count pages in pdf without opening c# : Delete pages from pdf in reader application Library utility azure asp.net wpf visual studio ap07_englit_teachersguide4-part360

26
Hiawatha
Pan
Scylla and Charybdis
Judgment of Paris
Pandora’s Box
Sisyphus
Jupiter/Zeus
Paris
Tiresias
Laocoön
Parnassus
Titan
Leda
Prometheus
Vesta
Midas
Proteus
Zephyr
Nemesis
Pygmalion
Venus/Aphrodite
Odin
Romulus and Remus
Bible
Abraham and Isaac
Esther
olive branch
Annunciation
golden calf
pearls before swine
Ararat
Jacob’s Ladder
Promised Land
Armageddon
Jeremiah
Prodigal Son
Babel
Job
Queen of Sheba
Babylon
Leviathan
Ruth
burning bush
Lot’s wife
Damascus
Methuselah
Chapter 2
Delete pages from pdf in reader - application Library utility:C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Easy to Use C# Code to Extract PDF Pages, Copy Pages from One PDF File and Paste into Others
www.rasteredge.com
Delete pages from pdf in reader - application Library utility:VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed VB.NET Guide for Extracting Pages from Microsoft PDF Doc
www.rasteredge.com
27
DATA SHEET    1 
AP English
Name:   
Ms. Caraballo
DATA SHEET 
Date:   
Per.
Title:   
Author:  
Date of Publication:   
Source of Information for Data Sheet:
Provide significant details about the author 
Provide information about the period (literary, historical,  
philosophical, etc.)
Provide plot points (use bullets or graphic organizer)
Identify the genre & specify how this work fits its characteristics 
Draw an image or write your impressions
Advice for AP English Literature and Composition Teachers
application Library utility:VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.
doc.Save(outPutFilePath). How to VB.NET: Delete Consecutive Pages from PDF. doc.Save(outPutFilePath). How to VB.NET: Delete Specified Pages from PDF.
www.rasteredge.com
application Library utility:C# PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
doc.Save(outPutFilePath); Demo Code: How to Delete Consecutive Pages from PDF in C#.NET. Demo Code: How to Delete Specified Pages from PDF in C#.NET.
www.rasteredge.com
28
DATA SHEET    2 
AP English DATA SHEET
Name:   
Identify and explain the use and effect of three literary 
techniques  
1.
2.
3.
Cite and quote one example of each 
1.
2.
3.
Cite and quote three significant passages
(use ellipses to abbreviate)
1.
2.
3.
Explain the significance of each passage or explain how it relates to 
the work as a whole 
Chapter 2
application Library utility:C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
VB.NET Page: Insert PDF pages; VB.NET Page: Delete PDF pages; VB.NET Annotate: PDF Markup & Drawing. XDoc.Word for XImage.OCR for C#; XImage.Barcode Reader for C#
www.rasteredge.com
application Library utility:C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
how to merge PDF document files by C# code, how to rotate PDF document page, how to delete PDF page using C# .NET, how to reorganize PDF document pages and how
www.rasteredge.com
29
DATA SHEET    3 
AP English DATA SHEET (use additional paper as needed)
Name:   
Name of each 
significant character 
Relationship to other 
characters
Purpose/function in story 
(specify round or flat)?
Three adjectives that 
describe character 
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
Advice for AP English Literature and Composition Teachers
application Library utility:VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Page: Insert PDF Pages. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Insert PDF Page. Add and Insert Multiple PDF Pages to PDF Document Using VB.
www.rasteredge.com
application Library utility:VB.NET PDF delete text library: delete, remove text from PDF file
Visual Studio .NET application. Delete text from PDF file in preview without adobe PDF reader component installed. Able to pull text
www.rasteredge.com
30
DATA SHEET    4 
AP English DATA SHEET
Name  
Describe the setting(s) and explain its significance. 
Write and explain the theme(s) of the work. 
Identify and explain key metaphors (M), symbols (S) or 
motifs (F) in the work. 
Write at least five vocabulary words from the text and define them. 
Cite the page and passage in which you found them.
Write at least three questions or topics for discussion. 
Chapter 2
application Library utility:C# PDF Page Rotate Library: rotate PDF page permanently in C#.net
batch changing PDF page orientation without other PDF reader control. NET, add new PDF page, delete certain PDF page, reorder existing PDF pages and split
www.rasteredge.com
application Library utility:C# PDF delete text Library: delete, remove text from PDF file in
Delete text from PDF file in preview without adobe PDF reader component installed in ASP.NET. C#.NET PDF: Delete Text from Consecutive PDF Pages.
www.rasteredge.com
31
Chapter 3 
Course Organization
Syllabus Development
Remember the advice in Chapter 2 about using your strengths and the texts you already know to develop your 
first AP course? As you read through the sample syllabi that follow, bear in mind that you can modify them, 
substituting texts with which you are familiar or that are available to you. You might decide that you want to 
combine approaches from these syllabi or you might feel inspired to create one that is entirely your own.
First-time AP English Literature and Composition teachers sometimes have difficulty with pacing and 
with knowing how much time to devote to exam preparation. You should certainly challenge your students 
with a college- or university-level course, but don’t forget to take into account the stresses and demands 
on high school seniors. Beware of overestimating or underestimating students as you plan a syllabus that 
includes poetry, prose, drama, and some exam preparation, and know that the best way to prepare students 
for the exam is to create and teach a rich and challenging class. 
The freedom to choose what to read and how to organize the reading can be both intoxicating and 
daunting for the first-time AP teacher. Without a prescribed reading list but with the requirement that 
students read from all genres from the late sixteenth to the early twenty-first centuries, you might have 
trouble deciding where and how to start. 
The Value of Poetry
My students of language and literature, like all humans, occupy familiar elements. They breathe the sweaty air 
of adolescence; they sneaker and flip-flop their way across polished floor and grassy field. They taste and touch 
everything. They also read and write and speak, sometimes with passion and flourish, but often with the same 
inattention and nonchalance they bring to the most pursuits. Until, that is, they begin to read and write and 
speak poetry. Poetry, language at its most primitive and its most refined, affords them the opportunity to enter 
an element that is at once intimately familiar and as exotic as a perfect kiss. They never fail to be smitten by its 
power—in short, they fall in love. In the process, they see language as they’ve never seen it before; magnified 
and fluid, both solid and liquid, like glass. They understand that on those rare occasions when the inexpressible 
is indeed expressed, poetry is the cause. 
How can we encourage our students to see language as they’ve never seen it before? By focusing their 
attention on the details, by encouraging them, again and again, to probe the meanings and connotations of 
words, to understand the richness of allusions, to grasp the varieties of tone. As they recognize the rewards of 
reading closely, they will increasingly become their own best guides through the poems and, perhaps, better 
poets themselves. 
—Kay Cavan, Sir Francis Drake High School,  
San Anselmo, California
As you will see from the syllabi that follow, you have the freedom to organize your course by genre 
or by theme, chronologically or not; yet I know that some of you crave a more specific plan for action. So, 
with an invitation to embrace wholeheartedly or to tinker with the guidelines that follow, let me suggest 
a template for your course syllabus. The order in which you do the work is not important, but I like to 
32
Chapter 3
start with poetry, the most economical form of writing, because through the study of a series of poets and 
poems, I can be certain that all students are comfortable with the language and terminology we use to 
discuss literature as a whole.
A possible course syllabus (30 weeks)
Weeks 1–2: Course Introduction  
Summer reading (probably at least two longer works), discussions, and writing.
Weeks 3–7: An Introduction to Poetry 
Close focus on Renaissance lyrics followed by a survey of poetry through the later twentieth century. 
Several close reading exercises. Student presentations and papers.
Weeks 8–11: A Nineteenth-Century Novel 
Several short writing exercises. Major paper (writing workshop).
Weeks 12–17: Drama 
A play by Shakespeare and two to three contemporary plays. These may be thematically linked if you 
wish. Several acting exercises and shorter writing assignments based on close reading. Major paper 
(writing workshop).
Weeks 18–24: Contemporary Fiction 
Two to three novels (depending on length). In this section in particular, strive to include traditionally 
underrepresented voices (women and people of color). Reflective writing, student-led discussions, 
major paper (writing workshop).
Weeks 25–27: Return to Poetry 
Student group presentations on contemporary (last 30 years) poets. Individual major paper on the 
poet on which each student has focused (writing workshop).
Weeks 28–30: Review 
Student-led review of reading from the year, including summer reading. Two to three practice sessions 
for multiple-choice questions. One full-scale practice examination (to be sure that students who might 
never have sat for a three-hour exam are prepared).
Read the sample syllabi that follow and get ready to devise an AP English Literature and Composition 
syllabus that reflects your and your students’ interests and concerns.
Fostering Dialogue with a Thematic Approach
One of the great benefits of teaching an AP English Literature and Composition course is that teachers are 
in charge of developing their own “must teach” list. In preparing my first syllabus, I reread several texts and 
read others for the first time, considering whether I liked them and whether students would—not that our 
predictions are always accurate.
With possible titles in mind, I grouped these major works according to themes built around essential questions 
that I thought would appeal to high school seniors. These four themes are Identity and Perception, Truth and 
Illusion, The Nature of Good and Evil, and Finding Purpose. To each unit I added essays and poems. Every year I 
add at least one new title to the course. 
I prefer a thematic approach to teaching literature because it allows for various genres to converse with one 
another. It also demystifies, to some extent, the genre of poetry, which can seem nearly impenetrable. When 
linked to a passage from a novel or short story, however, the poem offers more entry points for students.
—Kathleen M. Puhr, Clayton High School,  
St. Louis, Missouri
33
Course Organization
Important note: The AP Course Audit
The syllabi included in this Teachers Guide were developed prior to the initiation of the AP Course Audit 
and the identification of the current AP English Literature and Composition Curricular Requirements. 
These syllabi contain rich resources and will be useful in generating ideas for your AP course. In addition 
to providing detailed course planners, the syllabi contain descriptions of classroom activities and 
assignments, along with helpful teaching strategies. However, they should not necessarily be used in their 
entirety as models that would be authorized under the guidelines of the AP Course Audit. To view the 
current AP English Literature and Composition Curricular Requirements and examples of syllabi that 
have been developed since the launch of the AP Course Audit and therefore meet all of the Curricular 
Requirements, please see AP Central.
http://apcentral.collegeboard.com/courseaudit/resources
34
Chapter 3
Sample Syllabus 1
Carlos Escobar 
Felix Varela Senior High School 
Miami, Florida
School Profile
School Location and Environment: Felix Varela Senior High School is located in Miami, Florida, and has 
the distinction of being Miami-Dade County’s first new high school in the twenty-first century. While 59 
countries are represented by the student body, most students have immigrated to Miami from countries 
throughout Latin America and the Caribbean. Although their socioeconomic backgrounds are also diverse, 
they generally come from lower-middle-class families. 
Grades: 9–12
Type: Public neighborhood academy school
Total Enrollment: 4,672 students
Ethnic Diversity: Hispanic students comprise 81 percent of the student population; African Americans,  
5 percent; and Asian, Indian, or multiracial students, 2 percent.
College Record: Approximately 73 percent of graduating seniors enroll in either two- or four-year 
institutions. Florida colleges and universities are typical destinations for graduates, although some attend 
public and private out-of-state schools, including Ivy League institutions. 
Personal Philosophy
AP English Literature and Composition endows students with the ability to read, think, analyze, discuss, 
and write with heightened insight and stronger control of language. These skills ensure student success in 
other AP courses and facilitate their transition into higher education. Moreover, teaching this class entails 
exposing them to the breadth of the human experience. This study ultimately leads students to recognize 
the bond between all people, thereby fostering the eradication of prejudice and ethnocentricity. AP English 
Literature also demands that I continually improve my pedagogy in order to better prepare students for 
college courses. In essence, while I witness extensive growth in my students throughout the course,  
I too expand my own understanding of society and teaching. While challenging for both, the value of  
AP English Literature for students and teachers is immeasurable. 
Class Profile
The beginning of my teaching career coincided with the opening of Felix Varela Senior High in the  
2000-01 school year. I have taught tenth-grade regular and honors English; eleventh-grade honors English; 
twelfth-grade regular and honors English; and AP English Literature and Composition, which I have 
taught since its inception at Felix Varela in 2002. I am currently the lead teacher of the AP program at 
the school and teach five classes and two preparations: two regular tenth-grade and three AP English 
Literature and Composition courses. My teaching load is approximately 147 students, 72 of whom are  
AP students. The school administration currently seeks to limit regular classes to 31 students and AP 
classes to 25. The school operates on an alternating block schedule, with students attending three  
100-minute periods daily. Additionally, I spend approximately six hours per week in out-of-class tutorials.
35
Course Organization
Felix Varela offers honors English courses in grades 9–12, AP English Language and Composition in 
grade 11, and AP English Literature and Composition in grade 12. There are currently four sections of 
AP English Language and seven sections of AP English Literature. The school’s mission is to provide each 
student with the opportunity to participate in the benefits and rigors associated with AP classes.
Course Overview
AP English Literature and Composition is a one-year course in which students’ reading, writing, and oral 
skills are strengthened through the study of novels, plays, poems, and short stories from the sixteenth 
century to the present. Certain films are also used throughout the year in order to further the student’s 
understanding of the texts. Most of the authors represented are canonical, but Latin American and 
Caribbean writers also play an integral role in my curriculum because of the student population at the 
school. Students purchase their own novels and read poems and short stories from The Norton Introduction 
to Literature. I sometimes incorporate poems into my curriculum to complement major texts, but I usually 
teach poetry through isolated units between novels. I use short stories, on the other hand, to introduce 
students to the idiosyncrasies of certain authors. Paired texts from various genres and time periods having 
similar themes or characters are used to further the students’ abilities to compare, discuss, interpret, and 
write about imaginative literature. Felix Varela has a summer reading program for AP English Literature 
and Composition, which serves as the basis for instruction at the beginning of the school year. 
The writing component of the course is developed through a myriad of timed essays, which are often 
rewritten several times, and longer essays that usually consist of comparing two novels or poems. Students 
generally write one essay each week. My curriculum also encourages the development of oral skills. Aside 
from classroom discussions, each student therefore delivers formal and informal timed presentations 
throughout the year.
In addition to the reading and writing instruction crucial to an AP course, students become 
familiar with the MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers and literary research volumes such 
as Contemporary Literary Criticism. These two elements allow students to conduct research and then 
incorporate it into their essays in a conventional manner.
Course Planner/Student Activities
Fall Semester—First Grading Period
Crime and Punishment by Fyodor Dostoevsky and Heart of Darkness by Joseph Conrad (three weeks)
I allot only three weeks for the study of these two novels because I assign them as summer reading. 
Among other factors, they are chosen and paired in order to discuss the effects of setting on the psyche 
of characters. Their rigor establishes the tone of scholarship inherent in the AP English Literature and 
Composition course. It is important, however, to guide students through their reading of these novels. 
I therefore meet with them prior to the beginning of the summer to introduce them to topics such as 
Christianity and nihilism for Crime and Punishment and imperialism for Heart of Darkness. Front-
loading is crucial at this stage in order for students to then successfully delve into the layers of philosophy, 
psychology, and symbolism inherent in Dostoevsky’s novel and the historical context of Conrad’s novella. 
During this session, I provide students with my e-mail address so they may contact me during the summer 
as questions regarding the texts inevitably arise. 
For the first texts of the school year, I use an “assessment question” to determine how carefully 
students read the novels and to gauge the depth of their comprehension. After students write the 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested