crystal report export to pdf without viewer c# : Extract page from pdf acrobat software Library dll windows asp.net wpf web forms Appendix_A2-part431

Common Core State StandardS for engliSh language artS  & literaCy in hiStory/SoCial StudieS, SCienCe, and teChniCal SubjeCtS
appendix a  |   21
Figure 11: Vowel Graphemes with Definitions and Examples
Grapheme Type
Definition
Examples
Single letters
A single vowel letter stands for a vowel sound.
(short vowels) cap, hit, gem, clod, 
muss 
(long vowels) me, no, music
Vowel teams
A combination of two, three, or four letters 
stands for a vowel.
(short vowels) head, hook 
(long vowels) boat, sigh, weigh  
(diphthongs) toil, bout
Vowel-r combinations
A vowel, followed by r, works in combination 
with /r/ to make a unique vowel sound.
car, sport, her, burn, first
Vowel-consonant-e (VCe)
The vowel–consonant–silent e pattern is 
common for spelling a long vowel sound.
gate, eve, rude, hope, five
Figure 12: Six Types of Written Syllable Patterns
Syllable Type
Definition
Examples
Closed
A syllable with a short vowel spelled with a 
single vowel letter ending in one or more con-
sonants
dap-ple
hos-tel
bev-erage
Vowel-C-e 
(“Magic e”)
A syllable with a long vowel spelled with one 
vowel + one consonant + silent e
compete
despite
Open
A syllable that ends with a long vowel sound, 
spelled with a single vowel letter
program
table
recent
Vowel Team
Syllables that use two to four letters to spell the 
vowel
beau-ti-ful
train-er
con-geal
spoil-age
Vowel-r  
(r-controlled)
A syllable with er, ir, or, ar, or ur  
Vowel pronunciation often changes before /r/.
in-jur-ious
con-sort
char-ter
Consonant-le
An unaccented final syllable containing a conso-
nant before /l/ followed by a silent e
dribble
beagle
little
Three Useful Principles for Chunking Longer Words into Syllables
1. VC-CV: Two or more consonants between two vowels 
When syllables have two or more adjacent consonants between them, we divide between the consonants. The first 
syllable will be closed (with a short vowel).
sub-let 
nap-kin 
pen-ny 
emp-ty
2. V-CV and VC-V: One consonant between two vowels
a) First try dividing before the consonant. This makes the first syllable open and the vowel long. This strategy will 
work 75 percent of the time with VCV syllable division.
e-ven 
ra-bies 
de-cent 
ri-val
Extract page from pdf acrobat - software Library dll:C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Easy to Use C# Code to Extract PDF Pages, Copy Pages from One PDF File and Paste into Others
www.rasteredge.com
Extract page from pdf acrobat - software Library dll:VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed VB.NET Guide for Extracting Pages from Microsoft PDF Doc
www.rasteredge.com
Common Core State StandardS for engliSh language artS  & literaCy in hiStory/SoCial StudieS, SCienCe, and teChniCal SubjeCtS
appendix a  |   22
b) If the word is not recognized, try dividing after the consonant. This makes the first syllable closed and the vowel 
sound short. This strategy will work 25 percent of the time with VCV syllable division.
ev-er 
rab-id 
dec-ade 
riv-er
3. Consonant blends usually stick together. Do not separate digraphs when using the first two principles for decod-
ing.
e-ther 
spec-trum 
se-quin
Morphemes Represented in English Orthography
Figure 13: Examples of Inflectional Suffixes in English
Inflection
Example
-s plural noun
I had two eggs for breakfast.
-s third person 
singular verb
She gets what she wants.
-ed past tense verb
We posted the notice.
-ing progressive tense verb
We will be waiting a long time.
-en past participle
He had eaten his lunch.
’s possessive singular
The frog’s spots were brown.
-er comparative adjective
He is taller than she is.
-est superlative adjective
Tom is the tallest of all.
Examples of Derivational Suffixes in English
Derivational suffixes, such as -ful, -ation, and -ity, are more numerous than inflections and work in ways that inflec-
tional suffixes do not. Most derivational suffixes in English come from the Latin layer of language. Derivational suffixes 
mark or determine part of speech (verb, noun, adjective, adverb) of the suffixed word. Suffixes such as -ment, -ity, 
and -tion turn words into nouns; -ful, -ous, and -al turn words into adjectives; -ly turns words into adverbs.
nature (n. — from nat, birth) 
permit  (n. or v.)
natural (adj.) 
permission  (n.)
naturalize (v.) 
permissive   (adj.)
naturalizing (v.) 
permissible   (adj.)
naturalistic (adj.) 
permissibly (adv.) 
software Library dll:.NET PDF Document Viewing, Annotation, Conversion & Processing
Extract bookmark & outlines. Extract hyperlink inside PDF. PDF Write. Print. Support for all the print modes in Acrobat PDF. Print only specified page ranges.
www.rasteredge.com
software Library dll:C# PDF Converter Library SDK to convert PDF to other file formats
using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. to image or document, or from PDF document to other file formats, like multi-page TIFF file
www.rasteredge.com
Common Core State StandardS for engliSh language artS  & literaCy in hiStory/SoCial StudieS, SCienCe, and teChniCal SubjeCtS
appendix a  |   23
Writing
Definitions of the standards’ three text types
Argument
Arguments are used for many purposes—to change the reader’s point of view, to bring about some action on the 
reader’s part, or to ask the reader to accept the writer’s explanation or evaluation of a concept, issue, or problem. 
An argument is a reasoned, logical way of demonstrating that the writer’s position, belief, or conclusion is valid. In 
English language arts, students make claims about the worth or meaning of a literary work or works. They defend 
their interpretations or judgments with evidence from the text(s) they are writing about. In history/social studies, 
students analyze evidence from multiple primary and secondary sources to advance a claim that is best supported by 
the evidence, and they argue for a historically or empirically situated interpretation. In science, students make claims 
in the form of statements or conclusions that answer questions or address problems. Using data in a scientifically ac-
ceptable form, students marshal evidence and draw on their understanding of scientific concepts to argue in support 
of their claims. Although young children are not able to produce fully developed logical arguments, they develop a 
variety of methods to extend and elaborate their work by providing examples, offering reasons for their assertions, 
and explaining cause and effect. These kinds of expository structures are steps on the road to argument. In grades 
K–5, the term “opinion” is used to refer to this developing form of argument.
Informational/Explanatory Writing
Informational/explanatory writing conveys information accurately. This kind of writing serves one or more closely 
related purposes: to increase readers’ knowledge of a subject, to help readers better understand a procedure or pro-
cess, or to provide readers with an enhanced comprehension of a concept. Informational/explanatory writing address-
es matters such as types (What are the different types of poetry?) and components (What are the parts of a motor?); 
size, function, or behavior (How big is the United States? What is an X-ray used for? How do penguins find food?); 
how things work (How does the legislative branch of government function?); and why things happen (Why do some 
authors blend genres?). To produce this kind of writing, students draw from what they already know and from primary 
and secondary sources. With practice, students become better able to develop a controlling idea and a coherent fo-
cus on a topic and more skilled at selecting and incorporating relevant examples, facts, and details into their writing. 
They are also able to use a variety of techniques to convey information, such as naming, defining, describing, or dif-
ferentiating different types or parts; comparing or contrasting ideas or concepts; and citing an anecdote or a scenario 
to illustrate a point. Informational/explanatory writing includes a wide array of genres, including academic genres 
such as literary analyses, scientific and historical reports, summaries, and précis writing as well as forms of workplace 
and functional writing such as instructions, manuals, memos, reports, applications, and résumés. As students advance 
through the grades, they expand their repertoire of informational/explanatory genres and use them effectively in a 
variety of disciplines and domains.
Although information is provided in both arguments and explanations, the two types of writing have different aims. 
Arguments seek to make people believe that something is true or to persuade people to change their beliefs or be-
havior. Explanations, on the other hand, start with the assumption of truthfulness and answer questions about why or 
how. Their aim is to make the reader understand rather than to persuade him or her to accept a certain point of view. 
In short, arguments are used for persuasion and explanations for clarification.
Like arguments, explanations provide information about causes, contexts, and consequences of processes, phenom-
ena, states of affairs, objects, terminology, and so on. However, in an argument, the writer not only gives information 
but also presents a case with the “pros” (supporting ideas) and “cons” (opposing ideas) on a debatable issue. Be-
cause an argument deals with whether the main claim is true, it demands empirical descriptive evidence, statistics, or 
definitions for support. When writing an argument, the writer supports his or her claim(s) with sound reasoning and 
relevant and sufficient evidence.
Narrative Writing
Narrative writing conveys experience, either real or 
imaginary, and uses time as its deep structure. It 
can be used for many purposes, such as to inform, 
instruct, persuade, or entertain. In English language 
arts, students produce narratives that take the form 
of creative fictional stories, memoirs, anecdotes, and 
autobiographies. Over time, they learn to provide 
visual details of scenes, objects, or people; to depict 
specific actions (for example, movements, gestures, 
Creative Writing beyond Narrative
The narrative category does not include all of the pos-
sible forms of creative writing, such as many types of 
poetry. The Standards leave the inclusion and evaluation 
of other such forms to teacher discretion.
software Library dll:C# powerpoint - PowerPoint Conversion & Rendering in C#.NET
without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. PowerPoint to PDF Conversion. This page will tell you how to use XDoc.PowerPoint SDK
www.rasteredge.com
software Library dll:C# Word - Word Conversion in C#.NET
independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. Word to PDF Conversion. This page will tell you how to use XDoc.Word
www.rasteredge.com
Common Core State StandardS for engliSh language artS  & literaCy in hiStory/SoCial StudieS, SCienCe, and teChniCal SubjeCtS
appendix a  |   24
postures, and expressions); to use dialogue and interior monologue that provide insight into the narrator’s and char-
acters’ personalities and motives; and to manipulate pace to highlight the significance of events and create tension 
and suspense. In history/social studies, students write narrative accounts about individuals. They also construct event 
models of what happened, selecting from their sources only the most relevant information. In science, students write 
narrative descriptions of the step-by-step procedures they follow in their investigations so that others can replicate 
their procedures and (perhaps) reach the same results. With practice, students expand their repertoire and control of 
different narrative strategies.
Texts that Blend Types
Skilled writers many times use a blend of these three text types to accomplish their purposes. For example, The Longitude 
Prize, included above and in Appendix B, embeds narrative elements within a largely expository structure. Effective stu-
dent writing can also cross the boundaries of type, as does the grade 12 student sample “Fact vs. Fiction and All the Grey 
Space In Between” found in Appendix C.
the special Place of argument in the standards
While all three text types are important, the Standards put 
particular emphasis on students’ ability to write sound argu-
ments on substantive topics and issues, as this ability is critical 
to college and career readiness. English and education professor 
Gerald Graff (2003) writes that “argument literacy” is fundamen-
tal to being educated. The university is largely an “argument cul-
ture,” Graff contends; therefore, K–12 schools should “teach the 
conflicts” so that students are adept at understanding and en-
gaging in argument (both oral and written) when they enter col-
lege. He claims that because argument is not standard in most 
school curricula, only 20 percent of those who enter college are 
prepared in this respect. Theorist and critic Neil Postman (1997) 
calls argument the soul of an education because argument 
forces a writer to evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of mul-
tiple perspectives. When teachers ask students to consider two 
or more perspectives on a topic or issue, something far beyond 
surface knowledge is required: students must think critically and 
deeply, assess the validity of their own thinking, and anticipate 
counterclaims in opposition to their own assertions.
The unique importance of argument in college and careers is as-
serted eloquently by Joseph M. Williams and Lawrence McEner-
ney (n.d.) of the University of Chicago Writing Program. As part 
of their attempt to explain to new college students the major 
differences between good high school and college writing, Wil-
liams and McEnerney define argument not as “wrangling” but as “a serious and focused conversation among people 
who are intensely interested in getting to the bottom of things cooperatively”:
Those values are also an integral part of your education in college. For four years, you are asked to 
read, do research, gather data, analyze it, think about it, and then communicate it to readers in a 
form . . . which enables them to assess it and use it. You are asked to do this not because we expect 
you all to become professional scholars, but because in just about any profession you pursue, you 
will do research, think about what you find, make decisions about complex matters, and then ex-
plain those decisions—usually in writing—to others who have a stake in your decisions being sound 
ones. In an Age of Information, what most professionals do is research, think, and make arguments. 
(And part of the value of doing your own thinking and writing is that it makes you much better at 
evaluating the thinking and writing of others.) (ch. 1)
In the process of describing the special value of argument in college- and career-ready writing, Williams and McEner-
ney also establish argument’s close links to research in particular and to knowledge building in general, both of which 
are also heavily emphasized in the Standards.
Much evidence supports the value of argument generally and its particular importance to college and career readi-
ness. A 2009 ACT national curriculum survey of postsecondary instructors of composition, freshman English, and sur-
vey of American literature courses (ACT, Inc., 2009) found that “write to argue or persuade readers” was virtually tied 
with “write to convey information” as the most important type of writing needed by incoming college students. Other 
curriculum surveys, including those conducted by the College Board (Milewski, Johnson, Glazer, & Kubota, 2005) and 
“Argument” and “Persuasion”
When writing to persuade, writers employ a 
variety of persuasive strategies. One common 
strategy is an appeal to the credibility, char-
acter, or authority of the writer (or speaker). 
When writers establish that they are knowl-
edgeable and trustworthy, audiences are 
more likely to believe what they say. Another 
is an appeal to the audience’s self-interest, 
sense of identity, or emotions, any of which 
can sway an audience. A logical argument, on 
the other hand, convinces the audience be-
cause of the perceived merit and reasonable-
ness of the claims and proofs offered rather 
than either the emotions the writing evokes in 
the audience or the character or credentials 
of the writer. The Standards place special 
emphasis on writing logical arguments as a 
particularly important form of college- and 
career-ready writing.
software Library dll:C# Windows Viewer - Image and Document Conversion & Rendering in
standard image and document in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. Convert to PDF.
www.rasteredge.com
software Library dll:VB.NET PDF: How to Create Watermark on PDF Document within
or image (such as business's logo) on any desired PDF page. And with our PDF Watermark Creator, users need no external application plugin, like Adobe Acrobat.
www.rasteredge.com
Common Core State StandardS for engliSh language artS  & literaCy in hiStory/SoCial StudieS, SCienCe, and teChniCal SubjeCtS
appendix a  |   25
the states of Virginia and Florida6, also found strong support for writing arguments as a key part of instruction. The 
2007 writing framework for the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) (National Assessment Gov-
erning Board, 2006) assigns persuasive writing the single largest targeted allotment of assessment time at grade 12 
(40 percent, versus 25 percent for narrative writing and 35 percent for informative writing). (The 2011 prepublication 
framework [National Assessment Governing Board, 2007] maintains the 40 percent figure for persuasive writing at 
grade 12, allotting 40 percent to writing to explain and 20 percent to writing to convey experience.) Writing argu-
ments or writing to persuade is also an important element in standards frameworks for numerous high-performing 
nations.
7
Specific skills central to writing arguments are also highly valued by postsecondary educators. A 2002 survey of 
instructors of freshman composition and other introductory courses across the curriculum at California’s community 
colleges, California State University campuses, and University of California campuses (Intersegmental Committee of 
the Academic Senates of the California Community Colleges, the California State University, and the University of 
California, 2002) found that among the most important skills expected of incoming students were articulating a clear 
thesis; identifying, evaluating, and using evidence to support or challenge the thesis; and considering and incorporat-
ing counterarguments into their writing. On the 2009 ACT national curriculum survey (ACT, Inc., 2009), postsecond-
ary faculty gave high ratings to such argument-related skills as “develop ideas by using some specific reasons, details, 
and examples,” “take and maintain a position on an issue,” and “support claims with multiple and appropriate sources 
of evidence.”
The value of effective argument extends well beyond the classroom or workplace, however. As Richard Fulkerson 
(1996) puts it in Teaching the Argument in Writing, the proper context for thinking about argument is one “in which 
the goal is not victory but a good decision, one in which all arguers are at risk of needing to alter their views, one in 
which a participant takes seriously and fairly the views different from his or her own” (pp. 16–17). Such capacities are 
broadly important for the literate, educated person living in the diverse, information-rich environment of the twenty-
first century.
6
Unpublished data collected by Achieve, Inc.
7
See, for example, frameworks from Finland, Hong Kong, and Singapore as well as Victoria and New South Wales in Australia.
software Library dll:VB.NET PowerPoint: VB Code to Draw and Create Annotation on PPT
other documents are compatible, including PDF, TIFF, MS platform-friendly, this .NET PPT page annotating component more plug-ins needed like Acrobat or Adobe
www.rasteredge.com
software Library dll:C# Excel - Excel Conversion & Rendering in C#.NET
independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. Excel to PDF Conversion. This page will tell you how to use XDoc.Excel
www.rasteredge.com
Common Core State StandardS for engliSh language artS  & literaCy in hiStory/SoCial StudieS, SCienCe, and teChniCal SubjeCtS
appendix a  |   26
speaking and Listening
the special role of speaking and Listening in K–5 Literacy
If literacy levels are to improve, the aims of the English language arts classroom, especially in the earliest grades, must 
include oral language in a purposeful, systematic way, in part because it helps students master the printed word. Be-
sides having intrinsic value as modes of communication, listening and speaking are necessary prerequisites of reading 
and writing (Fromkin, Rodman, & Hyams, 2006; Hulit, Howard, & Fahey, 2010; Pence & Justice, 2007; Stuart, Wright, 
Grigor, & Howey, 2002). The interrelationship between oral and written language is illustrated in the table below, using 
the distinction linguists make between receptive language (language that is heard, processed, and understood by an 
individual) and expressive language (language that is generated and produced by an individual).
Figure 14: Receptive and Expressive Oral and Written Language
Receptive Language
Expressive Language
Oral 
Language
Listening
Speaking
Written 
Language
Reading 
(decoding + comprehension)
Writing 
(handwriting, spelling, 
written composition)
Oral language development precedes and is the foundation for written language development; in other words, oral 
language is primary and written language builds on it. Children’s oral language competence is strongly predictive of 
their facility in learning to read and write: listening and speaking vocabulary and even mastery of syntax set boundar-
ies as to what children can read and understand no matter how well they can decode (Catts, Adolf, & Weismer, 2006; 
Hart & Risley, 1995; Hoover & Gough, 1990: Snow, Burns, & Griffin, 1998).
For children in preschool and the early grades, receptive and expressive abilities do not develop simultaneously or at 
the same pace: receptive language generally precedes expressive language. Children need to be able to understand 
words before they can produce and use them.
Oral language is particularly important for the youngest students. Hart and Risley (1995), who studied young children 
in the context of their early family life and then at school, found that the total number of words children had heard 
as preschoolers predicted how many words they understood and how fast they could learn new words in kindergar-
ten. Preschoolers who had heard more words had larger vocabularies once in kindergarten. Furthermore, when the 
students were in grade 3, their early language competence from the preschool years still accurately predicted their 
language and reading comprehension. The preschoolers who had heard more words, and subsequently had learned 
more words orally, were better readers. In short, early language advantage persists and manifests itself in higher lev-
els of literacy. A meta-analysis by Sticht and James (1984) indicates that the importance of oral language extends well 
beyond the earliest grades. As illustrated in the graphic below, Sticht and James found evidence strongly suggesting 
that children’s listening comprehension outpaces reading comprehension until the middle school years (grades 6–8).
Figure 15: Listening and Reading Comprehension, by Age
software Library dll:JPEG to PDF Converter | Convert JPEG to PDF, Convert PDF to JPEG
It can be used standalone. JPEG to PDF Converter is able to convert image files to PDF directly without the software Adobe Acrobat Reader for conversion.
www.rasteredge.com
software Library dll:PDF to WORD Converter | Convert PDF to Word, Convert Word to PDF
PDF to Word Converter has accurate output, and PDF to Word Converter doesn't need the support of Adobe Acrobat & Microsoft Word.
www.rasteredge.com
Common Core State StandardS for engliSh language artS  & literaCy in hiStory/SoCial StudieS, SCienCe, and teChniCal SubjeCtS
appendix a  |   27
The research strongly suggests that the English language arts classroom should explicitly address the link between 
oral and written language, exploiting the influence of oral language on a child’s later ability to read by allocating in-
structional time to building children’s listening skills, as called for in the Standards. The early grades should not focus 
on decoding alone, nor should the later grades pay attention only to building reading comprehension. Time should be 
devoted to reading fiction and content-rich selections aloud to young children, just as it is to providing those same 
children with the skills they will need to decode and encode.
This focus on oral language is of greatest importance for the children most at risk—children for whom English is a 
second language and children who have not been exposed at home to the kind of language found in written texts 
(Dickinson & Smith, 1994). Ensuring that all children in the United States have access to an excellent education re-
quires that issues of oral language come to the fore in elementary classrooms.
read-alouds and the reading-speaking-Listening Link
Generally, teachers will encourage children in the upper elementary grades to read texts independently and reflect 
on them in writing. However, children in the early grades—particularly kindergarten through grade 3—benefit from 
participating in rich, structured conversations with an adult in response to written texts that are read aloud, orally 
comparing and contrasting as well as analyzing and synthesizing (Bus, Van Ijzendoorn, & Pellegrini, 1995; Feitelstein, 
Goldstein, Iraqui, & Share, 1993; Feitelstein, Kita, & Goldstein, 1986; Whitehurst et al., 1988). The Standards acknowl-
edge the importance of this aural dimension of early learning by including a robust set of K–3 Speaking and Listening 
standards and by offering in Appendix B an extensive number of read-aloud text exemplars appropriate for K–1 and 
for grades 2–3.
Because, as indicated above, children’s listening comprehension likely outpaces reading comprehension until the 
middle school years, it is particularly important that students in the earliest grades build knowledge through being 
read to as well as through reading, with the balance gradually shifting to reading independently. By reading a story 
or nonfiction selection aloud, teachers allow children to experience written language without the burden of decod-
ing, granting them access to content that they may not be able to read and understand by themselves. Children are 
then free to focus their mental energy on the words and ideas presented in the text, and they will eventually be better 
prepared to tackle rich written content on their own. Whereas most titles selected for kindergarten and grade 1 will 
need to be read aloud exclusively, some titles selected for grades 2–5 may be appropriate for read-alouds as well as 
for reading independently. Reading aloud to students in the upper grades should not, however, be used as a substitute 
for independent reading by students; read-alouds at this level should supplement and enrich what students are able to 
read by themselves.
Common Core State StandardS for engliSh language artS  & literaCy in hiStory/SoCial StudieS, SCienCe, and teChniCal SubjeCtS
appendix a  |   28
Language
overview
The Standards take a hybrid approach to matters of conventions, knowledge of language, and vocabulary. As noted 
in the table below, certain elements important to reading, writing, and speaking and listening are included in those 
strands to help provide a coherent set of expectations for those modes of communication.
Figure 16: Elements of the Language Standards 
in the Reading, Writing, and Speaking and Listening Strands
Strand
Standard
Reading
r.ccr.4. Interpret words and phrases as they are 
used in a text, including determining technical, con-
notative, and figurative meanings, and analyze how 
specific word choices shape meaning or tone.
Writing
W.ccr.5. Develop and strengthen writing as 
needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or 
trying a new approach.
Speaking 
and Listening
sL.ccr.6. Adapt speech to a variety of contexts 
and communicative tasks, demonstrating com-
mand of formal English when indicated or appro-
priate.
In many respects, however, conventions, knowledge of language, and vocabulary extend across reading, writing, 
speaking, and listening. Many of the conventions-related standards are as appropriate to formal spoken English as 
they are to formal written English. Language choice is a matter of craft for both writers and speakers. New words and 
phrases are acquired not only through reading and being read to but also through direct vocabulary instruction and 
(particularly in the earliest grades) through purposeful classroom discussions around rich content.
The inclusion of Language standards in their own strand should not be taken as an indication that skills related to 
conventions, knowledge of language, and vocabulary are unimportant to reading, writing, speaking, and listening; 
indeed, they are inseparable from such contexts.
conventions and Knowledge of Language
Teaching and Learning the Conventions of Standard English
Development of Grammatical Knowledge
Grammar and usage development in children and in adults rarely follows a linear path. Native speakers and language 
learners often begin making new errors and seem to lose their mastery of particular grammatical structures or print 
conventions as they learn new, more complex grammatical structures or new usages of English, such as in college-
level persuasive essays (Bardovi-Harlig, 2000; Bartholomae, 1980; DeVilliers & DeVilliers, 1973; Shaughnessy, 1979). 
These errors are often signs of language development as learners synthesize new grammatical and usage knowledge 
with their current knowledge. Thus, students will often need to return to the same grammar topic in greater complex-
ity as they move through K–12 schooling and as they increase the range and complexity of the texts and communica-
tive contexts in which they read and write. The Standards account for the recursive, ongoing nature of grammatical 
knowledge in two ways. First, the Standards return to certain important language topics in higher grades at greater 
levels of sophistication. For instance, instruction on verbs in early elementary school (K–3) should address simple 
present, past, and future tenses; later instruction should extend students’ knowledge of verbs to other tenses (pro-
gressive and perfect tenses
8
in grades 4 and 5), mood (modal auxiliaries in grade 4 and grammatical mood in grade 
8) and voice (active and passive voice in grade 8). Second, the Standards identify with an asterisk (*) certain skills and 
understandings that students are to be introduced to in basic ways at lower grades but that are likely in need of being 
8
Though progressive and perfect are more correctly aspects of verbs rather than tenses, the Standards use the more familiar 
notion here and throughout for the sake of accessibility.
Common Core State StandardS for engliSh language artS  & literaCy in hiStory/SoCial StudieS, SCienCe, and teChniCal SubjeCtS
appendix a  |   29
retaught and relearned in subsequent grades as students’ writing and speaking matures and grows more complex. 
(See “Progressive Language Skills in the Standards,” below.)
Making Appropriate Grammar and Usage Choices in Writing and Speaking
Students must have a strong command of the grammar and usage of spoken and written standard English to succeed 
academically and professionally. Yet there is great variety in the language and grammar features of spoken and writ-
ten standard English (Biber, 1991; Krauthamer, 1999), of academic and everyday standard English, and of the language 
of different disciplines (Schleppegrell, 2001). Furthermore, in the twenty-first century, students must be able to com-
municate effectively in a wide range of print and digital texts, each of which may require different grammatical and 
usage choices to be effective. Thus, grammar and usage instruction should acknowledge the many varieties of English 
that exist and address differences in grammatical structure and usage between these varieties in order to help stu-
dents make purposeful language choices in their writing and speaking (Fogel & Ehri, 2000; Wheeler & Swords, 2004). 
Students must also be taught the purposes for using particular grammatical features in particular disciplines or texts; 
if they are taught simply to vary their grammar and language to keep their writing “interesting,” they may actually 
become more confused about how to make effective language choices (Lefstein, 2009). The Standards encourage 
this sort of instruction in a number of ways, most directly through a series of grade-specific standards associated with 
Language CCR standard 3 that, beginning in grade 1, focuses on making students aware of language variety.
Using Knowledge of Grammar and Usage for Reading and Listening Comprehension
Grammatical knowledge can also aid reading comprehension and interpretation (Gargani, 2006; Williams, 2000, 
2005). Researchers recommend that students be taught to use knowledge of grammar and usage, as well as knowl-
edge of vocabulary, to comprehend complex academic texts (García & Beltrán, 2003; Short & Fitzsimmons, 2007; 
RAND Reading Study Group, 2002). At the elementary level, for example, students can use knowledge of verbs to 
help them understand the plot and characters in a text (Williams, 2005). At the secondary level, learning the gram-
matical structures of nonstandard dialects can help students understand how accomplished writers such as Harper 
Lee, Langston Hughes, and Mark Twain use various dialects of English to great advantage and effect, and can help 
students analyze setting, character, and author’s craft in great works of literature. Teaching about the grammatical 
patterns found in specific disciplines has also been shown to help English language learners’ reading comprehension 
in general and reading comprehension in history classrooms in particular (Achugar, Schleppegrell, & Oteíza, 2007; 
Gargani, 2006).
As students learn more about the patterns of English grammar in different communicative contexts throughout their 
K–12 academic careers, they can develop more complex understandings of English grammar and usage. Students can 
use this understanding to make more purposeful and effective choices in their writing and speaking and more accu-
rate and rich interpretations in their reading and listening.
Progressive Language Skills in the Standards
While all of the Standards are cumulative, certain Language skills and understandings are more likely than others to 
need to be retaught and relearned as students advance through the grades. Beginning in grade 3, the Standards note 
such “progressive” skills and understandings with an asterisk (*) in the main document; they are also summarized in 
the table on pages 29 and 55 of that document as well as on page 34 of this appendix. These skills and understand-
ings should be mastered at a basic level no later than the end of the grade in which they are introduced in the Stan-
dards. In subsequent grades, as their writing and speaking become more sophisticated, students will need to learn to 
apply these skills and understandings in more advanced ways.
The following example shows how one such task—ensuring subject-verb agreement, formally introduced in the Stan-
dards in grade 3—can become more challenging as students’ writing matures. The sentences in the table below are 
taken verbatim from the annotated writing samples found in Appendix C. The example is illustrative only of a general 
development of sophistication and not meant to be exhaustive, to set firm grade-specific expectations, or to establish 
a precise hierarchy of increasing difficulty in subject-verb agreement.
Common Core State StandardS for engliSh language artS  & literaCy in hiStory/SoCial StudieS, SCienCe, and teChniCal SubjeCtS
appendix a  |   30
Figure 17: Example of Subject-Verb Agreement Progression across Grades
Example
Condition
Horses are so beautiful and fun to ride.
[Horses, grade 3]
Subject and verb next to each other
When I started out the door, I noticed that Tigger and Max were follow-
ing me to school.
[Glowing Shoes, grade 4]
Compound subject joined by and
A mother or female horse is called a mare.
[Horses, grade 3]
Compound subject joined by or; each 
subject takes a singular verb1
The first thing to do is research, research, research!
[Zoo Field Trip, grade 4]
Intervening phrase between subject and 
verb
If the watershed for the pools is changed, the condition of the pools 
changes. 
[A Geographical Report, grade 7]
Intervening phrase between each subject 
and verb suggesting a different number 
for the verb than the subject calls for
Another was the way to the other evil places.
[Getting Shot and Living Through It, grade 5]
All his stories are the same type.
[Author Response: Roald Dahl, grade 5]
All the characters that Roald Dahl ever made were probably fake charac-
ters.
[Author Response: Roald Dahl, grade 5]
One of the reasons why my cat Gus is the best pet is because he is a 
cuddle bug.
[A Pet Story About My Cat . . . Gus, grade 6]
Indefinite pronoun as subject, with 
increasing distance between subject and 
verb
1
In this particular example, or female horse should have been punctuated by the student as a nonrestrictive appositive, but the 
sentence as is illustrates the notion of a compound subject joined by or.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested