crystal report export to pdf without viewer c# : Extract page from pdf file application Library tool html asp.net winforms online AppendixU0-part415

Appendix U: Curatorial Care of Paleontological and Geological Collections
Page
Section I: Paleontological Collections.....................................................................................................U:1
A.
Overview............................................................................................................................................U:1
What information concerning paleontological collections will I find in this appendix?.......................U:1
Why is it important to practice preventive conservation with paleontological specimens?................U:1
How do I learn about preventive conservation?.................................................................................U:1
Where can I find the latest information on care of paleontological specimens?................................U:2
B.  Paleontological Collections and Fossils ......................................................................................U:2
What are paleontological collections?................................................................................................U:2
What is a fossil?.................................................................................................................................U:2
Are there other types of fossils?.........................................................................................................U:2
How can I identify the fossils in my collection?..................................................................................U:3
C.  Body Fossils ....................................................................................................................................U:3
How did body fossils develop?...........................................................................................................U:3
What is Permineralization?.................................................................................................................U:3
What is replacement?.........................................................................................................................U:4
What is carbonization?.......................................................................................................................U:4
What are molds and casts?................................................................................................................U:4
What are nodules?.............................................................................................................................U:4
What is amber?..................................................................................................................................U:4
D.
Trace Fossils ...................................................................................................................................U:4
How did trace fossils form?................................................................................................................U:4
How are trace fossils usually exhibited?............................................................................................U:4
What else should I know about trace fossils?....................................................................................U:5
E.
Factors that Contribute to Specimen Deterioration ....................................................................U:5
How can I minimize deterioration of paleontological specimens?......................................................U:5
How can I identify active deterioration of a paleontological specimen in storage?............................U:6
How can I stop active deterioration of a specimen once it’s started?................................................U:6
What is pyrite disease?......................................................................................................................U:7
How can I protect my specimens from pyrite disease?......................................................................U:7
What should I do if I notice pyrite disease?........................................................................................U:8
What else should I consider when confronting pyrite disease?.........................................................U:8
F.
Handling and Storage of Paleontological Specimens..................................................................U:9
What factors should I consider when accepting paleontological specimens for storage?.................U:9
How do I ensure the preservation of specimens in storage?.............................................................U:10
What temperature and humidity levels should I maintain in storage?................................................U:10
Should I be concerned about light levels?.........................................................................................U:10
What about dust?...............................................................................................................................U:10
What is the proper way to handle paleontological specimens?.........................................................U:11
Are there any other handling issues?.................................................................................................U:12
What type of storage equipment should I use?..................................................................................U:12
How should I label fossil specimens?................................................................................................U:14
Extract page from pdf file - application Library tool:C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Easy to Use C# Code to Extract PDF Pages, Copy Pages from One PDF File and Paste into Others
www.rasteredge.com
Extract page from pdf file - application Library tool:VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed VB.NET Guide for Extracting Pages from Microsoft PDF Doc
www.rasteredge.com
G.
Health and Safety Issues.................................................................................................................U:15
What health and safety issues are related to paleontological specimens?.......................................U:15
What types of specimens might be radioactive?................................................................................U:15
How do I test fossils for radioactivity?................................................................................................U:16
What is radon?...................................................................................................................................U:16
How should I protect staff and the public from radioactive specimens?............................................U:16
Who should I consult for additional safety information?.....................................................................U:18
Are there any special requirements for loans and shipping of radioactive specimens?....................U:18
H.
Security and Fire Protection of Paleontological Collections.......................................................U:19
What are the fire and security considerations for paleontological collections?..................................U:19
How can I determine if certain specimens are monetarily valuable?.................................................U:20
Are some specimens at increased risk of theft and/or vandalism?....................................................U:20
How should I best protect specimens at risk?....................................................................................U:20
I. 
Exhibiting Paleontological Specimens..........................................................................................U:20
What should I consider when planning or rehabilitating an exhibit?..................................................U:20
Are there any other exhibit planning considerations?........................................................................U:21
Are there any particular environmental concerns for specimens on exhibit?....................................U:21
Where can I obtain additional information about exhibiting paleontological specimens?..................U:21
J. 
Preparation and Conservation of Specimens...............................................................................U:22
What is preparation?..........................................................................................................................U:22
Who can I contact to prepare my park’s fossil specimens?...............................................................U:22
Why should I contact a preparator?...................................................................................................U:23
Are there preparators that my park can hire under contract to prepare specimens?........................U:24
Are there any special considerations regarding preparation?............................................................U:24
How much time does it take to prepare a specimen?........................................................................U:25
Should I have damaged and/or incomplete specimens repaired?.....................................................U:25
Are there occasions when I should not have a preparator repair a damaged specimen?.................U:25
What’s the best way to repair specimens?.........................................................................................U:25
What about applying protective coatings to specimens?...................................................................U:26
Who should clean specimens?...........................................................................................................U:26
Section II: Geological Collections............................................................................................................U:27
A.
Overview............................................................................................................................................U.27
What information concerning geological collections will I find in this appendix?...............................U.27
Why is it important to practice preventive conservation with geological specimens?........................U.27
How do I learn about preventive conservation?.................................................................................U.27
Where can I find the latest information on care of geological specimens?........................................U.27
B.
Geological Collections.....................................................................................................................U.28
What types of geological specimens are generally found in park collections?..................................U.28
What is a rock?...................................................................................................................................U.28
What is a mineral?..............................................................................................................................U.29
What are ores?...................................................................................................................................U.29
Why do some collections include cave formations?..........................................................................U.29
Why do some collections contain quarried stone?.............................................................................U.30
How do I identify the different types of specimens?...........................................................................U.30
C.
Factors That Contribute to Specimen Deterioration....................................................................U.30
What agents of deterioration affect geological specimens?...............................................................U.30
application Library tool:C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
File: Compress PDF. Page: Create Thumbnails. Page: Insert PDF Pages. Page: Delete Page: Replace PDF Pages. Page: Move Page Position. Page: Extract, Copy and
www.rasteredge.com
application Library tool:C# PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in
C# PDF - Extract Text from PDF in C#.NET. Feel Free to Extract Text from PDF Page, Page Region or the Whole PDF File. Advanced Visual
www.rasteredge.com
How can I identify active deterioration?.............................................................................................U.30
How can I protect my specimens from deterioration?........................................................................U.31
What is the best relative humidity and temperature for my specimens?...........................................U.31
Should I be concerned about atmospheric pollution?........................................................................U.31
Does cleaning contribute to deterioration?.........................................................................................U.32
Are there any other deterioration concerns?......................................................................................U.32
D.
Handling and Storage of Geological Collections..........................................................................U.32
What do I need to know about handling specimens?........................................................................U.32
How should I store specimens?.........................................................................................................U.33
What additional protection do geological specimens need in storage?.............................................U.33
E.
Health and Safety Issues.................................................................................................................U:34
What health and safety issues are related to geological specimens?...............................................U:34
How can I best protect the health of staff and researchers using potentially toxic collections?........U:35
What other safety concerns should I consider?.................................................................................U:35
Could some specimens be radioactive?............................................................................................U:36
What terms should I know that are relative to radioactivity?..............................................................U:36
How can I determine if specimens are radioactive?..........................................................................U:37
What is radon?...................................................................................................................................U:37
How should I protect staff and the public from radioactive specimens?............................................U:38
Are there any other human health risks associated with geological specimens?..............................U:39
F.
Security Concerns............................................................................................................................U:39
Are some types of specimens at increased risk of theft and/or vandalism?......................................U:39
How should I best protect specimens at risk?....................................................................................U:39
G.  Exhibiting Geological Specimens..................................................................................................U:40
What should I consider when planning an exhibit?............................................................................U:40
Are there any particular concerns for exhibiting geological specimens?...........................................U:40
Are there any specific situations that I should avoid when exhibiting geological specimens?..........U:40
What should I know about cleaning geological specimens?..............................................................U:40
H.  Conservation of Specimens............................................................................................................U:41
When should I contact a conservator?...............................................................................................U:41
Should park staff repair damaged and/or incomplete specimens?....................................................U:41
What types of repairs can a conservator undertake?........................................................................U:41
What type of damage is beyond repair by a conservator?.................................................................U:42
Should protective coatings be applied to specimens?.......................................................................U:42
What about cleaning specimens?......................................................................................................U:42
Section III: References...............................................................................................................................U:43
A.
National Park Service Resources...................................................................................................U:43
B.
Professional Organizations.............................................................................................................U:43
C.
Glossary............................................................................................................................................U:44
D.
Web Resources................................................................................................................................U:45
E.
Bibliography......................................................................................................................................U:46
List of Figures
Figure U.1. Cabinet Storage of Paleontological Specimens.............................................................U:13
Figure U.2. Paleontological Specimen Cradled in Polyethylene Foam-lined Fiberglass Jacket.......U:13
Figure U.3. Radioactive Specimen Cabinet with Venting System and Safety Signage....................U:18
Figure U.4. Preparator Preparing a Specimen..................................................................................U:23
application Library tool:VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF
able to extract target text content from source PDF document and save extracted text to other file formats through VB.NET programming. This page will supply
www.rasteredge.com
application Library tool:C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
using RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF; Add and Insert a Page to PDF File in C#. doc2.Save( outPutFilePath); Add and Insert Blank Page to PDF File in C#.NET.
www.rasteredge.com
Figure U.5 Example Preparation Record #1.....................................................................................U:49
Figure U.6. Example Preparation Record #2.....................................................................................U:51
application Library tool:C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
Page, a Region on a Page, and PDF Document. C#.NET extract image from multiple page adobe PDF file library for Visual Studio .NET.
www.rasteredge.com
application Library tool:VB.NET PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images
By using RsterEdge XDoc PDF SDK for .NET, VB.NET users are able to extract image from PDF page or file and specified region on PDF page, then get image
www.rasteredge.com
NPS Museum Handbook
,
Part I (2005)
U:1
APPENDIX U: CURATORIAL CARE OF 
PALEONTOLOGICAL AND GEOLOGICAL COLLECTIONS
SECTION I: PALEONTOLOGICAL COLLECTIONS
A. Overview
1. What information 
concerning 
paleontological collections 
will I find in this appendix?
This appendix will:
introduce you to the preventive conservation of paleontological 
specimens
provide you with the information necessary for the day-to-day 
management of your fossil collections
prepare you to carry out the duties associated with the long-term 
storage of a paleontological collection
not teach you the skills of fossil preparation or conservation
,
as 
practiced by trained preparators and conservators
The appendix includes:
a discussion of the characteristics of paleontological collections
tools to help you recognize deterioration
information about proper storage environments
health and safety concerns
a listing of NPS resources and outside organizations that can provide 
you with additional information
2. Why is it important to 
practice preventive 
conservation with 
paleontological 
specimens?
Fossils may seem to be “hard as stone
.
”  You might then assume that 
fossils require little monitoring or preventive conservation
.
This isn’t the 
case
.
Paleontological collections do
require an appropriate level of 
preventive conservation
.
Without routine monitoring (including good 
baseline information)
,
the first indication of a problem is usually when a 
specimen starts to crumble
.
Often
,
little can be done at this point
.
The 
deterioration is irreversible
.
This results in:
damage to the specimen 
the loss of scientific information
.
3. How can I learn about 
preventive conservation?
Read about the agents of deterioration in Section E and the proper storage 
of paleontological specimens in Section F
.
See Chapter 3: Preservation: 
Getting Started
,
and Chapter 4: Museum Collections Environment
,
for a 
discussion on the agents of deterioration
.
For information on exhibits
,
refer to Museum Handbook
,
Part III (MH-III)
,
Chapter 7: Using Museum 
Collections in Exhibits and NPS CD-ROM publication
,
Exhibit 
Conservation Guidelines
,
available from the Harpers Ferry Center (see 
application Library tool:VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
using RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF; Add and Insert a Page to PDF File Using VB. doc2.Save( outPutFilePath). Add and Insert Blank Page to PDF File Using VB.
www.rasteredge.com
application Library tool:C# PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files
Besides, in the process of splitting PDF document, developers can also remove certain PDF page from target PDF file using C#.NET PDF page deletion API.
www.rasteredge.com
NPS Museum Handbook
,
Part I (2005)
U:2
Section III
.
References)
.
4. Where can I find the latest 
information on care of 
paleontological 
specimens?
See Section III
.
References
.
This section lists contact information for 
NPS resources
,
professional organizations devoted to paleontology and 
geology
,
a glossary
,
Internet resources
,
and a bibliography
.
B. Paleontological 
Collections and Fossils 
1. What are paleontological 
collections?
Paleontology is the study of ancient life
.
It includes the five kingdoms of 
life (Monera
,
Protista
,
Fungi
,
Plantae
,
and Animalia)
,
but most 
paleontological collections are identified as:
vertebrates
invertebrates
plants
NPS paleontological collections cover the entire span of geological time 
and represent all five kingdoms of life
.
2. What is a fossil?
A fossil is any evidence of past life preserved in the earth’s crust
.
Fossils 
can be divided into two main categories:
body fossils are the preserved remains of a plant or animal
trace fossils are indications of past animal activity such as: 
tracks
burrows
-
borings
gnaw or bite marks
coprolites (fossilized feces)
3. Are there other types of 
fossils?
Unaltered fossils result from burial conditions that prevent decomposition
,
such as low temperatures or low humidity
.
The classic example of an 
unaltered fossil is a frozen woolly mammoth
.
Bison and horses also have
been found preserved in Alaskan permafrost
.
In arid environments
,
mummified specimens may be preserved in caves or in pack rat middens
.
Unaltered fossils are extremely sensitive to changing environmental 
conditions
.
If you remove such specimens from the field
,
you must 
duplicate the field environment within the museum (temperature
,
The study of trace fossils is called ichnology
.
NPS Museum Handbook
,
Part I (2005)
U:3
humidity
,
etc
.
)
.
This will ensure their continued preservation
.
4. How can I identify the 
fossils in my collection?
Because a wide variety of plants and animals have fossilized
,
it’s very 
difficult for anyone to identify every type of fossil
.
You can consult a 
paleontologist
,
but remember that even the experts can’t identify all 
fossils
.
Most paleontologists specialize in one (or several) plant or animal 
group(s)
,
fossils from a specific geologic time
,
or fossils in a given 
geographic area
.
There are many “popular” guides to fossils
,
but you’ll probably need to 
consult the scientific literature to confirm a fossil’s identification
.
C. Body Fossils
1. How did body fossils 
develop?
Body fossils formed when an organism died and was rapidly buried
.
This 
minimized decomposition and destruction from scavengers
.
(These fossils 
escaped the natural recycling process!)  
Common burial sites include rivers and lakes or other areas of rapid 
sedimentation
.
The death either occurred there or the specimen was 
quickly transported to the area shortly after death
.
After burial
,
the 
specimen was protected from further transport
,
scavenging
,
and some 
types of decay
.
Eventually
,
minerals from ground water cemented the 
surrounding sediments
.
Body fossils were preserved by:
permineralization
replacement
carbonization
molds and casts
nodules
amber
2. What is 
Permineralization?
Permineralization is what we commonly associate with fossils
.
“Petrified” 
or “fossilized” are words used to describe a fossil preserved this way
.
Minerals have been deposited in the specimen
.
It has “turned to stone
.
”  
Even though minerals were deposited in the specimen
,
it still may retain 
part of its original organic structure
.
If you examine the fossil under a 
microscope at high magnification
,
you may see the original organic 
material with minerals deposited in spaces
.
The logs at Petrified Forest 
Organisms
, particularly vertebrates with a skeleton made of 
numerous parts often are represented by isolated bones and 
teeth
. Individuals  that died at the site of deposition and were 
quickly buried are more likely to be preserved as complete
, well-
preserved specimens
.
Organisms that were transported are more likely to be 
incomplete
.  They also may show signs of transport such as 
abrasion
.
NPS Museum Handbook
,
Part I (2005)
U:4
National Park are a good example of permineralization
.
3. What is replacement?
Replacement is similar to permineralization
,
except that none of the 
original specimen survived
.
Minerals replaced the original components
.
The replacement occurred at the molecular level
,
so all of the original 
details may be preserved
.
4. What is carbonization?
Carbonized fossils are often preserved on the bedding planes of shale
.
These shales were often deposited in water that is low in oxygen
.
This 
permitted the preservation of soft-bodied organisms that would not 
otherwise have been preserved
.
Heat and pressure of sediments reduced 
the original plant or animal to a carbon film
.
Many types of plants and 
animals that would not normally be preserved in other environments are 
preserved this way
.
The best examples are fossil fish from the Green 
River Formation at Fossil Butte National Monument and the insects and 
leaves at Florissant Fossil Beds National Monument
.
5. What are molds and 
casts?
A mold formed when the original fossil dissolved
.
This left a cavity 
within the surrounding rock
.
This negative impression preserves the 
external details of the original specimen
.
One rare form of mold can 
form when lava flows around a living tree
.
Tree molds are found at 
Craters of the Moon
,
El Malpais
,
and Lava Beds National 
Monuments
.
A cast is formed if this negative impression later filled with 
sediment
.
The cast may preserve all of the external morphological 
details of the original specimen but lacks any microscopic details
.
A steinkernis another type of mold
.
Steinkerns can result when a 
shell (such as a snail or clam) filled with sediment and then 
dissolved
.
The hardened sediment preserves a reverse image of the 
formerly hollow inside of the shell
.
6. What are nodules?
During preservation the original organic material may serve as a nucleus 
around which minerals are deposited
.
The minerals may be deposited in 
layers and eventually the original specimen becomes completely encased 
in a nodule
.
Depending on the types of minerals and environment of 
deposition
,
the original fossil may be preserved or only an impression may 
be left
.
Often the fossil can only be seen when the nodule is cracked 
open
.
7. What is amber?
Amber is fossilized resin produced by various trees
.
Amber results from 
the evaporation of volatile organic compounds
,
and oxidation and 
polymerization
.
Amber often includes insects or other arthropods and 
pieces of plants
.
D. Trace Fossils
1. How did trace fossils 
form?
Trace fossils result from an animal disturbing sediments (such as 
burrowing worms
,
a dinosaur leaving footprints in the mud
,
or depositing 
dung)
.
These specimens are usually found in rock
.
2. How are trace fossils 
usually exhibited?
Because there are no hard parts to be preserved
,
trace fossils are generally 
found as molds
,
casts
,
and infillings
.
They may be difficult to distinguish 
from the surrounding rock
.
Larger trace fossils
,
such as track sites of 
multiple tracks
,
are usually left in-situ
.
NPS Museum Handbook
,
Part I (2005)
U:5
Smaller specimens
,
such as large pieces of rock containing trace fossils
,
are sometimes transported to the visitor center for an outdoor display
.
Such specimens may not have been accessioned and cataloged into the 
museum collection
.
If not
,
you should accession and catalog them
.
Remember: If such fossils are displayed outdoors
,
or within reach of 
visitors
,
the specimens are subject to consumptive use
,
including wear
,
deterioration
,
vandalism
,
or environmental damage
.
Trace fossils are not expendable
.
Take proper steps to ensure their long-
term preservation
.
Even tracks displayed in a “structure” that prevents 
visitors from touching them can suffer deterioration
,
due to environmental 
fluctuations (Shelton et al
,
1993)
.
Ensure that all paleontological exhibits 
at your park have addressed preventive conservation issues to the extent 
possible
.
For additional information
,
refer to Section I
.
“Exhibiting 
Paleontological Specimen” below
,
and the National Park Service CD-
ROM publication
,
Exhibit Conservation Guidelines (see Section III
.
References)
.
3. What else should I know 
about trace fossils?
Trace fossils generally require less preparation than body fossils
.
Different kinds of trace fossils may require different types of care
.
For 
example
,
caves in the Grand Canyon and the Guadalupe Mountains 
preserve unaltered dung of the extinct ground sloth
.
Dung of mammoths 
and extinct brush-ox are found in alcoves in Glen Canyon
.
This type of 
original organic material requires a different preservation approach than 
slabs of rock with tracks
.
Such specimens are extremely fragile
and break 
easily; handle them with extreme care
.
For storage of dung or other trace fossils of original organic material:
Store the specimens in cabinets with low humidity
.
Protect the fossils from insect pests
.
You may need to build a microclimate within the storage cabinet using 
desiccants (see Conserve O Gram [COG] 1/8 “Using Silica Gel in 
Microenvironments”)
.
E. Factors that Contribute 
to Specimen 
Deterioration
1. How can I minimize 
deterioration of 
paleontological 
specimens?
Preservation of paleontological collections is a collaborative effort 
between field paleontologists
,
laboratory preparators
,
and curators
.
Everyone brings a different perspective and expertise to the matter
.
It’s 
important to understand the concerns and needs of each professional when 
making decisions about how to care for the specimens
.
Preservation begins in the field
.
You should:
For a more conservation-friendly approach to outdoor exhibits
use reproductions of fossils for visitor center design elements and 
interpretive dinosaur “track walks
.
NPS Museum Handbook
,
Part I (2005)
U:6
Work with the paleontologist who collects the specimen and the 
preparator who prepares it in the laboratory
.
Address conservation issues throughout the project
.
Ensure that everyone is using current conservation techniques
.
When 
in doubt
,
contact the NPS Geologic Research Division (GRD)
,
Paleontology Program Coordinatoror the Senior Curator of Natural 
History for advice
.
Make any necessary notations to catalog records or other 
documentation
,
such as:
conservation information from the paleontologist or preparator 
type of glues and preservatives used to stabilize the fossil
,
both in 
the field and in the lab
Note: Be sure to request all
preparation data from the preparator
.
This includes a list of solvents and any other chemicals used on a 
specimen
.
Follow through with proper curatorial care and museum storage 
conditions
.
2. How can I identify active 
deterioration of a 
paleontological specimen 
in storage?
The best way to detect active deterioration is careful
,
routine observation:
Note the condition of specimens when they arrive for storage
.
Create a baseline photograph of every specimen upon arrival
.
Are there small bits of unattached bone associated with the 
specimen
,
or is the specimen completely intact? 
Is the specimen well supported and padded with an appropriate 
material such as polyethylene foam?
Are some delicate parts prone to damage from gravity or 
mishandling? 
Previously attached bone or rock pieces under/around a specimen are 
a sign of deterioration and crumbling!
3. How can I stop active 
deterioration of a 
specimen once it’s 
started?
First
,
determine the cause of the deterioration:
Was the specimen mishandled? 
Are the environmental conditions in storage appropriate? 
Did the deterioration occur because of routine cleaning? 
Is the specimen properly supported (such as cavity packing using 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested