crystal report export to pdf without viewer c# : Delete page from pdf acrobat control application system azure html .net console Accenture-Digital-Government-Pathways-to-Delivering-Public-Services-for-the-Future1-part508

11
Digital Government
Pathways to Delivering Public Services for the Future
1. Research Scope and Methodology
Research scope
We used our experience of working with global public 
service entities to anchor a comprehensive in-depth 
research across 10 countries.
To measure Citizen Service Experience, Accenture 
appraised government’s public service programs in a 
quantitative manner for the 10 countries by evaluating 
services offered at a federal or central-government 
level to ensure our analysis of the services was directly 
comparable across countries. Accenture researchers 
emulated businesses and service users, and attempted to 
fulfil service needs that typically might be provided at  
this level.
For measuring citizen satisfaction levels, Accenture 
conducted an online survey of 5,000 citizens across the 
10 countries. The surveyed citizens largely belonged to 
an educated, digitally engaged group of people who 
have used or been exposed to online services on various 
devices for personal and professional needs. 
Research approach and methodology
For the research, we followed a four-step process:
1. Establish hypotheses on Citizen Service Experience 
of the digital government’s performance and citizen 
satisfaction levels. 
2. Collect survey responses from citizens who use online 
digital platforms.
3. Analyze digital government’s performance metrics and 
Citizen Satisfaction Survey findings.
4. Aggregate findings from the Citizen Satisfaction 
Survey results and Citizen Service Experience  
into an overall ranking for the country with  
supporting insights. 
The research is based on three components under Citizen 
Service Experience, which provide the overall ranking 
for a country—Citizen Satisfaction Survey (demand 
side), Service Maturity (supply side) and Citizen Service 
Delivery Experience (supply side).
Overall Ranking in Citizen Service Experience is 
measured through three key components, each carrying 
a weight based on their relevance to the overall  
digital government performance to arrive at an 
integrated score.
Citizen Satisfaction Survey (CSS) carries a weight 
of 40 percent within Citizen Service Experience. 
Citizens are the end users of public services with 
strong opinions about the role of their governments in 
providing excellence in services, and their voices should 
carry a lot of weight. These views have been quantified 
and incorporated in the scoring. 
Service Maturity (SM) measures the level to which 
a government has developed an online presence 
as an indicator. The importance of this factor has 
decreased over the years since e-governments (more 
informational in the nature of their digital presence) 
have become ubiquitous and less of a differentiator 
among countries. However, given e-government’s 
continued importance to this measure, we have 
assigned it a 10 percent weight in our rankings. 
Citizen Service Delivery Experience (CSDE) carries 
a weight of 50 percent, and measures the extent to 
which government agencies manage interactions with 
their customers—citizens and businesses—and deliver 
service in an integrated way. The CSDE score considers 
how well governments have addressed the five pillars 
of leadership in customer service—citizen-centered, 
multichannel and cross-government service delivery, 
proactive communication and education, and  
social media. 
Finally, we used the Digital Maturity dimension as a 
lens to view the digital governments’ rankings. Digital 
Maturity compares the digital government initiatives 
of countries relative to one another instead of being an 
absolute measurement through a range of quantitative 
and qualitative variables across the key outcome areas 
in digital government public service delivery. See Figure 
4 for the overall approach used to measure the digital 
performance of the government.
Delete page from pdf acrobat - copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Easy to Use C# Code to Extract PDF Pages, Copy Pages from One PDF File and Paste into Others
cut pdf pages; copy pdf page into word doc
Delete page from pdf acrobat - VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed VB.NET Guide for Extracting Pages from Microsoft PDF Doc
copy pages from pdf into new pdf; deleting pages from pdf in preview
Figure 4: Components of the digital government performance score
Citizen Service Experience
Citizen Service Delivery Experience
Citizen
Satisfaction
Survey
Service Maturity
New social media
Citizen
centered
Cross government
Multichannel
Proactive
communication
10%
40%
50%
25%
25%
25%
15%
10%
(To know more about the research methodology, see Annexure 1).
Figure 5: Countries overall rankings
12
Digital Government
Pathways to Delivering Public Services for the Future
1.1 Ten Country Overall Ranking
We ranked the 10 countries on a scale of 1 to 10 based 
on the scores from the Citizen Satisfaction Survey, 
Service Maturity and Citizen Service Delivery Experience. 
Singapore emerged as the overall leader (7.4), followed 
by Norway (7.3), and the UAE (6.7). South Korea (6.0), 
Saudi Arabia (5.9), the US (5.9) and the UK (5.7) formed 
the middle pack, and India (5.4), Germany (4.7) and 
Brazil (4.3) followed as the last three (see Figure 5).
7.4
Singapore
7.3
Norway
6.7
UAE
6.0
South Korea
5.9
Saudi Arabia
5.9
United States
5.7
United Kingdom
5.4
India
4.7
Germany
4.3
Brazil
.NET PDF Document Viewing, Annotation, Conversion & Processing
Edit, update, delete PDF annotations from PDF file. Print. Support for all the print modes in Acrobat PDF. Print only specified page ranges.
extract page from pdf acrobat; export pages from pdf reader
C# PDF Converter Library SDK to convert PDF to other file formats
using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. to image or document, or from PDF document to other file formats, like multi-page TIFF file
convert few pages of pdf to word; add and remove pages from pdf file online
13
Digital Government
Pathways to Delivering Public Services for the Future
We found that despite having a well-developed 
infrastructure, the availability of online services and 
citizen participation channels differ widely within the 
countries in the Cutters category, which lag behind the 
Enhancers. The governments in the Cutters category, 
the UK and the US, demonstrate moderate levels of 
prioritization of ICT even though most of them have 
articulated a digital government strategy with clear 
implementation plans. The perceived government 
efforts in leveraging digital to drive greater economic 
competitiveness and public sector productivity  
remained mixed.
Indeed, the UK and the US are ahead in terms  
of Service Maturity, but not in terms of engagement as 
observed in the Citizen Satisfaction Survey. We found 
that these countries are focusing on driving efficiencies 
and cost cutting, which may be seen by their citizens as 
government centered, rather than being truly  
citizen centered.
The growth trajectory among countries in the Builders 
category is driving governments to develop a more 
progressive public sector, with an emphasis on ICT as a 
key enabler. Performance in the areas considered by our 
study remained constrained by unequal access to ICT 
and education infrastructure. There is an opportunity for 
these countries to leverage digital creatively to leapfrog 
the adoption curve and build quality public services that 
are available to all.
The UAE is a strong performer from the Builders 
category, ranking third, leading the way in citizen 
satisfaction and engagement. Its citizens are cognizant 
of the importance of digital channels in improving 
service quality and outcomes, and confident of their 
government’s ability to meet the challenges that 
may arise in the process. At the same time, the UAE 
government is focusing on placing high priority in 
digitalization. However, there are opportunities for 
improvement that exist for the government in  
the areas of citizen centricity and multichannel  
service delivery.
Saudi Arabia scores behind the UAE in citizen 
satisfaction and confidence where citizens are 
demanding more focus on education. Incidentally, while 
the country’s Citizen Service Experience score is on the 
lower side, the citizens are satisfied and confident of 
the government’s ability to deliver service quality and 
outcomes. The opportunities that exist for Saudi Arabia 
are for delivering citizen-centric services in a cost-
effective manner.
Other Builders in the category, such as India and Brazil, 
score higher in Citizen Satisfaction Survey than Service 
Maturity and Citizen Service Delivery Experience, where 
significant improvement is needed for both countries. 
It was observed that while the Brazilian government is 
committed to a clear digital strategy and is building a 
robust infrastructure, its citizens seem less satisfied with 
the public services offered and want to be more involved 
in shaping them. Similarly, the Indian government is on 
track with its e-governance plan for improving citizen 
engagement and satisfaction; however, it needs to focus 
on accelerating execution with greater transparency and 
citizen involvement.
We found countries in the Enhancer category have 
performed relatively better across most dimensions, 
as compared to the other two categories. This can be 
attributed to their conscious effort to deliver world-class 
public services through digital platforms. Given their 
robust economies, well-developed ICT infrastructure and 
informed societies, countries in the Enhancer category 
have invested in building their digital governments to 
drive citizen satisfaction, economic competitiveness and 
public sector efficiencies, with varying maturities.  
The challenge for countries in the Enhancers  
category is further leveraging digital to drive greater 
citizen engagement.
Singapore and Norway are leaders in digital government 
service with Singapore leading the way due to a 
sustained focus and investment in ICT across a range of 
public services, such as health and education. Norway 
has a highly engaged digital citizenry and does more on 
communication and social media presence.
Other Enhancers such as South Korea and Germany have 
scored poorly on dimensions such as citizen satisfaction 
and engagement. This could be the result of not having 
a single integrated presence for citizen and business 
services in the case of Germany and not involving the 
citizens more formally in rule-making processes in the 
case of South Korea.
C# powerpoint - PowerPoint Conversion & Rendering in C#.NET
without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. PowerPoint to PDF Conversion. This page will tell you how to use XDoc.PowerPoint SDK
pdf extract pages; cut pages out of pdf file
C# Word - Word Conversion in C#.NET
independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. Word to PDF Conversion. This page will tell you how to use XDoc.Word
delete pages from pdf without acrobat; delete pages from pdf acrobat reader
3
Source: http://unpan1.un.org/intradoc/groups/public/documents/un/unpan048065.pdf
4
Source: http://www3.weforum.org/docs/WEF_GlobalCompetitivenessReport_2012-13.pdf
14
Digital Government
Pathways to Delivering Public Services for the Future
Citizens’ expectations from 
their governments have risen 
significantly in recent years, 
encouraged in part, by their 
experiences with the private 
sector, such as banking, 
consumer goods, media 
and entertainment services. 
Governments have often been 
playing catch up. Their approach 
has primarily been supply 
driven—top-down, one-size-fits-all service delivery—led 
by archaic rules and budget constraints. This approach 
is out of step with current realities. Mega trends such 
as mobility, social media and big data, powered by 
analytics and cloud computing, offer a new paradigm 
shift for governments to drive reforms in public services, 
processes and technologies. Governments run the risk of 
becoming irrelevant if they don’t  
start delivering public services to the new digital 
citizens—now. 
Accenture conducted a citizen survey to identify the gap 
between demand and supply in the provision of public 
services. The objective of the survey was to:
Discover general attitudes toward the digitalization of 
government operations, and understand the depth of 
interactions between citizens and the government.
Measure the level of satisfaction with government 
services against expectations.
Appraise the confidence level of citizens and 
understand their priorities.
Determine current and future channels used for 
different types of government transactions.
Assess the likelihood of citizens using new emerging 
technologies for government transactions.
2.1 Are the citizens satisfied?
Accenture research found that an important aspect 
of a successful, sustainable digital government is 
aligning initiatives with their citizens’ or constituents' 
expectations and preferences, thereby improving overall 
satisfaction and building trust and engagement. Our 
study found a strong correlation between improved 
quality of services and a stronger relationship between 
citizens and their governments. This is the predominant 
reason countries in the Builders category, such as the 
UAE and Saudi Arabia, lead in terms of satisfaction 
with the quality of services among the reference group, 
demonstrating that it is more about the direction of 
travel, rather than reaching the destination. (Figure 
6). The citizens perceive that the governments have 
evolved over time and taken initiatives to proactively 
communicate through various digital channels, 
including social media. For example, Saudi Arabia 
ranked nineteenth in the world in the United Nations 
E-government Survey 2012
3
and is also recognized for 
leveraging ICT to improve access to basic service  
for citizens.
As an average across the 10 countries, less than 40 
percent of the surveyed citizens are satisfied with the 
quality of public services in their country. Despite being 
the leaders in digital services, South Korea and the US, 
rank low on the Citizen Satisfaction Survey. 
South Korea, which ranked quite high in Service 
Maturity and is considered one of the leaders in 
ICT development, ranked second to last in terms of 
citizen satisfaction levels. Its citizens’ dissatisfaction 
stems from their perception of wastefulness in public 
spending by the government and increased demand for 
information on issues related to policymaking—aspects 
also forming part of the top priorities identified by the 
citizens for their government. The World Economic 
Forum (WEF) Global Competitiveness Index 2012–13
4
ranked the country 133 out of 144 economies—the 
lowest in its peer group—in terms of transparency of 
government policymaking. 
The US government is focusing on cost reduction as a 
priority agenda at both federal and state levels, though 
this could be seen by its citizens as a government-
led approach to fulfill budget constraints rather than 
being truly citizen-centric. It ranked 76 out of 144 
countries on the control of wastefulness of public 
spending score in the WEF’s Global Competitiveness 
Index 2012–13. Additionally, citizens reported feeling 
uncomfortable interacting with their government 
through digital channels (including social, mobile and 
cloud computing) which may also contribute to the 
country’s low ranking on citizen satisfaction.
Citizen
Satisfaction
Survey
Service Maturity
Customer Service Delivery Experience
10%
40%
50%
2. Citizen Satisfaction Survey 
VB.NET PDF: How to Create Watermark on PDF Document within
or image (such as business's logo) on any desired PDF page. And with our PDF Watermark Creator, users need no external application plugin, like Adobe Acrobat.
extract pages from pdf reader; extract pages pdf preview
C# Windows Viewer - Image and Document Conversion & Rendering in
standard image and document in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. Convert to PDF.
extract pdf pages online; deleting pages from pdf document
Figure 6: Citizen satisfaction level in countries
We asked: Overall, how satisfied or dissatisfied are you with the quality of public services in your country?
15
Digital Government
Pathways to Delivering Public Services for the Future
33
UAE
36
Saudi Arabia
44
Singapore
40
Norway
34
United Kingdom
24
India
28
Germany
22
United States
18
South Korea
10
34
19
6
7
3
7
3
6
1
5
7
10
5
4
6
12
7
19
7
45
14
21
16
14
28
25
22
25
28
22
Brazil
Very dissatisfied
Fairly dissatisfied
Fairly satisfied
Very satisfied
2.2 How to improve public services for the 
future? Some tips from citizens
We asked citizens to select the top priorities they felt 
governments should focus on to improve public services. 
The set of options included:
Publish information on public services so that citizens 
can evaluate the effectiveness.
Provide more services through digital channels, such as 
online or mobile.
Understand the priorities of citizens and communities 
better.
Provide services in a more cost-effective way.
Make sure that services are tailored to the needs of 
people using them.
Work more closely with businesses and nonprofit 
organizations.
Improve the skills of people who work in public 
services.
Improve understanding of what works well and what 
doesn’t. 
Involve citizens in deciding how public services should 
work. 
Respond to changes flexibly, such as adopting new 
technologies or an increased demand for a particular 
service.
Plan for the long term, not just the next few years.
Citizens selected understanding the priorities of 
citizens and communities better (34 percent) as their 
top priority for improving public services for the future. 
This clearly demonstrates that a majority of the surveyed 
citizens believe their governments do not understand 
or give enough importance to their needs, conditions 
and requirements. We found that citizens want their 
governments to engage in a more consultative process 
with them more regularly to understand their needs 
and expectations better, and to design and deliver 
customized services to meet these needs. The second 
most important priority citied by the citizens was 
planning for the long term, not just the next few years 
(33 percent). Not surprisingly, citizens are cognizant 
of the fact that many social and economic outcomes 
require long-term planning and cannot be improved in 
the short term. The other priorities cited by the surveyed 
citizens included: providing services in a more cost-
effective manner (31 percent) and making sure that 
services are tailored to the needs of people using them 
(27 percent).
C# Excel - Excel Conversion & Rendering in C#.NET
independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. Excel to PDF Conversion. This page will tell you how to use XDoc.Excel
extract page from pdf document; extract pages from pdf online tool
VB.NET PowerPoint: VB Code to Draw and Create Annotation on PPT
other documents are compatible, including PDF, TIFF, MS platform-friendly, this .NET PPT page annotating component more plug-ins needed like Acrobat or Adobe
extract pages from pdf; cut pdf pages online
16
Digital Government
Pathways to Delivering Public Services for the Future
Incidentally, countries in the Enhancers category, 
such as South Korea and Norway, stand out because 
“better understanding of the priorities of citizens and 
communities” does not appear among the top three 
priorities for their citizens. Instead, as we highlighted 
earlier for South Korea on the issue of lack of 
transparency, accountability and skills of people is a top 
priority for these citizens (Figure 7).
In the Builders category, cost efficiency (39 percent), 
plan for the long term (36 percent) and understanding 
the priorities of citizens and communities better  
(35 percent) form the top three priorities for the 
surveyed citizens from the UAE. Its citizens feel that 
long-term planning, and appropriate communication 
and rollout of digital services will help increase their 
confidence in their government. The government, on 
its part, is undertaking major initiatives to reduce 
wastefulness in public spending as well as leveraging 
ICT for higher cost efficiency. For Saudi Arabia, the 
order of priorities is slightly different: plan for the long 
term (38 percent) ranks as most important, followed by 
understand the priorities of citizens and communities 
(36 percent) and cost efficiency (33 percent). In line 
with these priorities, several ministries in Saudi Arabia 
are taking transformative initiatives to increase the use 
of digital innovations to address major public policy 
challenges and enhance citizen interaction.
Further, the study findings revealed some common 
themes and principles adopted by countries in each 
category that help meet some of their their citizens' and 
constituents' needs (Figure 8), such as:
Robust and clear digital strategy: Countries in the 
Cutters category, such as the US and the UK, have 
articulated a digital government strategy with clear 
implementation plans, and a major focus on achieving 
cost efficiencies by shifting demand from traditional 
to digital channels. For instance, the UK government 
is embracing a strong digital strategy to create world-
class citizen-centric services, while driving efficiency 
gains and economic progress. It has established the 
Government Digital Service (GDS) for scaling up the 
digital services provided to citizens. Defined by a 
robust implementation road map and key performance 
indicators, the digital strategy contains 16 actions the 
government will take to become “Digital by Default,” 
with the intention of dramatically increasing the scale 
and quality of online provision of government services 
(See the UK country profile).
E-participation and coproduction of services: 
The advent of new collaboration technologies, 
collectively known as Web 2.0, has opened up a 
number of new ways citizens and communities can 
participate in the public sector. While a majority of the 
reference countries promote citizen consultation and 
participation through online platforms, countries in 
the Enhancer category rank higher in e-participation. 
They emphasize e-participation brings citizens into a 
consultative process on performance and policymaking.
Focus on cost efficiencies: Optimizing financial 
resources has gained importance in the aftermath 
of the economic crisis. Economies that have been 
severely affected by the current global volatility, focus 
on reducing government expenditure to balance their 
budgets. As a result, governments are increasingly 
seeking digitalization to achieve significant cost 
efficiencies. For example, the Society of Information 
Technology Management’s 2012 study across 120 local 
councils estimated that the cost of contact for face-
to-face transactions averages US$13.84, for telephone 
US$4.54, but for the Web only US$0.24. This is further 
supported by its Digital Efficiency Report, which 
found that the average cost of a central government 
digital transaction can be 20 times lower than the 
cost of telephone and 50 times lower than face-to-
face interactions. The UK government now estimates 
that moving these transactional services from offline 
to digital channels will save US$2.7–2.9 billion a year 
(See the UK country profile).
Figure 7: Top government priorities according to citizens 
We asked: Which three of the following do you think are most important for the government to focus on to 
improve public services in future?
Figure 8: Governments’ digital principle for citizens’ top priorities 
17
Digital Government
Pathways to Delivering Public Services for the Future
Country
Brazil
First priority
Second priority
Third priority
Understand better the priorities of citizens and
communities (54% vs. 64% in 2012)
Improve the skills of people who work in public
services (34% vs. 47% in 2012)
Involve citizens themselves in how public services
should work (34%, on par with 2012)
United 
Kingdom
Plan for the long term, not just the next few years
(45% vs. 39% in 2012)
Understand better the priorities of citizens and
communities (35% vs. 42% in 2012)
Provide services in a more cost-effective way (34%
vs. 45% in 2012)
Saudi 
Arabia
Plan for the long term, not just the next few years
(37%)
Understand better the priorities of citizens and
communities (36%)
Provide services in a more cost-effective way (33%)
Singapore
Understand better the priorities of citizens and
communities (45% vs. 64% in 2012)
Make sure that services are more tailored to the
needs of people using them (34% vs. 38% in 2012)
Provide services in a more cost-effective way (29%
vs. 32% in 2012)
Norway
Make sure that services are more tailored to the
needs of people using them (47%)
Plan for the long term, not just the next few years
(37%)
Improve the skills of people who work in public
services (36%)
Germany
Make sure that services are more tailored to the
needs of people using them (43% vs. 46% in 2012)
Understand better the priorities of citizens and
communities (43% vs. 36% in 2012)
Be flexible to respond to changes around them (25%
vs. 23% in 2012)
India
Plan for the long term, not just the next few years
(35% vs. 14% in 2012)
Understand better the priorities of citizens and
communities (33% vs. 39% in 2012)
Involve citizens themselves in deciding how public
services should work (31%)
South Korea
Publish information so that people can hold public
services to account (33%)
Plan for the long term, not just the next few years
(28%)
Provide services in a more cost-effective way (26%)
UAE
Provide services in a more cost-effective way (39%)
Plan for the long term, not just the next few years
(36%)
Understand better the priorities of citizens and
communities (35%)
United 
States
Provide services in a more cost-effective way (45%
vs. 51% in 2012)
Plan for the long term, not just the next few years
(44% vs. 35% in 2012)
Understand better the priorities of citizens and
communities (33% vs. 40% in 2012)
Citizens’ priority
Digital principle
To understand better the priorities 
of citizens and communities
To plan for the long term, not just
the next few years
Provide services in a more 
cost-effective way
e-participation and coproduction of services
Define a clear digital strategy
Delivering better public services optimizing 
the available financial resources
Figure 9: Digital interaction with public services
We asked: How often, if at all, are you currently using digital channels—online or mobile—to do business  
with public services?
5
Source: http://www.medianama.com/2013/03/223-the-lowdown-indian-government-clears-electronic-delivery-
of-service-bill/
Never
Not very often
Fairly often
Very often
Saudi Arabia
Norway
India
UAE
Singapore
United Kingdom
South Korea
United States
Brazil
Germany
9
31
39
22
8
32
34
26
10
30
43
16
15
33
40
13
9
42
38
11
24
30
33
13
29
41
19
11
28
48
19
5
5
34
39
22
7
28
32
33
18
Digital Government
Pathways to Delivering Public Services for the Future
2.3 Using digital government: Citizens 
demand more
Overall, half of the surveyed citizens say they use 
digital channels very or fairly often to interact with 
their governments (Figure 9). This number increases to 
60 percent if we look at the top six countries. In Saudi 
Arabia, citizens are highly conscious of the importance 
of digital channels in enhancing social outcomes and 
service quality, with 65 percent citizens using this 
medium for interaction with their government. As a 
result, Saudi Arabia is making a large number of public 
services available through digital channels. For example, 
the Virtual Labor Market ecosystem that the Ministry of 
Labor and the Human Resources Development Fund are 
launching to serve all stakeholders in the labor market 
is testimony to this approach. It aims to create a robust 
job database and matching engine that job seekers can 
access easily. The program will provide the necessary job 
search support, online training and counseling services, 
and support private employers in locating qualified 
resources to increase employment opportunities for 
Saudi Arabia citizens, including women and disabled 
persons (See the Saudi Arabia country profile).
Even governments of emerging countries are responding 
to this digital need. India’s Cabinet, for example, has 
cleared the Electronic Delivery of Service Bill that 
will deliver all public services, from state and central 
governments, electronically in the next eight years.  
The bill will allow Indian citizens to gain access to 
services such as passport, ration card and driving  
license electronically.
5
Conversely, Germany ranked below the all-country 
average for using digital services (a mere 24 percent). 
These findings should be taken in the context of cultural 
nuances and other factors such as highly engaged and 
urban citizens, which may affect the results. One of the 
biggest obstacles in Germany to an increased use of 
digital channels could be concerns over data privacy  
and security.
Citizens’ hopes and intent about public service for the 
future expresses a strong argument for governments 
to expand service provision through digital channels. 
When we asked the citizens for their opinion on how 
important is it for governments to provide more services 
through digital channels in the future, the results are 
more consistent across the reference countries—with 
81 percent of the citizens considering it fairly or very 
important. The percentage is as high as 94 percent for 
the UAE, followed by 92 percent for Saudi Arabia  
(Figure 10). 
Figure 10: Importance of digital government in the future 
We asked: How important is it for governments to provide more services through digital channels in the future?
Figure 11: Comparison between digital interaction with public services and the importance of digital government in 
the future
Not at all important
Not very important
Fairly important
Very important
UAE
Saudi Arabia
India
Singapore
South Korea
Norway
Brazil
United Kingdom
United States
Germany
2
12
41
45
3
13
56
29
1
18
60
20
3
17
51
30
6
14
38
43
6
17
45
31
7
17
47
29
8
28
46
18
3
6
28
63
1
5
39
55
Saudi
Arabia
65%
+40.8%
92%
Norway
61%
+30.8%
80%
India
61%
+40.9%
86%
UAE
60%
+55.2%
94%
Singapore
60%
+42.3%
85%
United
Kingdom
53%
+45.5%
77%
South
Korea
49%
+64.8%
81%
United
States
46%
+65.5%
76%
Brazil
30%
+168.5%
80%
Germany
25%
+159.1%
64%
% using very or fairly often digital channels to interact
% considering very or fairly important to provide more digital channels
19
Digital Government
Pathways to Delivering Public Services for the Future
We see the largest demand gap (the gap between 
where governments are today in fulfilling service needs 
and what levels are being demanded by citizens) with 
respect to current usage in Brazil (168.5 percent) and 
Germany (159.1 percent), where citizens accord high 
importance to digital channels for future use (Figure 11).
Figure 12Citizens who believe their government is proactive across the 10 countries
20
Digital Government
Pathways to Delivering Public Services for the Future
2.4 In a speedily changing world, are 
governments acting or reacting?
Citizens have been demanding public services that 
promote a flourishing society, safety and security, and 
economic vitality. They want their governments to 
operate efficiently and respond quickly to emerging 
challenges. This is especially important in the current 
global context, with high economic volatility. Being 
agile and responding proactively to issues is now one 
of the core competencies needed. However, our survey 
indicates that only 17 percent of the surveyed citizens, 
across the 10 countries, feel that their governments 
are proactive to a great extent—across public safety, 
employment, social security, health, education, housing 
and economic development. There emerges a clear need 
for governments to be more insight driven rather than 
react in a perpetual catch-up mode (Figure 12).
Parameters
Proactive
(to a great extent)
Employment
13.4%
Public safety
23.4%
Health
16.9%
Education
17.5%
Housing
13.4%
Economic development
18.3%
Case study
Using a virtual labor market to drive efficiency
The German Federal Ministry for Labor and Social 
Affairs developed a Virtual Labor Market (VLM), an 
online platform to enable successful reintegration of 
jobseekers into the labor market. The platform integrates 
three elements: an online job portal, an internal 
system supporting employment service and vocational 
counseling, and an online job-crawler that collects 
job vacancies from companies’ websites. Through the 
VLM, jobseekers can manage their applications and 
tailor them to employers’ demands. Companies, in turn, 
receive assistance and operate a wide number of tools to 
manage their job postings, besides being able to access 
a large pool of candidates. For both groups, a specific 
matching technology presents results weighted over 
40 parameters that go beyond the headline job title 
and allow for better matching of candidates (See the 
Germany country profile).
Enhancing citizen satisfaction through process 
automation/simplification
The Norwegian State Education Loan Fund, Lånekassen, 
supports citizens with loans and grants for their further 
education. It is one of the leading state agencies that 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested