crystal report export to pdf without viewer c# : Copy pdf page into word doc software control cloud windows web page winforms class AppendixU3-part422

NPS Museum Handbook
,
Part I (2005)
U:27
Copy pdf page into word doc - software control cloud:C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Easy to Use C# Code to Extract PDF Pages, Copy Pages from One PDF File and Paste into Others
www.rasteredge.com
Copy pdf page into word doc - software control cloud:VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed VB.NET Guide for Extracting Pages from Microsoft PDF Doc
www.rasteredge.com
NPS Museum Handbook
,
Part I (2005)
U:28
SECTION II: GEOLOGICAL COLLECTIONS 
A. Overview
1. What information 
concerning geological 
collections will I find in this 
appendix?
In this section of the appendix you will find:
a discussion of the characteristics of geological collections
guidelines and resources to aid in identifying different types of 
geological specimens
tools for recognizing deterioration
information about proper storage environments
health and safety concerns
additional sources of information
2. Why is it important to 
practice preventive 
conservation with 
geological specimens?
The general impression that “rocks” are inert
,
strong
,
and durable is false
.
Many geological specimens can be:
fragile
chemically active
easily damaged
3. How do I learn about 
preventive conservation?
Read about the agents of deterioration in Section C and the proper storage 
of specimens in Section D
.
See Chapter 3: Preservation: Getting Started
,
and Chapter 4: Museum Collections Environment
,
for a discussion on the 
agents of deterioration
.
Also refer to Museum Handbook
,
Part III (MH-
III)
,
Chapter 7: Using Museum Collections in Exhibits
.
4. Where can I find the latest 
information on care of 
geological specimens?
Several professional organizations focus on the care of natural history 
collections
,
including geological specimens
.
Such organizations’
publications often contain articles on the care of geological specimens
.
Examples include:
The Society for the Preservation of Natural History Collections 
(SPNHC) publishes Collection Forum
The Geological Curators’ Group in England publishes a newsletter
,
The Coprolite and a technical series
,
The Geological Curator
.
Refer to Section III of this appendix for additional information
.
software control cloud:C# Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in C#.
Program.RootPath + "\\" Output.pdf"; // Load a Word (.doc) document. zoom value and save it into stream. The magnification of the original PDF page size.
www.rasteredge.com
software control cloud:C# PDF copy, paste image Library: copy, paste, cut PDF images in
C#.NET example describes how to copy an image document and paste it into another page. outputFilePath = Program.RootPath + "\\" output.pdf"; PDFDocument doc
www.rasteredge.com
NPS Museum Handbook
,
Part I (2005)
U:29
B.  Geological Collections
1. What types of geological 
specimens are generally 
found in park collections?
Since all parks have geology
,
there’s always the potential for geological 
specimens in a park’s collection
.
Geological collections can include:
rocks (igneous
,
sedimentary
,
and metamorphic)
mineral specimens (including crystals) 
ores 
cave formations and minerals
samples of geological formations
soils
building stone samples
2. What is a rock?
A rock is an aggregate of one or more minerals or a body of undif-
ferentiated mineral matter
.
Rocks are divided into three different types:
Igneous Rocks solidified from molten or partly molten material
.
Examples include: 
basalt lava flows found at Hawaii Volcanoes
,
Craters of the 
Moon
,
El Malpais
,
Lava Beds
,
and Devil’s Postpile 
lava bombs (features associated with lava flows) 
granite at Yosemite
obsidian at Yellowstone
Sedimentary Rocks result from the consolidation of loose sediment 
that has accumulated in layers
.
Sedimentary rocks are divided into:
clastic rocks formed by the mechanical breakdown of fragments 
of older rock
,
such as sands and shales 
chemical rock formed by the precipitation of minerals such as 
gypsum or limestone from solution 
organic rock formed by the secretions of plants or animals or 
accumulations of organic matter such as coal or shell fragments 
called coquina used in the construction of the fort at Castillo de 
San Marcos
Examples include sandstones in Glen Canyon
,
limestones at 
Guadalupe Mountains
,
dolomites
,
shales
,
clays like bentonite at 
Bighorn Canyon and Cuyahoga Valley
,
and coal at New River Gorge
.
software control cloud:VB.NET PDF copy, paste image library: copy, paste, cut PDF images
This VB.NET example shows how to copy an image page of PDF document and paste it into another page. As String = Program.RootPath + "\\" output.pdf" Dim doc
www.rasteredge.com
software control cloud:C# PDF insert text Library: insert text into PDF content in C#.net
String outputFilePath = Program.RootPath + "\\" output.pdf"; doc.Save(outputFilePath) ; value, The char wil be added into PDF page, 0
www.rasteredge.com
NPS Museum Handbook
,
Part I (2005)
U:30
Some parks have loose sands and sand dunes
.
Samples of sand may 
be collected and placed in the park collection such as the gypsum sand 
at White Sands or silica sands at Great Sand Dunes or Sleeping Bear 
Dunes
.
Metamorphic Rocks are modifided pre-existing rocks
.
They 
undergo metamorphosis in response to marked changes in 
temperature
,
pressure
,
shearing stress
,
and chemical environment
.
Examples include:
gneiss and schist in the Grand Canyon
marble at Oregon Caves
,
Great Basin
,
and Mojave
3. What is a mineral?
Characteristics of minerals include:
naturally occurring inorganic element or compound 
orderly internal structure 
characteristic chemical composition
crystal form
physical properties
Examples include pyrite (also known as “Fools Gold”) from Prince 
William Forest and borate minerals from Death Valley
.
Today
,
over 
4
,
200 different types of minerals are known to science
.
4. What are ores?
Ores are the natural material from which a mineral of economic value can 
be extracted at a profit
.
In general
,
the term is used to refer to metal-
bearing rock
.
Many parks have historic mines and samples of ores from 
these mines may be present in the park collection
.
Copper ores are known 
from Delaware Water Gap
,
Keweenaw
,
and Wrangell-St
.
Elias
.
Prince 
William Forest has a historic pyrite mine
.
5. Why do some collections 
include cave formations?
Even though NPS policy is to ensure that all cave minerals and formations 
are managed in place
,
many parks with caves will have examples of cave 
formations (stalactites
,
stalagmites
,
cave pearls) or minerals in their 
collections
.
Often these specimens were salvaged during trail construction 
or other similar activities
.
Most cave formations are composed of calcium carbonate but may be 
formed by either calcite (more commonly) or aragonite (rarer) crystals
.
Cave formations composed of aragonite are more fragile and subject to 
damage
.
There are a variety of cave minerals
.
Depending on their chemical 
composition
,
they may require special conditions for their preservation
.
Cave formations and minerals are in the collections at Mammoth Cave and 
Carlsbad Caverns
.
A good reference for helping with the identification of 
cave formations and minerals is Cave Minerals of the World by Carol Hill 
and Paolo Forti (1997)
.
software control cloud:VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
DLLs for Adding Page into PDF Document in VB.NET Class. This demo explains how to use VB to insert an empty page to a specific location of current PDF file .
www.rasteredge.com
software control cloud:C# PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in C#.net
programming example for converting PDF to Word (.docx) file specified zoom value and save it into stream zoomValue, The magnification of the original PDF page size
www.rasteredge.com
NPS Museum Handbook
,
Part I (2005)
U:31
6. Why do some collections 
contain quarried stone?
Some parks like Harpers Ferry and Acadia have historic stone quarries 
that were used in building construction
.
Examples of the rock types from 
these quarries may be placed in the park collection
.
Other parks
,
such as 
Alibates Flint Quarries
,
may have prehistoric quarries where chert or flint 
was mined by Native Americans or the catlinite quarry at Pipestone
.
Reference samples of this rock material may be placed in park collections
.
7. How do I identify the 
different types of 
specimens?
You may need a geologist or mineralogist to help you identify a particular 
mineral
,
but the standard reference for mineral identification is: Dana
'
New Mineralogy: The System of Mineralogy of James Dwight Dana and 
Edward Salisbury Danaby Richard V
.
Gaines et
.
al
.
(1997)
.
C.  Factors That Contribute 
to Specimen 
Deterioration
1. What agents of 
deterioration affect 
geological specimens?
Deterioration can result from:  
Physical damage resulting from improper storage or handling
Chemical changes
,
depending on the chemical composition of the 
specimen and the environment in which it is stored
.
2. How can I identify active 
deterioration?
Look for:
physical changes in the specimen
,
such as changes in size or shape
“growth” of new minerals on the surface
spalling
breakage
powdery residues
change in color
change in translucency
swelling
uncharacteristic odors
Also
, look for darkening
, embrittlement
, and shrinkage of old 
coatings and adhesives
.  These can be very damaging to geological 
collections
.
software control cloud:VB.NET Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in
Image: Insert Image to PDF. Image: Remove Image from PDF Page. Image: Copy, Paste, Cut Image in Page. Create PDF files from both DOC and DOCX formats.
www.rasteredge.com
software control cloud:C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
Apart from the ability to inserting a new PDF page into existing PDF C# demo explains how to insert an empty page to a specific location of current PDF file.
www.rasteredge.com
NPS Museum Handbook
,
Part I (2005)
U:32
3. How can I protect my 
specimens from 
deterioration?
The best approach is to maintain: 
proper storage
climate control systems
an active environmental and Integrated Pest Management (IPM) 
monitoring program
Begin at the microenvironmental level and work outward
.
If you have a 
limited budget
,
you may have to start small
.
First
,
invest in archival-
quality enclosures and trays
.
If you have additional funding available
,
perhaps you can purchase new storage cabinets
.
The perfect scenario
,
if 
funding is appropriate is: 
a heating and cooling system that maintains appropriate 
environmental conditions facility-wide
proper storage cabinets
archival-quality enclosures and trays
No matter what your park can afford
,
be sure to take the time to maintain 
accurate records of your museum facilities’ environments
,
including:
temperature
relative humidity
visible and UV light
IPM
4. What is the best relative 
humidity and temperature 
for my specimens?
Maintain a stable storage environment:
temperature of 59° - 77°F
relative humidity at 45-55%
Relative humidity may not be a critical factor in the storage of most 
geological specimens
.
However
,
some anhydrous (water-free) minerals 
will absorb moisture from the atmosphere
.
Store these specimens in a 
cabinet or room that is maintained in a low humidity environment
.
You 
may need to place trays or packages of silica gel or some other desiccant 
in the cabinet to help reduce humidity levels
.
Conduct regular monitoring
.
Remember to regularly check and recondition or replace the silica gel
,
as 
needed
.
For additional information
,
see COGs 1/8 “Using Silica Gel in 
Microenvironments” and 2/15 “Cobalt Indicating Silica Gel Health and 
Safety Update
.
5. Should I be concerned 
about atmospheric 
pollution?
Yes
.
Both gaseous and particulate pollutants can accelerate deterioration
,
especially if they are acidic or caustic
.
Many minerals
,
including calcium 
carbonate
,
are highly susceptible to reactions with acids
.
Particulates can 
lodge on surfaces and surface coatings
,
which you’ll need to clean off (this 
NPS Museum Handbook
,
Part I (2005)
U:33
is never a risk-free procedure [see below])
.
In addition
,
some geological specimens are themselves sources of gaseous 
pollutants: 
mercury vapor is readily liberated from cinnabar
a number of uranium-series minerals release radon
asbestos-containing minerals may break down enough to release 
inhalable particles
6. Does cleaning contribute 
to deterioration?
Yes
.
Both custodial (room-level) cleaning and specimen (preparation-
level) cleaning can expose the specimen to rough handling and caustic 
materials
.
Maintenance chemicals that can cause severe damage to 
specimens include: chlorine bleach
,
ammonia
,
other cleaning agents
,
waxes
,
and related materials
.
Whenever possible
,
utilize nontoxic 
cleaning alternatives (see COG 2/21 “Safer Cleaning Alternatives for the 
Museum and Visitor Center”)
.
Carelessness and improper techniques can 
cause damage through vibration and impact
.
Remember that specimen cleaning is an irreversible process in many 
instances
.
Cleaning can cause loss of:
matrix
parts of the actual specimen
associated trace material
Don’t clean a specimen just to keep up a routine
.
Ask yourself if cleaning 
really is necessary
.
If not
,
don’t do it
.
7. Are there any other 
deterioration concerns?
Some sulphate-based cave minerals such as selenite (calcium sulphate) and 
epsomite (magnesium sulphate) readily absorb water from the atmosphere 
and can disintegrate
.
To prevent deterioration
,
any mineral that can 
potentially absorb water must be stored in a low humidity environment
.
For additional information
,
see Holmberg (2000) and Jerz (2000)
,
noted in 
the bibliography
.
D.  Handling and Storage of 
Geological Collections
1. What do I need to know 
about handling 
specimens?
Weight
Depending on the size of the specimen
,
weight can be a major factor
.
You 
may need to access heavily loaded cabinet drawers
.
Be sure not to overload 
drawers; consult the manufacturer’s recommended weight loads and do not 
exceed them
.
Always use extreme caution; due to its weight
,
if a specimen 
Monitor all specimens known to contain hazardous substances
 
Seek expert advice
.  Remember that such items may require 
separate storage (or transfer to a more appropriate facility)
.
NPS Museum Handbook
,
Part I (2005)
U:34
shifts it may cause the drawer to tip
.
Transport
Never carry specimens to a table or other area
.
Use a wheeled
,
sturdy 
cart with a padded surface to transport specimens between storage cabinets 
and exhibit or research areas
.
Handling
Protect the specimen
.
Practice limited handling
.
Specimens should spend 
as little time outside storage cabinets or exhibit cases as possible
.
Only 
handle specimens on or over a work surface
.
Gloves 
Contrary to standard handling practice with other museum collections
,
DO 
NOT
wear cotton gloves when handling geology specimens
.
The 
specimen may be slippery
,
and you could easily drop it
.
Use your clean
,
bare hands to assure a good grip
.
Lab Coats and Other Protective Outerwear
Wear a labcoat or other type of protective outer garment when handling 
collections
.
This will help to minimize deposits of particulates and dirt on 
your clothing
.
Wearing a labcoat also helps to protect the specimen from 
damage due to contact with badges
,
jewelry
,
and belt buckles
.
Another 
option is to wear a Tyvek
®
“jumpsuit
,
” sold in paint stores
.
2. How should I store 
specimens?
Use standard geology cabinets for most specimens (see Tools of the Trade
for additional information)
.
As with other collection items
,
you can store 
small specimens in trays
,
cavity-packed in polyethylene foam
.
This is a 
good idea for items that may require more frequent access and transport 
for research purposes
.
For larger specimens
,
you’ll probably need to use open shelf storage
.
Very large specimens such as pieces of building stone or larger ore 
samples may require their own pallet for support
.
To move these 
specimens
,
you’ll need a pallet jack
.
Since a specimen may spend well over 95% of time in storage
,
proper 
storage systems are a wise long-term investment
.
As with all collections
,
inappropriate storage materials put the specimen at risk
.
Always use acid-
free
,
inert storage materials and housings
.
Cabinetry should be of steel 
construction
,
with high gloss
,
epoxy powder coatings
.
3. What additional protection 
do geological specimens 
need in storage?
In general
,
don’t leave a specimen on a bare surface exposed to the 
open lab conditions
.
Make sure that specimens (particularly large ones) are not supporting 
their weight on appendages
,
attachments
,
or other weak areas
.
Pad surfaces with inert closed-cell polyethylene foam (such as 
Volara
®
or Plastizote
®
)
.
Use closed storage wherever possible
.
For large specimens
,
use custom-made reinforced fiberglass jackets 
(the same principle as cavity packing
,
but on a much larger scale)
.
NPS Museum Handbook
,
Part I (2005)
U:35
This facilitates open shelf storage
.
Place smaller specimens in specimen trays
.
Protection from high and/or fluctuating temperature and relative humidity 
are important for all specimens
.
Other threats include:
UV exposure
water
fire
theft and vandalism
related factors
E.  Health and Safety Issues
1. What health and safety 
issues are related to 
geological specimens?
Some minerals may contain elements that are toxic
.
The most common 
ones are:
Aluminum
Antimony
Arsenic
Beryllium
Bismuth
Bromine
Cadmium
Lead
Mercury
Selenium
Thallium
Uranium 
Handle all of these minerals with care
.
Many parks have historic mines that extracted minerals that may be 
considered hazardous to human health
.
Some examples include:
Cinnabar
,
which is a mercury sulfide (HgS) mineral
.
NPS Museum Handbook
,
Part I (2005)
U:36
Arsenopyrite (FeAsS)
,
which includes arsenic
.
Asbestos
,
which is a variety of fibrous
,
nonflammable minerals with 
flexibility and high tensile strength
.
Asbestos includes minerals such 
as chrysotile
,
amphibole
,
and crocidolite
.
Specimens of these economically important minerals related to historical 
mining in the parks may be present in park collections and used in park 
exhibits
.
2. How can I best protect the 
health of staff and 
researchers using 
potentially toxic 
collections?
Make sure that a mineral has been properly identified and that you are 
aware of its chemical composition
.
If a mineral does contain potentially 
toxic elements
,
always wear neoprene gloves when handling it
.
Be sure to 
wash your hands after you finish handling any other minerals with bare 
hands
,
as a precaution
.
As with all collections
,
never allow food or drink 
around mineral specimens
.
3. What other safety 
concerns should I 
consider?
Take into account the following: 
Heavy Metals
Heavy metals cause problems by displacing or replacing related minerals 
that are required for essential body functions
.
For example
,
cadmium can 
replace zinc
,
and lead displaces calcium
.
When this happens
,
cadmium or 
lead is stored in the bones or other tissues and becomes difficult to remove 
from the body
.
At the same time
,
the important functions of the minerals 
that are replaced cannot be carried out
.
Toxic Gases
Some minerals may release gases or vapors
.
In a closed specimen cabinet
,
this can generate high concentrations of toxic gases
.
These can include: 
acidic vapors (thought to be primarily carboxylic acid vapors)
mercury vapor
sulfur dioxide
hydrogen sulfide
,
the gas that tarnishes silver
Label all cabinets housing such minerals with the appropriate National 
Fire Protection Association (NFPA) Hazard Warning Symbol
.
This will 
ensure that all personnel (staff
,
visitors
,
and emergency workers) are 
aware of these potential hazards
.
Note: See Chapter 11: Curatorial Health and Safety
,
Figure 11:4 on page 
11:45
,
for an example of the NFPA Hazard Warning Symbol System
.
Also
,
be sure to note the presence of these minerals in relevant emergency 
Always wear neoprene gloves when handling minerals that 
contain potentially toxic elements
.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested