devexpress asp.net mvc pdf viewer : Export pages from pdf acrobat SDK Library service wpf asp.net html dnn AppleScriptLanguageGuide22-part531

C H A P T E R   6
Expressions
Operations
221
5/5/99  ã Apple Computer, Inc.
Equal, Is Not Equal To
6
The Equal and Is Not Equal To operators can handle operands of any class.
Table 6-1, “AppleScript operators” (page 215) summarizes the Equal and Is Not 
Equal To operators and other AppleScript operators.
OPERANDS OF DIFFERENT CLASSES
Two expressions of different classes are not equal.
BOOLEAN EXPRESSION
Two Boolean expressions are equal if both of them evaluate to 
true
or if both 
evaluate to 
false
. They are not equal if one evaluates to 
true
and the other to 
false
.
CLASS IDENTIFIER
Two class identifiers are equal if they are the same identifier. They are not equal 
if they are different identifiers.
CONSTANT
Two constants are equal if they are the same. They are not equal if they are 
different.
DATA
Two data values are equal if they are the same length in bytes and their bytes 
are the same (AppleScript does a byte-wise comparison).
DATE
Two dates are equal if they both represent the same date, even if they are 
expressed in different formats. For example, the following expression is 
true
because 
date date "12/31/99"
and 
date "December 31st, 1999"
represent the 
same date.
date "12/31/99" = date "December 31st, 1999"
Export pages from pdf acrobat - application software tool:C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Easy to Use C# Code to Extract PDF Pages, Copy Pages from One PDF File and Paste into Others
www.rasteredge.com
Export pages from pdf acrobat - application software tool:VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed VB.NET Guide for Extracting Pages from Microsoft PDF Doc
www.rasteredge.com
C H A P T E R   6  
Expressions
222
Operations
5/5/99  ã Apple Computer, Inc.
When you compile the previous statement, the Script Editor converts it to a 
form similar to the following (the format may vary depending on the settings of 
the Date & Time control panel):
date "Friday, December 31, 1999 12:00:00 AM" = ¬
date "Friday, December 31, 1999 12:00:00 AM"
INTEGER
Two integers are equal if they are the same. They are not equal if they are 
different.
LIST
Two lists are equal if each item in the list to the left of the operator is equal to 
the item in the same position in the list to the right of the operator. They are not 
equal if items in the same positions in the lists are not equal or if the lists have 
different numbers of items. For example,
{ (1 + 1), (4 > 3) } = {2, true}
is 
true
, because 
(1 + 1)
evaluates to 
2
, and 
(4 > 3)
evaluates to 
true
.
REAL
Two real numbers are equal if they both represent the same real number, even if 
the formats in which they are expressed are different. For example, the 
following expression is 
true
.
0.01 is equal to 1e-2
Two real numbers are not equal if they represent different real numbers.
RECORDS
Two records are equal if they both contain the same collection of properties and 
if the values of properties with the same label are equal. They are not equal if 
the records contain different collections of properties, or if the values of 
properties with the same label are not equal. The order in which properties are 
listed does not affect equality. For example, the following expression is 
true
.
application software tool:C# PDF Converter Library SDK to convert PDF to other file formats
Able to export PDF document to HTML file. C#.NET can manipulate & convert standard PDF documents in other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat.
www.rasteredge.com
C H A P T E R   6
Expressions
Operations
223
5/5/99  ã Apple Computer, Inc.
{ name:"Matt", mileage:"8000" } = { mileage:"8000",
Ø
name:"Matt"}
REFERENCE
Two references are equal if their classes, reference forms, and containers are 
identical. They are not equal if their classes, reference forms, and containers are 
not identical, even if they refer to the same object. 
For example, the expression 
x = y
in the following Tell statement is always 
true
, because the classes (
word
), reference forms (Index), and containers 
(
paragraph 1 of text body
) of the two references are identical.
tell document "Simple" of application "AppleWorks"
set x to a reference to word 1 of paragraph 1 of text body
set y to a reference to word 1 of paragraph 1 of text body
x = y
end tell
--result:true
The expression 
x = y
in the following statement is 
false
, regardless of the text 
of the document, because the containers are different.
tell document "Simple" of application "AppleWorks"
set x to a reference to word 1 of paragraph 1 of text body
set y to a reference to word 1 of text body
x = y
end tell
--result:false
When you use references in expressions without the A Reference To operator, 
the values of the objects specified in the references are used to evaluate the 
expressions. For example, the result of the following expression is 
true
if both 
documents begin with the same word.
tell application "AppleWorks"
word 1 of text body of document "Report" ¬
word 1 of text body of document "Simple"
end tell
C H A P T E R   6  
Expressions
224
Operations
5/5/99  ã Apple Computer, Inc.
STRING
Two strings are equal if they are both the same series of characters. They are not 
equal if they are different series of characters. AppleScript compares strings 
character by character. It does not distinguish uppercase from lowercase letters 
unless you use a Considering statement to consider the 
case
attribute. For 
example, the following expression is 
true
.
"DUMPtruck" is equal to "dumptruck"
AppleScript considers all characters and punctuation, including spaces, tabs, 
return characters, diacritical marks, hyphens, periods, commas, question marks, 
semicolons, colons, exclamation points, backslash characters, and single and 
double quotation marks in string comparisons. AppleScript ignores style in 
string comparisons.
All string comparisons can be affected by Considering and Ignoring statements, 
which allow you to selectively consider or ignore the case of characters, as well 
as specific types of characters. For more information, see “Considering and 
Ignoring Statements” (page 268).
Greater Than, Less Than
6
The Greater Than and Less Than operators work with dates, integers, real 
numbers, and strings.
Table 6-1, “AppleScript operators” (page 215) summarizes the Greater Than and 
Less Than operators and other AppleScript operators.
DATE
A date is greater than another date if it represents a later time. A date is less 
than another date if it represents an earlier time.
INTEGER
An integer is greater than a real number or another integer if it represents a 
larger number. An integer is less than a real number or another integer if it 
represents a smaller number.
C H A P T E R   6
Expressions
Operations
225
5/5/99  ã Apple Computer, Inc.
REAL
A real number is greater than an integer or another real number if it represents 
a larger number. A real number is less than an integer or another real number if 
it represents a smaller number.
STRING
A string is greater than (comes after) another string if it would appear after the 
other string in an English-language dictionary. For example,
"zebra" comes after "aardvark"
and 
"zebra" > "aardvark"
are 
true
. A string is less than (comes before) another string if it would appear in 
a dictionary before the other string. For example,
"aardvark" comes before "zebra"
and
"aardvark" < "zebra"
are 
true
.
AppleScript uses the language-defined collating sequence specified by the Text 
control panel to determine a word’s position in an English-language dictionary. 
The order of the collating sequence, in the English language and Roman script, 
is
space!"#$%&'()*+,-./
0123456789:;<=>?@ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ[\]^_`{|}~
AppleScript compares strings character by character. When the corresponding 
characters in two strings are not the same, the string containing the character 
closest to the beginning of the collating sequence is less than the other string. If 
two strings have identical characters but one is shorter than the other, the 
shorter string is less than the longer string. AppleScript treats all letters as 
C H A P T E R   6  
Expressions
226
Operations
5/5/99  ã Apple Computer, Inc.
lowercase letters, unless you use a Considering statement to consider the 
case
attribute, in which case letters are ordered as follows, in the English language 
and Roman script:
AaBbCcDdEeFfGgHhIiJjKkLlMmNnOoPpQqRrSsTtUuVvWwXxYyZz
If you use a Considering statement that considers the 
diacriticals
attribute, 
AppleScript uses the following ordering for vowels, in the English language 
and Roman script:
a á à â ä ã å
e é è ê ë
i í ì î ï
o ó ò ô ö õ
u ú ù û ü
For more information about Considering statements, refer to “Considering and 
Ignoring Statements” (page 268).
Starts With, Ends With
6
The Starts With and Ends With operators work with lists and strings.
Table 6-1, “AppleScript operators” (page 215) summarizes the Starts With and 
Ends With operators and other AppleScript operators.
LIST
A list starts with another list if the values of the items in the list to the right of 
the operator are equal to the values of the items at the beginning of the list to 
the left. A list ends with another list if the values of the items in the list to the 
right of the operator are equal to the values of the items at the end of the list to 
the left. In both cases, the items in the two lists must be in the same order. Both 
Starts With and Ends With work if the operand to the right of the operator is a 
single value. For example, the following three expressions are all 
true
:
C H A P T E R   6
Expressions
Operations
227
5/5/99  ã Apple Computer, Inc.
{ "this", "is", 2, "cool" } ends with "cool"
{ "this", "is", 2, "cool" } starts with "this"
{ "this", "is", 2, "cool" } starts with { "this", "is" }
STRING
A string starts with another string if the characters in the string to the right of 
the operator are the same as the characters at the beginning of the string to the 
left. For example, the following expression is 
true
:
"operand" starts with "opera"
A string ends with another string if the characters in the string to the right of 
the operator are the same as the characters at the end of the string to the left. 
For example, the following expression is 
true
:
"operand" ends with "and"
AppleScript compares strings character by character according to the rules for 
the Equal operator.
Contains, Is Contained By
6
The Contains and Is Contained By operators work with lists, records, and 
strings.
Table 6-1, “AppleScript operators” (page 215) summarizes the Contains and Is 
Contained By operators and other AppleScript operators.
LIST
A list contains another list if the list to the right of the operator is a sublist of the 
list to the left of the operator. A sublist is a list whose items appear in the same 
order and have the same values as any series of items in the other list. For 
example,
{ "this", "is", 1 + 1, "cool" } contains { "is", 2 }
C H A P T E R   6  
Expressions
228
Operations
5/5/99  ã Apple Computer, Inc.
is 
true
, but
{ "this", "is", 2, "cool" } contains { 2, "is" }
is 
false
.
A list is contained by another list if the list to the left of the operator is a sublist 
of the list to the right of the operator. For example, the following expression is 
true
:
{ "is", 2} is contained by { "this", "is", 2, "cool" } 
Both Contains and Is Contained By work if the sublist is a single value. For 
example, both of the following expressions are 
true
:
{ "this", "is", 2, "cool" } contains 2
2 is contained by { "this", "is", 2, "cool" }
RECORD
A record contains another record if all the properties in the record to the right of 
the operator are included in the record to the left, and the values of properties 
in the record to the right are equal to the values of the corresponding properties 
in the record to the left. A record is contained by another record if all the 
properties in the record to the left of the operator are included in the record to 
the right, and the values of the properties in the record to the left are equal to 
the values of the corresponding properties in the record to the right. The order 
in which the properties appear does not matter. For example,
{ name:"Matt", mileage:"8000", description:"fast"} 
Ø
contains { description:"fast", name:"Matt" }
is 
true
.
STRING
A string contains another string if the characters in the string to the right of the 
operator are equal to any contiguous series of characters in the string to the left 
of the operator. For example,
C H A P T E R   6
Expressions
Operations
229
5/5/99  ã Apple Computer, Inc.
"operand" contains "era"
is 
true
, but
"operand" contains "dna"
is 
false
.
A string is contained by another string if the characters in the string to the left 
of the operator are equal to any series of characters in the string to the right of 
the operator. For example, this statement is 
true
:
"era" is contained by "operand"
Concatenation
6
The concatenation operator (&) can handle operands of any class. The result 
type of a concatenation depends on the type of the left hand operand. If the 
left-hand operand is a string, the result is always a string, and only in this case 
does AppleScript try to coerce the value of the right-hand operand to match 
that of the left. If the left-hand operand is a record, the result is always a record. 
If the left-hand operand is any other type, the result is a list.
Table 6-1, “AppleScript operators” (page 215) summarizes the concatenation 
operator (&) and other AppleScript operators.
STRING
The concatenation of two strings is a string that begins with the characters in 
the string to the left of the operator, followed immediately by the characters in 
the string to the right of the operator. AppleScript does not add spaces or other 
characters between the two strings. For example,
"dump" & "truck"
returns the string 
"dumptruck"
.
If the operand to the left of the operator is a string, but the operand to the right 
is not, AppleScript attempts to coerce the operand to the right to a string. For 
example, when AppleScript evaluates the expression
C H A P T E R   6  
Expressions
230
Operations
5/5/99  ã Apple Computer, Inc.
"Route " & 66
it coerces the integer 
66
to the string 
"66"
, and the result is
"Route 66"
However, you get a different result if you reverse the order of the operands:
66 & "Route "
--result: {66, "Route "}
RECORD
The concatenation of two records is a record that begins with the properties of 
the record to the left of the operator, followed by the properties of the record to 
the right of the operator. If both records contain properties with the same name, 
the value of the property from the record to the left of the operator appears in 
the result. For example, the result of the expression
{ name:"Matt", mileage:"8000" } & 
Ø
{ name:"Steve", framesize:58 }
is
{ name:"Matt", mileage:"8000", frameSize:58 }
ALL OTHER CLASSES
The concatenation of two operands that are not strings or records is a list whose 
first item is the value of the operand to the left of the operator, and whose 
second item is the value of the operand to the right of the operator. If the 
operands to be concatenated are lists, then the result is a list containing all the 
items in the list to the left of the operator, followed by all the items in the list to 
the right of the operator. For example,
{ "This" } & { "and", "that" }
--result: { "This", "and", "that" }
{ "This" } & item 1 of { "and", "that" }
--result: { "This", "and" }
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested