C H A P T E R   4
Commands
Using Results
121
5/5/99  ã Apple Computer, Inc.
Using Results
4
The following sections describe how you work with the results generated when 
AppleScript executes a command:
n
“Viewing a Result in the Script Editor’s Result Window” (page 121)
n
“Using the Predefined Result Variable” (page 122)
For related information, see “The Return Statement” (page 281).
Viewing a Result in the Script Editor ’s Result Window
4
The result of a command is the value generated when the command is 
executed. You can display the result of a command in the Script Editor by using 
the Show Result command from the Controls menu to open the result window. 
For example, if you run the following script,
tell application "Finder"
duplicate folder "Apple Extras" of startup disk
end tell
and then choose Show Result in the Script Editor, you’ll see a value similar to
folder "Apple Extras copy" of disk "Hard Disk" of application "Finder"
The term 
startup disk
is one of several special folder and disk names that the 
Finder understands. Others include 
apple menu items folder
control panels 
folder
desktop
extensions folder
fonts folder
preferences folder,
and 
system folder
. You can read more about scripting the Finder in the AppleScript 
section of the Mac OS Help Center.
Some commands return a result as a value. For example, the Count command in 
the following statement returns a value: the number of files (not including 
folders or files enclosed in folders) in the specified folder.
tell application "Finder"
count files in folder "Apple Extras" of startup disk
end tell
Pdf extract pages - application software utility:C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Easy to Use C# Code to Extract PDF Pages, Copy Pages from One PDF File and Paste into Others
www.rasteredge.com
Pdf extract pages - application software utility:VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed VB.NET Guide for Extracting Pages from Microsoft PDF Doc
www.rasteredge.com
C H A P T E R   4  
Commands
122
Using Results
5/5/99  ã Apple Computer, Inc.
You can use this statement anywhere a value is required by enclosing the 
statement in parentheses. For example, the following statement sets the value of 
numFiles
to the value returned by the Count command.
tell application "Finder"
set numFiles to ¬
(count files in folder "Apple Extras" of startup disk)
end tell
For more information on how to use the Script Editor, see the AppleScript 
section of the Mac OS Help Center. 
Using the Predefined Result Variable
4
In addition to displaying the result of a command in the result window, 
AppleScript puts the result into a predefined variable called 
result
. The value 
remains there until the next command is executed. If the next command does 
not return a result, the value of 
result
is undefined. The following two 
commands show how to use the 
result
variable to set the value of 
numFiles
to 
the value returned by the Count command: 
tell application "Finder"
count files in folder "Apple Extras" of startup disk
set numFiles to result
end tell
When a direct parameter specifies more than one object, the result is a list that 
contains a value for each object that was handled. Here is an example of a 
command whose result is a list:
tell application "Finder"
get name of every file in folder "Apple Extras" of startup disk
end tell
The result is a list of strings, one for each file (not including folders or files 
enclosed in folders). Depending on the contents of the Apple Extras folder, the 
list looks something like the following:
{"Key Caps", "Language Register", "Register with Apple"}
application software utility:C# PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in
inputFilePath); PDFTextMgr textMgr = PDFTextHandler.ExportPDFTextManager(doc); // Extract text content C# example code for text extraction from all PDF pages.
www.rasteredge.com
application software utility:VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF
PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Extract PDF Text. VB.NET PDF - Extract Text from PDF Using VB. How to Extract Text from PDF with VB.NET Sample Codes in .NET Application.
www.rasteredge.com
C H A P T E R   4
Commands
Double Angle Brackets in Results and Scripts
123
5/5/99  ã Apple Computer, Inc.
The first string is the name of the first file, the second string is the name of the 
second file, and so on.
Double Angle Brackets in Results and Scripts
4
When you type English language script statements in a Script Editor script 
window, AppleScript is able to compile the script because the English terms are 
described either in the terminology built into the AppleScript language or in the 
dictionary of an available scriptable application or scripting addition. When 
AppleScript compiles your script, it converts it into an internal executable 
format, then reformats the text as described in “Compiling Scripts With the 
Script Editor” (page 47).
When you open, compile, edit, or run scripts with the Script Editor, you may 
occasionally see terms enclosed in double angle brackets, or chevrons («»), in a 
script window or in the result window. For example, you might see the term 
«event sysodlog»
as part of a script. You will typically see text enclosed in 
chevrons for one of three reasons:
n
AppleScript can’t reformat a term in English in a script window because the 
term is not part of the AppleScript language and no dictionary that defines 
the term is available. This situation is described in “When a Dictionary Is Not 
Available” (page 123).
n
AppleScript can’t display data in the data’s native format in the result 
window. This situation is described in “When AppleScript Displays Data in 
Raw Format” (page 125).
n
You intentionally entered the chevrons (by typing Option-Backslash and 
Shift-Option-Backslash). This situation is described in “Entering Script 
Information in Raw Format” (page 125).
When a Dictionary Is Not Available
4
AppleScript uses double angle brackets in a Script Editor script window when 
it can’t identify a term or can’t display a value directly. The first word within 
the double angle brackets can be any of the following: 
event
property
class
data
preposition
keyform
constant
, or 
script
. The second word varies 
depending on the context.
application software utility:C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
Image: Extract Image from PDF. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› C# PDF: Extract PDF Image. How to C#: Extract Image from PDF Document.
www.rasteredge.com
application software utility:VB.NET PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images
Image: Extract Image from PDF. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Extract PDF Image. VB.NET PDF - Extract Image from PDF Document in VB.NET.
www.rasteredge.com
C H A P T E R   4  
Commands
124
Double Angle Brackets in Results and Scripts
5/5/99  ã Apple Computer, Inc.
AppleScript can not display a term in English if isn’t a part of the AppleScript 
language and it isn’t defined in an application or scripting addition dictionary 
that is available when the script is opened or compiled. That usually happens 
for one of two reasons:
n
A required application or scripting addition dictionary isn’t physically 
present when the script is opened or compiled (possibly because the script 
was compiled on one machine and opened on another).
n
A required application or scripting addition dictionary is available but 
doesn’t support a term used in the script (most likely because the dictionary 
is from an older version of the application or scripting addition).
As an example of a missing dictionary, suppose you create a script that uses the 
Display Dialog scripting addition command, then open the script when the 
Standard Additions scripting addition (which includes the Display Dialog 
command) is not present. AppleScript replaces the words 
display dialog
in the 
script with 
«event sysodlog»
. In this case, you should make sure the Standard 
Additions scripting addition is present in the Scripting Additions folder (which 
is located in the System folder) before attempting to compile or run the script.
As an example of a missing term, suppose you create the following script, 
which uses the 
delay
scripting addition command, available starting with Mac 
OS 8.5:
display dialog "Ready to test your patience?"
set myDate to current date
delay 4
display dialog "4 second delay on " & (date string of myDate) & "."
This script displays a dialog, waits for the user to dismiss it, then delays for four 
seconds before displaying a second dialog that includes the current date. If you 
save this script as text and compile it on a machine running Mac OS 8.1, the 
Script Editor will display the following:
display dialog "Ready to test your patience?"
set myDate to current date
«event sysodela» 4
display dialog "4 second delay on " & (date string of myDate) & "."
AppleScript converts the term 
delay 4
to 
«event sysodela» 4
because the Delay 
scripting addition command is not available with Mac OS 8.1. Without the 
Delay term in an available dictionary, AppleScript doesn’t have an English 
application software utility:C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
Page: Insert PDF Pages. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› C# PDF: Insert PDF Page. Add and Insert Multiple PDF Pages to PDF Document Using C#.
www.rasteredge.com
application software utility:VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.
Page: Delete Existing PDF Pages. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Delete PDF Page. How to VB.NET: Delete Consecutive Pages from PDF.
www.rasteredge.com
C H A P T E R   4
Commands
Double Angle Brackets in Results and Scripts
125
5/5/99  ã Apple Computer, Inc.
language term to display. The script compiles, but won’t run correctly on the 
machine with Mac OS  8.1 because the Delay command isn’t available. If you 
save the compiled script, then move it to the original machine with Mac OS 8.5, 
it will run correctly. If you recompile the script on the original machine, 
AppleScript converts 
«event sysodela»
back to 
delay 4
.
For related information, see “Entering Script Information in Raw Format” 
(page 125).
When AppleScript Displays Data in Raw Format
4
Double angle brackets can also occur in results. For example, if the value of a 
variable is a script object named 
Joe
, AppleScript represents the script object as 
shown in this script:
script Joe
property theCount : 0
end script
set x to Joe
x
--result: «script Joe»
For more information about script objects, see “Script Objects” (page 325).
Similarly, if the value of a variable is of class Data and the Script Editor can’t 
display the data directly in its native format, it uses double angle brackets to 
enclose both the word 
data
and a sequence of numerical values that represent 
the data. Although this may not visually resemble the original data, the data’s 
original format is preserved. You can treat the data like any other value, except 
that you can’t view it directly in its native format in a Script Editor window. For 
an example, see “Raw Data in Parameters” (page 120).
Entering Script Information in Raw Format
4
You can enter double angle brackets, or chevrons («»), directly into a script by 
typing Option-Backslash and Shift-Option-Backslash. There are several reasons 
you might choose to do this:
application software utility:C# PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
Page: Delete Existing PDF Pages. Provide C# Users with Mature .NET PDF Document Manipulating Library for Deleting PDF Pages in C#.
www.rasteredge.com
application software utility:VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Page: Insert PDF Pages. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Insert PDF Page. Add and Insert Multiple PDF Pages to PDF Document Using VB.
www.rasteredge.com
C H A P T E R   4  
Commands
126
Double Angle Brackets in Results and Scripts
5/5/99  ã Apple Computer, Inc.
n
You’re creating a script at home to use on a work machine that is running a 
newer version of the Mac OS or a newer version of a scriptable application or 
scripting addition. Drawing from the example in “When a Dictionary Is Not 
Available” (page 123), suppose you want to use the scripting addition 
command Delay, but are running Mac OS 8, which doesn’t support that 
command. At home, you can write 
«event sysodela» 4
in your script. When 
you open the script at work, AppleScript converts the term to 
delay 4
. A 
problem with this approach is that you can’t check the validity of your script 
until you try it on the target machine.
n
You know that an application supports a certain Apple event but it doesn’t 
supply terminology for the event in its dictionary. For example, if you’re a 
developer creating a scriptable application, you may want to test a feature 
you’ve added to the code but not yet added to the application’s dictionary.
You can also use AppleScript to insert chevrons into a script, using the 
following steps:
1. Create a script using standard terms compiled against an available 
application or scripting addition.
2. Save the script as text and quit the Script Editor.
3. Remove the application or scripting addition from the computer.
4. Open the script again and compile it.
5. When AppleScript asks you to locate the application or scripting addition, 
specify a file that doesn’t contain a terminology.
The script will compile successfully, but the Script Editor will display the script 
with chevron format for any terms that rely on a missing dictionary. (To 
recompile the script again and supply the correct dictionary, save it as text and 
quit the Script Editor again, then open and recompile it, specifying the correct 
application or scripting addition.)
There are several situations in which you might want to recompile a script this 
way.
n
You’re creating a script that will target an application on a remote machine. 
AppleScript doesn’t currently allow you to compile against the dictionary of 
an application or scripting addition on a remote machine. If you compile 
using a local copy of the application, you are not only using its dictionary 
(which may be the same as for the remote application), you are also targeting 
the local application. However, you can write and compile the script with the 
local version of the application, insert chevrons as described above so that 
C H A P T E R   4
Commands
Command Definitions
127
5/5/99  ã Apple Computer, Inc.
the target is no longer the local application, then type in the remote machine 
target, as described in “References to Remote Applications” (page 196).
n
You want a Tell block loop variable to loop over items (such as disk drives) 
on a remote machine. As described in the previous item, you can compile 
your script using a local copy of the application, insert chevrons as described 
above, then type in the remote machine target.
Sending Raw Apple Events From a Script
4
The section “Entering Script Information in Raw Format” (page 125) describes 
how you can use double angle brackets (or chevrons) to enter raw information 
directly into a script. You enter these symbols («») by typing Option-Backslash 
and Shift-Option-Backslash.
Using chevrons, you can directly enter a term such as 
«event sysodlog»
(equivalent to 
display dialog
) in a script. If the Display Dialog command is 
available, AppleScript will convert 
«event sysodlog»
to 
display dialog
when 
you compile the script. The term 
«event sysodlog»
is actually the raw form for 
an Apple event with event class 
'syso'
and event ID 
'dlog'
. You can use raw 
syntax to enter and execute events (even complex events with numerous 
parameters) when there is no dictionary to support them. However, this guide 
does not provide detailed documentation for raw syntax.
Command Definitions
4
The sections that follow are in alphabetical order by command name and 
provide definitions for both AppleScript commands and standard application 
commands. The general features of these types of commands are described in 
“Types of Commands” (page 110). The command type is noted in the brief 
command description at the beginning of each definition. 
Table 4-1 summarizes the standard application-only commands described in 
this chapter and provides links to sections that describe the commands in detail. 
Table 4-2 does the same for the AppleScript commands defined in this chapter. 
Some of the commands in Table 4-2 are also implemented as application 
commands.
C H A P T E R   4  
Commands
128
Command Definitions
5/5/99  ã Apple Computer, Inc.
For more information about the standard scripting addition commands 
distributed with AppleScript, see the AppleScript section of the Mac OS Help 
Center. For definitions of commands provided by other scripting additions, see 
the documentation for those scripting additions.
The application commands defined in this chapter are standard application 
commands supported by most scriptable applications. The definitions in this 
chapter describe how these commands work in most applications. Individual 
applications can extend or change the way the standard application commands 
work.
Application dictionaries list application commands by suites. Each suite defines 
the Apple event constructs (object class definitions, descriptor types, and so on) 
needed for performing a particular type of scriptable activity. The suite 
categories include the Standard suite, the Internet suite, the Text suite, and so 
on. Different applications may support different commands in the Standard 
suite, but all support the Open, Print, Quit, Run, and Reopen commands, which 
were formerly in a separate Required suite.
Note
If an application supports just the four required commands 
it is not considered scriptable and it doesn’t need a 
dictionary. If it supports the required commands in the 
standard way and supports additional commands as well, 
it needn’t include the required commands in its dictionary. 
In either case, the required commands will be available to 
scripters (they will compile and run with the Script 
Editor).
u
Many applications also define their own suite of more specialized commands. 
The application’s dictionary provides definitions of all commands supported by 
the application (with the exception noted above for the four required 
commands). Check the appropriate application dictionary before using 
application commands. You can view the dictionary of an application or 
scripting addition by dropping its icon on the Script Editor’s icon, or by 
C H A P T E R   4
Commands
Command Definitions
129
5/5/99  ã Apple Computer, Inc.
opening the application or scripting addition with the Script Editor’s Open 
Dictionary command.
Table 4-1
Standard application-only commands
Command
Description
Must be supported by all applications
“Launch” (page 143)
Launches an application without invoking its 
standard startup procedures. This command is 
handled differently than other commands in this 
table. Refer to the definition for details.
“Open” (page 149)
Opens one or more files.
“Print” (page 150)
Prints one or more objects.
“Quit” (page 151)
Terminates an application.
“Reopen” (page 152)
Brings an already-open application to the front and 
re-invokes its standard startup procedures.
“Run” (page 154)
Launches an application and invokes its standard 
startup procedures.
Commonly supported by scriptable applications
“Close” (page 130)
Closes one or more objects.
“Count” (page 134)
Counts elements of a particular class in an object.
“Delete” (page 137)
Deletes one or more objects.
“Duplicate” (page 138)
Copies an object or objects to a new location.
“Exists” (page 139)
Determines if an object exists.
“Get” (page 141)
Returns the value of an object.
“Make” (page 146)
Creates a new object.
“Move” (page 148)
Moves an object or objects.
“Save” (page 156)
Saves an object to a file.
“Set” (page 157)
Assigns a value to an object.
C H A P T E R   4  
Commands
130
Command Definitions
5/5/99  ã Apple Computer, Inc.
Table 4-2 lists the AppleScript commands defined in this chapter. Some of these 
commands are also implemented as.application commands
Another AppleScript command, the Error command, is described in “Try 
Statements” (page 259).
Close
4
Close is an application command that requests the closing of one or more 
objects, usually application windows or documents.
SYNTAX
close 
referenceToObject
[ saving in 
referenceToFile
] [ saving
saveOption
PARAMETERS
referenceToObject
A reference to the object or objects to close, usually application 
windows or documents.
Class: 
Reference
Table 4-2
AppleScript and application commands
Command
Description
“Copy” (page 132)
Assigns a value to a variable or object.
“Count” (page 134)
Counts the elements of a composite value.
“Get” (page 141)
Returns the value of an expression.
“Run” (page 154)
Executes statements other than handler and 
property definitions in a script object definition.
“Set” (page 157)
Assigns a value to a variable or an object.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested