count pages in pdf without opening c# : Delete pages of pdf online control SDK platform web page .net winforms web browser ap07_englit_teachersguide9-part365

76
Chapter 3
attempting to conceive of a thesis first (a daunting task to most), beginning with ground-level observations, 
in effect, demystifies the writing process for my students. On the other hand, that these ground-level 
observations are unquestionably theirs renders the prospect of building a critical argument a point of 
personal pride. 
In the parenthetical “Note to Teachers” in the student course description that follows, I also address 
these teaching strategies, which have proven to be highly effective in my class:
• 
Student-generated topics
• 
Short responses
• 
Electronic discussion group (EDG)
Course Overview
Bearing Witness: Contemporary Literature of Testimony
Though enforced dislocation and large-scale population removal are not exclusive to modernity, the 
twentieth century has borne witness to events that, in their critically considered aftermath, have 
contributed significantly—across a wide cultural spectrum—to an ever-expanding lexicon intended to 
identify places, or “gray zones,” whose function it is and has been to house racialized subjects that have 
been forcibly, and in many instances fatally, displaced: way station, holding cell, detention center, refugee 
camp, comfort station, internment camp, gulag, concentration camp. These euphemistic terms denote 
transitional, often extranational sites that paradoxically signify both refuge and the impossibility of refuge, 
belonging in a context of not belonging. This course aims to examine, via a consideration of a culturally 
varied, mid- to late-twentieth-century cross-section of literature of testimony, the modern phenomenon of 
mass detention and internment as well as its determination by a governing logic of racial exclusion. With 
due attention to historical particularity, we will explore literary representations of the camp as a notably 
complex site, intended to contain and detain those pushed (to borrow from Walter Benjamin’s description 
of the urban disenfranchised) to the “back of beyond,” in addition to considering the camp’s instrumental 
function vis-à-vis the nation in a self-perceived state of crisis. We will read a broad array of literary 
selections, written in or translated into English, that depict both allegorized and historical examples of 
internment from authors as diverse as Primo Levi, Joy Kogawa, J. M. Coetzee, Leslie Marmon Silko, and 
Chang-rae Lee. We will also turn, to a lesser yet still significant degree, our critical attention to cinematic 
treatments of the internment experience.
Requirements for the Course
This course is intended, above all, to give you the opportunity to hone your critical thinking skills as well 
as to strengthen and to refine the quality of your written expression. With literature of testimony as our 
collective textual interest, we will focus on 
• 
developing attentive reading skills; 
• 
staking interpretative, thoughtful claims based on foundational observations of each text; and
• 
crafting written arguments (with, it should be added, a strong emphasis on substantial revisions of 
your original drafts). 
In addition to short responses, group journal-keeping, presentations, and participation (including one 
field outing), you will write three papers (the first two with at least one revision). The last paper will have a 
research component.
Delete pages of pdf online - control SDK platform:C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Easy to Use C# Code to Extract PDF Pages, Copy Pages from One PDF File and Paste into Others
www.rasteredge.com
Delete pages of pdf online - control SDK platform:VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed VB.NET Guide for Extracting Pages from Microsoft PDF Doc
www.rasteredge.com
77
Course Organization
Required Texts
1.  J. M. Coetzee, Waiting for the Barbarians (1982)
2.  Chang-rae Lee, A Gesture Life (1999)
3.  Primo Levi, Survival at Auschwitz (originally published as Se questo è un uomo 1958; Touchstone 
edition 1993)
4.  Joy Kogawa, Obasan (1982)
5.  Leslie Marmon Silko, Ceremony (1977)
6.  Course Reader
Student Evaluation
Papers 
60 percent (three papers)
Each paper is worth 20 percent of your overall grade. The second draft of each paper will receive detailed 
comments but no grade and will be followed by a one-on-one, half-hour conference during which you will 
discuss your goals for your revision with me. You will initiate the discussion on your writing, so please 
come prepared to do so. (In addition to these mandatory one-on-one conferences, you are also welcome 
to attend office hours for additional feedback.) Following this conference, you must be willing to make 
a comprehensive effort to re-envision and to reconceive your argument as well as to retool its expression, 
if need be. Don’t be tempted, in other words, to make purely cosmetic changes. Superficial, insubstantial 
changes may result in a lower grade. Your revisions will receive a letter grade but few comments. Grades 
aside, it is in your best interests—as a developing writer and a flexible thinker—to make your revisions 
worthwhile endeavors. 
Note to teachers: I am a  firm believer  in students  arriving  at  their own theses without the 
assistance of provided prompts. Observations, Marie Ponsot and Rosemary Deen point out, have a 
dual nature—they are at once public and personal. They are public insofar as they are available to 
anyone reading a text, e.g., “Doc Hata is not a doctor.” That is, they are, in essence, descriptive. At 
the same time, they are personal in that what one reader observes in a text is not necessarily what 
another reader might pick up on. For example, I might be troubled by the knowledge that Chang-
rae Lee’s Doc Hata is neither a doctor nor ethnically Japanese, whereas your curiosity might be 
piqued by Hata’s exacting insistence on matters of decorum. Throughout the semester, I encourage 
my students to trust not only their intuition when it comes to critical reading—a nagging hunch, 
for example, that draws their attention to certain observable aspects of the text—but to follow up 
their hunches with sustained, evidentiary consideration of why these observations are important. 
Critical  writing, I stress to my students,  proceeds from critical reading, and critical reading 
necessarily requires intimate engagement with and sound observations of the text. I want my 
students, moreover, to be invested in as well as responsible for their reading of a work—to be as 
excited and passionate about their critical thinking as possible. Having students come up with 
their own theses without the “benefit” of given paper topics ensures that—over the course of the 
semester—students begin to develop their own internal critical compasses when it comes to critical 
reading. Rather than writing to the shadow text of a “correct” or desired answer, as students often 
attempt to do when writing to a teacher-given prompt, my students must take charge of a writing 
process that fundamentally begins with trusting their own observations.
Paper Format (see, in addition, the “Sample Paper Format” handout in the reader)
1.  Typewritten.
2.  Double-spaced throughout.
control SDK platform:VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.
Easy to delete PDF page in .NET WinForms application and ASPX webpage. Enable specified pages deleting from PDF in Visual Basic .NET class.
www.rasteredge.com
control SDK platform:C# PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
able to delete PDF page in both Visual C# .NET WinForms and ASP.NET WebForms project. Free online C# class source code for deleting specified PDF pages in .NET
www.rasteredge.com
78
Chapter 3
3.  12-point, Times New Roman font.
4.  1-inch margins on all sides.
5.  Distinct, original paper title.
6.  Each page must bear your last name and the page number in the upper right-hand corner.
7.  All pages should be arranged in the proper order and stapled together (no paper clips, please!).
8.  Citations should be in standard, MLA format (we’ll discuss this in class).
9.  A “Works Cited” must be appended to the essay.
10.  Final papers should be submitted with previous drafts.
Group Presentation 
10 percent
The class will be divided into five groups. Each group is in charge of developing a collaborative 
presentation on one of the five key texts. In your presentation, you should be sure to engage with your 
assigned text’s central themes and concerns. Your presentation should be approximately 45 minutes long 
and must contain an interactive component that fosters active class discussion and participation. Your 
peers will grade your presentation. 
Note to teachers: At the beginning of the semester, students are assigned to presentation groups 
on a partly self-selected, partly random basis. I first describe each text briefly—if the publisher’s 
account on the back cover is strong, I have a student volunteer read that aloud. Each student, based 
upon a number he or she has randomly drawn, then chooses a presentation group to which he or 
she will belong for the whole semester. Because the members of any one presentation group work 
closely with each other in preparation for the presentation—the work for which, I always stress, 
must be democratically distributed and conscientiously shared—they often become close friends. 
Members of a presentation group tend to rely on each other, viewing other group members as 
an informal support network with regard to the class. I encourage them to turn to each other, 
for example, for information concerning missed classes, and extra peer feedback on essay ideas. 
The members of the presentation group also belong to an electronic discussion group (EDG), 
a semiprivate, collective journal reserved for their use alone. In the weeks leading up to their 
presentation, the group members are advised not only to meet directly but also to use the EDG 
as a brainstorming and planning site. (See the Teacher Resources section below for information 
on setting up an EDG.) I also meet at least once with each group beforehand—preferably after 
the groups have come up with some variation on a plan for their presentations—to serve as a 
sounding board for their ideas and to give specific suggestions, if they so desire. Following the 
presentation, I calculate the peer grades and then meet with the groups once again, both to give 
postpresentation feedback and to give students the opportunity to read their peers’ comments. (I 
furnish my students with an evaluation form, the template of which is reproduced in my reader so 
that each group, while planning its presentation, has a clear sense of what the grading criteria will 
be.) What I have found, time and again, is that students are astute, discerning, and fair graders 
of each other’s work. Handing the task of evaluation, in this instance, to the students themselves 
not only  heightens  the  presentation  group’s  incentive to  produce  a  thoughtful  yet engaging 
presentation but also grants the peer-graders an opportunity to put their critical receptive skills 
to the test. The presentation is the only peer-graded assignment for the course.
Participation 
20 percent
This portion of your grade will reflect:
1.  Your attendance. In terms of workload and pace, this course is, with no exaggeration, both 
intensive and demanding; steady attendance is therefore a must. Attendance will be taken at the 
beginning of class only. 
control SDK platform:C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
C# view PDF online, C# convert PDF to tiff, C# read PDF, C# convert PDF to text, C# extract PDF pages, C# comment annotate PDF, C# delete PDF pages, C# convert
www.rasteredge.com
control SDK platform:C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
document files by C# code, how to rotate PDF document page, how to delete PDF page using C# .NET, how to reorganize PDF document pages and how
www.rasteredge.com
79
Course Organization
2.  Your contributions to our discussions. Being bodily present does not constitute active 
participation. The quality of our class conversations depends vitally on your direct engagement 
with the material assigned, as reflected in the ideas, questions, and comments that you express 
during our discussions. 
Note to teachers: Even though I take pains to emphasize the importance of active participation 
from the outset of the course, I am not one to penalize a student who is reticent or shy by nature 
for not speaking up in class. A brilliant member of my graduate school cohort once told me that 
she gains more through observation and reflection than she does through vocal participation, and 
I do believe that accommodation should be made for different student learning strategies. All the 
same, neither am I one not to draw such a student into the conversational fold or dynamic class 
activities during class time. I often make a point of asking quiet students to read passages aloud, or 
in the instance that a characteristically reserved student has written a fantastic short response for 
a certain text, I’ll often expressly call on that student to share a honed interpretive insight with his 
or her classmates during discussion on that text. Also, in the information sheets that my students 
fill out at the beginning of the course, I provide a space for students to address any disabilities or 
other issues that they feel might impact their performance in the class. Should a student indicate 
to me in either his or her student information sheet or private conference that he or she finds 
it uncomfortable or, worse, distressing to speak in class, I make a concerted effort to honor the 
import of this communication.
3.  Your EDG journal. This class will be divided into five presentation groups (as mentioned above), 
each of which will keep a shared weekly EDG journal. You will write your own entry outside of 
our designated class time as well as read and respond to the entries submitted by members of your 
presentation group. Each group will have access to a discrete EDG space, which I’ll set up for you 
(I’ll provide you with the EDG address by the end of the first week), and each member of the group 
is responsible for writing the equivalent of approximately one page of “free writing” per EDG 
entry. Some tips for the journal: You can approach these entries as conversations, inquiries, or 
individual reflections. The EDG journal can serve as a very useful forum for raising and discussing 
questions you might have about the readings, planning your presentation, testing out and getting 
feedback for your analysis of a text, and bouncing around possible paper ideas. The hidden social 
upshot of the journal is that, most likely, you will develop close ties to and lasting bonds with your 
group members. 
4.  Your short-response papers (more detailed explanation later; a sample short-response paper has 
been included in the reader—see the “Table of Contents”).
Note to teachers: The short-response paper has proven to be an invaluable assignment in the 
targeted development of my students’ critical thinking and writing skills. I provide a sample short 
response, one that clearly demonstrates my expectations for this assignment, in a reader that I 
prepare for the course. The short response is divided into five, categorically specific yet open-ended 
sections that each student must individually respond to: (1) critical questions, (2) overall theme, 
(3) passage/excerpt selection, (4) brief close reading, and (5) explanation for choosing the passage. 
The short response is due on the first day of discussion of a new text and thus typically gives me 
a sense of the student’s unfiltered, fresh engagement with the text. I often will ask my students 
to give heightened critical attention to one or two of the five sections of the short response in the 
interest of having them develop and hone a particular critical-reading or writing strategy and then 
ask them, for a subsequent short response, to focus on another section. For example, I emphasize to 
my students that strong literary analyses are only as strong as the critical questions that implicitly 
motivate them. “The questions you ask of a text are potential starting points for critical literary 
analyses,” I tell my students. If I ask my students to focus on the critical-question section of the 
short response, I then also focus on the critical-question section in my feedback on this assignment. 
control SDK platform:VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
add and insert one or multiple pages to existing adobe PDF document in VB.NET. Ability to create a blank PDF page with related by using following online VB.NET
www.rasteredge.com
control SDK platform:C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document online in C#.NET
C# view PDF online, C# convert PDF to tiff, C# read PDF, C# convert PDF to text, C# extract PDF pages, C# comment annotate PDF, C# delete PDF pages, C# convert
www.rasteredge.com
80
Chapter 3
Also, I typically make note, of the critical questions students have with regard to a text so as to 
address those questions in a lecture or to incorporate them in follow-up discussion activities.
5.  Your peer editing. On the days scheduled for peer editing, bring working drafts of your paper for 
each of your peer editors. Though these papers are works in progress, they should be presentable. 
They must be typed and double-spaced. Your peer editors will review and comment upon the draft 
you’ve provided for them. All marked drafts with the peer editor’s name must be turned in with 
the final revision. Peer-editing comments will be evaluated (though not graded).
Note to teachers: My students take their first two essays through several stages: thesis → thesis 
workshop → first draft → peer-editing workshop → second draft (this is the draft that I read and 
comment upon) → one-on-one, half-hour conference with me → revision (this final version of the 
essay receives a grade but few comments). For both the first and second drafts of the first two 
papers, the students fill out self-assessment and reflection sheets, respectively, and attach them 
to their drafts. For the third and final essay, the writing process, unlike the one just described 
for the first two essays, is less explicitly staged. According to UC Berkeley English Department 
regulations, the instructor must retain the last paper for a full academic year (a regulation aimed 
at resolving potential grading disputes), so I am not permitted, in any case, to return this essay to 
my students until a year after the course is over, by which time few students request their papers 
back. By the third paper, I assume, moreover, that my students are relatively secure in their critical 
skills and capable of self-direction.
6.  Your attending a collective outing (more TBA). Field trip!
Exams 
10 percent
1.  Midterm Quiz (5 percent)
2.  Final Quiz (5 percent) 
Note to teachers: Although there is no exam requirement for the R&C requirement, I incorporate 
what I call  midterm and  final  quizzes  into  my  curriculum. These quizzes are not weighted 
heavily, as you can see, and the final quiz is not comprehensive, yet I find them to be valuable 
in assessing where each student is at—at both mid- and end-term—with regard to their reading 
comprehension, textual analysis,  and close  reading  skills.  The  first  section of  these  quizzes 
is labeled “Identification Questions.” For this section, the students must  identify  8 out of 10 
characters, references, and quotations. Not only must they provide the title and the author of the 
work of the character, reference, or quotation in question, but they must also furnish as much 
contextualizing detail as possible about the latter. The second section is called “Short Answer 
Identification Questions.” For this section, the students are given two analytic prompts for each 
work covered. Of the two prompts, the students must respond to one. A typical prompt might be 
something along the lines of “In Helena María Viramontes’s short story, ‘The Cariboo Café,’ the 
café owner repeats the statement, ‘I run an honest business.’ Place this statement in context. Is this 
statement itself ‘honest’? Why might the café owner feel compelled to assert and then to reassert 
the honesty of his work?” The final section is titled “Close Reading.” For this section, I provide 
two passages taken from the assigned texts. For example, a representative passage might look like 
the following (extracted from Héctor Tobar’s The Tattooed Soldier): “I have too much pride. A bus 
boy with too much pride is a contradiction in terms. An illegal immigrant with too much pride is 
doomed to unemployment. Only Mr. Finkel, the Culver City restaurateur, tolerated Antonio’s sour 
disposition. Mr. Finkel was a Polish Jew and seemed to recognize something in Antonio, the face 
of concealed trauma, perhaps, the disoriented, resentful eyes of the exile.” The students must select 
one of two passages, such as this one, and deliver a close reading modeled after those written for 
their short responses.
control SDK platform:VB.NET PDF- View PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
RasterEdge. PRODUCTS: ONLINE DEMOS: Online HTML5 Document Viewer; Online XDoc.PDF C# File: Split PDF; C# Page: Insert PDF pages; C# Page: Delete PDF pages;
www.rasteredge.com
control SDK platform:VB.NET PDF - Convert PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
C# view PDF online, C# convert PDF to tiff, C# read PDF, C# convert PDF to text, C# extract PDF pages, C# comment annotate PDF, C# delete PDF pages, C# convert
www.rasteredge.com
81
Course Organization
Class Policies
1.  A text must be read in its entirety by the day of open discussion.
2.  The late penalty for papers is a subtraction of a third of a grade (e.g., from a B to a B-), for every 
day the paper is late. 
3.  Extensions: If an emergency comes up and you cannot submit your essay on time, please speak 
with me. I will grant an extension on a paper due date, provided that you have a compelling reason 
for not turning in the paper on time and have notified me sufficiently in advance. Extensions on 
peer-editing drafts and conferences are not possible.
4.  During the course of the semester, I will use student papers to model strong writing practices. This 
is a completely anonymous process. If you would prefer that a paper not be read by anyone other 
than me, please let me know. (I’ll be sure to ask you in advance if I’m interested in using your 
paper as a sample.) 
5.  All work submitted in this class must be your own. According to the University of California, 
plagiarism “is defined as the use of intellectual material produced by another person without 
acknowledging its source.” 
General Reminders
1.  While grades are a necessary evil of academic life, don’t let them become the focal point of your 
experience in this class. Rather than obsess over your grade on an individual paper, focus on your 
overall growth as a writer over the course of the semester. One surefire way to mature as a writer 
is to be flexible and self-reflexive about your writing. Although you probably won’t and shouldn’t 
always agree with the feedback from your peers and from me, keep in mind that we function as 
outside readers of your work and therefore furnish you with a valuable external point of view on 
your work. Also, be open to the idea of revision. Ultimately, being able to see your own work with 
a good measure of critical distance is essential to the evolution of your writing.
2.  For extra safety (technological failures can never be predicted), save all major assignments on disk 
in case of loss. Keeping an extra hard copy of each of the three papers is also a good idea. Please 
don’t throw away anything until you have received a final grade for the course.
3.  E-mail etiquette: I am not available to give extensive feedback and editing via e-mail. Please 
come in and see me during my office hours instead. I do not, for the record, download e-mail 
attachments (from previous bad experience); place hard copies in my office box. That said, should 
you need to notify me concerning an absence or wish to contact me about a brief matter, feel free 
to use e-mail for that purpose. 
4.  The syllabus is open to alteration. We’ll see how things unfold throughout the course of the 
semester and play it by ear. I’ll make certain to announce any changes as clearly as possible.
Course Planner
Week 1
Wed. 
Introductory remarks about the course 
Student information sheets 
Establishment of presentation/EDG  
Opening discussion
Fri. 
Overview of the materials in the reader 
Short one-on-one meeting signup 
*EDG journal
control SDK platform:VB.NET PDF - Annotate PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
VB.NET PDF - Annotate PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer. Explanation about transparency. VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer: Annotate PDF Online. This
www.rasteredge.com
control SDK platform:C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to convert and export PDF document to
C# view PDF online, C# convert PDF to tiff, C# read PDF, C# convert PDF to text, C# extract PDF pages, C# comment annotate PDF, C# delete PDF pages, C# convert
www.rasteredge.com
82
Chapter 3
Week 2
Mon. 
Short reading exercise: Michael Dorris’s “The Myth of Justice” (reader) 
(during office hours) One-on-one short meetings
Wed. 
Writing: E. B. White, “The Elements of Style” excerpt (reader) 
Writing: Ponsot and Deen, “Making Observations” (reader) 
“The Shawl” (reader) open discussion 
Short Response #1 (“The Shawl”) due
Fri. 
“The Shawl” continued 
Open discussion: Giorgio Agamben, “What Is a Camp?” (reader) 
(Survival in Auschwitz group: meet with me) 
*EDG journal
Week 3
Mon. 
Open discussion: Cathy Caruth, “Introduction” to Trauma: Explorations in Memory  
(reader)
Wed. 
Oxford English Dictionary definitions and etymologies (reader): open discussion 
Critical concept: key terms, core definitions 
Survival in Auschwitz open discussion
Fri. 
Film: Claude Lanzmann’s Shoah (segment)  
(Obasan group: meet with me) 
*EDG journal
Week 4
Mon. 
Survival in Auschwitz presentation and group-directed discussion 
Wed. 
Survival in Auschwitz lecture and directed discussion 
Fri. 
Obasan open discussion 
Mine Okubo’s Preface to Citizen 13660  
Short Response #2 (Obasan) due 
*EDG journal
Week 5
Mon. 
Holiday (no class)
Wed. 
Obasan presentation and group-directed discussion 
Film: short WWII government propaganda film on Japanese American internment
Fri. 
Obasan lecture and directed discussion  
*EDG journal
Week 6
Mon. 
Thesis Workshop 
Online Writing Lab (OWL) Thesis reading (reader)
83
Course Organization
Wed. 
First draft due—Paper #1 
Peer-Editing Modeling 
Peer Editing
Fri. 
Writing: Nancy Sommer’s “Revision Strategies of Student Writers and Experienced Adult 
Writers” 
Christine’s Writing Tips Handout 
(A Gesture Life group: meet with me) 
*NO EDG journal
Week 7
Mon. 
Final draft due—Paper #1 
Model paper 
Wed. 
A Gesture Life open discussion 
Comfort Women translator’s preface 
Short Response #3 (A Gesture Life) due 
Fri. 
A Gesture Life presentation and group-directed discussion 
Film: Excerpts from The Murmuring and Habitual Sadness 
(All day) One-on-one paper conferences 
*EDG journal
Week 8
Mon. 
Midterm Review (Sample Midterm Questions) 
(All day) One-on-one paper conferences
Wed. 
A Gesture Life lecture and directed discussion 
Fri. 
Revision due—Paper #1 
Midterm review (sample midterm questions) 
(Ceremony group: meet with me) 
*EDG journal
Week 9
Mon. 
Midterm quiz (in class)
Wed. 
Ceremony open discussion 
Short Response #4 (Ceremony) due
Fri. 
Ceremony presentation and group-directed discussion 
*EDG journal
SPRING BREAK: Enjoy!
Week 10
Mon. 
Ceremony lecture and directed discussion 
Wed. 
Thesis workshop
84
Chapter 3
Fri. 
Library Research Orientation Day (meet in library) 
(Waiting for the Barbarians group: meet with me) 
*EDG journal
Week 11
Mon. 
First draft—Paper #2 due 
Peer editing 
Wed. 
Final draft—Paper #2 due 
Model paper
Fri. 
Waiting for the Barbarians open discussion 
Short Response #5 (Waiting for the Barbarians) due 
*EDG journal
Week 12
Mon. 
Waiting for the Barbarians presentation and group-directed discussion 
(All day) One-on-one paper conferences 
Wed. 
Film: A Long Night’s Journey into Day
Fri. 
Film continued: A Long Night’s Journey into Day 
*EDG journal
Week 13
Mon. 
Revision—Paper #2 due  
Research sources: open discussion 
Critical Question: credibility and bias 
Jose Padilla, Guantanamo, and Abu Ghraib articles (reader)
Wed. 
Samples (you bring in): contemporary instances of internment  
Post–9/11 Internment: open discussion (topic: due process or continued confinement?)
Fri. 
Cynthia Ozick, “Metaphor and Memory” (handout): open discussion 
Stephen Knapp excerpt on “collective punishment” (handout): open discussion 
Critical Question: history as analogy, history as continuity? 
*EDG journal
Week 14
Mon.  
Reparations (handout to be distributed): open discussion
Wed. 
Outside resources workshop 
Fri. 
Thesis workshop  
*EDG journal
Week 15
Mon. 
Film (TBA)
Wed. 
Final exam review
85
Course Organization
Fri. 
Paper #3 due 
Closing festivities 
*NO EDG journal
Week 16
Mon. 
Final exam
Teacher Resources
In addition to the assigned literary texts for the course, key required texts also include Joseph Gibaldi’s 
MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers (6th edition) and Frederick Crews’s The Random House 
Handbook (6th edition). In noting a recurring stylistic or grammatical error while marking a student’s 
draft, I typically refer him or her to a relevant section in either Gibaldi or Crews. I make clear that these 
errors should be attended to in the student’s revision. 
For each Reading and Composition course that I teach, I also prepare an extensive reader comprising 
four parts. The first part of the reader contains general course materials that I have both devised and 
borrowed (including syllabus, sample assignments, close reading strategies, peer-editing templates, revision 
checklists, research paper tips, model paper, and grading rubric). The second part provides essays and 
articles on composition. (I find a section called “Making Observations” from Marie Ponsot and Rosemary 
Deen’s Beat Not the Poor Desk and an essay by Nancy Sommers called “Revision Strategies of Student 
Writers and Experienced Adult Writers” particularly helpful.) The third part of the reader delves into 
critical definitions and key concepts pertinent to the course. For a course on literature of testimony, for 
example, highlighting the religious, juridical, and sociohistorical mobilizations of the term “testimony” 
might be useful, depending on the literary texts you choose to teach. And finally, for the fourth part of 
the reader, I include critical essays relating to the topic that organizes the course. I have found Giorgio 
Agamben’s essay “What Is a Camp?” (2000), Cathy Caruth’s introduction to Trauma: Explorations in 
Memory (1995), Dori Laub’s “Bearing Witness or the Vicissitudes of Listening” (1992), Marita Sturken’s 
“Absent Images of Memory: Remembering and Reenacting the Japanese Internment” (1997), and Achille 
Mbembe’s “Necropolitics” (2003) all variously useful.
Setting Up an Electronic Discussion Group (EDG)
Anyone can set up a Yahoo! EDG, at no charge, by going directly to the Yahoo! Web site and clicking 
on “Groups.” The steps for setting up an EDG are explained in a straightforward fashion, and the whole 
setup process takes several minutes, at most. If you choose to explore this option, please note that to invite 
students to a group, you must first have their e-mail addresses in order to send them direct invitations. 
Also, I always block public access to the EDG space. (There are a series of specific options that you can 
select to customize your EDG space.) Although I serve as the designated Yahoo! Groups monitor for each 
EDG space and I receive and read the students’ entries weekly, I make it plain to my students from the 
outset of the semester that the EDG weekly journal is meant to be an exploratory, relatively uncensored, 
expressive forum; accordingly, EDG writing follows no set format, just as long as the concerns expressed 
within each entry relate to the course. Because the majority of writing assignments for the course are 
highly directed and formally structured, I deliberately reserve the EDG space as an alternative writing 
space for my students. Even as I stress that—given the small class size—students should participate 
actively in class discussion, I also indicate at the beginning of the semester that those students who feel 
less comfortable broaching ideas or proffering responses in class should consider the EDG space as a 
supplemental discussion site and express their thoughts there.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested