crystal report export to pdf without viewer c# : Add remove pages from pdf SDK software API .net winforms wpf sharepoint appendix-c-96-part406

Ashbridges Bay Light Rail Vehicle Maintenance and Storage Facility 
Comments Tracking Table  
29 TAB-2010-09-16-Comments Tracking Table -60118979-111853.Docx 
61
ID #  Date 
Stakeholder 
Type 
Comments 
Response 
211 
25-Jan-10 
First Nations 
Regarding the subject project, can you tell me what is presently located at the proposed site? 
We would be interested to know if previous excavations have been undertaken at the location. 
Thank you for inviting Alderville to submit comments about your project, my Chief and Council may do so when I learn more about it and 
report to them.  
Thank you for your interest in the Ashbridges Bay Light Rail Vehicle Maintenance and Storage Facility.  I wish to respond to your questions 
on behalf of John Cursio. 
The site of the proposed facility is in the southeast corner of Lake Shore Boulevard East and Leslie Street adjacent to the Ashbridges Bay 
Wastewater Treatment Facility.  It is currently vacant with a significant mound of fill material located on the site.   
Our studies have indicated that there has been some previous excavation in the northwest portion of the property in order to facilitate the 
construction of the Gardiner Expressway on-
ramp built in the 1960‟s and it‟s subsequent dismantling in 2002.
Should you have any further questions, please do not hesitate to contact John Cursio, myself or our Community Liaison Officer, Lito 
Romano. Lito can be contacted at lito.romano@ttc.ca or at 416-397-8699. 
210 26-Apr-10 
Public 
Add to mailing list 
Added to mailing list 
211 
26-Apr-10 
Public 
Disabled person. Called to register his support for transit city. Afraid of how the funding cuts would affect the project. Transit is his only 
means of transportation. 
Spoke with the caller and addressed his questions. 
212 7-Apr-10 
Public 
Like many of my neighbours, I plan to attend the Thursday meeting regarding the new streetcar facility and the route the cars will follow.  
Though the proposed route has been in the news more than a year, all of a sudden different routes are being proposed, including one on 
Connaught Ave. where I live.  According to Mr. Romano from TTC, a route on Connaught Ave. would require the appropriation of part of 
our front yards to allow for widening of the roadway to accomodate 2-way traffic. 
All on our street find this possibility unacceptable. I would like to know that we can count on your support against this option.  No others 
require appropriation of property. 
Thank you for your e-mail which was forwarded to me from Councillor Bussin.  
Following our public open house on February 18, 2010 where the community voiced concern over the Leslie Street route, the TTC 
committed to obtaining additional technical details on alternate routes. Although Connaught was one of the routes identified, it was not our 
technically preferred option.  The TTC will be reviewing all of the public comments received on each of the routes, as well as the technical 
data, and returning to the community with its findings in May 2010. 
Thank you again for contacting the Councillor and sharing your concerns. They have been documented. 
******************************************************* 
Initial Email sent by Councillor Bussin's staff (April 7, 2010):  
Ms. Bliss, Thank you for bringing your concerns to Councillor Bussin's attention. This message is provided to Sandra for review. We hope 
to see you at the Thursday meeting. 
213 
26-Apr-10 
Public 
I just realized there is a plan to build a new carhouse near Lesilie and Lakeshore to accomodate the new LRV.   
I am thinking about moving into this area, and would like to know, when the new carhouse is built, what would happen to the old car 
houses, such as Roncesvalles and Russell?  I understand there may not be any plan at this moment, but could you let me know what the 
current thinking is? 
Thank you for your email regarding the Ashbridges Bay Maintenance and Storage Facility.  The Facility is scheduled for construction in 
2011 with a completion date of 2013, to coincide with the arrival of Toronto‟s new fleet of low floor street cars. You are co
rrect that the 
location of the facility is the south east corner of Lakeshore Blvd and Leslie Street. This facility is one of four that are planned to service 
new transit vehicles in Toronto. The others include locations on Eglinton, Finch, Sheppard to serve new transit lines.  The new vehicles 
(100 of which will be stored at Ashbridges Bay) will have 4 doors, which will significantly speed boarding and end the frustrating process of 
waiting in long lines to enter.  As the new vehicles will also be double the length of the existing streetcars, TTC  will increase the 
passenger carrying capacity by a great deal.  Th
e new vehicles will be approximately 30% larger than the “coupled” streetcars you see 
today that have the “accordion”
-type design.   
The current "carhouses" (Roncesvalle and Russell)  have insufficient storage and maintenance capacity to support the new vehicles and 
thus will continue to operate in their usual capacity.  They will each store and maintain approximately 50 of the new vehicles.  I have 
attached a link to the project web site which will provide you with additional information on this project. 
http://www.toronto.ca/involved/projects/lrv/
Should you require anything further, please do not hesitate contacting me. 
214 19-Apr-10 
Public 
Hello Lito. I attended the recent meeting about streetcar routing to the new Ashbridges Bay maintenance facility. I do not have a specific 
routing preference as my main interest has been making sure that cyclists are considered in any major redesign of Leslie and any other 
routes. I have already communicated with you in this regard after the previous site selection meetings. 
A desire to run streetcars on Cherry street was mentioned at the meeting. TTC officials were quite adamant that running overhead wires 
across a lift bridge was a daunting task requiring a massive engineering effort. I think someone said this had not been done anywhere else 
in the world. By chance, I saw a bridge on TV today designed for cyclists, pedestrians, trams(streetcars) and autos and while researching 
the cycling infrastructure discovered that it has a lift bridge at one end accomodating the tram overhead wiring, exactly what you need for 
Cherry St. It is the Erasmus Bridge in Rotterdam. 
I happened to see this on TV when looking at a marathon which crossed it. I can't find a good aerial view like the TV showed, online but 
here are a few shots and articles I did find. 
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Erasmusbrug 
http://www.mimoa.eu/images/1131_l.jpg 
http://www.mimoa.eu/projects/Netherlands/Rotterdam/Erasmus Bridge http://img1.jurko.net/wall/paper/24875.jpg 
http://cmuarch2013.files.wordpress.com/2009/07/dsc_0224.jpg 
Scroll down on this page for some pictures of the main bridge http://urbantoronto.ca/showthread.php?1793-Euro-Adventure-Rotterdam-II 
Thank you again for sharing the images of the Erasmus Bridge in Rotterdam.  
The safety of cyclist and pedestrians are of paramount importance in designing the Maintenance and Storage Facility and identifying a 
suitable connecting track. The TTC recognizes that every effort must be made to minimize the impact on recreational trails in the vicinity. 
In fact, this was one of the variables used to evaluate each of the route options between Queen Street Eastand the Facility. 
The project team had an opportunity to review the technology on the Erasmus Bridge and provide comments. The technology is slightlty 
different than what is currently used on our legacy routes in Toronto.  
The LRV shown in your image, travelling over the bridge, uses pantograph technology. The overhead traction power cable does not have 
to re-align exactly when the draw/swing bridge comes back together if there is a pantograph bar on the LRV. The pantograph bar allows 
for contact with the traction power cable anywhere along it, so the LRV just needs enough momentum to cross the traction power cable 
gap/joint where the bridge separates. 
The TTC Legacy Fleet has a trolley pole with a carbon shoe wrap that connects to the overhead traction power cable. If the traction power 
cable does not re-align exactly when the draw/swing bridge returns to the down (or closed) position, the carbon shoe will not travel across 
the gap/joint between the two bridge pieces. The trolley pole will subsequently dislodge from the traction power wire. This would then 
require the operator to get out of his vehicle and re-align the trolley pole and carbon shoe with the overhead traction power cable. 
I appreciate you taking the time to forward your suggestions. We look forward to continuing this dialogue with the community and 
identifying a solution which works for all. 
Add remove pages from pdf - SDK software API:C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Easy to Use C# Code to Extract PDF Pages, Copy Pages from One PDF File and Paste into Others
www.rasteredge.com
Add remove pages from pdf - SDK software API:VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed VB.NET Guide for Extracting Pages from Microsoft PDF Doc
www.rasteredge.com
Ashbridges Bay Light Rail Vehicle Maintenance and Storage Facility 
Comments Tracking Table  
29 TAB-2010-09-16-Comments Tracking Table -60118979-111853.Docx 
62
ID #  Date 
Stakeholder 
Type 
Comments 
Response 
The interesting feature for you is the "bascule" lift bridge at one end for passage of very tall ships.  
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bascule_bridge 
Here's a picture of the lift bridge in action. 
http://photo.bergertom.com/netherlands/photos/3-6.jpg 
Note the wiring is supported by a cage lifting synchronously with the bridge and the approaching wires are supported by a catenary, 
arguably more complex than standard TTC wiring. 
Perhaps you could obtain the plans from Rotterdam, saving massive amounts of engineering and material source research too. The TTC 
may even be able to offer something in exchange such as your rubber encased track designs, reducing up-front costs even further. 
I hope this helps 
215 
21-Apr-10 
Public 
I'm afraid I was unable to get to the public meeting, however I've reviewed the material on your website 
http://toronto.ca/involved/projects/lrv/ 
I'm fully supportive of the project, and in particular the connection up Leslie Street to Queen.  The new yards will provide an excellent 
source of employment to the community, and clearly have minimal impact.  While I don't live adjacent to Leslie Street, I frequently drive in 
the area (down Lakeshore, down Eastern, and when shopping in the Loblaws at Leslie/Eastern).  I do live very near the Gerrard Street 
East streetcar tracks, and the disturbance from those cars is minimal, particularly since the new track was installed in 2006.  I do however, 
a couple of minor questions/concerns. 
1) All the proposals for the new yards seem to rely on a single stretch of track to connect to the streetcar network.  The existing yards both 
have multiple points where streetcars can enter the system.  I am concerned that if there is some kind of accident on Leslie between 
Lakeshore and Queen, that streetcars will be unable to enter service, potentially paralyzing transit throughout the city.  Shouldn't there be 
a second connection to the yards, if only as a back-up? 
2) The existing streetcars often carry passengers while travelling back and forth to the yards. Hopefully streetcars entering and exiting 
service will be able to drop-off and pick-up passengers in the Lakeshore/Leslie location.   
However, I don't see any stops shown in the plans.  Could these stops be built as part of this project? 
Thank you for your email regarding the Ashbridges Bay Maintenance and Storage Facility and the connecting track. The new low-floor 
vehicles will significantly enhance ridership comfort for all. Families with strollers and cyclists will enjoy a far more accessible vehicle. 
With regard to your questions on a single track; it is always preferable to have a secondary access to a yard and it was one of the issues 
considered when selecting a site, however, it has been very difficult finding an appropriate site close to the downtown streetcar network 
that would also provided a reasonable secondary access.  
We will implement operating strategies and emergency response protocols on Leslie Street to minimise the impact of on-street problems 
that may block access to the site. In the very long term, a connection on Commissioners Street into the Portlands will provide a second 
access but until that time we will need to manage with just a single access. Should emergency circumstances arise where the single 
access is blocked, provisions will be made to reroute vehicles from our other two yards at Roncesvalles and Russell until full service 
resumes.     
With regard to placing stops on routes with non-revenue service, the TTC reviews ridership demands and suggestions on a case by case 
basis. Your suggestion of including stops on Leslie St, has been considered but due to the infrequency of service during the day, this 
suggestion was not pursued. 80% of the vehicles using Leslie Street will do so between 5:00 am and 7:00 am and then sporadically 
through the day as they come in and out of service.  
216 2-Apr-10 
Public 
Letter to Councillor Fletcher: 
As I indicated in my earlier correspondence, I believe that a design review panel should be implemented for the new LRV facility in Leslieville. 
As I am traveling at the moment, would you mind passing on this letter to Mr. Webster and Mr. Giambrone?  Thank you very much.  
April 1, 2010 
Gary Webster  General Manager, Toronto Transit Commission 1900 Yonge Street Toronto, ON. M4S 1Z2 
Councillor Adam Giambrone, TTC Chair, 100 Queen Street West, Suite C42, Toronto,ON. M5H 2N2 
Dear Mr. Webster and Councillor Giambrone, 
I am writing to request that a design review panel be established to review the design for the new streetcar facility at the corner of 
Lakeshore and Leslie.  As you know, the TTC facility will have a very prominent location, along the Lakeshore and at the gateway to the 
Leslie Street Spit.  This facility should have an outstanding design in terms of its siting, architecture and landscape architecture. The 
streetcar facility will be in this very public place for generations - it should be memorable and iconic, not utilitarian. Given that this facility 
represents a major expenditure of public funds, it should be a well designed object.  
Toronto is frequently criticized by it own citizens and people from the outside as being a physically bland and unremarkable city. At the 
same time, some of its best facilities are public infrastructure (e.g. Bloor Street viaduct, Harrison Filtration Plant). Many cities (e.g.Berlin, 
Zurich) pay significant attention to the design of their public infrastructure.  Design review panels are routinely used by many cities (e.g. 
Vancouver, Helsinki) to assist the project architect to come up with the best project possible.  This complex of buildings should set an 
example for all buildings.  Just as the TTC is showing concern for the design of its new stations, it should also be a design leader with its 
other facilities.  
Regarding the design, is hiding the facility behind a berm a better idea than designing buildings that actually show people an outstanding design for 
the investment of their public funds?  Good design does not need to be expensive - we could have a truly outstanding facility within budget.   
In as much as the City is requiring design reviews for buildings built by the private sector, it should lead by example and require a design 
review panel for this public sector facility.    I look forward to hearing your thoughts on this matter and hope that you will proceed to 
establish a review panel.   Thank you very much. 
Thank you for your correspondence regarding the future Ashbridges Bay Streetcar Facility.   
The TTC recognizes the importance of the site as a gateway to the Portlands. Consultations regarding site selection and routing options 
have taken place in June 2009, February and April 2010 and more consultations will take place.   
TTC is keen on ensuring the community can become involved in a landscape design competition process. Many residents have 
specifically expressed interest in "greening" the Lakeshore Blvd. and Leslie Street area. To that end, I am pleased to inform you that we 
are working on a process to host consultations specific to a landscape design competition. Although we are still in the early stages of this 
exercise, the community will have an opportunity at a public event to make suggestions to a number of design firms. The suggestions 
would then be incorporated into their proposals. The design proposals would be presented for public review and input at a second 
meeting.  Public input would inform a design jury who would select the winning design.  
I look forward to sharing more details with you as plans develop  in the coming weeks. 
Thank you again for your interest.  
SDK software API:VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password
manipulations. Open password protected PDF. Add password to PDF. Change PDF original password. Remove password from PDF. Set PDF security level. VB
www.rasteredge.com
SDK software API:VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.
can simply delete a single page from a PDF document using VB.NET or remove any page Add necessary references: How to VB.NET: Delete Consecutive Pages from PDF.
www.rasteredge.com
Ashbridges Bay Light Rail Vehicle Maintenance and Storage Facility 
Comments Tracking Table  
29 TAB-2010-09-16-Comments Tracking Table -60118979-111853.Docx 
63
ID #  Date 
Stakeholder 
Type 
Comments 
Response 
217 
9-Apr-10 
Public 
Email to Councillors: 
Mr. Ford.  We would like to thank you for taking the time to attend last evening.  You have been helping out this community for several 
years and  last evening was no different.   As you no doubt saw and heard, numerous residents were happy to see you at the session.  We 
have a lot of opportunity in this part of the city and look forward to future engagement with you to leverage and grow the community. 
Never have I witnessed the mood of a room change from hesitation to empowerment as it did when you arrived. To your credit, people that 
would not have stood up and voiced an opinion, did so knowing you were there.  Several people expressed relief that "somebody was 
here" to support the residents and fill the obvious leadership void at the session.  Thank you so much. You are a true leader and certainly 
"TORONTO's COUNCILLOR. 
Ms Bussin 
Certainly I can appreciate the advantage of having questions provided in a controlled manner, I was not aware and actually surprised that 
you would NOT be taking questions in the open forum. Perhaps at future meetings, if you are not taking questions on a subject in your 
ward - declare this and let the residents know prior to the meeting. Your perceived indifference on this issue was well noted by those in 
attendance. 
My questions to you, as the Councillor and member of the T.T.C. commission are very simple: 
1)  Do you support the Connaught Ave routing and resulting expropriation of land (front lawns)? 
Understanding that this question was asked last evening but, like many questions from the residents, went unanswered. 
2) Should this option go forward, what is the plan for residents who still need to park their vehicles? 
3) Who put Connaught Ave forward as an option? What was your position on this given Connaught is in your ward? Why are you allowing 
Connaught to even be considered? 
4) In the spirit of improving quality of life, why Is this not an excellent opportunity to actually remove the trains from Connaught v.s. the 
proposal which is the exact opposite? Can track routing within Russell not accommodate the elimination of Connaught as a turn loop? If 
not, why not? 
5) One slide indicated this would go before "commission/council" Given how this slide was written, can you confirm if the proposal will see 
a vote by the entire council or just the selected councillors on the T.T.C. commission? 
Mr Giambrone 
My questions for you are as follows: 
1) On the decision matrix for the location of the new yard,  is was indicated that this location had the least amount of impact on residents 
and housing.  In fact when this question was asked at the session, the presenters confirmed/agreed.   My question is, why would the same 
rational not be used on deciding the routing?  
To admit I am confused by how the decisions were made is an understatement given you have proposed to actually increase traffic on a 
residential street (Connaught) and expropriate land (our front lawns).  
I have been told by more than one person that the Connaught option likely won't happen - in the interests of trust and transparency, if this 
is infact the case - why is Connaught still shown as a viable option? 
2) Where would the infrastructure be located to support the overhead wires that would be needed to 
Am I to conclude the residents on Connaught are of less importance, hence the support to increase train traffic down this well established 
residential street? 
Please explain the apparent misalignment in thought process. 
3) What is the incremental cost of the Connaught option vs for  example Leslie or Coxwell?  Would the impact be on the current site plan 
for utilities and incremental costs....e.g. current overhead wires pre/post the development? 
4) In keeping with the "Green" agenda, why are you not divesting Russell?  
Thank you for your e-mail regarding connecting route options to the Ashbridges Bay Maintenance and Storage Facility. 
The TTC was asked by the community to explore other route options following the February 18, 2010 Public Meeting where staff 
presented Leslie Street as the preferred route. This was partly due to the fact that Leslie St.,  from Lake Shore Blvd. to Queen St. East, is 
classified in Toronto‟s Official Plan (2002) as a “Transit Corridor”. The long term plan is to provide new, accessible street
car service across 
Commissioners to Cherry Street, to Queens Quay and Union Station. 
As a result of community concerns, TTC committed to obtaining additional technical details on alternate routes, one of which included 
Connaught Ave. These results were presented at the April 8 Public Meeting. I have attached them for your reference. 
We are now reviewing comments from that meeting, along the technical data and will be returning to the community shortly with our 
findings. Please note that the Connaught Ave route is still not our technically preferred option due in part to some of the issues you raised 
in your letter. 
The Russell Carhouse will continue to play an integral role in our transit network. Approximately 50 of the new low floor vehicles will be 
maintained and stored at this facility, with an equal number being housed at the Roncesvalles Carhouse. 
Thank you again participating in the consultation process and sharing your comments with me. 
SDK software API:C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#
String outputFilePath = Program.RootPath + "\\" Output.pdf"; // Remove the password. doc.Save(outputFilePath); C# Sample Code: Add Password to Plain PDF
www.rasteredge.com
SDK software API:C# PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
Ability to remove a range of pages from PDF file. Add necessary references: Demo Code: How to Delete Consecutive Pages from PDF in C#.NET.
www.rasteredge.com
Ashbridges Bay Light Rail Vehicle Maintenance and Storage Facility 
Comments Tracking Table  
29 TAB-2010-09-16-Comments Tracking Table -60118979-111853.Docx 
64
ID #  Date 
Stakeholder 
Type 
Comments 
Response 
Given the current state of affairs in the city and the spending problems the city has, does it not make sense to sell the property?  
No doubt the revenue from the sale and resulting tax base from future development and the residents would enjoy any positive 
development and green space that would come from this initiative 
5) Has it been made clear that Leslie St is in fact a transit designated corridor?  Do the professional protestors that are against Leslie St. 
understand the status of Leslie St.? 
6) When so many people that live in the area that are directly impacted by the proposal show up, listen patiently to you presentations (a bit 
of a time burner) yet are not allowed to ask questions due to the selective nature of how the Q&A was managed? How do you expect to 
get people out to these sessions if they are not allowed to ask question - please be assured, our expectations of receiving a response, are 
very low so you should have no fear in us asking questions. 
You allowed questions from people that do not even live in the area yet repeatedly passed over identified residents who had questions. 
Why is this? Why did you not answer any questions? 
Would appreciate an appropriate response 
218 22-Apr-10 
Public 
First, let me state that I do not belong to the so-called Leslieville Residents Association. This group of individuals does not speak for me, 
and I believe overstates its “mandate”. While I am very sympathetic to the plight of residents along the path of any of the p
ossible routes 
for streetcars to get to the yard, I‟m also aware that the site selection for the
yard was not done secretly and the opportunity for input about 
that was available in Spring, 2009. I certainly hope the site is not changed after all this time. 
I understand from a letter you sent to another interested person, which has been posted on the Leslieviller social network website, that 
“The comments received at the April 8, 2010 meeting will be reviewed and assessed along with the technical data which our pro
ject team 
compiled on each of the routes. We plan on completing our review and returnin
g to the community in May, 2010 with our conclusion.”
Who is “we” in this instance? While I commend the TTC for holding the April 8 meeting (which I was unable to attend due to il
lness) and 
advertising it widely, the process now seems less than transparen
t. And what will “returning to the community…with our conclusion” look 
like? If you are planning another community meeting, it could be extremely volatile. 
Are there noise abatement strategies that can be used to allay the concerns of Leslie St residents? What has been the experience in 
neighbourhoods elsewhere where these cars have been used?  As I have pointed out previously in social forums, TTC buses run along 
the same route until late at night, and start up very early in the morning (the Greenwood line serving the postal plant) and buses are far 
noisier than streetcars. Most streetcar noise, in my experience, comes from their horns and bells, often from drivers heading in opposite 
directions greeting one another: this must be forbidden in overnight hours. Maybe there is a type of noise-
dampening “skirt” that could 
hang down and diagonally out from the side wall of the car over the wheels. Or maybe a dedicated lane could have short noise-dampening 
walls on each side.  
If a dedicated lane is used, the pa
rking argument arises, and for this I have no sympathy. I have read the statement, “I‟m entitled to park in 
front of my house,” and I couldn‟t disagree more. Countless Toronto residents do not have that entitlement. They have permit 
parking for a 
zone, and take their chances on where they end up parking within that zone.  
If I lived on those blocks of Leslie Street, I too would be unhappy about the prospects of numerous streetcars running past my house to a 
yard. I too would want to ensure that alternatives were considered. But I hope I would not be raising red herrings about parking and noise. 
I hope I would not be urging a switch to another residential street (like Knox or Woodfield).  This is a big, busy city and Leslie is a busy 
street. That should have been obvious to any house purchaser. The Leslie-Eastern intersection does seem risky and it should be 
addressed using signal lights and dedicated turn lanes to control vehicles better than it does. (Uh-oh, that might mean taking out some 
property on corners!) 
Thank you for accepting my input. I really would like answers to my two questions at the beginning of this letter. 
Thank you for your comments and questions related to the Ashbridges Bay Maintenance and Storage Facility. 
With regard to your first qu
estion asking who  “we” is in reference to;  this refers to our project team of engineers, planners and 
consultation staff who will be providing a recommendation to TTC Commissioners through a report.  The public will have an opportunity to 
speak on this matter during one of the regular monthly meetings. The matter will ultimately proceed to City Council for final approval. 
As for noise and vibration abatement along Leslie Street, the new TTC‟s vehicle procurement specification defines both noise 
and vibration 
criteria based on international vehicle guidelines and past TTC vehicle performance experience.  The specification takes into consideration 
Toronto‟s operating environment, which includes residential neighbourhoods, steep grades and tight radius curve
s.   
In order to meet the TTC‟s rigorous noise and vibration requirements, Bombardier had improved its standard low
-floor light rail vehicle 
design for Toronto in several areas.  Noise mitigation features include, softer resilient wheels (softer rubber blocks between the steel tire 
and the axle); skirting around vehicle running gears; suspension, insulation, and wheel lubrication system.  TTC engineers are confident 
that the new vehicles for Toronto will perform better in ground-borne vibration and noise t
han Bombardier‟s “off
-the-
shelf” vehicles.  
The TTC will also be applying a new technology for its connecting track. This involves a rubber sleeve isolating the rail from the concrete 
base, helping to reduce noise and vibration. This new feature, in addition to the continuous welded track is expected to increase the life of 
rails to 25 years as well as reduce the need for regular track maintenance 
As part of the  Transit Project Assessment Process, governed by the Ministry of the Environment, noise and vibration levels must be 
maintained within acceptable levels before proceeding with any work. 
I trust this addresses your questions. Should you require anything further, please do not hesitate contacting me.  
SDK software API:C# PDF Digital Signature Library: add, remove, update PDF digital
Image: Insert Image to PDF. Image: Remove Image from Redact Text Content. Redact Images. Redact Pages. Annotation & Highlight Text. Add Text. Add Text Box. Drawing
www.rasteredge.com
SDK software API:C# PDF metadata Library: add, remove, update PDF metadata in C#.
Add metadata to PDF document in C# .NET framework program. Remove and delete metadata from PDF file. Also a PDF metadata extraction control.
www.rasteredge.com
Ashbridges Bay Light Rail Vehicle Maintenance and Storage Facility 
Comments Tracking Table  
29 TAB-2010-09-16-Comments Tracking Table -60118979-111853.Docx 
65
ID #  Date 
Stakeholder 
Type 
Comments 
Response 
219 
18-Apr-10 
Public 
We are writing to express our concerns over the three proposed Connaught routes to access the planned Ashbridges Bay site for the new 
streetcar facility.  
We are a home-owning couple on Connaught Avenue. We have serious concerns regarding these streetcars, each of them a whopping 90 
feet long, clogging up the tiny street we and many other residents live on. We already quite often see several streetcars lined up the whole 
length of the street... which can occur at all hours of the day and night - and regularly does. Parking on our street can already be an exercise in 
patience whenever the streetcars are bunched up, waiting their respective turn to lumber onto Eastern and then file into the Russell barn. 
Should there be added to the mix a couple hundred gigantic new cars, we can just imagine the chaos that will ensue. 
Do the thousands of motorists who daily roar down Eastern Avenue (coming in from Kingston Rd./The Beach/Scarborough en route to 
Lakeshore and the Gardiner) know that the Connaught/Knox 'solution' will require the building of a two-way streetcar extension along Eastern 
extending from Connaught over to Knox, and then down to Lakeshore Boulevard, where it would continue on to Leslie? Both of these heavily-
used gateway arterials to downtown will certainly become bogged down in a traffic mire. The construction disruptions alone will create an epic 
mess. 
Should this ill-considered plan ever go through, the residents of Connaught and Eastern would be in for some grief. Home-owners will see 
property values drop (while it can be argued that Connaught residents have already long dealt with the noise of streetcars, should this plan be 
realized it would make the situation considerably worse and can't fail but to negatively impact the attractiveness of our street for residents). 
Residents in general on the affected streets would experience a substantial commensurate rise in traffic, noise pollution and parking problems. 
How would the TTC propose to deal with all of the construction and simultaneously allow for residents to park their vehicles for the duration of 
the construction process - again, on such a tiny, narrow street as Connaught? 
As if that weren't enough, we are facing even worse prospects. It would appear that, for all three proposals involving Connaught Avenue, the 
existing track bed would be insufficient. It looks like a two-way bed is planned for all three of the Connaught proposals. This presumably would 
require expropriation of land on both sides of Connaught Avenue in order to provide: (A) a double-track streetcar bed; (B) a lane for regular 
vehicular traffic and (C) space, somewhere, somehow, for regular street parking. If expropriation is the alleged answer, what's fair for the 
residents of Connaught Avenue? Who determines that, and what mechanism determines the compensation for the resultant expropriation? 
The existing frontage on our little street is already exceedingly humble. Are we to expect that there will be streetcars whizzing by our front 
doors, a mere handful of feet away? How safe would that be for all of the young children who now live on the street? This street is highly 
residential with a population that has recently shot upwards, thanks to the multi-unit 3 story townhouse complex that recently went in at the top 
of the street. As well, there are large mature trees which provide shade on the street and are very much a part of Connaught's character. If a 
Connaught-related plan were to win approval, these majestic trees would be chopped down and their remains uprooted and hauled away. 
Nothing but a barren street would remain. 
Beyond the question of determining what's fair in the way of compensation for expropriated land, what answer has the TTC and the city to 
those of us who rightly fear that our property values will take a severe hit should this new two-way track bed and all of its attendant traffic be 
rammed down our street? Why would any of us who live on this little street want to bid a permanent goodbye to our front yards, gardens and 
parking pads? Who would want to buy our houses after our street has been so brutally remade? We ourselves have recently landscaped our 
own front of the property, creating a garden buffer between ourselves and the street traffic, an investment and beautification which cost us a 
small fortune. Why would we want to see that bulldozed away? 
We also have trouble with the dicey fiscal math for these various proposals as reported by The Mirror. How is it that the shortest, most direct 
and least expensive option, Leslie St., is a mere 5 million dollars cheaper than any of the Connaught proposals? How is it that upgrading (or 
replacing altogether) the Connaught trackbed, building an entirely new trackbed for Knox and running an extension along Eastern Avenue will 
cost only five million dollars more than the Leslie St. proposal? Surely the Connaught option would necessitate the installation of new traffic 
lights so as to regulate the flow of regular vehicular transportation on top of a motley mix of both current streetcars and the coming 90 foot 
behemoths? All that for just 5 million dollars more than the direct route down to the new facility from Queen and Leslie? We find these fiscal 
projections questionable, not to mention optimistic.... cost over-runs will doubtless cause all of these projections to spike upwards - and surely 
the longer more circuitous the route, the sharper those spikes will be. 
Leslie Street is the shortest, most direct and least expensive route. It's the widest of the streets in question and would allow for a two-way track 
bed. Leslie already has four lane, two-way traffic; Connaught is a quite narrow street. The residents of Leslie Street are fighting the Leslie 
proposal most vociferously - yet for them, in the best case scenario, the only part of Leslie below Queen that *wouldn't* be effected would be 
the short stretch between Queen and Eastern - and even at that, residents there would be further away from the actual streetcar traffic than we 
would be on our own street - due to the comparative widths and tolerances. From there south, Leslie is is on all of the proposals anyway. 
Regardless of whatever proposal is ultimately chosen, residents of Leslie Street are fairly soon going to be seeing streetcars going up and 
down that street. 
Residents of Connaught Avenue are going to fiercely resist any plan which would see Connaught face the rude imposition of expropriation and 
the burden of much heavier traffic. The math is wrong. The plan is costly and inefficient. Expropriation of private property on our little street is 
unacceptable; the cost to the taxpayers of Toronto is needlessly punitive. 
Thank you for your recent e-mail expressing concern over using Connaught Ave as a connecting route . 
The new streetcars must have efficient access to and from the new facility in order to provide the community and wider TTC streetcar 
network with effective service. Although Leslie Street was identified as the technically preferred route at the February 18, 2010 Public 
Meeting, there were concerns from local residents,  and a request to provide further details on each of the routes.  
These additional details were presented at the April 8 Public Meeting. The TTC is now reviewing public comments and will be returning to 
the community shortly with our findings. 
Your comments and concerns have been noted and will be considered in our final decision. 
Thank you again for your interest. 
SDK software API:C# PDF bookmark Library: add, remove, update PDF bookmarks in C#.
Help to add or insert bookmark and outline into PDF file in .NET framework. Ability to remove and delete bookmark and outline from PDF document.
www.rasteredge.com
SDK software API:C# PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in C#.
Image: Insert Image to PDF. Image: Remove Image from Redact Text Content. Redact Images. Redact Pages. Annotation & Highlight Text. Add Text. Add Text Box. Drawing
www.rasteredge.com
Ashbridges Bay Light Rail Vehicle Maintenance and Storage Facility 
Comments Tracking Table  
29 TAB-2010-09-16-Comments Tracking Table -60118979-111853.Docx 
66
ID #  Date 
Stakeholder 
Type 
Comments 
Response 
220 20-Apr-10 
Public 
My spouse and I attended the information session a few weeks ago and we would like to offer our comments. 
First, it is apparent that TTC staff has done a lot of work in evaluating the different routes and that the Leslie Street route is the "lesser of 
evils." However, it is still an "evil." We do not live on Leslie Street but we really feel sorry for those who do. They will not be able to sleep. 
While the new streetcars are supposedly quieter than the old ones, you said they are the equivilent to the noise  level of heavy trucks or 
buses. So at 5 o'clock in the morning, the Leslie Street residents will have 70 or so heavy trucks rumbling by their bedroom windows. Now, 
would any of the  decision-makers at TTC or the City would vote for this route if they lived on Leslie Street? Of course not. 
Second, the reason that the TTC is having to choose between the lesser of evils is because of the ill-advised site selection.  The 
Ashbridges Bay site is a primary gateway to the waterfront and the Martin Goodman trail.  Thousands of Torontonians walk, run, bike or 
blade around that corner. Toronto has limited recreation trails, given the large population. And that section of the Martin Goodman trail is 
rather homely, as it skirts around and through an uglly concrete plant, the rather smelly Ashbridges site, and the noise and pollution from 
the vehicles on on the Lakeshore. The Ashbridge's berm at least provides a flash of greenery. And now you want to take that way and plop 
rail yard into the area. Quite apart from aesthetics, how are the walkers, runners, bikers and blades supposed to negotiate the multitude of 
tracks and street cars? And assuming they "just do it", how can we call that "recreation." The recreation trail, while homely and smelly, is 
all we have. The City has ruined most of the waterfront. Don't ruin it further, please. 
It seems to us that you should look at the Unwin site or other sites more closely. Your pamphlet says the Unwin sitet was opposed by the 
film industry and 'residents.'  Why does the film industry have such a big say? And what residents? That area is mostly commercial. You 
also say you would need to put in a new bridge. But there are plans to do that in the future. So why not do it now?  
Several factors were considered in selecting Leslie Street and Lakeshore Blvd. East as the site of the new Maintenance and Storage 
Facility.  Of the three sites which were short-listed and presented at the Public Open Houses in June, 2009, the Unwin Ave site was not 
preferred, as it would involve displacing existing businesses and would also involve rail crossings. This would impact service reliability  in 
cases where the line was being used by train. 
I appreciate your concern on maintaining Leslie Street as the “green” gateway to the Portlands and preserving our recreationa
l trails. This 
is a priority for the TTC. As such, we will be engaging the community to help design this section to ensure it retains its attractiveness. The 
TTC is keen on ensuring the community can become involved in a landscape design competition process. Many residents have 
specifically 
expressed interest in “greening” the Lakeshore Blvd. and Leslie Street area. To that end, I am pleased to inform you that we 
are working on a process to host consultations specific to a landscape design competition. Although we are still in the early stages of this 
exercise, the community will have an opportunity at a public event to make suggestions to a number of design firms. The suggestions 
would then be incorporated into their proposals. The design proposals would be presented for public review and input at a second 
meeting.  Public input would inform a design jury who would select the winning design.  
I look forward to sharing more details with you as plans develop in the coming weeks. 
Thank you again for your comments and interest in this project. 
221 
23-Apr-10 
Public 
I'm writing you to express my concern with the proposed LRV route and alternatives as discussed at the community meeting that I 
attended on April 8 2010. I have reviewed the Route Evaluation Summary and have come to the conclusion that the TTC made the right 
decision early on with the routing directly down Leslie Street. While investigating all possible routes is a positive step that should have 
been undertaken in the first place, it seems that a small but vocal group of residents would like to see the route adjusted so as not to 
directly impact them, even if this means affecting even more residents of our neighbourhood. 
The results of the summary speak for themselves; Leslie Street is clearly the least impactful option to the residents of Leslieville as a 
whole and to the the commuters who depend on Lakeshore Boulevard as their route to their destination on a daily basis. It is also the most 
cost-effective, which benefits all residents of Toronto, Leslievillers included. It is consistent with the City Plan and all zoning, as well as 
being an established transit corridor.  
Locating the route on small, residential streets such as Knox is unacceptable. These streets were not developed or planned with this kind 
of use in mind. Residents on these streets would rightly feel blindsided that their small, quiet street could suddenly become a major transit 
route. Conversely, no resident of Leslie Street south of Queen Street East should be surprised to see TTC vehicles on their street. 
The proposed Pape/Eastern/Leslie route likewise exposes far more residents to the noise and inconvenience of the TTC vehicles than 
routing them down Leslie. Additionally, there would be a sharp turn at Leslie and Eastern, creating much more noise for the residents in 
the immediate vicinity than if the cars simply glided straight through from Queen to Lakeshore. Moreover, Pape Avenue has as many, if not 
more, residential units than the corresponding stretch of Leslie Street. 
The proposed Coxwell option is an interesting one. It would pose some challenges operationally to the TTC and to traffic patterns on 
Lakeshore Blvd, but the fact it impacts fewer residents should be given greater weight.  
The so-called Leslieville Residents Association is simply a protest group of people centred around Leslie Street with the single mandate of 
being opposed to the proposed Leslie Street route. As such, they cannot be seen to represent the residents of Leslieville in general nor 
anyone else who isn't actively a part of their group. 
I believe it would be unfair and irresponsible to impose the inconveniences of the LRV route to more residents than is necessary, because 
one small pocket of our neighbourhood is better organized and more vocal.  
Thank-you for taking the time to read my letter and for your efforts in involving the community in this process; it is appreciated. Please add 
me to any mailing list that may exist to notify me of any decisions or developments regarding this project. 
Thank you kindly for your letter. 
The TTC was asked by the community to explore other route options following the February 18, 2010 Public Meeting where staff 
presented Leslie Street as the preferred route. As  you mentioned, this was partly  due to the fact that Leslie St.,  from Lake Shore Blvd. to 
Queen St. East, is classified in Toronto‟s Official Plan (2002) as a “Transit Corridor”. The long term plan is to provide new
, accessible 
streetcar service across Commissioners to Cherry Street, to Queens Quay and Union Station. 
As a result of community concerns, TTC is committed to obtaining additional technical details on alternate routes, one of which included 
Coxwell Ave. which has no single family units adjacent to the route but does have 41 multi-dwelling  units. Other variables were also 
considered as noted at the April 8 meeting. I have attached the evaluation matrix for your reference. 
We are now reviewing comments from that meeting, along the technical data and will be returning to the community shortly with our 
findings.  
I appreciate your comments on our consultation process and we look forward to continuing our dialogue with the community. 
222 5-May-10 
Public 
There doesn‟t seem to be any new info re: weighting system for the alternative routes.  Is the Leslie Street still considered
the preferred 
option?  When is this going forward to council?  Our voice is still not being heard by TTC and I would like to let council know how the 
residents feel about the tracks running down our street. 
Thank you for your e-mail. The intent behind the landscape competition meeting on May 19, 2010 will focus on developing a vision for the 
perimeter of the Ashbridges Bay TTC Facility.  As for the connecting track, as soon as a recommended option is available, it will be 
communicated to stakeholders. The recommendation would advance to the  TTC Commission meeting for discussion and approval. 
Members of the public have the opportunity to present at this forum. I have attached a link which will provide you with details and contact 
information, in the event  you wanted to pursue this further. 
http://www3.ttc.ca/About_the_TTC/Commission_reports_and_information/Commission_meetings/index.jsp 
If you require anything further, please do not hesitate contacting me. 
SDK software API:VB.NET PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in
Image: Insert Image to PDF. Image: Remove Image from Redact Text Content. Redact Images. Redact Pages. Annotation & Highlight Text. Add Text. Add Text Box. Drawing
www.rasteredge.com
SDK software API:VB.NET PDF metadata library: add, remove, update PDF metadata in
Add permanent metadata to PDF document in VB .NET framework program. Remove and delete metadata content from PDF file in Visual Basic .NET application.
www.rasteredge.com
Ashbridges Bay Light Rail Vehicle Maintenance and Storage Facility 
Comments Tracking Table  
29 TAB-2010-09-16-Comments Tracking Table -60118979-111853.Docx 
67
ID #  Date 
Stakeholder 
Type 
Comments 
Response 
223 
17-Apr-10 
Public 
To Councillors Bussin & Fletcher 
You were quoted in the Star recently as being concerned about the use of Leslie St by the TTC to access its new street car yard. You may 
like to consider the suggested alternative route described below. I plan to send a letter to the Commission for its meeting on May 6 . (In 
case my name is not familiar to you or your staff, my special interest at the UoT Cities Centre is transit & I have been following TTC affairs 
closely since c 1980). 
There was an article in the Star last week re  esidents' objections to the TTC proposal to install tracks on Leslie S of Queen to provide 
access to the new LRV yard to be built at Ashbridge's Bay a little way to the SE of Lakeshore & Leslie (see AD FIN). 
Last Saturday, I went across town to have a look at the site & esp one of the other options, which also gets good marks, to connect via 
Connaught, Eastern & Knox & across Lakeshore into the site.  The  1  real objection is that Connaught is too narrow for double track. 
What I found was that there is a route almost as short as Leslie, which provides  100 %  dedicated right-of-way from Queen to the yard.  
The vital option overlooked by TTC staff in their analysis is to take the space of  2  storage tracks on the W side of the existing Russell 
Yard (which is immediately W of Connaught) to create a dedicated RoW from Queen to Eastern: 
it would run just E of Minto (see attached map). 
The tracks can then cross Eastern with a transit-friendly light & continue on reservation just S of Eastern, where there is a large Post Office 
facility with much free space. Knox S of Eastern is almost a private road for the PO entrance & the LRV line can run there or parallel S-
wards as far as Lakeshore, where another transit-friendly light would give direct access to the yard. 
This route is as quick & cheap as tracks on Leslie & is  100 %  reserved. It's not clear where the property line of the PO facility runs, but 
one would hope the PO would be willing to sell/lease the necessary land to permit a private RoW along the S side of Eastern from Minto to 
Knox. If eventually the Russell Yard site is sold for redevelopment, the RoW at the W side would be retained as a private TTC roadway. 
Loss of space for the existing fleet while it remains in service should not be a problem, as the TTC has room for  c 25  extra cars at the  2  
existing yards & during the changeover to the new fleet temporary access could be made via Connaught & the existing perimeter track.  
There is  1  very serious objection to using Leslie for the connection. It's a busy arterial road which crosses  2  other busy roads & any 
traffic accident would totally block access to/from the yard. This is never a problem with the existing yards, which have tracks running 
directly to/from the local streets. This ought to be a major concern to the TTC in deciding what to do.  The W Russell-Eastern-Knox 
dedicated RoW should be added to the options & thoroughly examined before any further decisions are taken. 
Toronto Star 100408 
A proposal to use Leslie St as a streetcar route to a new storage facility at Ashbridges Bay drew the ire of Leslieville residents Thursday 
night. 
As part of the Transit City plan, the city and the TTC ordered 204  low-floor streetcars, set to arrive between 2012 and 2018. 100  will be 
stored at the yet-to-be built Ashbridges Bay maintenance facility, at the corner of Lakeshore Blvd. E and Leslie St. 
Although there are  9  possible ways to get streetcars on to Queen St E every morning, the Leslie Av route is preferred by TTC staff for its 
lower cost, travel time, and impact on people who live nearby. Other options include Connaught Av, Coxwell Av and Carlaw Av. 
Janet McDonald, who lives in a townhouse on Leslie Av, said TTC staff underestimated how many homes would be affected on her street: 
" 85  streetcars are going to be coming by our houses at 5 a.m., fully lit? Your analysis is flawed". 
Many residents were concerned that the new streetcars, which are longer than existing models, will clog the avenue since the proposal 
does not include a dedicated lane. 
"For people trying to get downtown or on the Gardiner, there are only  3  ways to get on to Lakeshore.  Traffic is very congested, incl 
Leslie. How can you say traffic impact is small?" said Luba Maisterrena. 
Some at the meeting thought a route that uses Commissioners would be better since it is a more industrial area, but staff said a lift bridge 
on Cherry St makes the construction virtually impossible. 
Toronto-Danforth councillor Paula Fletcher hoped the TTC would reconsider a route along the more industrial Commissioners St. 
"The choices aren't great", agreed Beaches-E York councillor Sandra Bussin: "Maybe we can spend a bit more money and do something 
more innovative then using existing roads". 
Thank you for your correspondence which was forwarded to me by Councillor Fletchers Office. 
The Russell Yard was considered as a possible access route for the new LRVs travelling to and from the Ashbridges Bay site. The yard 
was considered as a possible  connection option from Queen Street to Eastern Ave., however a number of issues were identified which 
made this route undesirable.  The following is a summary: 
1. There is insufficient space on the property. The entire yard plays an integral role in delivering transit service. Removing storage tracks to 
create run-in tracks would displace storage for the new LRV vehicles which is not available elsewhere. Both Russell and Roncesvalles 
Yards are expected to be fully utilised and the Ashbridges Yard has been made as small as possible on this basis. 
2. Connecting a bi-directional route on Eastern Avenue to the western edge of the storage yard appears feasible at the south end, from 
both the east (i.e. via Woodfield Ave), and the west (i.e. via Knox). At the north end, this would entail cutting the corner on an adjacent 
property unless a 3rd track was to be removed. (See #3 following).  
3. Storage tracks are installed closer together than run-in tracks, as run-in tracks require improved sight lines and faster than walking-
speed operation - three storage tracks would therefore need to be removed to provide for two run-in tracks 
4. The removal of 3 storage tracks would require expanding Ashbridges site to accommodate 14 new LRVs. This would result in a loss of 
green space on north edge of the property.  
5. A separate yard run-around track should be maintained for efficient maintenance facility operations 
6. High volume through-moves through Russell Yard will create an unacceptable potential for conflict with regular maintenance operations 
at the Russell car house; as well as potential 
for delays putting LRV‟s into service on Queen Street. 
7. Requires re-grading/major reconstruction of Russell Yard 
The other option of using Connaught Ave as a conduit to the Eastern -Knox- Lakeshore connection, poses other problems. As you 
indicated, the roadway is narrow and construction of an additional track would require property acquisition and/or loss of parking. Local 
residents have also voiced strong opposition to this option. 
There is little benefit to having a run-in track that is in a fully-dedicated right-of-way given the relatively infrequent use of the track. For this 
reason, mixed-traffic operation on Eastern Avenue and Knox Avenue is considered acceptable from a TTC perspective and there is no 
need to acquire additional land from Canada Post for this purpose.  
The TTC recognizes that a single track entrance into the Ashbridges Bay Facility has risks associated with vehicle operations, should the 
right of way (Leslie Street) be blocked. Measure will be taken to institute protocols with all emergency services to ensure an efficient and 
effective resolution to restoring service.  Eventually, when revenue service is in operation on Leslie and Commissioners there will be two 
routings into and out of the yard from Leslie and Commissioners. 
Should there be extenuating circumstances where vehicles cannot operate for an extended period due to road obstructions, additional  
vehicles from the Roncesvalles and Russell Car houses can be deployed temporarily, until full service can be restored. 
Thank you again for your interest in this project 
Ashbridges Bay Light Rail Vehicle Maintenance and Storage Facility 
Comments Tracking Table  
29 TAB-2010-09-16-Comments Tracking Table -60118979-111853.Docx 
68
ID #  Date 
Stakeholder 
Type 
Comments 
Response 
224 20-Apr-10 
Public 
The real issue at hand regarding your planned streetcar maintenance facility at Ashbridges Bay is not whether the streetcars should go up 
Leslie or up Connaught or any of the other routes you presented on Thursday, April 8 
that was just an attempt to divide and conquer 
Leslieville residents by pitting street against street. The real issue at hand is the fact the planned facility should not be going up at the 
corner of Leslie/Lakeshore in the first place.  
Everyone from Leslieville residents to TTC to City Hall can see this site and the potential routes for streetcars up to Queen makes no 
sense. And the idea of sending these massive streetcars (why we invested in these is unknown and should be further investigated) up 
Leslie, as the TTC is recommending, ma
kes even less sense. It‟d be comical if it wasn‟t for the myriad of problems you‟ll be incurring –
traffic nightmares, impact on local area residents and businesses.  
I could go on and on and I‟m sure you‟ve heard everything under the 
sun about this issue, 
but here‟s my input:
1. The TTC should not be clearing 22 acres of recreational green space for this facility 
2. The TTC should be looking into redeveloping existing/underutilized/wasted industrial sites elsewhere (e.g. Portlands) for their industrial 
facility 
3. The TTC should subject themselves to an environmental assessment should they wish to move forward with the Ashbridges Bay site 
it‟s my understanding the site is heavily contaminated
4. The TTC should not be looking for the cheapest (which this site/route is) and quickest solution to their self-inflicted problem of investing in 
streetcars of this quantity and size 
clearly you‟re looking to ram this down everyone‟s throats (City Hall, local councilors, Leslieville residents)
5. The TTC should be 
working with the City to contribute to the vision of what Toronto should and will be…not back room dealing to get 
their hands on land designated for water treatment  
I‟ve copied Councillors Bussin and Fletcher in the hopes they‟ll reconsider their initia
l stance and push the TTC to review alternative sites. 
Leslieville is a vibrant community 
activist I know 
but this planned streetcar facility will not just stunt it‟s growth, it‟ll kill it. You know that 
no good can come of this plan. 
Thank you for your comments. They have been forwarded to our project team for review and consideration. Further details on this initiative 
as well recently announced information on a landscape design competition are posted on the project web site at: 
http://www.toronto.ca/involved/projects/lrv/ 
225 
15-Apr-10 
Public 
Paula, Sandra and David: 
I attended the recent “Public Consultation Meeting” at Toronto EMS and Fire Academy, which was well attended by local residen
ts and concerned 
parties and placed my comments into the box for consideration and potential action before leaving. In writing again to you, I am now also copying 
our MP, Jack Leyton, in the hope that in an Federal NDP riding, he might also have some input to this shoddy treatment of taxpaying voters! I 
would also appreciate being able to copy The Honourable Dalton McGuinty, Premier of Ontario, but cannot find his email address! 
I have been in communication with Mike Logan (LRVYard@toronto.ca) and yourselves since June 16, 2009 (following a meeting at Jimmie 
Simpson Community Centre) providing my concerns on the LRV issues. Following the more recent meetings of February 18 and April 8, 
2010 at Toronto EMS, I am still frustrated that I have never been able to have a dialogue with anyone who has any power, or admits to 
acting on their constituents concerns to address this issue other than in meaningless meetings which only serve to explain the Municipal 
Govt and TTC decisions against all public sentiment. In support of my contention that the residents of Toronto, and Leslieville in particular, 
are being ill served, I have the following to offer 
1. The meetings I have attended have not been “consultative” at all. In fact from the outset, they appear to have followed a 
path that has 
already been decided upon, and th
en meetings have been made to persuade the “Public” that their concerns have been heard and options 
created to justify the original thinking/decisions. No meeting I have attended has ever supported the Ashbridges location nor the route to it!  
2. An examp
le of this is the way in which the yard decisions were outlined first without consideration of the “alternative routes” for e
ach 
location. In June of 2009, I wrote expressing concern that no site which significantly impacted residential property should be considered 
and that the location should be restricted to those sites in the commercial area in the Commissioners St / Unwin Ave area (Sites 3,4,5 and 
6). What a surprise then when the site at Ashbridges site was chosen, and we were informed that the site was acquired by the City in 
December 2009! What consultative process allowed this? 
3. At all the meetings I have attended, valuable time is wasted on convincing concerned parties that the TTC transit improvement is 
required and will provide “customer friendly transit experience”. This is not in debate! I believe as elected representatives you should be 
thoroughly ashamed of your conduct and abrogation of responsibility to your constituents for allowing the Ashbridges option to be forced 
down our throats (Railroaded - 
ha ha ha) in the first instance. This now to be compounded by the “Leslie St Route” foisted on us. 
4. The Toronto “Grand Plan” for redevelopment of Waterfront Toronto admits to envisaging a revenue route very similar to the 
Cherry 
St/Commissioners St route option, and yet the four potential sites referenced in point 2 above were not considered. Where is there any 
evidence of long term planning in your deliberations, or is this so far in the future that you cannot see benefits for yourselves beyond the near 
term? Why could you not collectively take a proactive step in the consideration of the bigger picture, and consider the LRV Yard location and 
route together as the first step in a grand infrastructure project for the city‟s redevelopment
of the dockland/waterfront?  Please see: The 
Please document for information purposes. No request from Councillor to respond. 
Ashbridges Bay Light Rail Vehicle Maintenance and Storage Facility 
Comments Tracking Table  
29 TAB-2010-09-16-Comments Tracking Table -60118979-111853.Docx 
69
ID #  Date 
Stakeholder 
Type 
Comments 
Response 
Government of Canada, the Province of Ontario and the City of Toronto established Waterfront Toronto (formerly Toronto Waterfront 
Revitalization Corporation) in 2001 to oversee and lead waterfront revitalization. Three orders of government have each committed $500 
million in seed funding to kick-start waterfront revitalizaton.  The goverments jointly fund the Corporation and all appoint a maximum of four 
members to Waterfront Toronto's Board of Directors.  The chair is jointly appointed by the governments. Federally, the Department of Finance 
Canada is responsible for waterfront revitalization. At the provincial level, responsibility rests with the Ministry of Energy and Infrastructure. The 
Waterfront Project Secretariat under Deputy City Manager Richard Butts oversees revitalization activities at the municipal level. 
5. xx has established a Leslieville residents association to channel our concerns and get you to act on our behalf, and I will be lending my 
support to h
er efforts going forward. Paula and Sandra‟s physical presence at the April 8 meeting was meaningless, as decisions have 
already been made and they were in no position to offer any alternate plans as this meeting was informative not consultative. At the very 
least we need the Commissioners / Cherry St route to be supported if the Ashbridges site is now set in stone. 
6. All the issues which related to alternate routes and prioritized rankings were presented in a condescending manner at best, and placed 
the 
residents‟ concerns and disruptions way behind cost concerns. The major objection to the Cherry / Commissioners route was giv
en as 
a fait accompli, involving the insoluble issue of the raised bridge 
This is not beyond human endeavour to solve, and if the concept of a 
new bridge or tunnel is too expensive to deal with currently, then put the dredging barge on the other side on a permanent basis and have 
it pump the silt through a pipe to the other side once every two months. This will certainly be a cheaper option than a new bridge or a 
tunnel, which however, are perfectly logical options in the context of the Waterfront Toronto planning. 
7. I can assure you that I will work tirelessly, alone and with other community members, to pursue this issue, which will cost the City 
hundreds of millions over the lifetime of the project, in the best interests of all Toronto residents, but especially the East End public who 
already have the Wastewater Plant and the disused Hearn Generation Plant to enjoy. The issue of crossing a rail spur line on Leslie or 
Commissioners is BS frankly, since the traffic disruption resulting from the crossing of Eastern Ave and Lakeshore by the proposed Leslie 
St route option will be horrendous in comparison to the little use on the spur lines! 
I look forward to hearing from you with answers to my questions and learning what you discovered from the Public Consultation Meeting 
that informed your judgment and has caused you to consider the input and recommendations of your constituents, and help me in working 
positively with my neighbours and yourselves to bring this to a satisfactory outcome. 
226 18-Apr-10 
Public 
our family has many questions regarding the proposed Leslieville plan : 
1.  how is the TTC paying for this project, the news reports that the TTC is advising of fare hikes because they have no money 
2.  why is the west end of Toronto not being considered for this project, surely they would love the convenience of having the cars so close 
to their location, there is room and the costs for travelling the cars would decrease, let's consider sharing the wealth with our west end 
transit riders 
3.  why are we going to put a car barn on a beautiful piece of green land that was cleaned up for people to use 
4.  why is it always the east end that has to bend to make things work 
5.  what are the benefits to our area for having this car barn, our family can't think of even one 
6.  how is steel on steel wheels going to be a reduction in noise, come on STEEL on STEEL 
7.   
We look forward to hearing from you regarding these questions and comments 
Thank you for your e-mail regarding the Ashbridges Bay Maintenance and Storage Facility.   
The TTC will be receiving 204 new low-floor light rail vehicles starting in 2013. These new vehicles will significantly enhance the ridership 
experience by making  it easier for parents with strollers, cyclist and those with mobility challenges, to enter and exit vehicles. Multiple entrances,  
double the passenger carrying capacity and a proof of payment system,  will also significantly increase the speed of passenger boarding and help 
eliminate line-ups. Collectively, these enhancements will help deliver a service with greater reliability , efficiency and comfort. 
100 of these new vehicles will be stored at Ashbridges Bay, with the balance will be located at the Roncesvalles and the Russell 
Carhouse.  New vehicle maintenance and storage facilities will also be located in other parts of Toronto,  including Eglinton Avenue West,  
Finch Avenue West and  Sheppard Avenue East) to serve future transit lines planned in these areas.  The TTC‟s vehicle procure
ment 
specification for this project has defined both noise and vibration criteria. 
In order to meet the TTC‟s rigorous noise and vibration requirements, Bombardier has improved its standard low
-floor light rail vehicle 
design for Toronto in several areas.  Noise mitigation features include, softer resilient wheels (softer rubber blocks between the steel tire 
and the axle); skirting around vehicle running gears; suspension, insulation, and wheel lubrication system.  TTC engineers are confident 
that the new vehicles for Toronto will perform better in ground-borne vibration and noise than Bo
mbardier‟s “off
-the-
shelf” vehicles.  
The TTC will also be applying a new technology for its connecting track. This involves a rubber sleeve isolating the rail from the concrete 
base, helping to reduce noise and vibration. This new feature, in addition to the continuous welded track, is expected to increase the life of 
rails to 25 years as well as reduce the need for regular track maintenance.  
We recognizes the importance of the site as a “green” gateway 
to the Portlands. Consultations regarding site selection and routing options have taken place in June 2009, February and April 2010 and 
more consultations will take place.   
TTC is keen on ensuring the community can become involved in a landscape design competition process. Many residents have 
specifical
ly expressed interest in “greening” the Lakeshore Blvd. and Leslie Street area. To that end, I am pleased to inform you that 
we 
are working on a process to host consultations specific to a landscape design competition. Although we are still in the early stages of this 
exercise, the community will have an opportunity at a public event to make suggestions to a number of design firms. The suggestions 
would then be incorporated into their proposals. The design proposals would be presented for public review and input at a second 
meeting.  Public input would inform a design jury who would select the winning design.  
I look forward to sharing more details with you as plans develop  in the coming weeks. Thank you again for your interest in this project. 
Ashbridges Bay Light Rail Vehicle Maintenance and Storage Facility 
Comments Tracking Table  
29 TAB-2010-09-16-Comments Tracking Table -60118979-111853.Docx 
70
ID #  Date 
Stakeholder 
Type 
Comments 
Response 
227 
2-May-10 
Public 
Since visiting the area this past weekend, I would like to add more comments to my opposition of Ashbridges Bay as the new TTC yard 
site.   
I drove down Leslie street about midday on Saturday and drove around the parking area for the treatment plant.   
With a clear picture of the area and structures, I am in complete shock that this site is being considered at all. 
First of all the idea of adding a streetcar throughway to this stretch of roadway is completely ludicrous.  It is so congested already with the 
traffic to and from the big box stores (Loblaws, Bulk Barn, Price Chopper, Canadian Tire) AND traffic passing through to access the nearby 
Gardiner. 
But this only points to an inconvenience.  What is more puzzling and disturbing is the proximity of the proposed site to the treatment plant.   
It will necessitate removing the mounds of earth and trees placed there specifically to create a visual buffer from the treatment plant.  I 
understand that the TTC has plans to incorporate "greenery" into their construction, but with the space available, any efforts at keeping the 
lakeshore "beautiful" would be token/ineffective gestures.   
Complaining about a visual problem may seem trite, but those mounds of earth represented an acknowledgement by the the City that 
industrialized services, although necessary to all city residents, can have a greater impact on the local residents.  This area is already 
inundated with industrialization....incinerators, power plants, sewage treatments.  And this was obviously recognized back when the 
treatment plant was being constructed; the hills after all, are built up from soil dug up during its construction.  The residents of Leslieville 
and beyond must live with the ordour from the sewage plant, but there is a buffer.  And that goes a long way. 
Tearing up an un-industrialized park space that was built in deliberate response to counter a side effect of city infrastructure development, 
completely contradicts CITY values and agendas.  It it goes through, it opens the door for more decisions coming down to convenience 
and money savings, rather its effect on peoples' lives, and this is a very dangerous thing. 
The TTC yard should not be built at Ashbridges Bay; it is too congested, it is too close to a sewage treatment plant and will be a great 
disrespect to this neighbourhood, considering other sites were available. 
I am responding to your recent emails related to the planned Ashbridges Bay Maintenance and Storage Facility. 
The  TTC will be receiving 204 new, fully accessible, low-floor vehicles in the near future that will make it easier for those with mobility 
challenges  and families with strollers to board the new vehicles. The new maintenance and storage facility at Lakeshore Blvd and Leslie 
Street is required for this purpose. Creating smaller facilities, as you suggest, significantly increases overall capital and operating costs. 
For that reason,  larger, more efficient facilities are being constructed in strategic locations across Toronto including,  Eglinton Avenue 
West, Finch Avenue West and Sheppard Avenue East. These will serve future transit lines planned in those areas.   
A traffic impact study was conducted by AECOM staff. The purpose of the report is to assess the traffic impact of the facility on the 
adjacent roadways and intersections and to determine if there are any mitigation measures required to accommodate the impact. As part 
of the impact study, existing conditions were analyzed. From the resulting analysis, conclusions were drawn describing the level of service, 
delays incurred to road users, and potential queue lengths. 
Future conditions were analyzed with streetcar loading on the street network by different analysis periods representing the key activity 
periods when the site may have an impact on the road system. Note that the majority of the vehicles would be entering and exiting the 
yard  during off peak hours, namely between 5:00 am and 7:00 am. 
The TTC has had discussions with Toronto Water on their expansion plans for the Ashbridges Bay Treatment Plant (ABTP). They have 
confirmed that the property being used for the facility is not required for  future wastewater capacity. The proposed rail yard, will not affect 
plant operations and all future needs can be accommodated without that parcel of land. The information was recently presented at the 
Ashbridges Bay Neighbourhood Liaison Committee meeting. The presentation is available for viewing at  
http://www.toronto.ca/water/wastewater_treatment/treatment_plants/ashbridges/nlc.htm 
According to Toronto Water, the berm located at the site, served three purposes including: 
• storage of soil during the construction of tanks, buildings and structures associated with the ABTP in the past 20 years.
• onsite storage to reduce costs of transporting soil
s to offsite landfill. 
• creating visual buffer to the plant.
Our construction plans include, safely removing approximately 400,000 cubic metres of contaminated soil which makes up this berm. 
A Certificate of Approval (C of A) from the Ministry of the Environment will be required before soil is hauled off-site. A route for trucks 
removing the soil from the site will be developed that minimizes temporary disruption to the local community.  Soil below the ground will be 
capped. A dust control plan has been developed and  includes: (i) active measures, (ii) perimeter air monitoring and (iii) a complaints 
recording and response procedure.  
In the coming months, further communication on soil removal will take place with the community. TTC is pleased to be in a position to clear 
the soil and begin the process of greening Leslie Street and Lakeshore Blvd through a landscape design competition which will involved 
the community. 
228 4-May-10 
Public 
Of course I am for making TTC more accessible to strollers (even though I am just out of that phase of parenting...I know from experience 
it is exceeding difficult to take a stroller on a streetcar), and to those with mobility challenges.  My concerns are based on the priority of 
overall city plans.  So it's not that I don't want accessible, potentially greener streetcars, but I'd like to see the ongoing problems with the 
treatment plant dealth with first.  And Leslieville is a Toronto neighbourhood full of families and a high number of lower income residents 
with mobiliy challenges.  It would be hard to speak on their behalf, but I know many living here who see the treatment plant as a higher 
priority in terms of City projects and funding.       
However, It would appear it does not work that way.  It was brought to my attention at the Neighbouhood Liaison Committee meeting that 
each service, for all intents and purposes, is a separate entity, ie. TTC and water treatment have their own funding allocations and 
management, within overall City planning and projects.  So while the treatment plant may have problems that can be solved (odours, 
overflow into the lake), the research, funding and implementation to correct these problems will take a long time.  I know from the City 
Water representative at the meeting that: they are currently dealing with these issues, they have models in Japan where treatment plants 
are smack dab in the middle of the city but are virtually ordourless, that they are looking at a 10 year plan to fix things at the plant.  There 
is already millions of litres of solid waste going through there, imagine a 10 year population increase, or the state of the lake in 10 years, 
and the smell for 10 more years at least.  In terms of our overall City health, the treatment plant should be the next great project.  At least 
the great TTC project is making more people, myself included, aware of the treatment plant. 
I appreciate the TTC statements made in regards to the measures that will be taken to safely remove contamintate soil and greening 
Leslie street.  But living within the vacinity of many services which promise environmental safety, greening and community response 
procedures that fail to hold up, I am left feeling very skeptical 
Comments in response to one of LR replies to her. Her concerns revolves around prioritizing funding for the plant instead of transit. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested