to fortify students for college success. The nurturing 
environment in which you help your students master a college-level curriculum—a much better 
atmosphere for one’s first exposure to college-level expectations than the often large classes in which many 
first-year college courses are taught—seems to translate directly into lasting benefits as students head 
off to college. An array of research studies, from the classic 1999 U.S. Department of Education study 
Answers in the Tool Box to new research from the University of Texas and the University of California, 
demonstrate that when students enter high school with equivalent academic abilities and socioeconomic 
status, those who develop the content knowledge to demonstrate college-level mastery of an AP Exam 
(a grade of 3 or higher) have much higher rates of college completion and have higher grades in college. 
The 2005 National Center for Educational Accountability (NCEA) study shows that students who take 
AP have much higher college graduation rates than students with the same academic abilities who do not 
have that valuable AP experience in high school.  Furthermore, a Trends in International Mathematics 
and Science Study (TIMSS, formerly known as the Third International Mathematics and Science Study) 
found that even AP Calculus students who score a 1 on the AP Exam are significantly outperforming other 
advanced mathematics students in the United States, and they compare favorably to students from the 
top-performing nations in an international assessment of mathematics achievement. (Visit AP Central® at 
apcentral.collegeboard.com for details about these and other AP-related studies.) 
For these reasons, the AP teacher plays a significant role in a student’s academic journey. Your AP 
classroom may be the only taste of college rigor your students will have before they enter higher education. 
It is important to note that such benefits cannot be demonstrated among AP courses that are AP courses in 
name only, rather than in quality of content. For AP courses to meaningfully prepare students for college 
success, courses must meet standards that enable students to replicate the content of the comparable college 
class. Using this AP Teacher’s Guide is one of the keys to ensuring that your AP course is as good as (or 
even better than) the course the student would otherwise be taking in college. While the AP Program does 
not mandate the use of any one syllabus or textbook and emphasizes that AP teachers should be granted 
the creativity and flexibility to develop their own curriculum, it is beneficial for AP teachers to compare 
their syllabi not just to the course outline in the official AP Course Description and in chapter 3 of this 
guide, but also to the syllabi presented on AP Central, to ensure that each course labeled AP meets the 
standards of a college-level course. Visit AP Central® at apcentral.collegeboard.com for details about the AP 
Course Audit, course-specific Curricular Requirements, and how to submit your syllabus for AP Course 
Audit authorization.
As the Advanced Placement Program® continues to experience tremendous growth in the twenty-first 
century, it is heartening to see that in every U.S. state and the District of Columbia, a growing proportion 
of high school graduates have earned at least one grade of 3 or higher on an AP Exam. In some states, more 
vi
Welcome Letter
than 20 percent of graduating seniors have accomplished this goal. The incredible efforts of AP teachers 
are paying off, producing ever greater numbers of college-bound seniors who are prepared to succeed in 
college. Please accept my admiration and congratulations for all that you are doing and achieving.
Sincerely,
Marcia Wilbur 
Director, Curriculum and Content Development 
Advanced Placement Program
vii
Equity and Access
In the following section, the College Board describes its commitment to achieving equity in the AP 
Program.
Why are equitable preparation and inclusion important?
Currently, 40 percent of students entering four-year colleges and universities and 63 percent of students at 
two-year institutions require some remedial education. This is a significant concern because a student is 
less likely to obtain a bachelor’s degree if he or she has taken one or more remedial courses.
1
Nationwide, secondary school educators are increasingly committed not just to helping students 
complete high school but also to helping them develop the habits of mind necessary for managing the 
rigors of college. As Educational Leadership reported in 2004: 
The dramatic changes taking place in the U.S. economy jeopardize the economic future of students 
who leave high school without the problem-solving and communication skills essential to success 
in postsecondary education and in the growing number of high-paying jobs in the economy. To 
back away from education reforms that help all students master these skills is to give up on the 
commitment to equal opportunity for all.
2
Numerous research studies have shown that engaging a student in a rigorous high school curriculum such 
as is found in AP courses is one of the best ways that educators can help that student persist and complete 
a bachelor’s degree.
3
However, while 57 percent of the class of 2004 in U.S. public high schools enrolled in 
higher education in fall 2004, only 13 percent had been boosted with a successful AP experience in high 
school.
4
Although AP courses are not the only examples of rigorous curricula, there is still a significant 
gap between students with college aspirations and students with adequate high school preparation to fulfill 
those aspirations.
Strong correlations exist between AP success and college success.
5
Educators attest that this is partly 
because AP enables students to receive a taste of college while still in an environment that provides more 
support and resources for students than do typical college courses. Effective AP teachers work closely 
with their students, giving them the opportunity to reason, analyze, and understand for themselves. As a 
result, AP students frequently find themselves developing new confidence in their academic abilities and 
discovering their previously unknown capacities for college studies and academic success.
1. Andrea Venezia, Michael W. Kirst, and Anthony L. Antonio, Betraying the College Dream: How Disconnected K–12 and Postsecondary 
Education Systems Undermine Student Aspirations (Palo Alto, Calif.: The Bridge Project, 2003), 8.
2. Frank Levy and Richard J. Murnane, “Education and the Changing Job Market.” Educational Leadership 62 (2) (October 2004): 83.
3. In addition to studies from University of California–Berkeley and the National Center for Educational Accountability (2005), see the 
classic study on the subject of rigor and college persistence: Clifford Adelman, Answers in the Tool Box: Academic Intensity, Attendance 
Patterns, and Bachelor’s Degree Attainment (Washington, D.C.: U.S. Department of Education, 1999).
4. Advanced Placement Report to the Nation (New York: College Board, 2005).
5. Wayne Camara, “College Persistence, Graduation, and Remediation,” College Board Research Notes (RN-19) (New York: College Board, 
2003).
viii
Equity and Access
Which students should be encouraged to register  
for AP courses?
Any student willing and ready to do the work should be considered for an AP course. The College Board 
actively endorses the principles set forth in the following Equity Policy Statement and encourages schools 
to support this policy.
The College Board and the Advanced Placement Program encourage teachers, AP Coordinators, 
and school administrators to make equitable access a guiding principle for their AP programs. The 
College Board is committed to the principle that all students deserve an opportunity to participate in 
rigorous and academically challenging courses and programs. All students who are willing to accept 
the challenge of a rigorous academic curriculum should be considered for admission to AP courses. 
The Board encourages the elimination of barriers that restrict access to AP courses for students from 
ethnic, racial, and socioeconomic groups that have been traditionally underrepresented in the AP 
Program. Schools should make every effort to ensure that their AP classes reflect the diversity of their 
student population.
The fundamental objective that schools should strive to accomplish is to create a stimulating AP 
program that academically challenges students and has the same ethnic, gender, and socioeconomic 
demographics as the overall student population in the school. African American and Native American 
students are severely underrepresented in AP classrooms nationwide; Latino student participation has 
increased tremendously, but in many AP courses Latino students remain underrepresented. To prevent a 
willing, motivated student from having the opportunity to engage in AP courses is to deny that student the 
possibility of a better future.
Knowing what we know about the impact a rigorous curriculum can have on a student’s future, it is 
not enough for us simply to leave it to motivated students to seek out these courses. Instead, we must reach 
out to students and encourage them to take on this challenge. With this in mind, there are two factors to 
consider when counseling a student regarding an AP opportunity:
1. Student motivation 
Many potentially successful AP students would never enroll if the decision were left to their own initiative. 
They may not have peers who value rigorous academics, or they may have had prior academic experiences 
that damaged their confidence or belief in their college potential. They may simply lack an understanding 
of the benefits that such courses can offer them. Accordingly, it is essential that we not gauge a student’s 
motivation to take AP until that student has had the opportunity to understand the advantages—not just 
the challenges—of such course work.
Educators committed to equity provide all students in a school with an understanding of the benefits of 
rigorous curricula. Such educators conduct student assemblies and/or presentations to parents that clearly 
describe the advantages of taking an AP course and outline the work expected of students. Perhaps most 
important, they have one-on-one conversations with the students in which advantages and expectations are 
placed side by side. These educators realize that many students, lacking confidence in their abilities, will 
be listening for any indication that they should not take an AP course. Accordingly, such educators, while 
frankly describing the amount of homework to be anticipated, also offer words of encouragement and 
support, assuring the students that if they are willing to do the work, they are wanted in the course.
The College Board has created a free online tool, AP Potential™, to help educators reach out to students 
who previously might not have been considered for participation in an AP course. Drawing upon data 
based on correlations between student performance on specific sections of the PSAT/NMSQT® and 
ix
Equity and Access
performance on specific AP Exams, AP Potential generates rosters of students at your school who have 
a strong likelihood of success in a particular AP course. Schools nationwide have successfully enrolled 
many more students in AP than ever before by using these rosters to help students (and their parents) 
see themselves as having potential to succeed in college-level studies. For more information, visit http://
appotential.collegeboard.com.
Actively recruiting students for AP and sustaining enrollment can also be enhanced by offering 
incentives for both students and teachers. While the College Board does not formally endorse any one 
incentive for boosting AP participation, we encourage school administrators to develop policies that will 
best serve an overarching goal to expand participation and improve performance in AP courses. When 
such incentives are implemented, educators should ensure that quality verification measures such as the AP 
Exam are embedded in the program so that courses are rigorous enough to merit the added benefits.
Many schools offer the following incentives for students who enroll in AP:
Extra weighting of AP course grades when determining class rank 
Full or partial payment of AP Exam fees
On-site exam administration
Additionally, some schools offer the following incentives for teachers to reward them for their efforts to 
include and support traditionally underserved students:
Extra preparation periods
Reduced class size
Reduced duty periods
Additional classroom funds
Extra salary
2. Student preparation
Because AP courses should be the equivalent of courses taught in colleges and universities, it is important 
that a student be prepared for such rigor. The types of preparation a student should have before entering 
an AP course vary from course to course and are described in the official AP Course Description book for 
each subject (available as a free download at apcentral.collegeboard.com). 
Unfortunately, many schools have developed a set of gatekeeping or screening requirements that go far 
beyond what is appropriate to ensure that an individual student has had sufficient preparation to succeed 
in an AP course. Schools should make every effort to eliminate the gatekeeping process for AP enrollment. 
Because research has not been able to establish meaningful correlations between gatekeeping devices and 
actual success on an AP Exam, the College Board strongly discourages the use of the following factors as 
thresholds or requirements for admission to an AP course:
Grade point average
Grade in a required prerequisite course
Recommendation from a teacher
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested