count pages in pdf without opening c# : Cut pages from pdf file software application project winforms html .net UWP ap07_englit_teachersguide3-part359

16
Strategies for AP Teachers of English
Linda Hubert, Ph.D. 
Agnes Scott College 
Decatur, Georgia
How can new AP teachers best prepare their students for the first-year college English class and college 
writing in general? I’ve thought hard about what college instructors most want and what it is that sets a 
first-rate AP English student apart from other students. I will venture a few suggestions about how your 
course can best serve students, both now and later.
1.  Probably the most important rule to remember when considering an AP program in English is that 
it is not all about the exam. 
 It’s important to keep the grade in the course independent from the grade on the AP Exam. The 
AP course provides the scope and experience that gives the student an edge, and that course 
should not be summed up and the subject concluded by an exam taken one morning in May. We 
build on our belief that AP students have enjoyed a rigorous course. When they arrive singing 
praises of English and literary study and wax enthusiastic about their former English teachers, we 
are thrilled.
2.  Emphasize to your students the virtues of continuing their English education, particularly if they 
are excellent students in the discipline. 
 Qualifying AP grades are best used to promote higher-level placement, not the avoidance of college 
English courses. Encourage your students to continue their study in a discipline in which they 
have demonstrated significant aptitude. Exploit their youthful romanticism and incite a passion 
for literature so that they won’t bypass English studies, regardless of earned exemptions or career 
plans. They will want to continue in a discipline that allows them to consider the huge issues of 
life, a discipline that you have made central to their existence. 
3.  Teach students to read attentively and feelingly. 
 Ideally our students will revel in language! Good students learn to adjust the pace of their reading 
to the nature of the task and the demands of comprehension. They can scan material efficiently 
when an overview is useful; they can slowly savor poetic passages and be sensitive to nuances of 
tone—they can pick up on irony, for instance, and recognize when a writer is deadly serious or 
when metaphors are mocking. Encourage a respect for the complexity and ambiguity of creative 
texts, and warn that flattening poems or stories into morals or dogma can be the reductio ad 
absurdum of literary analysis.
4.  Allow your students to think, challenge, create, and shape ideas independently.
 I expect students to be respectful and courteous, of me as well as their classmates, but I like to see 
some fire. Encourage students to express their unique ideas and perceptions.
5.  Instruction in the formal properties of literary texts is valuable, though only one of a number of 
ways to approach critical analysis.
 Although formal skills and the accompanying vocabulary are an excellent route to close reading 
and an appreciation of a work, fiction or nonfiction, it is nonetheless helpful to make students 
aware of the recent perspectives on literary texts that they will encounter in college and university 
classes, from the biographical to the political to the sociological to the historical. 
Chapter 2
Cut pages from pdf file - software application project:C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Easy to Use C# Code to Extract PDF Pages, Copy Pages from One PDF File and Paste into Others
www.rasteredge.com
Cut pages from pdf file - software application project:VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed VB.NET Guide for Extracting Pages from Microsoft PDF Doc
www.rasteredge.com
17
6.  Regard essays written under the pressure of time as drafts. 
 The bulk of writing instruction in college or universities is process oriented, as it probably is in 
your classrooms. Of course drafting for all its merits has to cease at some point—it’s a good idea 
to encourage revision of drafts. Seeing an improved essay take shape is exhilarating. The next first 
drafts that result from timed writings may well incorporate these insights.
 Engaging students in holistic grading based on the rubrics supplied with AP Released Exams is 
wonderful practice for them in assessing their own work as well as the work of others. 
7.  Computer literacy is fundamental.
 Few young people at this point lag behind their elders in computer use, but a student that has 
polished competency with a word-processing program will be at an advantage. It’s almost hard to 
imagine how writing, particularly creative writing, ever existed without the computer. Knowing 
how to type well can be a real asset. 
8.  Emphasize the importance of academic honesty and respect for intellectual property.
 Because of the computer skills that our students possess, plagiarism has escalated as a problem. It’s 
important to educate students on their scholarly responsibilities with respect to research. Students 
need instruction in distinguishing between legitimate collaboration and inappropriate dependence, 
and they need help in developing a respect for intellectual property and copyright laws. 
9.  An AP syllabus needs to represent a diversity of literary voices.
 Reading is an important tool for fostering world communion. The range of reading—classical and 
nontraditional texts from the sixteenth century to the present—makes an AP class exciting and 
not just another survey course. Reading works by writers from a variety of cultures provides a way 
to educate all students beyond their own narrow experience, no matter what their backgrounds. 
Similarly, confronting works from earlier times—and it seems that even nineteenth-century novels 
and poems can require substantial “translation” in the contemporary classroom—enlarges a 
student’s comfort zone and sharpens reading skills.
10.  Incorporate spontaneity and flexibility, and acknowledge the changing nature of life and letters.
 Allow students to understand language as an evolving gift that is changing even as they develop 
their own “in” words and slang expressions. Acknowledge that certain grammatical rules have 
gone or are going away—the horror of the split infinitive, for instance—and that fads and fashions 
prevail in literary currents as much as they influence clothing. 
11.  Resist inflating grades, but recognize that students may come with great differences in their 
preparation with similar pressures to excel. 
 Despite grade inflation, first-year college English courses remain notorious for shocking students 
who have previously experienced rewards for their academic efforts. Be as honest as possible 
without discouraging them. A bad grade when deserved may be just the ticket to kick-start growth. 
 The diversity of students and vagaries in their preparation represent both a boon and a challenge. 
During my long tenure, I’ve seen largely homogeneous classes morph into classes that replicate the 
demographics of any major American city. Agnes Scott College is still a women’s college; the only 
male faces that I encounter in my classes are in our graduate program, a carefully designed M.A.T. 
for teachers of secondary English. However, with minority students at 24 percent, an impressive 
population of international students, and an age range that cuts a swath through at least four 
decades, Agnes Scott College in greater Atlanta is well ahead of many private and selective public 
institutions in its diversity. 
Advice for AP English Literature and Composition Teachers
software application project:C# PDF copy, paste image Library: copy, paste, cut PDF images in
PDF image cutting is similar to image deleting. So, in C# demo code below, we will explain how to cut image from PDF file page by using image deleting API.
www.rasteredge.com
software application project:VB.NET PDF copy, paste image library: copy, paste, cut PDF images
PDF image cutting is similar to image deleting. So, below example explains how to cut image from PDF file page by using image deleting API.
www.rasteredge.com
18
 Consequently, we confront, particularly in first-year classes, the challenge of moving from a long 
ago lockstep world of similarly prepared young women to a breadth in skill levels belied to some 
extent by the overwhelming consistency of high grades and test scores touted on applications. Like 
students throughout the nation, many enter with the expectation of earning a stellar GPA. Students 
who have been through a rigorous AP English course probably have the best chance of retaining 
their scholarships and realizing their goals. 
12.  Leave them loving literature.
 I can’t explain the magic that makes students love literature and delight in words, but I am 
convinced that encouraging such enthusiasm is your biggest contribution to your students and 
their future teachers. It may seem impractical, even foolish, to say, but the world will be a better 
place if more of us are educated to honor and enjoy literature and perhaps even contribute 
ourselves to the creative dialogue that both defines our identity and emphasizes our shared 
humanity. 
 For complex reasons with which we are all familiar, many potentially good students are lost in 
the corridors of high school, but a dedicated AP English teacher can make the difference between 
failure and success in the important first year of college studies and thereafter. If we believe, as I 
think most of us do, that reading and writing well are the bedrock of almost any academic course 
or later employment and that literature is an essential component of any life well lived, then AP 
English Literature and Composition teachers may well be the key to it all. At least they have an 
opportunity to influence lives as much as or more than any other teacher a student will ever 
encounter. 
Chapter 2
software application project:C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
Image: Copy, Paste, Cut Image in Page. Link: Edit Redact Text Content. Redact Images. Redact Pages. Annotation & Text. Add Text Box. Drawing Markups. PDF Print. Work
www.rasteredge.com
software application project:C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
Add and Insert Blank Pages to PDF File in C#.NET. This C# demo explains how to insert empty pages to a specific location of current PDF file.
www.rasteredge.com
19
Making Do Isn’t Good Enough
Chesley Woods 
Avondale High School 
Atlanta, Georgia
Avondale High is an urban school within Dekalb County. It had a short run as the Creative Arts Charter 
School servicing students from the far reaches of the county as well as inside the community. Since 
Avondale lost its charter in 1998, the student body has become 97 percent African American, with the 
other 3 percent being made up of immigrants from Somalia, Cambodia, Mexico, Ghana, and Bosnia. 
Our Bosnian students comprise our only white student population, and approximately 80 percent of our 
students are eligible for free and reduced-price meals. In April 2004 the Atlanta Journal-Constitution 
featured Avondale in an article about the state of public education 50 years after the ruling of Brown v. 
Board of Education in Topeka, Kansas. We were highlighted as the classic resegregated school. 
The question for me has never been whether or not my curriculum is comparable to others in the 
country. Instead, I worry about whether I can provide enough information and rigor for the students who 
gain admission to Ivy League schools as well as for those who are happy to attend the local community 
college. 
No matter where they will go after high school, all these students need a chance to do rigorous 
work and be prepared for the challenges they will face in the future. The skill level in my AP classes is 
ever widening, and it will continue to do so as long as the number of underprepared students rises. AP 
curriculum has become the adopted standard for all children in Dekalb as a result of federal mandates, 
and my challenge is to welcome the 35 students (out of a senior class of 117), some shaking with disbelief as 
they enter my room. I must make them believe that they should be there, that they can do the work. It is no 
small task, but I am proud to maintain my reputation as the “hard” AP teacher, the one who won’t accept 
less than a student’s best. 
Over the last four years, I have taught only 6 males in AP; while I thought this year would prove to be 
a banner year in male enrollment with an extraordinary 11 males, 4 were allowed to drop because they 
expect football and basketball scholarships. 
The pressure for students to maintain a B average is intense because they wish to obtain the extremely 
valuable Georgia HOPE Scholarship, which allows them to attend the state college or university of their 
choice. Obviously, they must weigh their circumstances carefully. Which is more critical: learning in a 
strong environment for a year or being guaranteed an A in a course that requires much less from them? All 
too often, their parents cannot help in making that decision. All too often, the counseling department is 
overwhelmed with the needs of other students and the demands of running a public high school. Cliché or 
not, I must say that my colleagues and I share in the responsibility of raising these children. 
I make it clear to my AP students that they will have access to me when they need me. I offer my e-mail 
address and my cell phone number as they leave to go home for summer vacation and again on the first day 
of school. I become the around-the-clock tutor when they are stumped, a role I must play in order to level 
the playing field. I doubt my own experience in high school would have amounted to much had I not had 
the support of my English professor mother, and I shudder every time I hear of the number of hours my 
students must work to support parents and siblings or even their own children. I hate to think of the more 
than noisy environments in which so many of them are forced to attempt to concentrate on homework each 
night.
Advice for AP English Literature and Composition Teachers
software application project:VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Moreover, you may use the following VB.NET demo code to insert multiple pages of a PDF file to a PDFDocument object at user-defined position.
www.rasteredge.com
software application project:VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.
Ability to remove consecutive pages from PDF file in VB.NET. Enable specified pages deleting from PDF in Visual Basic .NET class.
www.rasteredge.com
20
A section of my AP contract with my students explicitly states that everyone is expected to stay for 
a mandatory tutorial for at least one hour one day a week. They receive a weekly participation grade and 
the opportunity to have independent study, private instruction, or test practice. It means that I drive 
students home or give them public transit fares, but the tutorial is an invaluable time for them and I 
wouldn’t give it up. Another after-school activity the AP students and I share is our monthly movie night. 
I invite the students and their families to view and discuss films I believe are critical for broadening 
their understanding and observation of life. Students sit around the big-screen TV in our media center, 
munching on popcorn, and sometimes taking notes without so much as a hint of a request to do so. We’ve 
enjoyed such films as Whale Rider, In America, Frida, and Rabbit-Proof Fence, and students often provide 
critiques for the school newspaper. 
The most important mission for teachers in low-income schools with underprepared students is to 
make their students understand right now that they are responsible for their own learning. I demand 
accountability and rigor from my students. I do not accept late work—ever—even if it means I go to their 
homes and wait for them to complete an essay. I do not give extra credit—ever—because I want them  
to comprehend the necessity of making the adult decision to risk getting it wrong the first time rather  
than failing to try at all. We start at the beginning and work our way up to mastery; mastery can mean 
a grade of 2 instead of 1 on the AP Exam. It is more important for these students to value the process of 
learning and the pleasure of having the option to know, to be for the first time members of a community  
of thinkers. 
Goethe explained to us that it is better to “treat people as if they were what they ought to be, and 
you help them to become what they are capable of being.” I put that quotation on the board for our 
introductory discussion of Frankenstein. My kids have plenty to say on the topic.
Chapter 2
software application project:C# PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files
note, PDF file will be divided from the previous page of your defined page number which starts from 0. For example, your original PDF file contains 4 pages.
www.rasteredge.com
software application project:C# PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
Ability to remove a range of pages from PDF file. Description: Delete consecutive pages from the input PDF file starting at specified position. Parameters:
www.rasteredge.com
21
Making the Summer Count—All Year Long
Limarys Caraballo 
Saint Mary’s College High School 
Berkeley, California
When I first began to teach AP English Literature and Composition, I was drawn to the challenge of 
creating a syllabus that would awaken in students a deep appreciation for the humanities, give them the 
background and skills necessary for more advanced study of literature in college, and prepare them for the 
AP Exam. One of the first difficulties I encountered in creating such a course was the limitation of time—a 
year is simply not enough. A second difficulty is the need to level the literary playing field for students of 
very diverse backgrounds. Part of the solution, for me, lies in making good use of the summer months to 
prepare students for the rigor of the year ahead.
We begin with a class meeting; every student who registers for AP English must attend a meeting 
during which I introduce the goals and objectives of the course, answer basic questions about the AP 
program, and explain the summer reading and writing assignments. The summer assignment consists of 
three novels with corresponding writing assignments for each and a list of terms from Western mythology 
and the Bible. By the end of the summer, students have reviewed many of the mythological and biblical 
terms that they need in order to analyze works of literature. They apply this knowledge early in the fall 
semester in a review activity, the mythology pageant, and on a test of the material. 
The works assigned during summer reading are long and complex, so to help them process their 
complexity, students are expected to read independently and then to record their impressions in their 
summer writing assignments. Long works, such as Crime and Punishment, are difficult to assign as reading 
during the school year because they require many weeks to cover in class. By assigning these novels to be 
read during the summer and requiring students to review them right before we discuss them in class, we 
can study a wider selection of material during the busy school year.
Most important, however, the approach students take toward the novels they read over the summer 
models their approach to literary analysis throughout the year. One of the key elements in their learning 
how to read closely is the Data Sheet. My version of this organizer, adapted from an idea acquired at an 
AP teachers’ workshop many years ago, is a place for students to record their impressions and questions as 
they are reading, and it becomes a prompt for literary analysis. The Data Sheet, which usually amounts to 
a dense four pages, requires students to look up information on the author of the work and the period in 
which it was written; identify the characteristics of the genre; analyze key passages; identify and explain 
literary techniques, metaphors, and themes; and generate topics for discussion. Teachers can change, 
expand, or adapt the Data Sheet to fit specific novels or address particular course objectives. 
Each Data Sheet requires that students read closely, apply their knowledge of literary terms, improve 
their vocabulary, and draw generalizations about the meaning of the work as a whole. Also, because 
students both read each text in its entirety and begin work on the Data Sheet before we discuss the text 
in class, they learn to develop independent interpretations of the texts and to formulate their ideas about 
the work before learning what others think. This leads to a more exciting exchange of ideas among the 
students.
Students complete one Data Sheet for each full-length work that we study during the year, but their 
first Data Sheet is based on one of their summer reading novels. Once I explain the purpose of the Data 
Sheet during our summer meeting, students realize there is no risk in trying out the process on their own 
because they know they will have an opportunity to modify and refine their responses during the school 
Advice for AP English Literature and Composition Teachers
22
year. I check the Data Sheets for completion on the preliminary deadline, either for summer reading or for 
reading during the school year, but I do not grade the content of the first drafts. 
During the semester, students complete the Data Sheet in pencil first, so they can make adjustments 
and corrections as they discuss the text as a class. At least two class discussions during each unit come 
directly from the questions and topics in the Data Sheets. This is a great way to ensure student-generated 
discussion topics, and it is also a way to assess students’ understanding of the reading as well as their ability 
to synthesize their own thoughts and those of critics and classmates. I keep a supply of blank Data Sheets in 
the classroom at all times, and I also e-mail the document template to those who have Internet access. They 
can draft as many versions as they wish while we discuss the text in class, but their evaluation is based on 
the accuracy, thoroughness, and quality of the final version they submit. Students keep their Data Sheets all 
year and use them to prepare several texts that they might be able to use on the AP Exam’s free-response 
essay.
The Data Sheet is also a key factor in student presentations. At least once during the semester, 
students are required to lead class discussion. Using their Data Sheets as a starting point, students 
prepare a presentation on the assigned text, generate discussion questions, and serve as moderators for 
that day’s discussion. The objective is for each group to become the “resident expert” on a given text. The 
presentation provides the group’s own interpretation of the text (especially the explication of significant 
passages), explanation of themes/symbols/style, selected criticisms from reputable sources, and background 
on the author. To create a context for the overall significance of the text, students must research some of 
the following areas of relevance to the time: social/political/historical events, art and music, architecture, 
male and female roles, and philosophy. In addition to the research-based and analytical components, the 
group prepares a creative representation of some significant aspect of the text in a nontraditional venue 
such as a video, skit, dance performance, or food display or tasting. Students are evaluated based on the 
quality and accuracy of their research and analysis, organization, creativity, and delivery. Presentations are 
extremely important in the development of students’ public speaking skills; therefore, part of the grade is 
based on the caliber of their performance.
Summer reading and writing is integral to AP work during the entire school year. Many of the skills 
and good habits that students need to succeed in AP English can actually be planted as seeds during the 
summer months, then nurtured, developed, and refined in the fall and spring. I think students reap the 
real advantage, though, when they gain the confidence to read and labor through a text on their own, then 
have something to contribute to the class from the very first day.
My sample summer assignment, templates for the Data Sheets, and resources for mythology all follow.
Chapter 2
23
Summer Reading Assignment: Reading and Writing
Wisdom and Spirit of the Universe!
Thou Soul that art the eternity of thought,
That giv’st to forms and images a breath 
And everlasting Motion! not in vain,
By day or star-light, thus from my first dawn
Of Childhood didst thou intertwine for me 
The passions that build up our human Soul,
Not with the mean and vulgar works of man,
But with the high objects, with enduring things, 
With life and nature, purifying thus
The elements of feeling and of thought, 
And sanctifying, by such discipline,
Both pain and fear; until we recognize
A grandeur in the beatings of the heart.
—William Wordsworth, The Prelude (Book First, ll. 401–414)
In our intensive study of literature next year, we will try to capture the “passions that build up our 
human Soul” in the many works that we read. Every piece of fiction strives to be more than a “mean and 
vulgar” work. In fact, Wordsworth himself created many “high objects” and “enduring things” even as he 
considered his art a distant second to life and nature. The Prelude is one such “enduring thing.”
The world of literature is vast, and the more we read the more we thirst. Although we must prepare 
for the AP Exam, our main goals will be advanced study of literature, insightful analysis, and effective 
written communication. We will therefore be sampling a wide range of authors and genres throughout the 
year. This summer you are to prepare for a challenging course of study by reading the following texts and 
working on corresponding writing assignments. All summer reading and writing is due on the first day of 
classes. 
Summer Reading
Crime and Punishment 
Fyodor Dostoevsky
The Grapes of Wrath 
John Steinbeck
Pride and Prejudice 
Jane Austen
“Mythology, Folklore, and Biblical References” handout 
The following book you will need as a reference. You should have it from your freshman-year book list.
Mythology 
Edith Hamilton
You may buy the above books from any distributor or bookstore. Try to get the Constance Garnett 
translation of Crime and Punishment. 
1.  You are expected to read the books listed above, unabridged, during the summer and be ready 
to be TESTED on each one as of the first week of classes. The evaluation will be detailed and 
demanding. 
2.  Study guides (such as CliffsNotes and SparkNotes) may NEVER be used as a substitute for the 
reading assigned or as a resource, although you will often need to refer to outside sources for 
information related to the text for the Data Sheet.
Advice for AP English Literature and Composition Teachers
24
3.  Although all of you should have read Mythology as freshmen at Saint Mary’s, that was a long 
time ago. This information needs to be fresh in your mind, as literature is full of allusions to the 
classics. You will have an advantage on the AP Exam if you have a good working knowledge of 
mythology, folklore, and biblical allusions. Read the attached handout, which has some abbreviated 
entries on many mythological elements as well as biblical references you should know. You will 
have a specific and detailed test on the handout during the first week of classes in the fall. You will 
need to have Mythology on hand as a reference throughout the year (you can also use it to clarify 
things you read about in the handout).
Summer Writing
1.  Complete a Data Sheet for The Grapes of Wrath. The purpose of the Data Sheet is for you to create 
your own study guide for the novel. Each section is to be approached analytically, not literally. 
For example, the section on setting requires that you identify not only the physical location of the 
plot(s), but also the atmosphere and significance of that location. You may attach additional sheets 
of paper to the Data Sheet if necessary, but try to stay within the space provided. Write or type 
neatly and legibly. 
2.  Write a two- to three-page response/commentary (typed, double-spaced, 10–12-point font, etc.) 
on Crime and Punishment. Although not necessarily a thesis essay, your commentary on the 
novel must be a well-written response to the work as a whole. Remember to support all of your 
comments and arguments by referring specifically to the text and using passages from the novel 
wherever appropriate.
3.  Choose ONE of the following options for your work on Pride and Prejudice. The piece must be one 
to two pages typed, double-spaced, 10–12-point font.
• 
Quote, cite, and analyze three passages from the novel that represent or discuss gender, social, 
or class- and status-based ideas addressed in the novel.
• 
Write an original letter from any character that reveals his or her personality, fears, desires, 
prejudices, and/or ways of dealing with conflict.
• 
Write a skit or dramatic scene based on your own rendition of the customs and values of the 
time and place in which the novel takes place.
• 
Write an original poem, with a minimum of 30 lines, about the ideals, values, or concerns of 
the Bennets or the society in which they live. Examples: the Gardiners, the soldiers, Lady de 
Bourgh, fate, religion, and the upper class.
Upcoming Mythology and Folklore Pageant
You will each represent a god, goddess, person, or entity at the pageant (you will receive an entry card 
showing the name of the entity you are to represent). On that day, you must be dressed for the part and 
must have at least one significant or symbolic attribute. The presentation itself will consist of the most 
important details on the half-sheet study guide that you must provide for each member of the “audience.” 
You must (1) dress for the part, (2) provide a copy of the completed half-sheet for everyone, and (3) be able 
to identify the most important element of this person or figure. At the end of the period, there will be an 
opportunity to elect the winner of the pageant, who will be awarded five extra-credit points (students may 
not vote for themselves).
Chapter 2
25
Your half-sheet study guide must be typed and include the following. Please use complete sentences.
Name (and origin) of entity: 
Attribute or defining characteristic: 
Function/significance in literature/culture: 
Summary of myth/legend/tale:
Happy Reading and Writing!!!
Bible and Mythology Resources for Students and Teachers
Web Sites:
Oxford Classical Mythology Online 
www.classicalmythology.org
The online companion guide to Classical Mythology, 7th edition, by Mark P. O. Morford and Robert J. 
Lenardon is an excellent glossary that students and teachers can use directly from the Web. It can also 
be printed and photocopied.
Mythweb 
www.mythweb.com/index.html
This searchable encyclopedia of Greek mythology is a thorough source of information for teachers 
and students.
Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia 
www.fact-index.com/l/li/list_of_biblical_figures.html
For biblical sources, I prefer this encyclopedic resource, which provides detailed and multiperspective 
entries on important biblical terms.
Mythology Terms:
I assign the following terms for students to present in the pageant and then review for the first mythology 
test. The rest of the year we continue to use the glossaries to look up relevant terms that come up in the 
reading and class discussions.
Classical Mythology
Achilles
Cassandra
Elysian Fields
Adonis
Cerberus
fauns
Aeneas
Ceres/Demeter
Golden Fleece
Ares/Mars
chimera
Hades
Argus
Circe
Holy Grail
Athena/Minerva
Daedalus
Hector
Atlas
Damocles
Henry, John
Augean stables
Delphic oracle
Hera/Juno
Bacchus/Dionysus
Electra
Hermes
Advice for AP English Literature and Composition Teachers
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested