crystal report export to pdf without viewer c# : Cut pages from pdf online Library control class asp.net web page wpf ajax AppendixU1-part420

NPS Museum Handbook
,
Part I (2005)
U:7
polyethylene foam)? 
Is the specimen crumbing due to glue failure or a preservative used 
during preparation?
You should be able to eliminate some of these causes of deterioration
.
Others require the skills of an experienced paleontologist
.
When in doubt
,
contact the GRD Paleontology Program Coordinator or the Senior Curator 
of Natural History for advice
.
Be prepared to discuss:
the type of paleontological specimen 
what formation it came from
who collected it
its present storage environment
types of preservatives used
The GRD Paleontology Program Coordinator or the Senior Curator of 
Natural Historymay suggest that you contact the person who collected or 
prepared the specimen
,
or possibly a professional paleontologist who 
works at another park
.
4. What is pyrite disease?
Pyrite disease is common in some fossil collections
.
Pyrite disease results 
from the oxidation of iron pyrite (“fool’s gold”) in a fossil
.
Pyrite can be 
present in bone
,
invertebrate shell
,
or plant fossils
.
The oxidation of 
pyrite will affect microcrystalline or framboidal pyrite far more than it 
does larger crystals
.
The resultant iron sulphate (FeSO
4
)causes fossils to 
crumble as the crystals grow and expand
.
The damage is preventable
,
but 
irreversible once it begins
.
5. How can I protect my 
specimens from pyrite 
disease?
Keep the fossils in a stable environment
.
Temperature and humidity 
fluctuations promote pyrite “rot
.
”  Consolidants
,
coatings
,
or adhesives 
can be of use only if they are introduced to the specimen under vacuum 
conditions to coat all surfaces internally and externally
.
Even carefully 
conserved specimens can explode spectacularly due to pyrite “rot” 
building up under the protective skin of preservatives
.
The only way to slow the oxidation is to lower the relative humidity
.
If 
the reaction has not started
,
keep RH at 45% or lower; if it has started
,
reduce it to 30% or lower
.
It’s possible to clean the reaction products off 
the surface of a specimen
.
This requires a very specific procedure and 
specialized training
.
Untrained personnel can easily inflict further damage 
to
,
or destroy the specimen
.
Remember: Prevention is always better than treatment
.
6. What should I do if I 
Follow these steps:
Do not undertake any type of conservation procedure on a 
specimen unless you are an experienced paleontologist with 
appropriate training
.
Cut pages from pdf online - Library control class:C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Easy to Use C# Code to Extract PDF Pages, Copy Pages from One PDF File and Paste into Others
www.rasteredge.com
Cut pages from pdf online - Library control class:VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed VB.NET Guide for Extracting Pages from Microsoft PDF Doc
www.rasteredge.com
NPS Museum Handbook
,
Part I (2005)
U:8
notice pyrite disease?
Remove the specimen from its storage environment to a work area
.
Brush away and discard the dry powdery reaction product with a 
dry
,
soft brush
.
If you’re fortunate
,
you may need to do nothing 
more than rehouse the specimen at this point
.
If you can’t keep the RH below 45%
,
and pyrite problems exist
,
you’ll have to upgrade your storage environment
.
Possible 
solutions:
Build a microclimate within the storage cabinet using desiccants 
(see COG 1/8 “Using Silica Gel in Microenvironments”)
.
Create an anoxic (low- or no-oxygen) environment (see COG 3/9 
“Anoxic Microenvironments: A Treatment for Pest Control”)
.
For a collection of known reactive specimens
,
anoxic film 
enclosures will help slow the reaction
.
But be aware that it 
never stops
.
For a large collection
,
consider installing climate-control 
equipment for an entire case or cases
.
7. What else should I 
consider when confronting 
pyrite disease?
Cross-Contamination
The pyrite oxidation reaction liberates sulfuric acid
.
This can damage 
other specimens and storage materials
.
Do not let other specimens touch 
infected ones
.
Also
,
encapsulate specimen labels (don’t laminate them) so 
that they are not in direct contact with the specimen
.
Susceptibility to pyrite disease
A fossil’s susceptibility to pyrite disease may depend on the types of rock 
in which it was preserved
.
Holmberg (2000) noted a good example of this 
principle:
Two fossil whale skeletons containing pyrite were obtained from 
Miocene clay
.
They were found in different states of preservation
,
though they had been stored under identical conditions
.
One of the 
skeletons was embedded primarily in light-colored clay dominated by 
the mineral smectite
.
(Smectite has a high absorption capability and 
low pH
.
)  The other embedding medium consisted of other clay 
minerals
,
mainly kaolinite and illite
.
(These minerals have a neutral 
pH resulting from the presence of carbonates
,
which work as buffers
.
)  
Pyrite in the fossil bones from smectite-rich clays was more 
susceptible to deterioration after exposure than bone containing pyrite 
preserved in clays dominated by other clay minerals
.
Library control class:VB.NET PDF copy, paste image library: copy, paste, cut PDF images
Copy, paste and cut PDF image while preview without adobe Free Visual Studio .NET PDF library, easy to be Online source codes for quick evaluation in VB.NET
www.rasteredge.com
Library control class:C# PDF copy, paste image Library: copy, paste, cut PDF images in
C#.NET PDF SDK - Copy, Paste, Cut PDF Image in C#.NET. C#.NET Demo Code: Cut Image in PDF Page in C#.NET. PDF image cutting is similar to image deleting.
www.rasteredge.com
NPS Museum Handbook
,
Part I (2005)
U:9
F. Handling and Storage of 
Paleontological 
Specimens
1. What factors should I 
consider when accepting 
paleontological 
specimens for storage?
Specimens collected and prepared by experienced paleontologists should 
arrive well supported
,
padded
,
and stable
.
The fossils can range in size 
from less than a millimeter to thousands of pounds
.
They are stored in 
many different ways
,
including:
attached to the head of a pin inserted into a polyethylene stopper in a 
vial
“cavity packed” in their own form-fitted plaster cradle
in specimen trays of various sizes with polyethylene sheeting used as 
padding
small microfossils mounted on special slides that can be stored in a 
slide cabinet
When accepting collections for storage
,
be sure to:
inspect each specimen and make sure each one is well supported and 
padded  
ask the paleontologist about the materials used for padding:
Do they off gas? 
Are they durable?
If the materials used to pad the specimens have loose threads or 
fibers
,
such as cotton and cheesecloth
,
these can easily snag on 
delicate parts of the fossil
.
Ask the paleontologist about other 
options
.
ask the paleontologist to demonstrate how the specimens should be 
handled
.
see how easily the specimens return to the storage container
.
note if the specimen label can be seen without handling the 
specimen
.
If not
,
discuss other options with the paleontologist
.
Remember: Don’t accept the specimens if they have not been properly 
prepared for storage
.
You can contact the GRD Paleontology Program 
Coordinator
,
the Senior Curator of Natural History
,
or your regional/SO 
curator for advice
.
Library control class:VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.
Enable specified pages deleting from PDF in Visual Basic .NET class. Free trial SDK library download for Visual Studio .NET program. Online source codes for
www.rasteredge.com
Library control class:VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
add and insert one or multiple pages to existing adobe PDF document in VB.NET. Ability to create a blank PDF page with related by using following online VB.NET
www.rasteredge.com
NPS Museum Handbook
,
Part I (2005)
U:10
2. How do I ensure the 
preservation of specimens 
in storage?
Practice preventive conservation.  Be sure to:
House the specimens in a proper environment.  See the CD-Rom 
publication Exhibit Conservation Guidelines, available from the 
Harpers Ferry Center.
Use standard geology/paleontology cabinets for most specimens (see 
Tools of the Trade for additional information).  As with other 
collections, you can store small specimens in trays, and cavity-pack 
them in polyethylene foam.
For larger specimens
,
you’ll probably need to use open shelf storage
.
-
Very large specimens such as sections of petrified logs may 
require their own pallet for support
.
-
To move these specimens
,
you’ll need a pallet jack
.
Protect the collection from dust and excessive light levels
.
Always use proper handling techniques
.
Pad and support each specimen appropriately
.
Use appropriate storage equipment (see Tools of the Trade)
.
3. What temperature and 
humidity levels should I 
maintain in storage?
For a mixed paleontological collection
,
keep a stable:
temperature between 59° and 77°F
.
relative humidity at 45-55%
.
4. Should I be concerned 
about light levels?
There is no evidence that light levels (UV or visible) adversely affect 
fossils
.
However
,
they do affect glues and preservatives used to preserve 
specimens
.
So be sure to keep light levels as low as possible
.
5. What about dust?
Airborne dust that settles on specimens is highly abrasive
.
Cleaning 
fossils
,
even with the gentlest techniques
,
causes damage too
.
To help 
eliminate dust in storage areas:
keep circulating air as clean as possible (use primary and secondary 
filtering systems whenever possible)
keep museum cabinet doors closed
use dust covers on open rack shelving
Improper storage and handling is a leading cause of specimen 
deterioration
.  Fossils are often more fragile than they appear
even if they are mostly rock
.  Many specimens cannot support 
their own weight
, which makes them extremely vulnerable to 
improper handling
.
Library control class:C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
adding and inserting one or multiple pages to existing Offer PDF page break inserting function. Free components and online source codes for .NET framework 2.0+.
www.rasteredge.com
Library control class:C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document online in C#.NET
Image: Copy, Paste, Cut Image in Page. Link: Edit Redact Text Content. Redact Images. Redact Pages. Annotation & Text. Add Text Box. Drawing Markups. PDF Print. Work
www.rasteredge.com
NPS Museum Handbook
,
Part I (2005)
U:11
practice good housekeeping procedures:
consistently carry out all specified duties 
use appropriate methods as approved by your park’s 
Housekeeping Plan
use proper equipment
,
such as a HEPA vacuum cleaner and a 
HEPA air purifier (if needed)
.
See Tools of the Trade for 
information concerning supplies and equipment
.
6. What is the proper way to 
handle paleontological 
specimens?
Contrary to standard museum practice
,
DO NOT
wear cotton gloves when 
handling paleontological specimens
.
Fossils may be slippery
.
You can 
easily drop a specimen
.
Use your clean
,
bare hands to assure a good grip
.
Some specimens may have special handling requirements
.
Discuss these 
issues with the paleontologist who collected or prepared the specimens
.
Call the GRD Paleontology Program Coordinator or Senior Curator of 
Natural History if questions arise
.
Have enough staff available to assist 
with especially vulnerable or heavy specimens
.
In general
,
handle specimens as you would other museum objects:
Handle specimens as infrequently as possible
.
Handle each specimen as though it’s irreplaceable and the most 
specimen valuable in the collection
.
Never smoke
,
eat
,
or drink while handling specimens
.
Don’t wear anything that may damage the specimen
.
To avoid 
scratching and snagging surfaces
,
be careful of breast pocket 
contents
,
jewelry
,
watches
,
and belt buckles
.
Use only a pencil when examining specimens
.
Save all information that is associated with the specimen
,
such as 
tags and labels
.
Know the condition of a specimen before moving it
.
Lift and/or move the specimen by supporting its strongest structural 
component
.
Do not lift it by protruding parts
,
small bones
,
or 
attachments
.
These areas are weak
.
Use a utility cart with padded shelves and raised sides to transport 
specimens from one room
,
area
,
or building to another
.
See Tools of 
the Trade for additional information
.
Handle only one specimen at a time and use both hands
.
Use one 
hand for support and the other hand for balance
.
Library control class:VB.NET PDF- View PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
from PDF Page. Image: Copy, Paste, Cut Image in Redact Text Content. Redact Images. Redact Pages. Annotation & Add Text. Add Text Box. Drawing Markups. PDF Print.
www.rasteredge.com
Library control class:VB.NET PDF: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF
example, you may easily create, load, combine, and split PDF file(s), and add, create, insert, delete, re-order, copy, paste, cut, rotate, and save PDF page(s
www.rasteredge.com
NPS Museum Handbook
,
Part I (2005)
U:12
If you need to temporarily place a specimen in an unstable position 
for examination
,
be sure to support it
.
Exercise extreme caution in 
these situations
.
Return the specimen to a stable base or surface as 
soon as possible
.
Never hurry when handling specimens
.
Move slowly
.
7. Are there any other 
handling issues?
Researchers will need to handle specimens in order to study them
.
But 
don’t assume that every paleontologist who requests collections access is 
aware of all the proper handling procedures
.
Be sure that you:
know how to appropriately handle all of the specimens in your 
collection
.
thoroughly brief all collections users on proper specimen handling 
techniques
.
A good way to do this is to provide all researchers with 
a copy of your park’s “Collections Handling Guidelines
.
”  
require all collections users to sign a statement agreeing to abide by 
these and any other applicable rules
,
as a condition of access
.
For additional information
,
refer to:
Chapter 6: Figure 6
.
14
,
“Example of Written Handling Rules for 
NPS Collections” on page 6:30
Appendix G: Figure G
.
6
.,
“Sample Visitor Log” on page G:32
,
and 
Figure G
.
7
.,
“Conditions for Access to Museum Collections” on 
page G:33
8. What type of storage 
equipment should I use?
Paleontological specimens can vary in size from less than a millimeter to 
thousands of pounds
.
You may need to use several different types of 
storage equipment
.
Options include:
Standard museum cabinets offer an added measure of security and 
environmental control
.
Use cabinets for all specimens small enough to fit 
safely in a drawer
.
Take care not to overload cabinets or drawers
.
As 
with other collections
,
use cavity packing and padding to keep specimens 
in place and eliminate any movement when someone opens a drawer
.
See 
Figure U
.
1
.
below
.
If part of a specimen is broken
, reattach it as soon as 
possible to prevent it from becoming separated or lost
.
NPS Museum Handbook
,
Part I (2005)
U:13
Figure U
.
1
.
Cabinet storage of paleontological 
specimens
.
Individual specimens are cavity-packed 
in polyethylene foam-lined specimen trays
.
Courtesy 
of John Day Fossil Beds National Monument
.
Open rack shelving with a steel frame and ¾ inch plywood shelves
,
will 
safely hold moderate size specimens
.
Use exterior grade plywood and 
completely seal all surfaces
.
You can use either a 2-component water-
based epoxy paint or a water-based urethane sealant
.
Line each shelf with 
polyethylene foam and pad/support each specimen with foam or another 
suitable material
.
Another option is to use custom-made reinforced 
fiberglass jackets (see Figure U
.
2
.
below)
.
This is the same principle as 
cavity packing
,
but on a much larger scale
.
Figure U
.
2
.
Paleontological Specimen cradled in 
polyethylene foam-lined fiberglass jacket
.
Courtesy 
of John Day Fossil Beds National Monument
.
Remember: Unsupported components of specimens can easily be 
damaged by gravity
.
Also
,
do not over-pack shelves
.
This will increase 
the likelihood of damage from handling
.
NPS Museum Handbook
,
Part I (2005)
U:14
Pallets are a safe technique to store large specimens
.
Some fossils may 
weigh thousands of pounds
.
Pallets are a relatively inexpensive alternative 
to specially designed
,
heavyweight shelves
.
You’ll need a pallet jack
,
front-end loader
,
or a forklift to transport these large specimens
.
Be sure 
to properly support all specimens
,
especially before moving them
.
You 
will also need to have room for the forks of a loader to get under the pallet 
without damaging the specimen or support structure
.
Discuss methods for 
moving the specimens with the paleontologist who collected or prepared 
them
.
You can also contact the GRD Paleontology Program Coordinator 
or the Senior Curator of Natural History for assistance
.
9. How should I label fossil 
specimens?
Labeling Directly on Specimens 
You can directly label bone
,
shell
,
and other specimens with a hard
,
fairly 
smooth surface
.
Be sure to use a stable acrylic resin (such as Acryloid B-
72) to the seal the surface below the number
.
If you don’t
,
inks can 
penetrate many surfaces
.
This can cause permanent alteration or require 
aggressive scraping to remove labeling errors
.
See COG 1/4 for 
additional information
.
If the surface is too rough or irregular to permit writing directly on the 
specimen:
Place a small square of enamel paint (usually white) on the specimen 
to provide a surface for the catalog number
.
Make sure the paint is completely dry before writing the catalog 
number
.
Keep the painted area as small as possible in order not to obscure 
anatomical details
.
Other Labeling Strategies
For other types of fossils (those that lack a hard surface)
,
such as the trace 
fossils discussed above
,
you’ll have to use different labeling methods
.
Such techniques are similar to those used for other types of collection 
materials
,
and may include:
paper labels tied to the specimen with string
catalog numbers written on storage containers (using permanent ink)
labels attached to storage containers
labels otherwise attached to the specimens in a non-permanent way
,
such as:
-
a twill tape label (with the catalog number written on the tape in 
permanent ink) tied to or gently
,
but not tightly! tied around the 
Be careful not to write the catalog number in a place that will 
obscure any critical anatomical details
.
NPS Museum Handbook
,
Part I (2005)
U:15
specimen
-
a similarly-used Tyvek
®
label
For additional labeling strategies
,
refer to Appendix T: Curatorial Care of 
Biological Collections
,
COG 1/4
,
your regional/SO curator
,
the NPS 
Geologic Research Division (GRD)
,
Paleontology Program Coordinator or 
the Senior Curator of Natural History
.
G.  Health and Safety 
Issues
1. What health and safety 
issues are related to 
paleontological 
specimens?
Many fossils are oversized and heavy
.
Don’t injure yourself or others
.
Always:
Lift properly (use your legs to avoid back strain)
.
For moving and 
lifting heavy specimens use a:
pallet jack
forklift
other equipment
Note: Before using any such equipment
,
be sure that you and others 
are properly trained in its safe operation
.
Maintain a good grip; don’t drop a specimen on someone’s foot
.
Wear personal protective equipment (PPE)
,
if needed
,
such as:
-
Hard hats when working beneath large full skeleton exhibits or 
whenever you’re below overhead hazards that: 
a) might fall on you
b) you might bump your head against
.
-
Respirators if a specimen is being prepared
.
This will protect 
you from inhaling hazardous mineral dust
.
Note:Before you can use a respirator
,
you must first undergo a 
medical evaluation
,
formal training
,
and fit testing
.
For 
additional information concerning respirator use
,
see COG 2/13
.
2. What types of specimens 
might be radioactive?
Fossils from any of these deposits may be radioactive:
The Morrison Formation and the Glenns Ferry Formation contain 
uranium
.
Be aware that some specimens may be radioactive.
NPS Museum Handbook
,
Part I (2005)
U:16
Black Shales can emit radon
.
Phosphate deposits like the Phosphoria Formation may include 
radon-producing minerals
.
Carnotite
,
which contains uranium
,
is often found in fossil logs in 
the Morrison Formation
,
present in many western parks
.
Sandstone often contains petrified trees and other fossils
,
which may 
be radioactive
Ask the collector if the specimens were checked for radioactivity
.
If not
,
you’ll need to arrange for testing
.
3. How do I test fossils for 
radioactivity?
Use a Geiger Counter or a Scintillator
.
If you do not have this equipment
,
perhaps a local university’s geology department or the state geologist’s 
office can help
.
Another option is this low-cost test:  
Place a small piece of unexposed black and white photographic film in 
a lightproof sleeve and place the specimen on the sleeve
.
When the 
film is developed
,
any fogging will indicate that the specimen is 
radioactive (Blount
,
1990)
.
4. What is radon?
Radon is a radioactive gas resulting from the radioactive decay of radium
.
Radium is formed by the decay of uranium
.
As radon decays
,
it forms 
radioactive by-products called progeny
,
decay products
,
or daughters
.
These radioactive by-products
,
if inhaled
,
can damage lung tissue and 
cause lung cancer
.
Radon is invisible and odorless
.
It is a dangerous health hazard when it 
accumulates to high levels inside homes or other structures
.
Radon is 
deadly
.
Indoor radon exposure is estimated to be the second leading 
cause of lung cancer deaths each year in the United States
.
5. How should I protect staff 
and the public from 
radioactive specimens?
Never
be careless around radioactive materials
.
Follow these general 
rules:
Minimize all contact with radioactive specimens
.
Protect everyone from breathing in radon or inhaling or ingesting 
other radioactive particles
.
-
Do not crush
,
saw
,
or grind radioactive minerals so as to cause 
their dust to enter the air
,
especially indoors
.
If your park’s collection contains radioactive fossils
, be sure to 
monitor radon levels in specimen cabinets and storage areas
.  
Your park safety officer can arrange for appropriate radon 
testing
 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested