devexpress asp.net mvc pdf viewer : Cut pages from pdf preview application SDK utility azure winforms .net visual studio AppleScriptLanguageGuide16-part518

161
5/5/99  ã Apple Computer, Inc.
C H A P T E R   5
Objects and References
5
Figure 5-0
Listing 5-0
Table 5-0
This chapter describes how to interpret object class definitions and how to use 
references to specify objects.
Objects are the things in applications, the Mac OS, or AppleScript that can 
respond to commands by performing actions. For example, application objects 
are objects stored in applications and their documents. Usually, they are 
identifiable items that users can manipulate in applications, such as windows, 
words, characters, and paragraphs in a text-editing application. Objects can 
contain data, in the form of values, properties, and elements, that can change 
over time.
Each object belongs to an object class, which is a category for objects that have 
similar characteristics and respond to the same commands. You can get detailed 
information about the object classes an application supports by examining the 
application’s dictionary. To examine the dictionary, you drop the application’s 
icon on the Script Editor icon, or open the application with Script Editor’s Open 
Dictionary command. Table 5-1 and Table 5-2 show a portion of the Window 
class definitions from the application dictionaries of, respectively, the Finder 
and AppleWorks.
To refer to an object from a script, you use a reference, which is a compound 
name, similar to a path or address, that identifies an object or groups of objects.
Objects and references are described in the following sections:
n
“Object Class Definitions” (page 162) describes the kind of information you 
can expect to find in an object class definition and where to obtain these 
definitions.
n
“References” (page 165) defines a reference, describes complete and partial 
references, and explains how to use containers in references.
n
“Reference Forms” (page 169) lists reference forms you can use to identify 
objects and provides sections that describe each reference form in detail.
Cut pages from pdf preview - application SDK utility:C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Easy to Use C# Code to Extract PDF Pages, Copy Pages from One PDF File and Paste into Others
www.rasteredge.com
Cut pages from pdf preview - application SDK utility:VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed VB.NET Guide for Extracting Pages from Microsoft PDF Doc
www.rasteredge.com
C H A P T E R   5  
Objects and References
162
Object Class Definitions
5/5/99  ã Apple Computer, Inc.
n
“Using the Filter Reference Form” (page 187) describes the optional filter 
form you can add to a reference to specify only the objects that match one or 
more conditions.
n
“References to Files and Applications” (page 190) describes how to specify 
files and applications, both locally and on remote machines.
Most objects are contained in applications, but you can also create another type 
of object, called a script object, that can be stored in scripts or saved in files. For 
information about script objects, see “Script Objects” (page 325).
Object Class Definitions
5
An object class definition describes the common features of objects that belong 
to the class. For example, all document objects created by the AppleWorks 
application have certain properties (such as a name property) and elements 
(such as a window element) in common. An application’s dictionary describes 
the classes that the application supports. You can view an application’s 
dictionary by dropping the application’s icon on the Script Editor’s icon, or by 
opening the application with the Script Editor’s Open Dictionary command.
Table 5-1 shows a sample object class definition for a window object, excerpted 
from the Finder dictionary. The definition contains three types of information: 
the plural form for the class, its elements (none in this case), and its properties. 
Each property description includes the name, the class, and a description. A 
property description should also state whether the property is read only.
The components of an object class definition are described in the following 
sections:
n
“Properties” (page 164)
n
“Element Classes” (page 165)
n
“Default Value Class Returned” (page 165)
For more information about how AppleScript works with application 
dictionaries, see “Dictionaries” (page 34). For additional examples of class 
definitions, see the value class definitions in “Values and Constants” (page 51).
Different applications can support the same class in different ways. Table 5-2 
shows a window class definition excerpted from the AppleWorks application. 
The window class defined by AppleWorks uses the same plural form as the 
application SDK utility:VB.NET PDF copy, paste image library: copy, paste, cut PDF images
Copy, paste and cut PDF image while preview without adobe reader component installed. Image resize function allows VB.NET users to zoom and crop image.
www.rasteredge.com
application SDK utility:VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
Remove bookmarks, annotations, watermark, page labels and article threads from PDF while compressing. Also a preview component enables compressing and
www.rasteredge.com
C H A P T E R   5
Objects and References
Object Class Definitions
163
5/5/99  ã Apple Computer, Inc.
Finder’s window class and shares some properties, such as name, bounds, and 
zoomed. However, the AppleWorks version has elements, such as panes, that 
the Finder does not, and there are several properties the two classes do not 
share.
Table 5-1
Window class definition from the Finder dictionary
As you would expect, these applications define window classes that support the 
different ways they work with windows. AppleWorks uses windows to let 
users enter and manipulate data in word processing documents, spreadsheet 
cells, database records, and so on. The Finder uses windows to display disks, 
folders, and files, and to let users manipulate these items. When you perform 
script operations on a window in one of these applications, you have access to 
Plural form
windows
Elements:
None
Properties:
Name
Class
Description
position 
point
The upper left position of the window
bounds
rectangle
The boundary rectangle for the 
window
titled
boolean [r/o]
Does the window have a title bar?
name
international text 
[r/o]
The name of the window
index
integer
The number of the window in the 
front-to-back layer ordering
closeable
boolean [r/o]
Does the window have a close box?
floating
boolean [r/o]
Does the window have a title bar?
modal
boolean [r/o]
Is the window modal?
resizable
boolean [r/o]
Is the window resizable?
zoomable
boolean [r/o]
Is the window zoomable?
zoomed
boolean [r/o]
Is the window zoomed?
(some properties not shown)
application SDK utility:C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
applications. Support adding and inserting one or multiple pages to existing PDF document. Forms. Ability to add PDF page number in preview. Offer
www.rasteredge.com
application SDK utility:C# PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in C#.
VB.NET comment annotate PDF, VB.NET delete PDF pages, VB.NET Able to cut and paste image into another PDF Remove PDF image in preview without adobe PDF reader
www.rasteredge.com
C H A P T E R   5  
Objects and References
164
Object Class Definitions
5/5/99  ã Apple Computer, Inc.
most of the operations a user can perform and, in some cases, to capabilities 
that a user cannot perform with the program’s user interface.
Table 5-2
Window class definition from the AppleWorks dictionary
Properties
5
A property of an object is a characteristic that has a single value, such as the 
name of a window or the font of a character. Properties of an object are 
distinguished from each other by their unique labels. For example, the Window 
class definition shown in Table 5-2 includes the Position property. Its unique 
label is the label Position. The definition also lists the class to which each 
property belongs. For example, the class of the Position property is Point, 
Plural form
windows
Elements:
Name
Description
split
by numeric index, as a range of elements, satisfying a test
pane
by numeric index, as a range of elements, satisfying a test
(some elements not shown)
Properties:
Name
Class
Description
name 
international text 
[r/o]
The window’s name
document
document [r/o]
The document associated with the 
window
bounds
bounding 
rectangle
The boundary rectangle for the 
window
zoomed
boolean
Is the window zoomed?
position
point
Upper left coordinates of the window
scale
real
The viewing scale (zoom percentage)
ruler
ruler
The ruler for this window
(some properties not shown)
application SDK utility:VB.NET PDF url edit library: insert, remove PDF links in vb.net
Able to embed link to specific PDF pages in VB.NET Copy, cut and paste PDF link to another PDF file in Edit PDF url in preview without adobe PDF reader control.
www.rasteredge.com
application SDK utility:C# PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files
Separate PDF file into single ones with defined pages. Advanced component for splitting PDF document in preview without any third-party plug-ins
www.rasteredge.com
C H A P T E R   5
Objects and References
References
165
5/5/99  ã Apple Computer, Inc.
indicating that the value of the property is a two-dimensional point. Because 
the Position property is not marked read only, you can set its value. The class of 
a property can be a simple value class like String or Number, a composite class 
like the Point class, or a more complex object class, perhaps with properties of 
its own.
Element Classes
5
Elements are objects contained within an object. The element classes listed in an 
object class definition indicate the kinds of elements objects of that class can 
contain. An object can contain many elements or none, and the number of 
elements that it contains may change over time. For example, it is possible for a 
Paragraph object to contain no words. At a later time, the same paragraph 
might have many words.
Most application and system objects can contain elements. The Finder’s 
Window definition in Table 5-1 has no elements, but the AppleWorks Window 
definition in Table 5-2 includes Panes, Splits, and other elements.
Default Value Class Returned
5
Each object has a value. For example, the value of a Word object is a string that 
may include style and font information. You can get the value of a system or 
application object by sending it a Get command or by simply referring to it in a 
script. If the Get command doesn’t specify a value class for the value returned, 
the default value class is used. For many object classes, the default value is a 
reference to an object of that class type. For example, the default value of a 
Window object based on the definition in either Table 5-1 or Table 5-2 is a 
reference to a Window object. References are described in detail in “References” 
(page 165).
References
5
A reference is a phrase that specifies one or more objects. You use references to 
identify objects within applications. An example of a reference is 
application SDK utility:VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple
Independent component for splitting PDF document in preview without using separate source PDF file to smaller PDF documents by every given number of pages.
www.rasteredge.com
application SDK utility:C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
An independent .NET framework viewer component supports inserting image to PDF in preview without adobe PDF reader installed. Able
www.rasteredge.com
C H A P T E R   5  
Objects and References
166
References
5/5/99  ã Apple Computer, Inc.
tell application "Finder"
file 1 of folder 1 of startup disk
end tell
which specifies the first file in the first folder of the startup disk.The term 
startup disk
and other special terms understood by the Finder are described in 
“Viewing a Result in the Script Editor’s Result Window” (page 121).
A reference describes what type of object you’re looking for, where to look for 
the object, and how to distinguish the object from other objects of the same 
type. These three types of information—the class, or type; the container, or 
location; and the reference form, or distinguishing information—allow you to 
specify any object of an application.
In general, you list the class and distinguishing information at the beginning of 
a reference, followed by the container. In the previous example, the class of the 
object is 
file
. The container is the phrase 
folder 1 of startup disk
. The 
distinguishing information (the reference form) is the combination of the class, 
file
, and an index value, 
1
, which together indicate the first file.
References allow you to identify objects in a flexible and intuitive way. Just as 
there might be several ways to identify an object on the desktop, AppleScript 
has different reference forms that allow you to specify the same object in 
different ways. For example, here’s another way to specify the first file in the 
first folder of the startup disk:
tell application "Finder"
file before file 2 of first folder of startup disk
end tell
Because the first file in the first folder of the startup disk can change (if files or 
folder are added or deleted or have their name changed, or if the startup disk is 
changed), you may need to use a more specific reference:
tell application "Finder"
file "SimpleText" of folder "Applications" of disk "Hard Disk:"
end tell
For detailed information on specifying files, see “References to Files” 
(page 191).
To write effective scripts, you should be familiar with AppleScript’s reference 
forms and know how to use containers and reference forms to identify the 
application SDK utility:VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
NET. An independent .NET framework component supports inserting image to PDF in preview without adobe PDF control installed. Access
www.rasteredge.com
application SDK utility:C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
Preview PDF documents without other plug-ins. The following example will tell you how to create a PDF document with 2 empty pages.
www.rasteredge.com
C H A P T E R   5
Objects and References
References
167
5/5/99  ã Apple Computer, Inc.
objects you want to manipulate. These topics are described throughout this 
chapter.
Containers
5
A container is an object that contains one or more objects or properties. In a 
reference, the container specifies where to find an object or a property. To 
specify a container, use the word 
of
or 
in
, as in the following statement
folder "Utilities" of disk "Hard Disk:"
A container can be an object or a series of objects. In a series, the smallest object 
is listed first, followed by the larger objects that contain it. Use the word 
of
or 
in
to separate each object from its larger, containing object. In the following 
example, the body of text is contained in a larger document object, paragraph 
three is contained in the larger text object, and word four in the larger 
paragraph object.
tell application "AppleWorks"
word 4 in paragraph 3 of text body of front document
end tell
You can also use the possessive form (
's
) to specify containers. If you use the 
possessive form, list the container before the object it contains. In the following 
example, the container is 
first window
. The object it contains is a Name 
property. 
tell application "AppleWorks"
first window’s name
end tell
All properties and elements have containers. The previous example specified 
the Name property of a window, which is contained in a window object. 
Similarly, the following example specifies the Style property, which is contained 
in a text object.
tell application "AppleWorks"
style of text body of front document
end tell
C H A P T E R   5  
Objects and References
168
References
5/5/99  ã Apple Computer, Inc.
Complete and Partial References
5
A complete reference has enough information to identify an object or objects 
uniquely. For a reference to an application object to be complete, its outermost 
container must be the application itself, as in 
version of application "Finder" --result: "8.5"
In contrast, partial references do not specify enough information to identify an 
object or objects uniquely; for example:
delete file 1 of disk 4
When AppleScript encounters a partial reference, it attempts to use the default 
target specified in the Tell statement to complete the reference. The default 
target of a Tell statement is the object that receives commands if no other object 
is specified. For example, the following Tell statement tells the Finder to delete 
the first file of the fourth disk, using the previous partial reference.
tell application "Finder"
delete file 1 of disk 4
end tell
Similarly, the following Tell statement tells the front document of the 
application AppleWorks to get the style of its text.
tell document 1 of application "AppleWorks"
get style of text body
end tell
Tell statements can contain other Tell statements, called nested Tell statements. 
When AppleScript encounters a partial reference in a nested Tell statement, it 
tries to complete the reference starting with the innermost Tell statement. If that 
does not provide enough information, AppleScript uses the direct object of the 
next Tell statement, and so on. For example, the following Tell statement is 
equivalent to the previous Finder example.
C H A P T E R   5
Objects and References
Reference Forms
169
5/5/99  ã Apple Computer, Inc.
tell application "Finder"
tell file 1 of disk 4
delete
end tell
end tell
This example works because all of the nested statements target the same 
application, the Finder. For information on restrictions in using nested Tell 
statements, see “Tell Statements” (page 240).
Reference Forms
5
A reference form is the syntax, or rule, for writing a phrase that identifies an 
object or group of objects. For example, the Index reference form allows you to 
identify an object by its number, as in 
word 5 of paragraph 10
AppleScript includes other reference forms for identifying objects in 
applications. Table 5-3 summarizes the reference forms you can use to identify 
objects and provides links to sections that describe them in detail. Each section 
includes a brief explanation of a reference form, a syntax summary, and 
examples of how to use the reference form to specify application objects. The 
Filter reference form is described in more detail in “Using the Filter Reference 
Form” (page 187).
Table 5-3
Reference forms 
Reference form
Purpose
“Arbitrary Element” 
(page 170)
Specifies an arbitrary object in a container (rarely 
used)
“Every Element” 
(page 171)
Specifies every object of a particular class in a 
container
“Filter” (page 173)
Specifies every object in a particular container that 
matches conditions specified by a Boolean test 
expression
C H A P T E R   5  
Objects and References
170
Reference Forms
5/5/99  ã Apple Computer, Inc.
Arbitrary Element
5
The Arbitrary Element reference form specifies an arbitrary object in a 
container. If the container is a value (such as a list), AppleScript chooses an 
object at random (that is, it uses a random-number generator to choose the 
object). If the container is an application object, it is up to the application to 
choose an object. It can choose a random object or any object at all. This form is 
rarely used.
SYNTAX
some 
className
where
className is the class identifier for the desired object.
“ID” (page 174)
Specifies an object by its ID property
“Index” (page 177)
Specifies the position of an object with respect to the 
beginning or end of a container
“Middle Element” 
(page 179)
Specifies the middle object in a container (rarely used)
“Name” (page 180)
Specifies an object by its Name property
“Property” 
(page 182)
Specifies a property of an application object, a record, 
a script object, or a date
“Range” (page 183)
Specifies a series of objects
“Relative” (page 185)
Specifies the position of an object in relation to 
another object in the same container
Table 5-3
Reference forms (continued)
Reference form
Purpose
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested