crystal report export to pdf without viewer c# : Deleting pages from pdf file Library software class asp.net winforms wpf ajax Appendix_A1-part426

Common Core State StandardS for engliSh language artS  & literaCy in hiStory/SoCial StudieS, SCienCe, and teChniCal SubjeCtS
appendix a  |   11
the model in action: sample annotated reading texts
The following examples demonstrate how qualitative and quantitative measures of text complexity can be used along 
with reader and task considerations to make informed decisions about whether a particular text is an appropriate 
challenge for particular students. The cases below illustrate some of the possibilities that can arise when multiple 
measures are used to assess text complexity and how discrepancies among those measures might be resolved. It 
is important to note that the conclusions offered below concerning the texts’ appropriateness for particular grade 
bands are informed judgments based on qualitative and quantitative assessments of text complexity. Different 
conclusions could reasonably be drawn from the same data, and reader and task considerations may also warrant a 
higher or lower placement.
Example 1: Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass (Grades 6–8 Text Complexity Band)
Excerpt
The plan which I adopted, and the one by which I was most successful, was that of making friends 
of all the little white boys whom I met in the street. As many of these as I could, I converted into 
teachers. With their kindly aid, obtained at different times and in different places, I finally succeed-
ed in learning to read. When I was sent of errands, I always took my book with me, and by going 
one part of my errand quickly, I found time to get a lesson before my return. I used also to carry 
bread with me, enough of which was always in the house, and to which I was always welcome; for I 
was much better off in this regard than many of the poor white children in our neighborhood. This 
bread I used to bestow upon the hungry little urchins, who, in return, would give me that more valu-
able bread of knowledge. I am strongly tempted to give the names of two or three of those little 
boys, as a testimonial of the gratitude and affection I bear them; but prudence forbids;—not that 
it would injure me, but it might embarrass them; for it is almost an unpardonable offence to teach 
slaves to read in this Christian country. It is enough to say of the dear little fellows, that they lived 
on Philpot Street, very near Durgin and Bailey’s ship-yard. I used to talk this matter of slavery over 
with them. I would sometimes say to them, I wished I could be as free as they would be when they 
got to be men. “You will be free as soon as you are twenty-one, but I am a slave for life! Have not I 
as good a right to be free as you have?” These words used to trouble them; they would express for 
me the liveliest sympathy, and console me with the hope that something would occur by which I 
might be free. 
I was now about twelve years old, and the thought of being a slave for life began to bear heavily 
upon my heart. Just about this time, I got hold of a book entitled “The Columbian Orator.” Every 
opportunity I got, I used to read this book. Among much of other interesting matter, I found in it a 
dialogue between a master and his slave. The slave was represented as having run away from his 
master three times. The dialogue represented the conversation which took place between them, 
when the slave was retaken the third time. In this dialogue, the whole argument in behalf of slavery 
was brought forward by the master, all of which was disposed of by the slave. The slave was made 
to say some very smart as well as impressive things in reply to his master—things which had the 
desired though unexpected effect; for the conversation resulted in the voluntary emancipation of 
the slave on the part of the master. 
In the same book, I met with one of Sheridan’s mighty speeches on and in behalf of Catholic 
emancipation. These were choice documents to me. I read them over and over again with unabated 
interest. They gave tongue to interesting thoughts of my own soul, which had frequently flashed 
through my mind, and died away for want of utterance. The moral which I gained from the dialogue 
was the power of truth over the conscience of even a slaveholder. What I got from Sheridan was 
a bold denunciation of slavery, and a powerful vindication of human rights. The reading of these 
documents enabled me to utter my thoughts, and to meet the arguments brought forward to sus-
tain slavery; but while they relieved me of one difficulty, they brought on another even more painful 
than the one of which I was relieved. The more I read, the more I was led to abhor and detest my 
enslavers. I could regard them in no other light than a band of successful robbers, who had left 
their homes, and gone to Africa, and stolen us from our homes, and in a strange land reduced us 
to slavery. I loathed them as being the meanest as well as the most wicked of men. As I read and 
contemplated the subject, behold! that very discontentment which Master Hugh had predicted 
would follow my learning to read had already come, to torment and sting my soul to unutterable 
anguish. As I writhed under it, I would at times feel that learning to read had been a curse rather 
than a blessing. It had given me a view of my wretched condition, without the remedy. It opened 
my eyes to the horrible pit, but to no ladder upon which to get out. In moments of agony, I envied 
my fellow-slaves for their stupidity. I have often wished myself a beast. I preferred the condition of 
the meanest reptile to my own. Any thing, no matter what, to get rid of thinking! It was this ever-
lasting thinking of my condition that tormented me. There was no getting rid of it. It was pressed 
Deleting pages from pdf file - control software system:C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Easy to Use C# Code to Extract PDF Pages, Copy Pages from One PDF File and Paste into Others
www.rasteredge.com
Deleting pages from pdf file - control software system:VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed VB.NET Guide for Extracting Pages from Microsoft PDF Doc
www.rasteredge.com
Common Core State StandardS for engliSh language artS  & literaCy in hiStory/SoCial StudieS, SCienCe, and teChniCal SubjeCtS
appendix a  |   12
upon me by every object within sight or hearing, animate or inanimate. The silver trump of freedom 
had roused my soul to eternal wakefulness. Freedom now appeared, to disappear no more forever. 
It was heard in every sound, and seen in every thing. It was ever present to torment me with a sense 
of my wretched condition. I saw nothing without seeing it, I heard nothing without hearing it, and 
felt nothing without feeling it. It looked from every star, it smiled in every calm, breathed in every 
wind, and moved in every storm.
Douglass, Frederick. Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, 
an American Slave. Written by Himself.
Boston: Anti-Slavery Office, 1845.
Figure 5: Annotation of Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass
Qualitative Measures
Quantitative Measures
Levels of Meaning
While the apparent aim of the text is to convince readers 
of the day of the evils of slavery, there are other aims as 
well; among the latter, not fully revealed in the excerpt, 
are Douglass’s efforts to assert his own manhood (and 
that of other black men) and to create an extended 
analogy between his own literal rise to freedom and a 
spiritual awakening.
Structure
The Narrative uses a fairly simple, explicit, and conven-
tional story structure, with events largely related chrono-
logically by a narrator recounting his past. There are 
some philosophical discussions that may, to the reader 
just looking for a story, seem like digressions.
Language Conventionality and Clarity
Douglass’s language is largely clear and meant to be ac-
cessible. He does, however, use some figurative language 
(e.g., juxtaposing literal bread with the metaphorical 
bread of knowledge) and literary devices (e.g., personi-
fying freedom). There are also some now-archaic and 
unusual words and phrasings (e.g., choice documents).
Knowledge Demands
The Narrative discusses moderately sophisticated 
themes. The experiences of slavery Douglass describes 
are obviously outside students’ own experiences, but 
Douglass renders them vivid. The text is bound by Dou-
glass’s authoritative perspective. General background 
knowledge about slavery and race in mid-nineteenth-
century America is helpful, as is knowledge of Christiani-
ty, to which Douglass makes frequent reference through-
out the excerpt and the work as a whole.
Various readability measures of the Narrative are largely 
in agreement that it is of appropriate complexity for 
grades 6–8. A Coh-Metrix analysis calls attention to this 
excerpt’s complex syntax and the abstractness of some 
of the language (e.g., hard-to-define concepts such 
as slavery and freedom). Helping to balance out that 
challenge are the text’s storylike structure and the way 
the text draws clear connections between words and 
sentences. Readers will still have to make many infer-
ences to interpret and connect the text’s central ideas, 
however.
Reader-Task Considerations 
These are to be determined locally with reference to 
such variables as a student’s motivation, knowledge, and 
experiences as well as purpose and the complexity of 
the task assigned and the questions posed.
Recommended Placement 
Both the qualitative and quantitative measures support 
the Standards’ inclusion of the Narrative in the grades 
6–8 text complexity band, with the understanding that 
the text sits at the high end of the range and that it 
can be reread profitably in later years by more mature 
students capable of appreciating the deeper messages 
embedded in the story
.
control software system:C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
Deleting Pages. You may feel free to define some continuous PDF pages and delete. Certainly, random pages can be deleted from PDF file as well. Sorting Pages.
www.rasteredge.com
control software system:C# PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
C#.NET PDF document page deleting library control (XDoc unnecessary page from target existing PDF document file. easily select one or more PDF pages and delete
www.rasteredge.com
Common Core State StandardS for engliSh language artS  & literaCy in hiStory/SoCial StudieS, SCienCe, and teChniCal SubjeCtS
appendix a  |   13
Example 2: The Grapes of Wrath (Grades 9–10 Text Complexity Band)
Excerpt
The man took off his dark, stained hat and stood with a curious humility in front of the screen. 
“Could you see your way to sell us a loaf of bread, ma’am?”
Mae said, “This ain’t a grocery store. We got bread to make san’widges.”
“I know, ma’am.” His humility was insistent. “We need bread and there ain’t nothin’ for quite a piece, 
they say.”
“’F we sell bread we gonna run out.” Mae’s tone was faltering.
“We’re hungry,” the man said.
“Whyn’t you buy a san’widge? We got nice san’widges, hamburgs.”
“We’d sure admire to do that, ma’am. But we can’t. We got to make a dime do all of us.” And he 
said embarrassedly, “We ain’t got but a little.”
Mae said, “You can’t get no loaf a bread for a dime. We only got fifteen-cent loafs.”
From behind her Al growled, “God Almighty, Mae, give ‘em bread.”
“We’ll run out ‘fore the bread truck comes.”
“Run out then, goddamn it,” said Al. He looked sullenly down at the potato salad he was mixing.
Mae shrugged her plump shoulders and looked to the truck drivers to show them what she was up 
against.
She held the screen door open and the man came in, bringing a smell of sweat with him. The boys 
edged behind him and they went immediately to the candy case and stared in—not with craving or 
with hope or even with desire, but just with a kind of wonder that such things could be. They were 
alike in size and their faces were alike. One scratched his dusty ankle with the toe nails of his other 
foot. The other whispered some soft message and then they straightened their arms so that their 
clenched fists in the overall pockets showed through the thin blue cloth.
Mae opened a drawer and took out a long waxpaper-wrapped loaf. “This here is a fifteen-cent loaf.”
The man put his hat back on his head. He answered with inflexible humility, “Won’t you—can’t you 
see your way to cut off ten cents’ worth?”
Al said snarlingly, “Goddamn it, Mae. Give ‘em the loaf.”
The man turned toward Al. “No, we want ta buy ten cents’ worth of it. We got it figgered awful 
close, mister, to get to California.”
Mae said resignedly, “You can have this for ten cents.”
“That’d be robbin’ you, ma’am.”
“Go ahead—Al says to take it.” She pushed the waxpapered loaf across the counter. The man took 
a deep leather pouch from his rear pocket, untied the strings, and spread it open. It was heavy with 
silver and with greasy bills.
“May soun’ funny to be so tight,” he apologized. “We got a thousan’ miles to go, an’ we don’ know 
if we’ll make it.” He dug in the pouch with a forefinger, located a dime, and pinched in for it. When 
he put it down on the counter he had a penny with it. He was about to drop the penny back into 
the pouch when his eye fell on the boys frozen before the candy counter. He moved slowly down 
to them. He pointed in the case at big long sticks of striped peppermint. “Is them penny candy, 
ma’am?”
control software system:VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.
Ability to remove consecutive pages from PDF file in VB.NET. Enable specified pages deleting from PDF in Visual Basic .NET class.
www.rasteredge.com
control software system:VB.NET PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for vb.net, ASP.NET
You may feel free to define some continuous PDF pages through deleting pages in VB.NET demo code. Certainly, random pages can be deleted from PDF file as well.
www.rasteredge.com
Common Core State StandardS for engliSh language artS  & literaCy in hiStory/SoCial StudieS, SCienCe, and teChniCal SubjeCtS
appendix a  |   14
Mae moved down and looked in. “Which ones?”
“There, them stripy ones.”
The little boys raised their eyes to her face and they stopped breathing; their mouths were partly 
opened, their half-naked bodies were rigid.
“Oh—them. Well, no—them’s two for a penny.”
“Well, gimme two then, ma’am.” He placed the copper cent carefully on the counter. The boys ex-
pelled their held breath softly. Mae held the big sticks out.
Steinbeck, John. The Grapes of Wrath.
New York: Viking, 1967 (1939).
Figure 6: Annotation of The Grapes of Wrath
Qualitative Measures
Quantitative Measures
Levels of Meaning
There are multiple and often implicit levels of meaning 
within the excerpt and the novel as a whole. The surface 
level focuses on the literal journey of the Joads, but the 
novel also works on metaphorical and philosophical 
levels.
Structure
The text is relatively simple, explicit, and conventional in 
form. Events are largely related in chronological order.
Language Conventionality and Clarity
Although the language used is generally familiar, clear, 
and conversational, the dialect of the characters may 
pose a challenge for some readers. Steinbeck also puts a 
great deal of weight on certain less familiar words, such 
as faltering. In various portions of the novel not fully rep-
resented in the excerpt, the author combines rich, vivid, 
and detailed description with an economy of words that 
requires heavy inferencing.
Knowledge Demands
The themes are sophisticated. The experiences and per-
spective conveyed will be different from those of many 
students. Knowledge of the Great Depression, the “Okie 
Migration” to California, and the religion and music of 
the migrants is helpful, but the author himself provides 
much of the context needed for comprehension.
The quantitative assessment of The Grapes of Wrath 
demonstrates the difficulty many currently existing 
readability measures have in capturing adequately the 
richness of sophisticated works of literature, as vari-
ous ratings suggest a placement within the grades 2–3 
text complexity band. A Coh-Metrix analysis also tends 
to suggest the text is an easy one since the syntax is 
uncomplicated and the author uses a conventional 
story structure and only a moderate number of abstract 
words. (The analysis does indicate, however, that a great 
deal of inferencing will be required to interpret and con-
nect the text’s words, sentences, and central ideas.)
Reader-Task Considerations
These are to be determined locally with reference to 
such variables as a student’s motivation, knowledge, and 
experiences as well as purpose and the complexity of 
the task assigned and the questions posed.
Recommended Placement
Though considered extremely easy by many quantitative 
measures, The Grapes of Wrath has a sophistication of 
theme and content that makes it more suitable for early 
high school (grades 9–10), which is where the Standards 
have placed it. In this case, qualitative measures have 
overruled the quantitative measures.
control software system:C# Word - Delete Word Document Page in C#.NET
C#.NET Word document page deleting library control (XDoc any unnecessary page from target existing Word document file. select one or more Word pages and delete
www.rasteredge.com
control software system:C# PowerPoint - Delete PowerPoint Document Page in C#.NET
C#.NET PowerPoint document page deleting library control page from target existing PowerPoint document file. select one or more PowerPoint pages and delete it
www.rasteredge.com
Common Core State StandardS for engliSh language artS  & literaCy in hiStory/SoCial StudieS, SCienCe, and teChniCal SubjeCtS
appendix a  |   15
Example 3: The Longitude Prize (Grades 9–10 Text Complexity Band)
Excerpt 
From Chapter 1: “A Most Terrible Sea”
At six in the morning I was awaked by a great shock, and a confused noise of the men on 
deck. I ran up, thinking some ship had run foul of us, for by my own reckoning, and that of 
every other person in the ship, we were at least thirty-five leagues distant from land; but, 
before I could reach the quarter-deck, the ship gave a great stroke upon the ground, and the 
sea broke over her. Just after this I could perceive the land, rocky, rugged and uneven, about 
two cables’ length from us . . . the masts soon went overboard, carrying some men with them 
. . . notwithstanding a most terrible sea, one of the [lifeboats] was launched, and eight of the 
best men jumped into her; but she had scarcely got to the ship’s stern when she was hurled 
to the bottom, and every soul in her perished. The rest of the boats were soon washed to 
pieces on the deck. We then made a raft . . . and waited with resignation for Providence to 
assist us.
—From an account of the wreck of HMS Litchfield off the coast of North Africa, 1758
The Litchfield came to grief because no one aboard knew where they were. As the narrator tells us, 
by his own reckoning and that of everyone else they were supposed to be thirty-five leagues, about 
a hundred miles, from land. The word “reckoning” was short for “dead reckoning”—the system 
used by ships at sea to keep track of their position, meaning their longitude and latitude. It was an 
intricate system, a craft, and like every other craft involved the mastery of certain tools, in this case 
such instruments as compass, hourglass, and quadrant. It was an art as well.
Latitude, the north-south position, had always been the navigator’s faithful guide. Even in ancient 
times, a Greek or Roman sailor could tell how far north of the equator he was by observing the 
North Star’s height above the horizon, or the sun’s at noon. This could be done without instruments, 
trusting in experience and the naked eye, although it is believed that an ancestor of the quadrant 
called the astrolabe—“star-measurer”—was known to the ancients, and used by them to measure 
the angular height of the sun or a star above the horizon.
Phoenicians, Greeks, and Romans tended to sail along the coasts and were rarely out of sight of 
land. As later navigators left the safety of the Mediterranean to plunge into the vast Atlantic—far 
from shore, and from the shorebirds that led them to it—they still had the sun and the North Star. 
And these enabled them to follow imagined parallel lines of latitude that circle the globe. Follow-
ing a line of latitude—“sailing the parallel”—kept a ship on a steady east-west course. Christopher 
Columbus, who sailed the parallel in 1492, held his ships on such a safe course, west and west again, 
straight on toward Asia. When they came across an island off the coast of what would later be 
called America, Columbus compelled his crew to sign an affidavit stating that this island was no 
island but mainland Asia.
Dash, Joan. The Longitude Prize.
New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2000. (2000)
control software system:VB.NET TIFF: Modify TIFF File by Adding, Deleting & Sort TIFF
Please check following TIFF page deleting methods and &ltsummary> ''' Sort TIFF document pages in designed & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
www.rasteredge.com
control software system:VB.NET TIFF: An Easy VB.NET Solution to Delete or Remove TIFF File
also empowers users to insert blank pages into TIFF I have tried the function of deleting page from powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
www.rasteredge.com
Common Core State StandardS for engliSh language artS  & literaCy in hiStory/SoCial StudieS, SCienCe, and teChniCal SubjeCtS
appendix a  |   16
Figure 7: Annotation of The Longitude Prize
Qualitative Measures
Quantitative Measures
Purpose
The single, relatively clear purpose of the text (not fully 
apparent in the excerpt but signaled by the title) is to 
recount the discovery of the concept of longitude.
Structure
The text is moderately complex and subtle in structure. 
Although the text may appear at first glance to be a 
conventional narrative, Dash mainly uses narrative ele-
ments in the service of illustrating historical and techni-
cal points.
Language Conventionality and Clarity
Language is used literally and is relatively clear, but 
numerous archaic, domain-specific, and otherwise 
unfamiliar terms are introduced in the course of citing 
primary historical sources and discussing the craft, art, 
and science of navigation.
Knowledge Demands
The text assumes relatively little prior knowledge 
regarding seafaring and navigation, but some general 
sense of the concepts of latitude and longitude, the 
nature of sailing ships, and the historical circumstances 
that promoted exploration and trade is useful to com-
prehending the text.
Various readability measures of The Longitude Prize 
are largely in agreement that the text is appropriate for 
the grades 9–10 text complexity band. The Coh-Metrix 
analysis notes that the text is primarily informational in 
structure despite the narrative opening. (Recall from 
“Why Text Complexity Matters,” above, that research 
indicates that informational texts are generally harder to 
read than narratives.) While the text relies on concrete 
language and goes to some effort to connect central 
ideas for the reader, it also contains complex syntax and 
few explicit connections between words and sentences.
Reader-Task Considerations
These are to be determined locally with reference to 
such variables as a student’s motivation, knowledge, and 
experiences as well as purpose and the complexity of 
the task assigned and the questions posed.
Recommended Placement
The qualitative and quantitative measures by and large 
agree on the placement of The Longitude Prize into the 
grades 9–10 text complexity band, which is where the 
Standards have it.
control software system:C#: How to Delete Cached Files from Your Web Viewer
PDF pages extract, copy, paste, C#.NET rotate PDF pages, C#.NET VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word Visual C#.NET Developers the Ways of Deleting Cache Files.
www.rasteredge.com
control software system:C# PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in C#.net, ASP.
C#.NET source code for combining multiple PDF pages together in as PDF page insertion, PDF page deleting, PDF document C# users can append a PDF file to the
www.rasteredge.com
Common Core State StandardS for engliSh language artS  & literaCy in hiStory/SoCial StudieS, SCienCe, and teChniCal SubjeCtS
appendix a  |   17
reading Foundational skills
The following supplements the Reading Standards: Foundational Skills (K–5) in the main document (pp. 15–17). See 
page 37 in the bibliography of this appendix for sources used in helping construct the foundational skills and the 
material below.
Phoneme-Grapheme correspondences
Consonants
Common graphemes (spellings) are listed in the following table for each of the consonant sounds. Note that the term 
grapheme refers to a letter or letter combination that corresponds to one speech sound.
Figure 8: Consonant Phoneme-Grapheme Correspondences in English
Phoneme
Word Examples
Common Graphemes (Spellings) 
for the Phoneme*
/p/
pit, spider, stop
p
/b/
bit, brat, bubble
b
/m/
mitt, comb, hymn
m, mb, mn
/t/
tickle, mitt, sipped
t, tt, ed
/d/
die, loved
d, ed
/n/
nice, knight, gnat
n, kn, gn
/k/
cup, kite, duck, chorus, folk, quiet
k, c, ck, ch, lk, q
/g/
girl, Pittsburgh
g, gh
/ng/
sing, bank
ng, n
/f/
fluff, sphere, tough, calf
f, ff, gh, ph, lf
/v/
van, dove
v, ve
/s/
sit, pass, science, psychic
s, ss, sc, ps
/z/
zoo, jazz, nose, as, xylophone
z, zz, se, s, x
/th/
thin, breath, ether
th
/th/
this, breathe, either
th
/sh/
shoe, mission, sure, charade, precious, notion, mission, 
special
sh, ss, s, ch, sc, ti, si, ci
/zh/
measure, azure
s, z
/ch/
cheap, future, etch
ch, tch
/j/
judge, wage
j, dge, ge
/l/
lamb, call, single
l, ll, le
/r/
reach, wrap, her, fur, stir
r, wr, er/ur/ir
/y/
you, use, feud, onion
y, (u, eu), i
/w/
witch, queen
w, (q)u
/wh/
where
wh
/h/
house, whole
h, wh
*Graphemes in the word list are among the most common spellings, but the list does not include all possible graph-
emes for a given consonant. Most graphemes are more than one letter.
Common Core State StandardS for engliSh language artS  & literaCy in hiStory/SoCial StudieS, SCienCe, and teChniCal SubjeCtS
appendix a  |   18
Vowels
Common graphemes (spellings) are listed in the following table for each of the vowel sounds. Note that the term 
grapheme refers to a letter or letter combination that corresponds to one speech sound.
Figure 9: Vowel Phoneme-Grapheme Correspondences in English
Phoneme
Word Examples
Common Graphemes (Spellings) 
for the Phoneme
*
/ē/
see, these, me, eat, key, happy, chief, either
ee, e_e, -e, ea, ey, -y, ie, ei
/ĭ/
sit, gym
i, y
/ā/
make, rain, play, great, baby, eight, vein, they
a_e, ai, ay, ea, -y, eigh, ei, ey
/ĕ/
bed, breath
e, ea
/ă/
cat
a
/ī/
time, pie, cry, right, rifle
i_e, ie, -y, igh, -i
/ŏ/
fox, swap, palm
o, wa, al
/ŭ/
cup, cover, flood, tough
u, o, oo, ou
/aw/
saw, pause, call, water, bought
aw, au, all, wa, ough
/ō.
vote, boat, toe, snow, open
o_e, oa, oe, ow, o-, 
/oo/
took, put, could
oo, u, ou
/ū/ [oo]
moo, tube, blue, chew, suit, soup
oo, u_e, ue, ew, ui, ou
/y//ū/
use, few, cute
u, ew, u_e
/oi/
boil, boy
oi, oy
/ow/
out, cow
ou, ow
er
her, fur, sir
er, ur, ir
ar
cart
ar
or
sport
or
* Graphem
es in the word list are among the most common spellings, but the list does not include all possible graph-
emes for a given vowel. Many graphemes are more than one letter.
Phonological awareness
General Progression of Phonological Awareness Skills (PreK–1)
Word Awareness (Spoken Language)
Move a chip or marker to stand for each word in a spoken sentence.
The dog barks.  (3) 
The brown dog barks.  (4) 
The brown dog barks loudly.  (5)
Rhyme Recognition during Word Play
Say “yes” if the words have the same last sounds (rhyme):
clock/dock  (y) 
red/said  (y) 
down/boy  (n)
Repetition and Creation of Alliteration during Word Play
Nice, neat Nathan 
Chewy, chunky chocolate
¯
˘
Common Core State StandardS for engliSh language artS  & literaCy in hiStory/SoCial StudieS, SCienCe, and teChniCal SubjeCtS
appendix a  |   19
Syllable Counting or Identification (Spoken Language)
A spoken syllable is a unit of speech organized around a vowel sound.
Repeat the word, say each syllable loudly, and feel the jaw drop on the vowel sound:
chair (1)    table (2)    gymnasium (4)
Onset and Rime Manipulation (Spoken Language)
Within a single syllable, onset is the consonant sound or sounds that may precede the vowel; rime is the vowel and all 
other consonant sounds that may follow the vowel.
Say the two parts slowly and then blend into a whole word:
school   
onset - /sch/;   rime - /ool/ 
star 
onset - /st/;   rime - /ar/ 
place 
onset - /pl/;   rime - /ace/ 
all 
onset (none);   rime - /all/
General Progression of Phoneme Awareness Skills (K–2)
Phonemes are individual speech sounds that are combined to create words in a language system. Phoneme aware-
ness requires progressive differentiation of sounds in spoken words and the ability to think about and manipulate 
those sounds. Activities should lead to the pairing of phonemes (speech sounds) with graphemes (letters and letter 
combinations that represent those sounds) for the purposes of word recognition and spelling.
Phoneme Identity
Say the sound that begins these words. What is your mouth doing when you make that sound? 
milk, mouth, monster  /m/ — The lips are together, and the sound goes through the nose. 
thick, thimble, thank  /th/ — The tongue is between the teeth, and a hissy sound is produced. 
octopus, otter, opposite  /o/  — The mouth is wide open, and we can sing that sound.
Phoneme Isolation
What is the first speech sound in this word?
ship 
/sh/ 
van 
/v/ 
king 
/k/ 
echo 
/e/
What is the last speech sound in this word?        
comb  /m/ 
sink 
/k/ 
rag 
/g/ 
go 
/o/
Phoneme Blending (Spoken Language)
Blend the sounds to make a word:   
(Provide these sounds slowly.)
/s/ /ay/      
say 
/ou/ /t/   
out 
/sh/ /ar/ /k/   
shark 
/p/ /o/ /s/ /t/       post
Phoneme Segmentation (Spoken Language)
Say each sound as you move a chip onto a line or sound box:
no 
/n/ /o/ 
rag  
/r/ /a/ /g/ 
socks   
/s/ /o/ /k/ /s/ 
float 
/f/ /l/ /oa/ /t/
Common Core State StandardS for engliSh language artS  & literaCy in hiStory/SoCial StudieS, SCienCe, and teChniCal SubjeCtS
appendix a  |   20
Phoneme Addition (Spoken Language)
What word would you have if you added /th/ to the beginning of “ink”?  (think)
What word would you have if you added /d/ to the end of the word “fine”?  (find)
What word would you have if you added /z/ to the end of the word “frog”?  (frogs)
Phoneme Substitution (Spoken Language)
Say “rope.” Change /r/ to /m/. What word would you get?  (mope)
Say “chum.” Change /u/ to /ar/. What word would you get?  (charm)
Say “sing.” Change /ng/ to /t/. What word would you get?  (sit)
Phoneme Deletion (Spoken Language)
Say “park.” Now say “park” without /p/.  (ark)
Say “four.” Now say “four” without /f/.  (or)
orthography
Categories of Phoneme-Grapheme Correspondences
Figure 10: Consonant Graphemes with Definitions and Examples
Grapheme Type
Definition
Examples
Single letters
A single consonant letter can represent a conso-
nant phoneme.
b, d, f, g, h, j, k, l, m, n, p, r, s, t, v, w, y, z
Doublets
A doublet uses two of the same letter to spell 
one consonant phoneme.
ff, ll, ss, zz
Digraphs 
A digraph is a two- (di-) letter combination that 
stands for one phoneme; neither letter acts 
alone to represent the sound.
th, sh, ch, wh  
ph, ng (sing)  
gh (cough) 
[ck is a guest in this category]
Trigraphs
A trigraph is a three- (tri-) letter combination 
that stands for one phoneme; none of the letters 
acts alone to represent the sound.
-tch 
-dge
Consonants in blends A blend contains two or three graphemes be-
cause the consonant sounds are separate and 
identifiable. A blend is not “one sound.”
s-c-r (scrape)     th-r (thrush) 
c-l (clean)          f-t (sift) 
l-k (milk)           s-t (most) 
and many more
Silent letter  
combinations
Silent letter combinations use two letters: one 
represents the phoneme, and the other is silent. 
Most of these are from Anglo-Saxon or Greek.
kn (knock), wr (wrestle), gn (gnarl), ps 
(psychology), rh (rhythm), -mb (crumb), 
-lk (folk), -mn (hymn), -st (listen)
Combination qu
These two letters, always together, usually stand 
for two sounds, /k/ /w/.  
quickly
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested