devexpress asp.net mvc pdf viewer : Extract page from pdf online software control dll windows azure web page web forms AppleScriptLanguageGuide19-part526

C H A P T E R   5
Objects and References
References to Files and Applications
191
5/5/99  ã Apple Computer, Inc.
References to Files
5
You can use either of these forms to refer to any file:
file 
nameString
alias 
nameString
where
nameString is a string of the form 
Disk
:
Folder1
:
Folder2
:...:
Filename
that 
specifies exactly where the file is stored or a string that consists of the file’s 
name only. Disk specifies the disk on the local computer on which the 
application is stored, Folder1
:
Folder2
:...
specifies the sequence of folders that 
you would have to open to find the application on the local computer, and 
fileName specifies the name of the file. File systems in the Mac OS don’t 
normally distinguish uppercase letters from lowercase letters in filenames, 
although applications such as AppleWorks may distinguish case in document, 
window, or other object names.
If 
nameString
consists of the file’s name only, AppleScript attempts to locate the 
file in the current directory for the application from which the script is being 
run (for example, Script Editor). The current directory is the folder or volume 
whose contents you can see when you choose Open, Save, or a related 
command from the application’s File menu. The current directory is typically 
the directory where the application was launched, the directory where the 
application last opened or saved a previous document, or another directory 
specified by the application. The current directory may be affected by settings in 
the General Controls control panel.
Specifying a File by Name or Pathname
5
To be sure that a command acts on the correct file, specify the entire pathname, 
including the names of the volume and the entire sequence of folders that you 
would have to open to find the file.
If you use a reference of the form 
file
nameString
, AppleScript doesn’t attempt to 
locate the file until the script is actually run. When AppleScript executes the 
statement that accesses the file, the file must exist in the specified folder (or, if 
only a filename was provided, in the current directory) for AppleScript to locate 
it. Some commands, such as the Save command, create a file with the specified 
name in the specified location if it doesn’t already exist. Some commands, such 
Extract page from pdf online - software control dll:C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Easy to Use C# Code to Extract PDF Pages, Copy Pages from One PDF File and Paste into Others
www.rasteredge.com
Extract page from pdf online - software control dll:VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed VB.NET Guide for Extracting Pages from Microsoft PDF Doc
www.rasteredge.com
C H A P T E R   5  
Objects and References
192
References to Files and Applications
5/5/99  ã Apple Computer, Inc.
as the Close and Save commands, may replace an existing file with the same 
name as the specified file (if one exists).
tell application "Finder"
open file "Hard Disk:June Sales"
end tell
A disadvantage of specifying a file by name or pathname is that if the user 
moves the file or renames the file or a folder in its pathname, AppleScript won’t 
be able to find the file and the script will not complete correctly. For a more 
robust approach, see “Specifying a File by Alias” (page 193).
For a sample script that shows how a script application can handle pathnames 
of files dropped on it, see “Open Handlers” (page 305).
Specifying a File by Reference
5
To save a reference of the form 
file
nameString
in a variable, you can use the A 
Reference To operator as shown in the example that follows.
tell application "Finder"
set fileRef to a reference to file "Hard Disk:June Sales"
--result: file "Hard Disk:June Sales" of application "Finder"
end tell
tell application "AppleWorks"
open fileRef
end
When you specify a file with a file reference, the file must exist at the time a 
statement that uses the reference is executed.
You cannot coerce a filename string to a file reference. For example, you cannot 
replace the second line of the previous script with the following line:
set fileRef to ("Hard Disk:June Sales" as file) --result: error!
However, you can perform a similar coercion with the alias form, as described 
in “Specifying a File by Alias” (page 193).
software control dll:C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
framework. C# users are able to extract image from PDF document page and get image information for indexing and accessing. C#
www.rasteredge.com
software control dll:C# PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in
Feel Free to Extract Text from PDF Page, Page Region or Advanced Visual Studio .NET PDF edit SDK, built on .NET framework 2.0 and compatible with Windows
www.rasteredge.com
C H A P T E R   5
Objects and References
References to Files and Applications
193
5/5/99  ã Apple Computer, Inc.
Specifying a File by Alias
5
If you use a reference of the form 
alias
nameString
, AppleScript creates an alias 
for the file—that is, a representation of the file, much like an alias icon on the 
desktop, that identifies the file no matter where it is located. AppleScript 
attempts to locate the file whenever you compile the script—that is, whenever 
you modify the script and then attempt to check its syntax, save it, or run it.
AppleScript treats an alias like a value that can be stored in a variable and 
passed around within a script. You don’t need to use the A Reference To 
operator. For example, this script first saves an alias in the variable 
fileRef
then uses the variable in a Tell statement that opens the file.
set fileRef to alias "Hard Disk:June Sales"
tell application "AppleWorks"
open fileRef
end
If you save this script as a script application or compiled script, rename the file 
“June Sales” or move it to another location, then run the script again, the script 
still works correctly and opens the original file.
You can coerce a filename string to an alias. For example, you can replace the 
first line of the previous script with the following line:
set fileRef to ("Hard Disk:June Sales" as alias)
However, you cannot perform a similar coercion with the file form, as described 
in “Specifying a File by Reference” (page 192).
Differences Between Files and Aliases
5
The difference between the forms 
file
nameString
and 
alias
nameString
is 
apparent when the file in question is located on a remote computer. If you use 
the form 
file
nameString
, AppleScript doesn’t attempt to locate the file until you 
actually run the script. If you use the form 
alias
nameString
, AppleScript also 
attempts to locate the file whenever you compile the script, requiring 
appropriate access privileges and possibly a password each time.
software control dll:VB.NET PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images
Online source codes for quick evaluation in VB.NET class. By using RsterEdge XDoc PDF SDK for .NET, VB.NET users are able to extract image from PDF page or file
www.rasteredge.com
software control dll:VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF
PDF Add-On, developers are able to extract target text content from source PDF document and This page will supply users with tutorial for extracting text
www.rasteredge.com
C H A P T E R   5  
Objects and References
194
References to Files and Applications
5/5/99  ã Apple Computer, Inc.
Specifying a File by File Specification
5
You can use a file specification to refer to a file that may not yet exist. The File 
Specification value class is described in “File Specification” (page 95). You can 
obtain a file specification from the New File scripting addition command 
distributed with AppleScript, or from an application command that returns a 
file specification.
You might use a file specification when you want to let a user specify a filename 
and location for a file that may not exist, but that you will create or save at a 
later time. For example, your script could use the first statement below to obtain 
a file specification by calling the New File scripting addition, which displays a 
standard system dialog to obtain a filename and location from the user. (The 
second statement just displays the class of the returned value.) In this case, the 
script supplies a default name of “New Report”:
set fileSpec to new file default name "New Report"
class of fileSpec --result: file specification
Suppose your script has opened a new AppleWorks document named 
“Untitled 1” and stored that name in a variable called 
currentDocument
. The 
document has not yet been saved to disk, but the script has executed the 
statement shown above to get a file specification for the file. At a later point, 
your script could use the following Tell statement to save the document:
tell application "AppleWorks"
save document currentDocument in fileSpec
end tell
--result: "Untitled 1" renamed and saved as "New Report".
References to Applications
5
You can use this form to refer to any application:
application 
applicationNameString
¬
[ of machine 
computerName
[ of zone 
AppleTalkZoneName
] ]
where
applicationNameString
is either a string of the form 
"
Disk
:
Folder1
:
Folder2
...:
ApplicationName
"
that specifies where the application is stored on the local 
software control dll:C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document online in C#.NET
Create PDF Online. Convert PDF Online. WPF PDF Viewer. View PDF in Page: Replace PDF Pages. Page: Move Page Position. Page: Extract, Copy and Paste PDF Pages.
www.rasteredge.com
software control dll:C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
Ability to add PDF page number in preview. Offer PDF page break inserting function. Free components and online source codes for .NET framework 2.0+.
www.rasteredge.com
C H A P T E R   5
Objects and References
References to Files and Applications
195
5/5/99  ã Apple Computer, Inc.
computer or a string that consists of the name of the application. Disk specifies 
the disk on the local computer on which the application is stored, 
Folder1
:
Folder2
:... 
specifies the sequence of folders that you would have to 
open to find the application on the local computer, and ApplicationName 
specifies the name of the application. If it is located on a remote computer, the 
application must be running and 
applicationNameString
must be the name of the 
application as listed in the Application menu on that computer. AppleScript 
doesn’t distinguish uppercase letters from lowercase letters in application 
names.
computerName (a string) is the Macintosh Name assigned in the File Sharing 
control panel of the computer on which the specified application is running. 
This portion of the reference is required if the application is located on a remote 
computer. 
AppleTalkZoneName (a string) is the name of the zone, if any, in which the 
specified remote computer is located. The name must appear in the list of 
AppleTalk Zones displayed in the Chooser. 
After a script is compiled, a reference to an application on the local computer 
identifies the application no matter where it is located on that computer. This 
behavior resembles the behavior of an alias. However, a reference to an 
application on a remote computer won’t compile unless the application is 
running and several other conditions are met; see “References to Remote 
Applications” (page 196) for details.
The actions you can perform on a specific application depend on the way the 
application that created the file defines an application object. AppleScript 
always locates the application as described in the sections that follow, but uses 
the definition in the application’s dictionary to determine the characteristics of 
the object, such as its properties and the commands it can handle.
References to Local Applications
5
You can specify an application on the local computer with a string of the form 
Disk
:
Folder1
:
Folder2
:...:
ApplicationName
that specifies the application’s exact 
location. If AppleScript can’t find the application in that location, it displays a 
directory dialog box asking where the application is located.
You can also specify an application on the local computer with only the 
application’s name (
ApplicationName
). In this case, AppleScript attempts to 
find an application of that name among currently running applications. If the 
application isn’t running, AppleScript attempts to locate it in the current 
software control dll:VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.
Online source codes for quick evaluation in VB.NET class. If you are looking for a solution to conveniently delete one page from your PDF document, you can use
www.rasteredge.com
software control dll:VB.NET PDF- View PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
Page: Replace PDF Pages. Page: Move Page Position. Page: Copy, Paste PDF Pages. Page: Rotate a PDF Page. PDF Read. Text: Extract Text from PDF. Text: Search Text
www.rasteredge.com
C H A P T E R   5  
Objects and References
196
References to Files and Applications
5/5/99  ã Apple Computer, Inc.
directory. If the application isn’t in the current directory, AppleScript displays a 
directory dialog box asking where the application is located. If the name of the 
application you select is different from the name specified in the script, the 
name in the script changes to match the name of the application you select.
When you run a script on the same computer on which it was compiled (that is, 
on which it was last run or saved, or had its syntax checked), AppleScript finds 
the application you specified in the original script even if you have moved it or 
changed its name. If the application has been removed, AppleScript searches for 
another version of the same application.
As with aliases, it is often convenient to store a reference to an application in a 
variable:
set x to application "AppleWorks"
tell x to quit
If you save this script as a script application or compiled script, move the 
AppleWorks application to another location, change its name, then open the 
script again, the name 
"AppleWorks"
in the script changes to reflect the 
application’s new name, and the script still works correctly.
References to Remote Applications
5
If an application is on a remote computer, you must specify the application’s 
name as it would be listed in the Application menu, the name of the computer, 
and, if necessary, the name of the zone in which the computer is located:
quit application "AppleWorks" 
Ø
of machine "Otto’s 2nd Best Server" of zone "Customer Service"
For a script to send commands to a remote application, the following conditions 
must be satisfied:
n
The specified remote application must be running. AppleScript doesn’t open 
applications on remote computers. 
n
The computer that contains the application and the computer on which the 
script is run must be connected to a network.
n
Program linking (set with the File Sharing control panel) must be enabled.
C H A P T E R   5
Objects and References
References to Files and Applications
197
5/5/99  ã Apple Computer, Inc.
n
Access for the user (set with the Users & Groups control panel) must be 
provided.
n
The application must allow remote program linking (set by selecting the 
application, choosing Sharing from the File menu, and selecting the checkbox 
labeled “Allow remote program linking”).
For information about these menus and control panels, see the user’s guide for 
your Macintosh computer.
The following script sends commands to an application on a remote computer, 
including a Quit command when the script is finished:
tell application "AppleWorks" of 
Ø
machine "Paula's Mac" of zone "Publications"
open file "Hard Disk:Reports:Status Report"
-- statements to perform operations on the report
close document "Status Report" saving ask
quit -- quit AppleWorks
end tell
199
5/5/99  ã Apple Computer, Inc.
C H A P T E R   6
Expressions
6
Figure 6-0
Listing 6-0
Table 6-0
An expression is any series of AppleScript words that has a value. You use 
expressions to represent or derive values in scripts. When AppleScript 
encounters an expression, it converts it into an equivalent value. This is known 
as evaluation.
The simplest kinds of expressions, called literal expressions, are representations 
of values in scripts. For more information on literal expressions, including 
examples, see Chapter 3, “Values and Constants.”
This chapter describes expressions in the following sections:
n
“Results of Expressions” (page 200) describes how you can use the Script 
Editor to evaluate an expression and display its value.
n
“Variables” (page 200) describes how to create and use variables. Topics 
covered include reference variables, data sharing, the scope of variables, and 
the predefined variables available in AppleScript.
n
“Script Properties” (page 208) describes script properties, which are named 
containers for values that you can use in the same way you use variables.
n
“AppleScript Properties” (page 210) describes global properties of 
AppleScript, which you can use in any script. Some properties act as 
constants, but you can modify AppleScript’s Text Item Delimiters, which 
AppleScript uses in performing various string operations.
n
“Reference Expressions” (page 212) describes compound expressions that 
refer to objects in applications, and which you can use to represent values in 
scripts.
n
“Operations” (page 213) describes expressions that use operators (such as 
addition or concatenation) to derive values from other values.
C H A P T E R   6  
Expressions
200
Results of Expressions
5/5/99  ã Apple Computer, Inc.
Results of Expressions
6
The result of any expression is its value.You can use the Script Editor to display 
the result of an expression by typing an expression on a line by itself and 
running the script. AppleScript returns the value of the expression. Here’s an 
example:
1. Open the Script Editor if it is not already open.
2. Type the following expression in the editor subwindow:
3 + 4
3. Click the Run button in the Script Editor window.
This causes AppleScript to evaluate the expression and show the result, 
7
, in 
the result window.
4. Choose Show Result from the Controls menu.
If the result window is behind another Script Editor window, this will bring 
it to the front.
Variables
6
A variable is a named container in which to store a value. When AppleScript 
encounters a variable in a statement, it evaluates the variable by getting its 
value. Variables are contained in a script, not in an application, and their values 
are normally lost when you close the script that contains them. If you need to 
keep track of variable values that are persistent even after you close a script or 
shut down your computer, use properties instead of variables. See “Script 
Properties” (page 208) for more information.
Unlike variables in many other programming languages, AppleScript variables 
can hold values of any class. For example, you can use the following sequence 
of assignment statements to set 
x
to a string value, an integer value, and finally 
a Boolean value: 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested