crystal report export to pdf without viewer c# : Export one page of pdf preview SDK software service wpf windows winforms dnn AppendixU4-part423

NPS Museum Handbook
,
Part I (2005)
U:37
planning documents (such as your Museum Emergency Operations Plan 
[MEOP]) and brief all first responders on their presence and locations
.
Mineral Dust
Inhaling mineral dust may be more of a hazard than handling the 
specimen
.
The amount of dust depends on how friable the specimen is 
and how it is handled
.
For example
,
handling may release asbestos fibers
.
Although mineral dust may not be a primary problem in museum 
collections
,
at times it may be important to use a good quality respirator 
when handling specimens
,
especially if they are being cut or trimmed
.
Note: Before you can use a respirator
,
you must first undergo a medical 
evaluation
,
formal training
,
and fit testing
.
For additional information 
concerning respirator use
,
see COG 2/13
.
4. Could some specimens 
be radioactive?
Yes
.
Many parks contain radioactive minerals or ores
.
Some examples of 
common radioactive minerals include:
Autunite (hydrated calcium uranium phosphate)
Brannerite (uranium titanate)
Carnotite (potassium uranium vanadate)
Monazite (a mixed rare earth and thorium phosphate)
Thorianite (thorium dioxide)
Uraninite (uranium dioxide)
The vast majority of the radioactive content in minerals or ores is either 
uranium-238 or thorium-232
,
although other radioactive elements may be 
present
.
Uranium minerals are found in Blue Ridge Parkway
,
and many 
western parks such as Canyonlands have abandoned uranium mines
,
so it 
is possible that uranium minerals will be present in park collections
.
5. What terms should I know 
that are relative to 
radioactivity?
Radioactivity is the spontaneous release of particles and energy by the 
nucleus of an unstable atom
.
This is part of a natural decay process in 
which an unstable element is transformed into a stable element
,
such as 
uranium-238 becoming lead-206
.
There may be a number of intermediate 
stages or daughter elements
.
Radiation in the common sense refers to 
ionizing radiation
: a term for 
invisible particles or waves with enough energy to strip electrons from 
atoms
,
causing chemical changes
.
The three basic types of natural radiation 
are alpha
,
beta
,
and gamma
.
There are also X-rays and neutrons
.
An alpha particle is composed of two protons and two neutrons-
essentially it’s a helium nucleus
,
an ionized helium atom (a helium atom 
devoid of its electrons and having a net charge of 
+
2)
.
Alpha particles are 
comparatively large and cannot penetrate much more than a sheet of paper 
or a few inches of air
.
However
,
they are extremely potent ionizing agents 
because they interact with plenty of matter in their [short] path
.
Export one page of pdf preview - SDK software service:C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Easy to Use C# Code to Extract PDF Pages, Copy Pages from One PDF File and Paste into Others
www.rasteredge.com
Export one page of pdf preview - SDK software service:VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed VB.NET Guide for Extracting Pages from Microsoft PDF Doc
www.rasteredge.com
NPS Museum Handbook
,
Part I (2005)
U:38
beta particle (actually a “beta-minus” particle
,
since it has a charge of -
1) is a stray electron originating from an atom’s nucleus as the result of 
neutron breakdown
.
“Beta-plus” particles are positrons or “positive 
electrons
,
” something seldom encountered in nature
.
Beta radiation can 
be stopped by a few centimeters of wood
,
plastic
,
or glass
.
A few 
millimeters of aluminum will also stop most beta particles
.
Note: Do not
use lead or other highly dense materials to shield from beta 
radiation
.
Certain types of shielding can actually be worse than none
.
Lead and other dense metals (including tungsten) can emit X-rays when 
exposed to beta particles such as those thrown out by the natural decay 
products of U-238 and Th-232
.
This phenomenon is called 
bremsstrahlung
.
If the lead is thick enough
,
the X-rays won’t get out the 
other side of it
.
Nevertheless
,
if you
'
re going to use shielding for a 
mineral display
,
it’s best to make it out of wood or acrylic (Plexiglas
®
)
.
Gamma radiation is composed of high-energy photons (invisible light; 
electromagnetic waves)
.
It has no charge
,
but its high energy means that it 
can cause ionization
.
Fortunately
,
gamma rays move so fast and have such 
energy that they often pass right through matter without interacting at all
.
6. How can I determine if 
specimens are 
radioactive?
It’s vital to correctly identify a mineral’s composition
.
If you have a speci-
men that you suspect is radioactive
,
confirm its identification with a trained 
mineralogist
.
Most university geology departments include a mineralogist 
on the faculty
.
The crystal structure
,
color
,
and other physical properties 
may permit a quick identification
.
If a Geiger counter or scintillator is 
available
,
you can use it to detect the presence of radioactive particles
.
If 
you do not have access to a Geiger counter or a mineralogist
,
use the 
procedure to detect radioactivity in specimens proposed by Blount (1990):
Place the specimen on a small piece of unexposed black-and-white 
photographic film in a lightproof sleeve and then have it developed to 
check for fogging
.
7. What is radon?
Radon is a naturally occurring radioactive gas that is colorless
,
odorless
,
tasteless
,
and chemically inert
.
It is found in soils
,
rock
,
and water 
throughout the U
.
S
.
Because radon occurs throughout the nation
,
it’s pos-
sible that specimens in your collection emit radon
.
Radon has a half-life of 
only 3
.
5 days
,
but when a radon-emitting sample is stored in a closed 
specimen cabinet
,
radon levels may come to equilibrium over time
.
The 
actual amount of radon will depend on the number
,
volume and chemical 
composition of the radioactive mineral specimens stored in the cabinet
.
30 CFR
,
Part 57
,
Subpart D regulates occupational levels of alpha and 
gamma radiation in underground uranium mines
.
Occupational yearly 
exposure per individual shall not exceed 4 WLM (working level month) 
alpha or 5 REM (Roentgen Equivalent Man 
=
the amount of ionizing 
radiation that when absorbed by a person is equivalent to one roentgen or 
x-ray or gamma radiation) gamma
.
While these levels may not exist in 
most park collections
,
they do provide a standard by which staff safety can 
be measured
.
Generally the EPA typically recommends 10% of 
occupational limits for the general public
.
If you have concerns regarding occupational exposure to radioactive 
specimens in your park’s collection
,
consult with an industrial hygienist
,
SDK software service:VB.NET PDF copy, paste image library: copy, paste, cut PDF images
be saved after cutting, copying and pasting into PDF page. existing PDF file and paste it into another one. Copy, paste and cut PDF image while preview without
www.rasteredge.com
SDK software service:VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple
Independent component for splitting PDF document in preview without using that they can split target multi-page PDF document file to one-page PDF files or
www.rasteredge.com
NPS Museum Handbook
,
Part I (2005)
U:39
NIOSH
,
and/or the U
.
S
.
Public Health Service specialist duty-stationed in 
your park or region
.
8. How should I protect staff 
and the public from 
radioactive specimens?
Never
be careless around radioactive materials
.
Follow these general rules:
Minimize all contact with radioactive specimens
.
Protect everyone from breathing in radon or inhaling or ingesting 
other radioactive particles
.
-
Do not crush
,
saw
,
or grind radioactive minerals so as to cause 
their dust to enter the air
,
especially indoors
.
-
As with all museum specimens
,
never smoke
,
drink
,
or eat 
while handling radioactive minerals
.
Note: Inhalation of radon or breathing in or ingesting radioactive 
minerals or their dust is the most likely method of radiation exposure
.
Wear latex or nitrile gloves whenever handling radioactive 
specimens
.
Always wash your hands after handling radioactive minerals
.
Work to minimize deposits of radioactive particulates on staff:
- Always wear a labcoat or other protective outer wear
.
Store all radioactive specimens appropriately
.
Post proper labels and 
signage (see Figure U
.
3
.
above)
.
Make sure that everyone knows 
the nature of the materials that they might be handling
.
Be sure to 
provide everyone accessing these collections with guidance on 
handling
,
precautions
,
and procedures
.
You may need to store radioactive specimens in a special cabinet 
with a venting systems (see Figure U
.
3
.
)
.
Refer to Conserve O 
Gram 2/5 “Fossil Vertebrates as Radon Sources: Health Update” for 
additional information
.
If possible
,
store radioactive specimens in a separate
,
secured room 
that is vented to the outdoors
.
Additional Important Safety Notes
The general rules stated above are NOT adequate for specimens emitting 
high levels of radiation
.
Consult an industrial hygienist or the National 
Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) for assistance 
developing appropriate control measures
.
Contact NIOSH by telephone at: (800) 356-4674 or on the web at: 
<
http://www
.
cdc
.
gov/niosh/homepage
.
html
>.
NIOSH also conducts Health Hazard Evaluations (HHE)
.
A HHE is the 
study of a workplace to see if workers are exposed to hazardous materials 
or harmful conditions
.
To request a HHE
,
or for more information
,
see the 
HHE Program website at: 
<
http://www
.
cdc
.
gov/niosh/hhe/default
.
html
>.
SDK software service:C# PDF delete text Library: delete, remove text from PDF file in
C#.NET Sample Code: Delete Text from One Page by Position in C#.NET. It demonstrates how to delete a character in the first page of sample PDF file with the
www.rasteredge.com
SDK software service:C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
applications. Support adding and inserting one or multiple pages to existing PDF document. Forms. Ability to add PDF page number in preview. Offer
www.rasteredge.com
NPS Museum Handbook
,
Part I (2005)
U:40
Requests for a HHE must be in writing
.
The HHE Program website 
includes an on-line HHE Request Form
.
For additional information concerning a HHE relative to geological and 
paleontological collections
,
refer to:
Jiggens
,
Timothy
,
E
.,
John J
.
Cardarelli
,
and Steven H
.
Arhrenholz
.
NIOSH Health Hazard Evaluation Report: Hagerman Fossil Beds 
National Monument
,
National Park Service
,
U
.
S
.
Department of the 
Interior
,
Hagerman
,
Idaho
,
HETA 96-0264-2713
.
Cincinnati: 
National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health
,
1998
.
Available on the web at: 
<
http://www
.
cdc
.
gov/niosh/hhe/reports/pdfs/1996-0264-2713
.
pdf
>.
Remember
:
There is an inverse square relationship between the level of exposure 
to radiation from a mineral and the distance you are from it
.
Radiation levels drop off dramatically the farther you are from the 
specimen
.
If you’re going to use shielding for a radioactive mineral on exhibit
,
it
'
s best to make it out of wood and/or acrylic (Plexiglas
®
)
.
9. Are there any other 
human health risks 
associated with geological 
specimens?
Some specimens of rocks or minerals are large and difficult to move
.
You 
may want to store such specimens on pallets and use a pallet jack or 
forklift to move them
.
Always follow proper safety precautions
.
Use 
appropriate techniques and equipment
.
F.  Security Concerns
1. Are some types of 
specimens at increased 
risk of theft and/or 
vandalism?
Gold nuggets and silver specimens have commercial value; store them in a 
safe
.
Other minerals may be vulnerable
,
including:
certain rare and valuable mineral specimens
minerals with good crystal structure
some minerals of gemstone quality
small specimens
,
which are easier for a thief to pick up and steal
2. How should I best protect 
specimens at risk?
You may wish to have a professional mineral appraiser examine your 
collections
.
An appraiser can provide an indication of the market value of 
specimens
.
Appraisals can help you to decide which specimens may 
require increased levels of security
.
As noted above
,
some specimens should not be stored with other items
.
Rather
,
they require their own secure storage areas
.
Specimens that may 
Always store specimens appropriately and use proper 
labels and signage that identifies ALL
hazardous 
materials
.
SDK software service:C# PDF Page Move Library: re-order PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
Enable C# users to move, sort and reorder all PDF page in preview. all or several PDF document pages, or just change the position of certain one PDF page in an
www.rasteredge.com
SDK software service:C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
Use corresponding namespaces; using RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic; using RasterEdge.XDoc. PDF; Create a new PDF Document with one Blank Page in C# Project.
www.rasteredge.com
NPS Museum Handbook
,
Part I (2005)
U:41
require separate storage include radioactive specimens and those that 
produce gases
.
For additional information concerning museum security
,
refer to Chapter 
9: Museum Collections Security and Fire Protection
.
G.  Exhibiting Geological 
Specimens
1. What should I consider 
when planning an exhibit?
Geology exhibits usually focus on two broad interpretive themes: 
Processes
.
The specimens illustrate a process such as erosion or 
volcanic activity
.
Objects
.
The exhibit focuses on the specimens themselves
,
such as 
examples of different rock types or mineral ores
.
Do not select specimens for exhibit until the exhibit planning team has 
developed interpretive themes
.
As the Exhibit Plan progresses
,
the 
planning team can then decide how each specimen can best illustrate the 
story being told
.
2. Are there any particular 
concerns for exhibiting 
geological specimens?
Many geological specimens are relatively inert; they don’t require any 
special conditions
.
Often
,
because of their durability
,
geological 
specimens are used as touch exhibits
.
Make sure that specimens selected 
for use as touch specimens do not contain any toxic or radioactive 
substances
.
Place fragile specimens (such as some smaller crystals) inside 
an exhibit case
.
Massive crystals such as quartz may be suitable for a 
touch exhibit
.
3. Are there any specific 
situations that I should 
avoid when exhibiting 
geological specimens?
Do not assume that all objects classified as geological specimens are the 
same
.
Know the properties of each specimen and how these different 
properties can affect the potential for damage
.
This includes damage from 
environmental conditions
,
improper display
,
or inappropriate handling
.
4. What should I know about 
cleaning geological 
specimens?
The care and cleaning of specimens on exhibit is similar to that of other 
objects
.
Dry dusting and vacuuming may be appropriate for larger 
specimens but not for smaller fragile specimens
.
A damp cloth may be 
appropriate for some rock types but not water-soluble minerals like certain 
types of salts
.
Practice preventive conservation
.
A proper exhibit case design can 
prevent dust accumulation
.
This approach is preferable to cleaning 
specimens after they become dusty
.
Know the composition of the 
specimen and its degree of durability prior to any decision on how it 
should be cleaned
.
Always consider the durability of a specimen and its value 
when deciding how to exhibit it (either as a touch specimen or 
in an exhibit case)
.
SDK software service:C# PDF insert text Library: insert text into PDF content in C#.net
Supports adding text to PDF in preview without adobe reader Imaging.Basic' or any other assembly or one of its The char wil be added into PDF page, 0
www.rasteredge.com
SDK software service:VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb
Add text to certain position of PDF page in Visual Basic .NET class. text font, color, size and location changes to existing PDF file or output a new one.
www.rasteredge.com
NPS Museum Handbook
,
Part I (2005)
U:42
H.  Conservation of 
Specimens
1. When should I contact a 
conservator?
Contact a geological conservator if you notice any signs that the specimen 
is reacting to environmental conditions such as:
new crystal growth
deterioration of labels or storage materials  
A trained geological conservator may be able to provide simple corrective 
steps that will address the immediate problem or determine if more serious 
treatment is warranted
.
For example
,
if there is active deterioration of the 
specimen
,
the conservator may be able to determine if it is the result of 
environmental conditions in storage or other causes
.
Proper diagnosis of 
the problem is critical in order to correct the situation
.
2. Should park staff repair 
damaged and/or 
incomplete specimens?
Do not attempt any specimen repairs yourself
.
The various glues and 
adhesives in common use can cause long-term damage to the specimen
.
If 
the specimen is intended solely for exhibit
,
you may be able to have a 
conservator repair it
.
However
,
it’s vital to ensure that specimens used in 
research are not chemically contaminated
.
Do not use any adhesives (or 
any other chemical additives) on such specimens
.
3. What types of repairs can 
a conservator undertake?
A conservator can
:
recommend what can (and cannot) be done for the specimen
advise you if conservation work is necessary
do advanced cleaning and stabilization
.
Such work may be beyond 
even the resources of a park that has its own laboratory and trained
staff
.
undertake delicate repairs and infills of specimens
.
Note: Infills
,
reconstructions and replacement of missing parts may be acceptable 
for exhibition and interpretive uses
.
Any such repairs should be:
easily distinguishable from the original specimen
inert
reversible  
Remember: Many specimens were initially prepared according to 
the original project’s research design and/or the specimen’s 
intended use
. Be sure that any proposed treatments (including 
preventive conservation) will not alter or compromise the 
specimen’s relevance to such research or hinder future 
investigation
.
SDK software service:C# PDF replace text Library: replace text in PDF content in C#.net
Replace text in PDF file in preview on ASPX webpage. Imaging.Basic' or any other assembly or one of its C#.NET PDF Demo: Replace Text in Specified PDF Page.
www.rasteredge.com
NPS Museum Handbook
,
Part I (2005)
U:43
Exhibiting repaired specimens also may require you to alter or revise 
related interpretive elements
.
Each specimen creates its own set of 
concerns and issues
.
4. What type of damage is 
beyond repair by a 
conservator?
A conservator cannot
undo irreversible damage
.
Such examples include
:
fading caused by UV exposure 
breaks
5. Should protective 
coatings be applied to 
specimens?
As a general rule
,
protective coatings are not currently applied to 
geological specimens
.
Older specimens may have been coated with a 
variety of poor-quality substances
,
including shellac
,
waxes
,
oils
,
films
,
and spray-on polymers
.
6. What about cleaning 
specimens?
Many larger
,
hardier specimens (like rocks and ores) can withstand 
occasional cleaning
.
In some cases
,
trained park staff can clean 
specimens
.
Appropriate methods
,
techniques
,
cleaning supplies
,
and 
equipment vary with the chemical composition of the specimen
.
For 
example:
Don’t use water to clean certain minerals
,
such as salt minerals like 
halite (sodium chloride) or gypsum (calcium sulfate) because they 
are soluble in water
.
Specimens with small delicate crystals may require procedures to 
remove dust and dirt
.
Ultrasonic cleaners can be used to clean some small crystal 
specimens
.
The technique used depends on the minerals (Hansen
,
1984)
.
Before starting
,
be sure to consult your park’s Museum Housekeeping 
Plan
.
It will help you determine:
which specimens you can safely clean
which specimens should only be cleaned by a conservator (or some 
other specially trained individual)
the frequency that specimens should be cleaned
appropriate method
,
techniques
,
supplies
,
and equipment
.
If you do not have a Housekeeping Plan
,
or if it’s out of date
,
consult your 
regional/SO curator
,
the NPS Geological Resources Division
,
and/or a 
natural history conservator to establish recommended cleaning guidelines
.
Breaks are irreversible
 They do not “go away” when the 
specimen is glued back together
.
NPS Museum Handbook
,
Part I (2005)
U:44
SECTION III. REFERENCES
A.  National Park Service 
Resources
Geologic Resources Division
,
Paleontology Program
P
.
O
.
Box 25287
Denver
,
Colorado 80225-0287
www2
.
nature
.
nps
.
gov/geology/paleontology
Senior Curator of Natural History
,
Park Museum Management Program
1201 Oakridge Drive, Suite 150
Fort Collins, Colorado 80525
(970) 267-2167
Your regional/SO curator
B. Professional 
Organizations
The Society of Vertebrate Paleontology has a preparators’ group and a 
special session at their annual meetings to discuss fossil preparation and 
related topics
.
Contact the society at:
Society of Vertebrate Paleontology
60 Revere Drive
Suite 500
Northbrook
,
IL 60062
www
.
vertpaleo
.
org
The Society for the Preservation of Natural History Collections (SPNHC)
,
represents the interests of natural history collections and the people asso-
ciated with the management and care of these collections
.
Publications 
include Collection Forum and SPNHC Newsletter
.
SPNHC’s annual 
meetings include formal presentations and workshops
.
Contact SPNHC at:
Society for the Preservation of Natural History Collections
PO Box 797
Washington
,
DC 20044
www
.
spnhc
.
org
The Paleontological Society is an international association dedicated to the 
science of paleontology
.
The organization publishes the Journal of 
Paleontology
,
Paleobiology
,
The Paleontological Society Memoirs
,
Short 
Course Notes
,
and various other special publications
.
The society holds 
an annual meeting
,
as well as regional meetings
.
Contact the society at:
The Paleontological Society
PO Box 7075
Lawrence
,
KS 66044
(785) 843-1235 ext
.
297
www
.
paleosoc
.
org
The Paleobotanical Section of the Botanical Society of America is an 
organization of individuals concerned with fossil plants
.
The section 
NPS Museum Handbook
,
Part I (2005)
U:45
publishes the Bibliography of American Paleobotany
,
as well as other 
materials and special publications
.
The Paleobotanical Section holds 
workshops and conferences at the annual meeting of the Botanical Society 
of America
.
For additional information
,
refer to their website at: 
<
www
.
dartmouth
.
edu/
~
daghlian/paleo
>.
The Mineralogical Society of America promotes scientific 
research
,
teaching
,
and educating the public concerning 
mineralogy
.
The Society publishes American Mineralogist
,
Reviews in Mineralogy and Geochemistry
,
monographs
,
newsletter
,
and books
.
It holds courses
,
lectureships
,
symposia
,
and meetings
.
The organization also gives grants and awards
.
For further information
,
contact the society at:
Mineralogical Society of America
1015 18
th
Street
,
NW
,
Suite 601 
Washington
,
DC 20036
(202) 775-4344
www
.
minsocam
.
org
The Geological Curator’s Group in England was established in 1974 to 
improve the status of geology in museums and raise the standard of 
geological curation. Their goals are to advise, inform, and create a forum 
for discussion for all aspects of the care of geological collections as an 
irreplaceable part of our scientific and cultural heritage.
The Geological Curator's Group is affiliated to the Geological Society of 
London.  For further information, refer to the Group’s website at: 
<http://www
.
hmag
.
gla
.
ac
.
uk/gcg
>.
C. Glossary
Body fossil: 
the preserved remains of any anatomical part of a plant or animal
.
Carbonization:
the accumulation of residual carbon from a plant or animal by changes in the organic 
matter and decomposition products
.
Consolidant: 
any type of material
,
often a plastic or shellac
,
used to hardened and strengthen a 
specimen
.
Applied by either specimen immersion or surface application
.
Fossil: 
any remains
,
trace or imprint of a plant or animal that has been preserved in the earth’s 
crust since some past geological time
.
Mineral:
a naturally occurring inorganic element or compound having an orderly internal 
structure and characteristic chemical composition
,
crystal form
,
and physical 
properties
.
Ore: 
the natural material from which a mineral or minerals of economic value can be 
extracted at reasonable profit
.
Usually applied to metalliferous material
.
NPS Museum Handbook
,
Part I (2005)
U:46
Permineralization:
a process of fossilization whereby the original hard parts of a plant or an animal have 
additional material deposited in their pore space
.
Pyrite disease:
humidity-driven oxidation of pyrite (iron sulfide) that affects the microcrystalline or 
framboidal forms that change the iron sulfide to iron sulfate
.
Replacement:
a process of fossilization involving the substitution of inorganic material for the original 
organic constituents of an organism
.
Rock:
an aggregate of one or more minerals or a body of undifferentiated mineral matter
.
Rocks are divided into three different types: igneous
,
sedimentary and metamorphic
.
a. Igneous 
Rock: 
rocks or minerals that solidified from molten or partly molten material
.
b. Sedimentary 
Rock:
a rock resulting from the consolidation of loose sediment that has accumulated in 
layers
.
Sedimentary rocks are divided into:
clastic rocks
formed by the mechanical breakdown of fragments of older rock such 
as sands and shales
chemical rocks
formed by the precipitation of minerals such as gypsum or 
limestone from solution
organic rocks
formed by the secretions of plants or animals or accumulations of 
organic matter such as coal
.
c. Metamorphic 
Rock:
any rock derived from pre-existing rocks by mineralogical
,
chemical and/or structural 
changes
,
essentially in the solid state
,
in response to marked changes in temperature
,
pressure
,
shearing stress
,
and chemical environment
.
Trace fossil:
a sedimentary structure resulting from the life activity of an animal such as a track
,
trail
,
burrow
,
tube
,
boring or tunnel
,
or marks on other fossils indicating feeding or 
chewing activities or the preserved feces of an animal
.
D. Web Resources
The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH)
http://www
.
cdc
.
gov/niosh
NIOSH Health Hazard Evaluation (HHE) Program
http://www
.
cdc
.
gov/niosh/hhe
Quality Condition Score for Paleontology/Geology collections
http://fenscore
.
man
.
ac
.
uk/Formspage1
.
htm
http://fenscore
.
man
.
ac
.
uk/FORMF3
.
htm
.
Fossil Plant Preservation
http://www
.
ucmp
.
berkeley
.
edu/IB181/VPL/Pres/Pres2
.
html
http://www
.
korrnet
.
org/kgms/feb-01/feb01-8
.
htm
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested