crystal report export to pdf without viewer c# : Delete pages from pdf document application Library tool html .net azure online Accenture-Digital-Government-Pathways-to-Delivering-Public-Services-for-the-Future3-part510

31
Digital Government
Pathways to Delivering Public Services for the Future
3.2.5 Comprehensive and updated use of new social 
media channels
New social media channels 
and technological changes 
represent a fresh set of 
challenges for countries 
that aspire to leverage 
this new paradigm in 
communicating with its 
citizens. Governments 
around the world recognize the advantages of using new 
channels to improve the quality of their interactions to 
get closer to their citizens.
New social media
25%
25%
25%
15%
10%
are now using popular social media channels—Facebook 
and Twitter—to garner feedback and seek ideas from 
citizens.
10
From the Builders category, the UAE ranked fourth 
(5.1) has also developed a single digital point of 
contact for feedback—Mygov.ae—denominated as the 
UAE Federal Feedback Gateway. Citizens, businesses, 
public employees and other customers are encouraged 
to actively use the tool to share their suggestions, 
administrative and executive remarks, and compliments 
and gratitude (See the UAE country profile).
We found that Norway (8.0) and the UAE (6.0) have 
established a wide and extensive presence in the social 
media environment, while Brazil and India, from the 
Builders category, are behind in adopting and using new 
channels available to them (Figure 26). 
Incidentally, the UAE is sharing a complete directory 
of social media presence of the different federal 
government agencies with its citizens and residents, 
and has fully integrated social media in the process of 
gathering complaints, by encouraging citizens to provide 
feedback using Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and Flickr 
at http://government.ae/en/web/guest/complaint-and-
suggestion. Initiatives such as these are enabling the 
UAE government to remain deeply connected to  
its citizens.
5.1
5.1
4.3
4.2
4.2
4.2
3.9
3.8
5.7
6.9
Norway
Singapore
United States
South Korea
United Kingdom
UAE
Germany
India
Saudi Arabia
Brazil
Figure 25: Countries ranked in proactive communication 
and education
10Source: As stated in the Overview and About sections of https://www.reach.gov.sg/default.aspx; http://app.sgdi.gov.sg/listing.
asp?agency_subtype=dept&agency_id=0000022151; and http://www.gov.sg/
4.5
4.1
3.4
3.4
3.4
2.4
1.0
0.6
6.0
8.0
Norway
Singapore
United States
South Korea
United Kingdom
UAE
Germany
India
Saudi Arabia
Brazil
Figure 26: Countries ranked in use of new social media
Delete pages from pdf document - copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Easy to Use C# Code to Extract PDF Pages, Copy Pages from One PDF File and Paste into Others
extract page from pdf online; copy web page to pdf
Delete pages from pdf document - VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed VB.NET Guide for Extracting Pages from Microsoft PDF Doc
cut pages from pdf; extract pages from pdf
32
Digital Government
Pathways to Delivering Public Services for the Future
Governments across the world are warming up to a 
new realization that embracing digitalization is at the 
heart of achieving public reform and transformation. 
These service transformation programs, powered by 
digital technologies and strategic use of government ICT 
assets, can help achieve a range of positive outcomes—
constituent satisfaction, citizen engagement, economic 
competitiveness and government productivity. Leaders 
in public service must set a new path toward digital 
maturity of their governments and make the right long-
term investments to deliver public services for the new 
digital citizen.
Through this research, Accenture seeks to help countries 
to not only understand where they may be today in 
terms of their Service Maturity, Citizen Service Delivery 
Experience, and in meeting overall citizen satisfaction 
levels, but also offers a “future-scope” on how different 
countries, based on their economic and social context, 
are progressing toward digital maturity and high-
performing government. 
Additionally, our comprehensive analysis of individual 
countries can help public sector leaders analyze specific 
trends to gain insights of real value to inspire them 
further on their digital journey. 
The path forward
What could be the strategies and actions that countries 
in the Cutters, Builders and Enhancers categories might 
implement to rapidly progress on their digital journey? 
Our research reveals that countries are in the process 
of building these strategies and actions on the basis of 
their own digital maturity levels and in the backdrop 
of the current experiences of their citizens and future 
expectations. Countries in the Builders category, for 
instance, are graduating from developing the basics to 
promoting mass adoption of digitalization in the longer 
term. Similarly, countries in the Cutters category focus 
on cost efficiencies and adopt a “Digital by Default” 
approach that leads to i-government (a government 
that is innovative, insight driven and Internet ready). 
The Enhancers category, which are already advanced on 
citizen engagement, are looking at creating a more open 
or networked government that encourages the creation 
of a digital society. Below, we summarize some of our 
overall findings by country category and chart a path to 
progressively build on a digital government and society.
The Cutters’ digital journey: The US and UK are ahead 
of the pack in terms of Service Maturity, but, with some 
of the lowest scores in the Citizen Satisfaction Survey, 
which could be the result of focusing too much on 
driving cost efficiencies and better management of their 
ICT assets. 
In the near term, Cutters will continue to accelerate 
on their cost-efficiencies agenda in delivery through a 
simple, convenient single point of access for citizens, 
such as integrated portals and websites, shut-down of 
several redundant or duplicative government websites, 
reducing cost of ownership and management of their ICT 
infrastructure, and shifting high-volume transactional 
services, such as pensions and taxes, toward e-Services.
In the mid term, Cutters could move toward “Digital 
by Default” promoting digital as the preferred access 
mode for citizens across all major services and making 
significant efforts toward digital inclusion, digital 
literacy and points of access. 
In the long term, they could be moving to paradigm 
of i-government by maintaining its push toward 
productivity while driving significant innovation in 
government. They could leverage technologies, such 
as cloud, mobility and social media, to create a lean 
operating model and help gain the agility to respond 
swiftly to citizens’ needs as well as actively involve 
citizens in policymaking and design of public services. 
Finally, governments in Cutters countries would need to 
deploy ICT strategically to reinvent public services, such 
as digital justice, employment, education and connected 
health platforms (Figure 27). 
4. Progressing on the Digital Journey
VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.
doc.Save(outPutFilePath). How to VB.NET: Delete Specified Pages from PDF. This is a VB .NET example for how to delete several defined pages from a PDF document.
extract pages from pdf on ipad; delete page from pdf acrobat
C# PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
in C#.NET. How to delete a range of pages from a PDF document. in C#.NET. How to delete several defined pages from a PDF document.
deleting pages from pdf document; delete page from pdf document
33
Digital Government
Pathways to Delivering Public Services for the Future
The Builders’ digital journey: We find the countries in the 
Builders category—UAE and Saudi Arabia—lead across 
the 10 countries in terms of Citizen Satisfaction Survey. 
Governments here have placed high priority on digital 
and have aligned their digital strategy with their broader 
plans to drive economic competitiveness and increase 
public sector efficiency. These two countries have scored 
low in terms of their Citizen Service Delivery Experience, 
but their overall scores have been lifted by citizens’ 
optimism meeting future needs.
In India and Brazil, citizen expectations hinge on 
addressing significant opportunities for improvement 
in Service Maturity and Citizen Service Experience. 
Citizens in Brazil are keen to be more involved in shaping 
public service to help improve the government plans to 
execute. However, what is encouraging is that in three 
of our Builders—UAE, Saudi Arabia and India—citizens 
are optimistic about public services in the future and 
show greater confidence in their government’s ability to 
improve quality of services based on steady progress over 
the past.
In the near term, countries in the Builders category 
are focusing on the basics—establishing a core ICT 
infrastructure and improving accessibility through 
common access points or service centers for citizens and 
businesses to access basic services, such as land records, 
health, and education (as in India), while increasing 
transparency and cutting red tape. They would need 
to innovate delivery models including public-private 
partnerships and leverage technologies such as mobility, 
social media and cloud computing.  
In the mid term, Builders need to consider encouraging 
mass adoption by continuing to move manual records 
and processes online, integrating data stores and 
offering access through one-stop portals. They could also 
initiate citizen engagement and e-participation through 
social media and mobile platforms, and develop large-
scale programs to build digital literacy and skills.
In the long term, countries in the Builders category could 
consider creating new trust-based relationships with 
citizens and businesses through greater transparency 
and accountability by putting in place a foundational 
infrastructure for key digital services. They could 
leapfrog Service Maturity by fully exploiting open data 
and cloud-based technologies, creating a new ecosystem 
of service providers, and use digitalization to transform 
key service areas, such as health, education and social 
services (Figure 28).
Digital Maturity
Current
Mid Term
Long Term
Focusing on cost efficiency
Seeking out digitalization to achieve
significant cost efficiencies in delivery
-  Move toward single integrated portals or websites 
with a view toward simplicity, convenience and 
single point of access for citizens
-  Consolidation of citizen and business data stores 
and a push toward cross-agency data sharing
-  Focus on transactional services (e.g. pensions, 
benefits, taxes) to shift toward e-services
-  Modest investments in high-speed broadband and 
last mile connectivity to address inclusion
Becoming digital by default
Where governments promote digital as the 
preferred access mode for citizens across
all major services
-  Tipping point reached on all major transactional 
and high volume services primarily delivered 
through digital channels
-  Significant efforts on digital inclusions to cover all 
parts of the population and provide digital literacy 
and points of access
-  Emphasis on e-participation and bringing citizens 
into a consultative process on performance and 
policy making
-  Productivity and cost-efficiency to remain high 
on the agenda, resulting in new models of delivery 
and procurement
Delivering iGovernment
Maintaining a push toward productivity and 
high levels of digitalization to drive significant 
innovation in government
-  Major shifts in cross-agency information sharing 
and joined up working to provide a streamlined 
service to citizens
-  Pervasive use of technologies such as cloud, 
mobility and social media, creating a lean operating 
model and agility in responding to citizen needs
-  Citizens will be actively involved in 
policy-making and implementation using various 
collaboration technologies
-  ICT seen as a strategic asset and deployed to 
reinvest public services across key sectors (e.g. 
digital justice, connected health platforms)
$
Figure 27: Cutters' digital maturity journey
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
how to merge PDF document files by C# code, how to rotate PDF document page, how to delete PDF page using C# .NET, how to reorganize PDF document pages and how
extract pages from pdf document; cut pages from pdf file
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
Page Process. File: Merge, Append PDF Files. File: Split PDF Document. File: Compress PDF. Page: Create Thumbnails. Page: Insert PDF Pages. Page: Delete Existing
add remove pages from pdf; copy one page of pdf to another pdf
34
Digital Government
Pathways to Delivering Public Services for the Future
Digital Maturity
Current
Mid Term
Long Term
Building the basics
Establishing a core information and 
communications technology infrastructure
- Focused investments to ramp up ICT infrastructure, 
last mile connectivity and access
- Setting up common access points or service centers 
for citizens and business to access basic services 
(e.g. land records, birth certificates)
- Innovating on delivery models (PPPs / PFIs), 
technologies (mobility, cloud) to leapfrog on service 
maturity and connecting the last mile
- Major obstacles on bureaucracy, financing and 
corruption that need to be addressed
Encouraging mass adoption
Making a large number of public services
available through digital channels; driving 
toward adoption, digital literacy and inclusion
- Continued efforts on moving manual records and 
processes online, integration of data stores and 
access through one-stop portals or common access 
points in rural areas
- Initiating citizen engagement and e-participation 
through social media and mobility
- Laying the foundation of cross-agency working 
and information-sharing to improve efficiency 
and productivity
- Large scale programs to build digital literacy and 
skills, as well as gradual moves to shift key services 
primarily through online channels
Creating new relationships
Putting in place a foundational infrastructure
for key digital services; driving new relationships
with citizens built on trust and accountability
- Mass adoption and digitalization leading to much 
greater transparency and forming trust-based 
relationships with citizens and businesses
- Leveraging open data and cloud-based 
technologies in a big way to create a new 
ecosystem of service providers
- Collaboration and integration between agencies to 
reduce administrative complexity
- An active citizenry, strong growth in e-participation 
and consultation on policy making
- Digitalization transforming key service areas such 
as health, education and social service
The Enhancers’ digital journey: The countries in the 
Enhancers category—Singapore and Norway—emerge 
as clear leaders in digital government service, while 
South Korea and Germany, despite performing well 
on other parameters of digital readiness, have fallen 
behind mainly because there is perception that they 
have neglected citizens’ needs, and not been actively 
communicating their intent in key service transformation 
programs. In the short term, countries in the Enhancers 
category are enhancing citizen engagement by involving 
them in consultative processes in policymaking and 
service delivery. They are also continuing to invest 
in digital channels and cloud-based technologies to 
deploy digital as a strategic enabler for economic 
progress, competitiveness and moving toward greater 
personalization via Web and mobile platforms.
In the mid term, countries in the Enhancers category 
would need to consider establishing open/networked 
government by creating a system of transparency, public 
participation and collaboration, and embrace open data 
in a majority of government services, where this doesn’t 
impinge on privacy and security. There will also be a 
focus on cross-government collaboration as  
well as involving the private and third sectors in the 
service model.
In the long term, countries in the Enhancers category 
may take stride toward developing a digital society, 
establishing new models of seamless collaboration 
and interaction between government, citizens and 
businesses. They could employ a networked ecosystem of 
external service providers and agencies, and make use of 
embedded technologies—such as the G-cloud, big data, 
predictive analytics and mobility—as the foundation of 
smart and sustainable societies (Figure 29).
Figure 28: Builders’ digital maturity journey
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Able to add and insert one or multiple pages to existing adobe PDF document in VB.NET. Add and Insert Multiple PDF Pages to PDF Document Using VB.
extract pages from pdf files; delete page from pdf file online
C# Word - Delete Word Document Page in C#.NET
Delete Consecutive Pages from Word in C#. How to delete a range of pages from a Word document. How to delete several defined pages from a Word document.
pdf extract pages; delete page from pdf preview
35
Digital Government
Pathways to Delivering Public Services for the Future
Digital Maturity
Current
Mid Term
Long Term
Fostering citizen engagement
Increasing focus on involving citizens in 
policymaking and program implementation
- Strong ICT prioritization and deployment as a 
strategic enabler for economic progress
- Early investments in digital channels and cloud 
based technologies to improve responsiveness and 
public sector efficiency
- Widening e-engagement efforts through policy 
framework and institutional mechanisms for greater 
citizen consultation and feedback
- Move toward greater personalization via different 
media and platforms (Web and mobile)
Establishing open/networked 
government
Building public trust and creating a system of
transparency, public participation and 
collaboration
-  Embrace open data by increasingly the number of 
publicly available datasets
-  Promote transparency and openness in all 
government activities, e.g. finances, performance 
indicators to improve  citizen trust and engagement
-  Stimulate greater innovation by facilitating 
co-creation among citizens and businesses 
-  Emphasis on cross-agency and private sector 
collaboration to maximize efficiencies gain
-  Secure and stable governance of the Internet and  
digital technologies
Developing a digital society
All stakeholders to adopt a pervasive and 
immersive use of digital technologies
-  Seamless collaboration and interaction between 
government, citizens and businesses across activity 
areas
-  Major shifts in the nature, structure and behavior of 
governments
-  New levels of engagement and trust with the  
citizens of the future—active, informed, mobile, 
enlightened
-  Networked ecosystem of external service providers 
and agencies
-  Embedded technologies such as public cloud, big 
data, predictive analytics, sensors, mobility forms 
the foundation of smart and sustainable societies
5. Digital Maturity: Country Profiles
This chapter aims to provide an overview of the digital 
strategy and approach, and major case studies for the 10 
countries. It also provides key insights into the country-
specific results for Citizen Service Experience and Citizen 
Satisfaction Survey. 
Figure 29: Enhancers’ digital maturity journey
C# PDF metadata Library: add, remove, update PDF metadata in C#.
C#.NET PDF SDK - Edit PDF Document Metadata in C#.NET. Allow C# Developers to Read, Add, Edit, Update and Delete PDF Metadata in .NET Project.
extract pdf pages online; extract pdf pages for
C# PowerPoint - Delete PowerPoint Document Page in C#.NET
C#. How to delete a range of pages from a PowerPoint document. C#. How to delete several defined pages from a PowerPoint document.
delete pages from pdf without acrobat; copy web pages to pdf
11
Source: https://gds.blog.gov.uk/, https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/government-digital-strategy/government-
digital-strategy, https://gds.blog.gov.uk/author/rebeccakempgds/
36
Digital Government
Pathways to Delivering Public Services for the Future
The UK’s digital 
strategy follows a 
key tenet—"Digital by 
Default", which means 
all major transactional 
services will be 
delivered through 
digital channels.
12
Source: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/government-digital-strategy/government-digital-strategy
37
Digital Government
Pathways to Delivering Public Services for the Future
respondents using GOV.UK took an average of 80 
seconds as opposed to 120 seconds on Directgov.
As transactional 
services present the 
biggest opportunity to 
save citizens’ time and 
government’s money, 
its digital strategy 
strongly focuses on 
making services—such 
as welfare applications, 
tax, licensing and payments—more convenient. In fact, 
the Society of Information Technology Management’s 
2012 study across 120 local councils estimated that the 
cost of contact for face-to-face transactions averages 
US$13.84, for telephone US$4.54, but for the Web only 
US$0.24. This is further supported by the government’s 
2012 Digital Efficiency Report, which found that the 
average cost of a central government digital transaction 
can be 20 times lower than the cost of telephone and 
50 times lower than face-to-face interactions.
12
The UK government now estimates that moving these 
transactional services from offline to digital channels 
will save US$2.7–2.9 billion a year. Of this, US$1.8–2.1 
billion will be saved directly by the government and the 
rest will be passed on to the users through low-cost 
services.
It is important to note that the UK, which ranked 
fourth in online services delivery in the United Nations 
E-Government Survey 2012, is strongly focused on 
increasing the scale and quality of online government 
services. However, it does need to focus on spending 
public funds appropriately and fostering technological 
innovation. To achieve digital excellence, the 
government is addressing some operational  
challenges, including:
Data privacy and security: The government bodies 
need to trust their constituents more and not  
require citizens or businesses to provide the same 
information repeatedly. The government aims to 
provide a secure, trusted environment to users to  
carry out their transactions. 
Moving transactional 
services to digital 
channels will save 
US$2.7–2.9 billion a 
year.
Digital inclusion: More than nine million UK residents 
have been assessed as digitally excluded, which means 
they do not use the Internet. The government wants to 
ensure that even the remote and marginalized citizens 
are easily managed in the transition to digital to realize 
its vision of "Digital by Default".
Digital government performance 
The UK ranked seventh overall in digital government 
performance (Figure 30).
As one of the most experienced countries in developing 
digital government services, the UK government provides 
many online services, with a lot of them having reached 
high maturity in interactive and transactional levels. 
In Citizen Service Delivery Experience, the UK 
government performed consistently across different 
pillars, specifically in multichannel service delivery. 
However, there is scope for improvement especially 
in the area of citizen-centered interaction, proactive 
communication with citizens, and presence and use of 
social media tools. 
A mid-level rank in the Citizen Satisfaction Survey 
reduced UK’s overall score (Figure 31). Only 44 percent of 
the surveyed citizens are confident of the government’s 
ability to address their need for better public services 
in the future. We also found that more than 75 percent 
of the surveyed citizens strongly feel that they should 
be more involved in shaping how public services are 
designed and delivered. 
Figure 30: UK overall ranking
6.7
6.0
5.9
5.9
5.7
5.4
4.7
4.3
7.3
7.4
Norway
Singapore
United States
South Korea
United Kingdom
UAE
Germany
India
Saudi Arabia
Brazil
13Source: http://central-government.governmentcomputing.com/features/2011/dec/16/tell-us-once-matt-briggs, https://www.
gov.uk/tell-us-once   
38
Digital Government
Pathways to Delivering Public Services for the Future
These results directly correlate with the top priorities 
expressed by the UK citizens for improving future public 
services:
Plan for the long term, not just the next few years 
(43 percent). Citizens feel that long-term planning, 
and appropriate communication and rollout of digital 
services would help increase their confidence in the 
government’s actions. 
Provide services in a more cost-effective manner (35 
percent). Citizens want the government to continue 
its focus on productivity and cost-efficiency while 
delivering high-quality services. 
Understand better the priorities of citizens and 
communities (34 percent). Citizens want the 
government to address their needs and go beyond 
pure online participation mechanism to enhance the 
way it provides public services. 
While these three expectations are part of the UK 
government’s digital strategy, they are not yet  
provided at the desired level. By keeping citizens’ needs 
at the heart of the process, it is looking at designing 
digital services that offer greater efficiency and  
accuracy at a lower cost, while simultaneously 
improving citizen experience.
Current achievements 
Tell Us Once
The UK government has already taken large strides 
in improving its public services. For example, it has 
implemented “Tell Us Once,” a cross-government 
program that allows citizens to report a birth or death 
to the central government and local authorities—such 
as the Department for Work and Pensions and the Driver 
and Vehicle Licensing Agency—through a single point of 
contact. The central government adopted an integrated 
approach to improve overall service delivery associated 
with this program. It partnered with local government 
authorities to deliver the service better and allowed them 
to opt for the service, decide when to start it, and brand 
and market it as they saw fit.
The program has seen high levels of adoption—96 
percent of local authorities have opted for it and there 
has been strong collaboration between central and local 
government bodies. 
The program has 
significantly reduced the 
complexity of citizens’ 
interaction with the 
government. For example, 
earlier, citizens had to 
make up to 44 contacts 
when reporting a death 
to government bodies 
and local authorities. 
In September 2011, 70 
percent citizens opted 
for the bereavement 
service and 90 percent 
opted for the birth service. As a result of this program, 
the government estimates major cost savings over the 
next 10 years: US$302 million for central and local 
governments, and US$104 million for the citizens.
13
Ninety six percent of 
local authorities have 
opted for the Tell Us 
Once program. Over 
the next 10 years, it 
is expected to save 
US$302 million for 
the government and 
US$104 million for the 
citizens.
Figure 31: UK Citizen Satisfaction Survey 
6.7
6.3
5.9
4.9
4.9
4.1
3.9
3.4
7.1
7.8
Norway
Singapore
United States
South Korea
United Kingdom
UAE
Germany
India
Saudi Arabia
Brazil
39
Digital Government
Pathways to Delivering Public Services for the Future
US
The US digital 
government strategy 
is built on four 
overarching principles 
of information 
centricity, shared 
platforms, customer 
centricity, and 
security and privacy.
An information-centric approach: Shift from managing 
documents to managing open data and content that 
can be tagged, shared, secured and presented in a 
useful way for citizen consumption.
A shared-platform approach: Work together—
both within and across agencies—to reduce costs, 
streamline development, and ensure consistency in 
creating and delivering information.
A customer-centric approach: Influence how to 
create, manage and present data through websites, 
mobile applications, raw data sets and other modes of 
delivery; allow citizens to shape, share and consume 
information, whenever and however they want it.
14Source: http://www.whitehouse.gov/sites/default/files/omb/egov/digital-government/digital-government.html 
15Source: http://www.usaid.gov/digitalstrategy 
40
Digital Government
Pathways to Delivering Public Services for the Future
Open Government
Plan (OGP)
Transparency
Participation / 
Collaboration
Flagship initiative/
Public and Agency
Involvement
Digital Government
Strategy (DGS)
Information-Centric
Shared Platform
Customer-Centric
Security and Privacy
IT Strategic Plan
(ITSP)
Information on demand
Innovation and process
Efficiency
Effective and Efficient 
IT Services
Workforce Development
Information 
Management Strategy
(IMS)
Standardize Information
Consolidate Information
Optimize Information
Secure Information
A platform of security and privacy: Ensure secure 
delivery and use of digital services to protect 
information and privacy.
The US government’s digital strategy seeks to accomplish 
three key goals in the long term:
Enable the citizens and increasingly mobile workforce 
to access high-quality digital government information 
and services anywhere, anytime, on any device. 
This means the government will operationalize an 
information-centric model, architect systems for 
interoperability and openness, modernize content 
publication model, and deliver better, device-agnostic 
digital services at a lower cost.
Ensure that as the government adjusts to the new 
digital world, it will seize the opportunity to procure 
and manage devices, applications, and data in smart, 
secure and affordable ways. The government will do 
away with the inefficient, costly and fragmented 
practices, build a sound governance structure for 
digital services, and focus on mobile solutions.
Unlock the power of government data to spur 
innovation across the country and improve the quality 
of services. The government will enable the public, 
entrepreneurs and government programs to better 
leverage federal data and ensure that data is open and 
machine-readable by default.
14
The government has already linked its digital strategy 
with its information management, IT and open 
government plans
(Figure 32).
15
Figure 32: US—Alignment between the Information Management Strategy, IT Strategic Plan, Digital Government 
Strategy and Open Government Plan
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested